oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Holmqvist, Kajsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Holmefur, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Occupational therapists' practice patterns for clients having cognitive impairments following acquired brain injury2012In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 26, no 4-5, p. 458-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Studies have shown that occupational therapy interventions for clients with cognitive impairment following acquired brain injury (CIABI) have a positive effect on performance of activities of daily living, although the exact nature of the interventions are not clearly described. A better understanding of current practice is therefore needed to move further in the search for evidence based occupational therapy for clients with CIABI. Research on occupational therapists’ (OTs’) practice can play an important role to explore and describe current practice and furthermore define and evaluate the effectiveness of different components in OT interventions. The aim of this study was to survey Swedish OTs’ practice patterns for clients having CIABI.

    Methods: The study had a cross-sectional design using a questionnaire developed in two former studies. A stratified random sample was done with 250 OTs each from the following areas: regional care, somatic county care, primary care and municipal eldercare. The questionnaire was sent out using on-line survey software and 462 participants responded. Data is currently analyzed by descriptive and comparative statistics.

    Results: Preliminary results show that the interventions targeted a wide range of cognitive impairments and its consequences. Interventions were both remedial and compensatory with graded activity as the most common remediating intervention. To compensate for activity limitations prescription, or recommendation, of assistive devices (AD) as well as supporting clients in finding internal strategies were used extensively. The ADs used consisted of both high and low technology devices. Eighty-two percent also included different specific interventions to improve clients’ decreased self-awareness in their practice. A vast majority of the OTs (94%) preferred to use observations in daily activities to assess both activity limitations and cognitive impairment. Almost all participants also used interviews and sixty-two percent used tests on impairment level. To support practice general Occupational Therapy models were widely used while theories focusing on cognitive impairments specifically were used less. The participants’ answers reflected a client-centered attitude with collaborative goal-setting and feedback discussions after each session. Eighty- four percent felt dependent on relatives to reach a successful outcome and most of them worked deliberately to involve relatives in the rehabilitation. The OTs responses were evenly distributed over the spheres of activity. Ninety-two percent of the participants worked in team and the most common diagnoses were stroke and traumatic brain injury. There were some differences in responses between the spheres.

    Conclusions: Preliminary conclusions are that the OTs practice patterns included interventions targeting most cognitive impairments and their consequences in daily activities. The use of daily activities as a mean was preferred irrespective of whether the interventions were remediative or compensatory. Interventions targeting decreased self-awareness as well as the use of ADs were common. A client-centered approach was dominating including collaboration with relatives.

    For personal

    centered approach was dominating including collaboration

    with relatives.

  • 2.
    Koskinen, Lars-owe
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Inst of Neurosurgery, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Naredi, Silvana
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olivecrona, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Anaesthesiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ten-year follow-up of patients in a double blinded randomized study on prostacyclin treatment in severe traumatic brain injury2017In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 31, no 6-7, p. 770-771Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Lidström Holmqvist, Kajsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Holmefur, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Occupational therapist practice patterns in relation to clients with cognitive impairment following acquired brain injury2014In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 1365-1373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary objective: To describe Swedish occupational therapist practice patterns for clients with cognitive impairment following acquired brain injury.

    Research design: A cross-sectional stratified random sample of 462 occupational therapists.

    Methods: An online questionnaire was used to collect data.

    Main results: The predominant practice pattern was the use of ADL-activities for assessment and therapy regardless of whether limitations in occupational performance or cognitive function were assessed or whether the approach was remedial or compensatory. For assessment, general ADL-instruments were used more often than instruments that assessed cognitive function. Instruments were used less often within municipal rehabilitation facilities compared to regional, county and primary care facilities. The most common focus of the therapies was in regard to abilities related to executive functioning. Another prominent practice pattern was a collaborative approach involving clients, relatives and other staff. The theories used in practice were, to a large extent, general in nature and did not focus specifically on cognitive functioning.

    Conclusions: Swedish occupational therapy practice for clients with cognitive impairments following acquired brain injury focuses highly on occupational performance. Therapies targeting executive functioning seem particularly important in practice and a collaborative approach involving clients, relatives and other staff is a prominent feature in practice.

  • 4.
    Mantell, Andy
    et al.
    University of Chichester, West Sussex, UK.
    Simpson, Grahame
    University of Sidney, Sidney, Australia.
    Jones, Kate
    Liverpool Hospital, Sidney, Australia.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Simonson, Pattie
    Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability, London, UK.
    Vungkhanching, Martha
    California State University, Fresno, USA.
    Social Work Practice with Traumatic Brain Injury: The Results of a Structured Review2012In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 26, no 4-5, p. 459-460, article id 0313Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Matérne, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Successful return to work after acquired brain injury: opportunities and barriers from a patient perspective2016In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 30, no 5-6, p. 516-516Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Acquired brain injury (ABI) is often a lifelong disability that entails a marked change in a person’s life. It involves biopsychosocial levels and return to work (RTW) is one of the main goals for the person. Several of those suffering an ABI are of working age. The society and the individuals are both winners if the person could get back to work and sustain working.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to increase knowledge about the opportunities and barriers for successful RTW among individuals with ABI.

    Methods: Adults who have ABI and had participated in work rehabilitation were interviewed in regard to their experiences of the process. The informants (five females, five males) had participated in work rehabilitation, had successfully RTW and had worked at least 50% in at least a year after the injury. The interviews were transcribed, structured and analysed by latent content analysis with a hermeneutic approach.

