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  • 1.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Rickard
    Region Örebro län. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Riddez, Louis
    Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Orebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Risk factors for depression following traumatic injury: An epidemiological study from a scandinavian trauma center2017Ingår i: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 48, nr 5, s. 1082-1087Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: A significant proportion of patients suffer depression following traumatic injuries. Once manifested, major depression is challenging to overcome and its presence risks impairing the potential for physical rehabilitation and functional recovery. Risk stratification for early detection and intervention in these instances is important. This study aims to investigate patient and injury characteristics associated with an increased risk for depression.

    METHODS: All patients with traumatic injuries were recruited from the trauma registry of an urban university hospital between 2007 and 2012. Patient and injury characteristics as well as outcomes were collected for analysis. Patients under the age of eighteen, prescribed antidepressants within one year of admission, in-hospital deaths and deaths within 30days of trauma were excluded. Pre- and post-admission antidepressant data was requested from the national drugs registry. Post-traumatic depression was defined as the prescription of antidepressants within one year of trauma. To isolate independent risk factors for depression a multivariable forward stepwise logistic regression model was deployed.

    RESULTS: A total of 5981 patients met the inclusion criteria of whom 9.2% (n=551) developed post-traumatic depression. The mean age of the cohort was 42 [standard deviation (SD) 18] years and 27.1% (n=1620) were females. The mean injury severity score was 9 (SD 9) with 18.4% (n=1100) of the patients assigned a score of at least 16. Six variables were identified as independent predictors for post-traumatic depression. Factors relating to the patient were female gender and age. Injury-specific variables were penetrating trauma and GCS score of≤8 on admission. Furthermore, intensive care admission and increasing hospital length of stay were predictors of depression.

    CONCLUSION: Several risk factors associated with the development of post-traumatic depression were identified. A better targeted in-hospital screening and patient-centered follow up can be offered taking these risk factors into consideration.

  • 2.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Corrigendum to "Does early beta-blockade in isolated severe traumatic brain injury reduce the risk of post traumatic depression?": [Injury 48 (2017) 101–105]2017Ingår i: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 48, nr 11, s. 2612-2612Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 3.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Does early beta-blockade in isolated severe traumatic brain injury reduce the risk of post traumatic depression?2017Ingår i: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 48, nr 1, s. 101-105Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Depressive symptoms occur in approximately half of trauma patients, negatively impacting on functional outcome and quality of life following severe head injury. Pontine noradrenaline has been shown to increase upon trauma and associated beta-adrenergic receptor activation appears to consolidate memory formation of traumatic events. Blocking adrenergic activity reduces physiological stress responses during recall of traumatic memories and impairs memory, implying a potential therapeutic role of beta-blockers. This study examines the effect of pre-admission beta-blockade on post-traumatic depression.

    Methods: All adult trauma patients (>= 18 years) with severe, isolated traumatic brain injury (intracranial Abbreviated Injury Scale score (AIS) >= 3 and extracranial AIS <3) were recruited from the trauma registry of an urban university hospital between 2007 and 2011. Exclusion criteria were in-hospital deaths and prescription of antidepressants up to one year prior to admission. Pre- and post-admission beta-blocker and antidepressant therapy data was requested from the national drugs registry. Post-traumatic depression was defined as the prescription of antidepressants within one year of trauma. Patients with and without pre-admission beta-blockers were matched 1: 1 by age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale, Injury Severity Score and head AIS. Analysis was carried out using McNemar's and Student's t-test for categorical and continuous data, respectively.

    Results: A total of 545 patients met the study criteria. Of these, 15% (n = 80) were prescribed beta-blockers. After propensity matching, 80 matched pairs were analyzed. 33% (n = 26) of non beta-blocked patients developed post-traumatic depression, compared to only 18% (n = 14) in the beta-blocked group (p = 0.04). There were no significant differences in ICU (mean days: 5.8 (SD 10.5) vs. 5.6 (SD 7.2), p = 0.85) or hospital length of stay (mean days: 21 (SD 21) vs. 21 (SD 20), p = 0.94) between cohorts.

    Conclusion: beta-blockade appears to act prophylactically and significantly reduces the risk of posttraumatic depression in patients suffering from isolated severe traumatic brain injuries. Further prospective randomized studies are warranted to validate this finding.

  • 4.
    Khalili, Hosseinali
    et al.
    Trauma Research Center, Shahid Rajaee (Emtiaz) Trauma Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Department of Neurosurgery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Paydar, Shahram
    Trauma Research Center, Shahid Rajaee (Emtiaz) Trauma Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Niakan, Amin
    Trauma Research Center, Shahid Rajaee (Emtiaz) Trauma Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Department of Neurosurgery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.
    Dabiri, Gholamreza
    Shahid Rajaee (Emtiaz) Trauma Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Early selenium treatment for traumatic brain injury: Does it improve survival and functional outcome?2017Ingår i: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 48, nr 9, s. 1922-1926Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and debility following trauma. The initial brain tissue insult is worsened by secondary reactive responses including oxidative stress reactions, inflammatory changes and subsequent permanent neurologic deficits. Effective agents to improve functional outcome and survival following TBI are scarce. Selenium is an antioxidant which has shown to reduce oxidative stress. This study examines the effect of intravenous selenium (Selenase (R)) treatment in patients with severe TBI on functional outcome and survival in a prospective study design.

    Methods: Patients sustaining TBI were prospectively identified during a 12-month period at an academic urban trauma center. Study inclusion criteria applied were: age >= 18 years, blunt injury mechanism and admission to neurosurgical intensive care unit (NICU). Early deaths (<= 48 h) and patients suffering extracranial injuries requiring invasive interventions or surgery were excluded. All consecutive admissions during a six-month period were administered intravenous Selenase (R) for a maximum 10-day period and constituted cases. Patient demographics and outcomes up to six-months post-discharge were collected for analysis.

    Results: A total of 307 patients met inclusion criteria of which 125 were administered Selenase (R). Stepwise Poisson regression analysis identified five common predictors of poor functional outcome and in-hospital mortality: GCS <= 8, age <= 55 years, hypotension at admission, high Rotterdam score and invasive neurosurgical intervention. Selenase (R) significantly reduced the risk of unfavourable functional outcomes, defined as GOS-E <= 4, at both discharge (adjusted RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.51-0.92, p = 0.012) and at six months follow-up (adjusted RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.44-0.83, p = 0.002). Following adjustment for significant group differences similar results were seen for functional outcome. Selenase (R) did not improve survival (adjusted RR 1.12, 95% CI 0.62-2.02, p = 0.709).

    Conclusion: Intravenous Selenase (R) treatment demonstrates a significant improvement in functional neurologic outcome. This effect is sustained at six months following discharge. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Holzmacher, Jeremy
    Center for Trauma and Critical Care, Department of Surgery, George Washington University, Washington DC, United States.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sarani, Babak
    Center for Trauma and Critical Care, Department of Surgery, George Washington University, Washington DC, United States.
    Outcomes after resection versus non-resection management of penetrating grade III and IV pancreatic injury: A trauma quality improvement (TQIP) databank analysis2018Ingår i: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 49, nr 1, s. 27-32Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: High-grade traumatic pancreatic injuries are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Non-resection management is associated with fewer complications in pediatric patients. The present study evaluates outcomes following resection versus non-resection management of severe pancreatic injury caused by penetrating trauma.

    METHODS: A retrospective study of the Trauma Quality Improvement Program (TQIP) database was performed from 1/2010 to 12/2014. Patients with AAST Organ Injury Scale pancreatic grade III and IV injuries caused by penetrating trauma were included in the study. Demographics, vital signs on admission, Abbreviated Injury Scale per body region, Injury Severity Score, transfusion and therapeutic modality were obtained. Mortality, length of stay (LOS), pseudocyst, pancreatitis, sepsis, thromboembolism, renal failure, ARDS and unplanned ICU admission or re-operation were stratified according to injury grade and treatment modality. Patients were stratified into those who did/did not undergo pancreatic resection.

    RESULTS: A total of 4,098 patients had a pancreatic injury of which 15.9% (n=653) had a grade III and 6.7% (n=274) a grade IV pancreatic injury. There were no differences in patient demographics or overall injury severity between the resected and non-resected cohorts within each pancreatic injury grade. Forty-two percent of grade III and 38.0% of grade IV injuries underwent pancreatic resection. The total LOS was longer in the resection arm irrespective of pancreatic injury severity. There was no significant difference in morbidity between cohorts. Similarly, mortality was not significantly different between the two management approaches for grade III: 15.1% (95% CI 11.0-19.9) vs. 18.4% (95% CI 14.6-22.6), p=0.32 and grade IV: 24.0% (95% CI: 16.2-33.4) vs. 27.1% (95% CI: 20.5-34.4), p=0.68.

    CONCLUSION: Resection for treatment of grade III and IV pancreatic injury is not associated with a significant decrease in mortality but is associated with an increase in hospital LOS.

  • 6.
    Sadeghi, Mitra
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Vascular Surgery, Västmanlands Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Hörer, Tal M.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Forsman, Daniel
    Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Dogan, Emanuel M.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kindler, Csaba
    Department of Pathology, Västmanlands Hospital Västerås, Västerås, Sweden.
    Skoog, Per
    Department of Vascular Surgery and Institute of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kristofer F.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Blood pressure targeting by partial REBOA is possible in severe hemorrhagic shock in pigs and produces less circulatory, metabolic and inflammatory sequelae than total REBOA2018Ingår i: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 49, nr 12, s. 2132-2141Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) is an effective adjunct in exsanguinating torso hemorrhage, but causes ischemic injury to distal organs. The aim was to investigate whether blood pressure targeting by partial REBOA (pREBOA) is possible in porcine severe hemorrhagic shock and to compare pREBOA and total REBOA (tREBOA) regarding hemodynamic, metabolic and inflammatory effects.

    Methods: Eighteen anesthetized pigs were exposed to induced controlled hemorrhage to a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 50 mmHg and randomized into three groups of thoracic REBOA: 30 min of pREBOA (target SBP 80-100 mmHg), tREBOA, and control. They were then resuscitated by autologous transfusion and monitored for 3 h. Hemodynamics, blood gases, mesenteric blood flow, intraperitoneal metabolites, organ damage markers, histopathology from the small bowel, and inflammatory markers were analyzed.

    Results: Severe hemorrhagic shock was induced in all groups. In pREBOA the targeted blood pressure was reached. The mesenteric blood flow was sustained in pREBOA, while it was completely obstructed in tREBOA. Arterial pH was lower, and lactate and troponin levels were significantly higher in tREBOA than in pREBOA and controls during the reperfusion period. Intraperitoneal metabolites, the cytokine response and histological analyses from the small bowel were most affected in the tREBOA compared to the pREBOA and control groups.

    Conclusion: Partial REBOA allows blood pressure titration while maintaining perfusion to distal organs, and reduces the ischemic burden in a state of severe hemorrhagic shock. Partial REBOA may lower the risks of post-resuscitation metabolic and inflammatory impacts, and organ dysfunction. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 7.
    Sluys, Kerstin
    et al.
    Röda Korsets Högskola, Avdelningen Teknik och Välfärd, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Shults, Justine
    Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Richmond, Therese S
    Department of Biobehavioral Health Sciences, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Health related quality of life and return to work after minor extremity injuries: A longitudinal study comparing upper versus lower extremity injuries.2016Ingår i: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 47, nr 4, s. 824-831Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate the impact on health related quality of life (HRQL) during the first year after minor extremity injury and to determine whether there is a difference in recovery patterns and return to work between upper extremity injuries (UEI) and lower extremity injuries (LEI).

    METHOD: A total of 181 adults' age 18 years or older randomly selected from patients admitted to an emergency department with minor injuries were studied. HRQL was measured using the Functional Status Questionnaire (FSQ) at 1-2 weeks, 3, 6, and 12-months post-injury. Pre-injury FSQ scores were measured retrospectively at admission. A quasi-least square (QLS) model was constructed to examine differences of FSQ scores at each measuring point for UEI and LEI.

    RESULTS: Fractures of the knee/lower leg (25%) were the most frequently injured body area. Slips or falls (57%) and traffic-related events (22%) were the most common injury causes. The mean ISS was 4.2 (SD 0.86). Both groups had significant declines in the FSQ scores physical and social functioning at 1-2 weeks after injury. Patients with UEI made larger improvements in the first 3 months post-injury versus patients with LEI whose improvements extended over the first 6 months. None of the groups reached the pre-injury FSQ scores during the first post-injury year except in the subscale work performance where UEI exceeded the pre-injury scores. At 12 months post-injury, significant lower FSQ scores remained in the LEI group compared to the UEI group in intermediate activities of daily living (p=0.036, d 0.4) and work performance (p=0.004, d 0.7). The return to work at 3 months and 12 months were 76% and 88% for UEI and 58% and 77% for LEI. No significant differences were found between groups in the FSQ scale mental health and social interaction.

    CONCLUSIONS: LEI had the highest impact on HRQL and return to work during the first year which exceeded the consequences of UEI. These findings contribute to the information about the consequences of injury in order to give sufficient prognostic information to patients and different stakeholders. Future investigations should aim to investigate specific minor extremity injuries and identify factors that facilitate recovery and return to work.

  • 8.
    van der Burg, B. L. S. Borger
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Alrijne Hospital, Leiderdorp, the Netherlands.
    Kessel, B.
    Department of Trauma, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Hadera, Israel.
    DuBose, J. J.
    R Adam Cowley Shock Trauma Center, University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore, USA.
    Hörer, Tal M.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hoencamp, R.
    Department of Surgery, Alrijne Hospital, Leiderdorp, the Netherlands; Defense Healthcare Organization, Ministry of Defense, Utrecht, the Netherlands; Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands.
    Consensus on resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the Aorta: A first consensus paper using a Delphi method2019Ingår i: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 50, nr 6, s. 1186-1191Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To further strengthen the evidence base on the use of Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA) we performed a Delphi consensus. The aim of this paper is to establish consensus on the indications and contraindications for the use of REBOA in trauma and non-trauma patients based on the existing evidence and expertise.

    Study Design: A literature review facilitated the design of a three-round Delphi questionnaire. Delphi panelists were identified by the investigators. Consensus was reached when at least 70% of the panelists responded to the survey and more than 70% of respondents reached agreement or disagreement.

    Results: Panel members reached consensus on potential indications, contra-indications and settings for use of REBOA (excluding the pre hospital environment), physiological parameters for patient selection and indications for early femoral access. Panel members failed to reach consensus on the use of REBOA in patients in extremis (no pulse, no blood pressure) and the use of REBOA in patients with two major bleeding sites.

    Conclusions: Consensus was reached on indications, contra indications, physiological parameters for patient selection for REBOA and early femoral access. The panel did not reach consensus on the use of REBOA in patients in pre-hospital settings, patients in extremis (no pulse, no blood pressure) and in patients with 2 or more major bleeding sites. Further research should focus on the indications of REBOA in pre hospital settings, patients in near cardiac arrest and REBOA inflation times.

  • 9. Weiss, Rüdiger J.
    et al.
    Montgomery, Scott M.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Al Dabbagh, Zewar
    Jansson, Karl-Åke
    National data of 6409 Swedish inpatients with femoral shaft fractures: stable incidence between 1998 and 20042009Ingår i: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 40, nr 3, s. 304-308Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Femoral shaft fractures are commonly thought to be primarily associated with high-energy trauma in young persons. Only limited attention has been given to low-energy violence as a cause of these fractures among the elderly. National epidemiological data on characteristics of patients with femoral shaft fractures are lacking, so the purpose of this study was to analyse the incidence, admissions, causes of fracture and operations for these fractures on a nationwide basis in Sweden during 1998-2004. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data on all femoral shaft fractures were extracted from the Swedish National Hospital Discharge Registry. Sex- and age-specific fracture incidence, hospital admissions, mechanisms of injury and surgical procedures were analysed using descriptive analysis, linear-regression analysis and other methods as appropriate. RESULTS: Over a period of 7 years, 6409 patients with femoral shaft fractures were identified, corresponding to an annual incidence of 10 per 100,000 person-years. Men had a younger median age (27 years, IQR 12-68) than women (79 years, IQR 62-86) (p<0.001). Females (54%) generated more admissions than males (46%). The incident rate ratio between men and women was 0.9 (p<0.001). Most hospital admissions were generated among females by the 80-89 years age-group and among males <10 years of age. 2% of the fractures were open fractures. The total number of hospital admissions was stable during 1998-2004. The two major mechanisms of injury were falls on the same level (50%) and transport accidents (17%). A significant number of fractures occurred among elderly patients after low-energy trauma. Osteosynthesis with femoral nail (54%) was the preferred operation, followed by osteosynthesis with plate and screws (16%), skeletal traction (14%) and external fixation (6%). DISCUSSION: This nationwide study on femoral shaft fractures provides an update on incidence, admissions, external causes and surgical procedures. This information assists health-care providers in planning hospital beds, surgical interventions and risk preventions. Moreover, these data can be used for power calculations for further clinical studies.

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