    Results: Three main themes that influenced RTW after ABI were identified: (i) individually adapted rehabilitation process, (ii) motivation for RTW and (iii) cognitive abilities and inabilities. The results indicate that an individually adapted vocational rehabilitation (VR) process was an important issue. The individuals with ABI actively involved in their own rehabilitation process also required continuous support from the society, the specialists, their employers and colleagues; this support has to be designed for each individual. A moderate level of motivation for RTW was necessary for the best result to RTW, in other words it was important to achieve a balance between too high and too low motivation. Finally, a comprehensive knowledge about the cognitive abilities and inabilities of the individual after ABI helped the individuals and their employers to find compensatory strategies to handle their work tasks. One implication of the findings was the necessity of a good support system and a good VR that functions well and lasts for a longer period. When there are obstacles in the VR process, it is important to have strategies and awareness of how to proceed further.

    Conclusions: Consequently, the support built for a person individually, with a balanced motivation, knowledge about the cognitive abilities and awareness of how to proceed further in the process will help to build a successful and sustainable RTW.

  • 6.
    Matérne, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Change in quality of life in relation to returning to work after acquired brain injury: a population-based register study2018In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 32, no 13-14, p. 1731-1739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study investigated changes in quality of life (QoL) in relation to return to work among patients with acquired brain injury (ABI).

    METHOD: The sample consisted of 1487 patients with ABI (63% men) aged 18-66 years (mean age 52) from the WebRehab Sweden national quality register database. Only patients who worked at least 50% at admission to hospital and were on full sick leave at discharge from hospital were included. QoL was measured by the EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaire.

    RESULTS: Patients who returned to work perceived a larger improvement in QoL from discharge to follow-up one year after injury compared to patients who had not returned to work. This difference remained after adjustment for other factors associated with improved QoL, such as having a university education, increased Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale scores and getting one's driving licence reinstated.

    CONCLUSION: Return to work is an important factor for change in QoL among patients with ABI, even after adjusting for other factors related to QoL. This is consistent with the hypothesis that having employment is meaningful, increases self-esteem and fosters participation in society. Thus, helping patients with ABI return to work has a positive influence on QoL.

  • 7.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Vertical and horizontal knowledge integration in disability studies: A case illustrated from acquired brain injury2016In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 30, no 5-6, p. 567-568Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Disability research as an academic field was established in the 1960s and 1970s in the Nordic countries and in the Anglo-Saxon world. Disability research was studied within the medical model, e.g. in medical and rehabilitation studies, while disability studies became a part of the social model, e.g. in social and psychological studies. It has been a lack of theoretical perspective in disability research and according to that a discussion of theoretical approaches in disability studies that has been raised during recent years. The aim of the study is to describe and illustrate conceptually how vertical and horizontal knowledge integration appear in disability research, exemplified within a case from a person with acquired brain injury.

    Methods: The study adopted a qualitative approach to answer the research aim, undertaking a literature review to accompany an analysis of the concepts, vertical and horizontal. The concepts were thereafter analysed within theories from disability research and exemplified with a case from brain injury rehabilitation.

    Results: Tentatively the conceptions, vertical and horizontal, are described and, in addition, a bio-psycho-social perspective is mentioned andtwo theoretical approaches within disability research are described: human functioning sciences and interdisciplinary research. Vertical knowledge integration can be seen as a stratification between differentlevels on a biological, psychological and social level. Horizontal knowledge integration can be understood across varying disabilities. The study indicates that vertical and horizontal knowledge integration in disability research are useful for a broader and deeper understanding of disability and functional impairment where, over the last few years, different theoretical perspectives have become increasingly common. Furthermore, the study shows that acquired brain injury, in a scientific context, has been studied within different levels of society. For example:

    ●On a biological level, e.g. within biochemical bloodanalysis;

    ●On a psychological level, e.g. within neuropsychologicaldiagnostics; and

    ●On a social level, e.g. as a changeover process duringrecovery.

    Conclusions: The study indicates that a variety of scientific contributions are needful in our understanding of the phenomenon of living withacquired brain injuryin the contemporary society.

  • 8.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Matérne, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Rehabil Res Ctr, Swedish Inst Disabil Res, Örebro Univ Hosp, Örebro, Sweden.
    Returning to working life after acquired brain injury: The rehabilitation-process, possibilities and hindrance for participation2014In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 28, no 5-6, p. 754-754Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Ström, Jakob O.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Boström, S.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bobinski, L.
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, A.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Low-grade infection complicating silastic dural substitute 32 years post-operatively2011In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 25, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A complication of a silastic dural substitute is described, which appeared after 32 years-by far the longest latency period reported in the literature.

    Methods: Case report and literature review.

    Results: In 1971, a 20-year old woman suffered from an acute subdural haematoma and a temporal cerebral contusion due to a motorbike accident. She underwent an operation with evacuation of these and the dura was mended with a silastic duraplasty. Thirty-two years later she deteriorated with increased memory problems and dysphasia. CT revealed an expanding haemorrhagic mass around the previous duraplasty, which demanded surgery with removal of the silastic dural implant and evacuation of the haemorrhagic mass. Although the haemorrhagic mass enveloped the silastic implant, a contribution of the acrylate flap cannot be ruled out. Bacteriological cultures revealed Acinetobacter spp. in the CSF. Adequate post-operative antibiotic treatment was administered. The patient slowly improved, but the complication represented a major setback in her long-term cognitive and communicative functions.

    Conclusions: This case widens the previously reported time-frame of late complications by 60%, from 20 to 32 years, and will hopefully serve to increase the awareness of late infections and haemorrhages induced by silastic dural implants, thereby improving diagnosis and treatment in future cases.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf