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  • 1. Leeuw, Maaike
    et al.
    Goossens, Marielle E. J. B.
    van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Vlaeyen, Johan W. S.
    Measuring perceived harmfulness of physical activities in patients with chronic low back pain: The photograph series of daily activities-short electronic version2007In: Journal of Pain, ISSN 1526-5900, E-ISSN 1528-8447, Vol. 8, no 11, p. 840-849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive-behavioral models of chronic low back pain (CLBP) predict that dysfunctional assumptions about the harmfulness of activities may maintain pain-related fear and disability levels. The Photograph Series of Daily Activities (PHODA) is an instrument to determine the perceived harmfulness of daily activities in patients with CLBP. This study examined the psychometric properties of a short electronic version of the PHODA (PHODA-SeV). The results show that the PHODA-SeV measures a single factor and has a high internal consistency. The test-retest reliability and stability of the PHODA-SeV over a 2-week time interval are good, with discrepancies between 2 measurements over 20 points suggesting true change. The construct validity is supported by the finding that both self-reported pain severity and fear of movement/(re)injury were uniquely related to the PHODA-SeV. Validity is further corroborated by the finding that patients who have received exposure in vivo, that aimed to systematically reduce the perceived harmfulness of activities, had significantly lower PHODA-SeV scores after treatment than patients receiving graded activity that did not address these assumptions. The findings support the PHODA-SeV as a valid and reliable measure of the perceived harmfulness of activities in patients with CLBP. Preliminary normative data of the PHODA-SeV are presented. Perspective: This article describes a pictorial measurement too/(PHODA-SeV) for the assessment of the perceived harmfulness of activities in patients with chronic low back pain. The PHODA-SeV has good psychometric properties and can be used to elaborate on the contribution of beliefs about harmful consequences of activities to pain and disability. (c) 2007 by the American Pain Society.

  • 2.
    MacDonald, Shane
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Reconstructing the Past on the Original Pain Recall Assessment Form (OPRA)2009In: Journal of Pain, ISSN 1526-5900, E-ISSN 1528-8447, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 809-817Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Original Pain Recall Assessment form (OPRA) is a technique that allows people to report on their pattern of pain over time. This investigation reports on the psychometric properties of the OPRA. Our results are analyzed from a cognitive-behavioral perspective. Correlation analyses on data from 72 respondents indicate that participants' patterns of symptoms recalled on the OPRA over a 28-day period were positively related to previous daily diary reports. Symptom ratings on an adapted OPRA showed different patterns of association with past symptom reports in distinct subgroups. A hypothesized, primacy recency effect of the diary procedure on symptom recall was supported. Statistics designed for use with paired, ordered categorical data showed acceptable agreement between diary ratings and those made at recall. In a basic research setting, the form offers the potential to evaluate individual correlates of pain recall. It can also be used at an individual level to describe the character of disagreement with prior ratings.

    Perspective

    This article presents the psychometric properties of a pain-assessment procedure. Our results suggest that the way people recall their symptoms is related to cognitive, emotional, and behavioral correlates of the pain experience. The importance of individual differences in overt and covert behaviors and their relationship to persistent pain complaints warrants further attention.

  • 3.
    Rothaug, Judith
    et al.
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Univ Jena, Jena, Germany.
    Zaslansky, Ruth
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Univ Jena, Jena, Germany.
    Schwenkglenks, Matthias
    European Ctr Pharmaceut Med, Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Komann, Marcus
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Univ Jena, Jena, Germany.
    Allvin, Renee
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Backstrom, Ragnar
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bri, Silviu
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Sourasky Med Ctr, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Buchholz, Ingo
    TAKWA GmbH, Erfurt, Germany.
    Engel, Christoph
    Inst Med Informat Stat & Epidemiol, Univ Leipzig,Leipzig, Germany.
    Fletcher, Dominique
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Hop Raymond Poincare, Garches, France.
    Fodor, Lucian
    Spitalul Clinic Judeţean de Urgenţă, Cluj Napoca, Romania.
    Funk, Peter
    School of Innovation, Design & Engineering, Mälardalen Univ, Västerås, Sweden.
    Gerbershagen, Hans J.
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Gordon, Debra B.
    Dept Anesthesiol & Pain Med, Univ Washington, Seattle WA, USA.
    Konrad, Christoph
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Kantonsspital, Luzern, Switzerland.
    Kopf, Andreas
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Charite Med Ctr, Berlin, Germany.
    Leykin, Yigal
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Univ Trieste & Udine, Trieste, Italy.
    Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Univ Hosp Muenster, Munster, Germany.
    Puig, Margarita
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, IMIM Hosp del Mar UAB, Barcelona, Spain.
    Rawal, Narinder
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Taylor, Rod S.
    Peninsula Coll Med & Dent, University of Exeter, Exeter, England.
    Ullrich, Kristin
    Queen Mary & Westfield Coll, Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, University of London, London, England.
    Volk, Thomas
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Saarland Univ Hosp, Homburg, Germany.
    Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam
    Inst Med Informat Stat & Epidemiol, Univ Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Meissner, Winfried
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Univ Jena, Jena, Germany.
    Patients' Perception of Postoperative Pain Management: Validation of the International Pain Outcomes (IPO) Questionnaire2013In: Journal of Pain, ISSN 1526-5900, E-ISSN 1528-8447, Vol. 14, no 11, p. 1361-1370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PAIN OUT is a European Commission-funded project aiming at improving postoperative pain management. It combines a registry that can be useful for quality improvement and research using treatment and patient-reported outcome measures. The core of the project is a patient questionnaire-the International Pain Outcomes questionnaire that comprises key patient-level outcomes of postoperative pain management, including pain intensity, physical and emotional functional interference, side effects, and perceptions of care. Its psychometric quality after translation and adaptation to European patients is the subject of this validation study. The questionnaire was administered to 9,727 patients in 10 languages in 8 European countries and Israel. Construct validity was assessed using factor analysis. Discriminant validity assessment used Mann-Whitney U tests to detect mean group differences between 2 surgical disciplines. Internal consistency reliability was calculated as Cronbach's alpha. Factor analysis resulted in a 3-factor structure explaining 53.6% of variance. Cronbach's alpha at overall scale level was high (.86), and for the 3 subscales was low, moderate, or high (range, .53-.89). Significant mean group differences between general and orthopedic surgery patients confirmed discriminant validity. The psychometric quality of the International Pain Outcomes questionnaire can be regarded as satisfactory. Perspective: The International Pain Outcomes questionnaire provides an instrument for postoperative pain assessment and improvement of quality of care, which demonstrated good psychometric quality when translated into a variety of languages in a large European and Israeli patient population. This measure provides the basis for the first comprehensive postoperative pain registry in Europe and other countries. (C) 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Pain Society

  • 4.
    Schrooten, Martien G. S.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Center for Health and Medical Psychology (CHAMP), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Research Group on Health Psychology, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Wiech, Katja
    Research Group on Health Psychology, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB), Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Nuffield Division Anaesthetics, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom; Centre for Pain Research, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom.
    Vlaeyen, Johan W. S.
    Research Group on Health Psychology, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
    When pain meets...: pain-related choice behavior and pain perception in different goal conflict situations2014In: Journal of Pain, ISSN 1526-5900, E-ISSN 1528-8447, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 1166-1178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individuals in pain often face the choice between avoiding pain and pursuing other equally valued goals. However, little is known about pain-related choice behavior and pain perception in goal conflict situations. Seventy-eight healthy volunteers performed a computerized task requiring repeated choices between incompatible options, differing in their effect on probability to receive painful stimulation and money. Depending on group assignment, participants chose between increased pain probability versus decreased money probability (avoidance-avoidance conflict situation); decreased pain probability versus increased money probability (approach-approach conflict situation); or decrease versus increase in both probabilities (double approach/avoidance conflict situation). During the choice task, participants rated painfulness, unpleasantness, threat, and fearfulness associated with the painful stimulation and how they felt. Longer choice latency and more choice switching were associated with higher retrospective ratings of conflict and of decision difficulty, and more equal importance placed on pain avoidance and earning money. Groups did not differ in choice behavior, pain stimulus ratings, or affect. Across groups, longer choice latencies were nonsignificantly associated with higher pain, unpleasantness, threat, and fearfulness. In the avoidance-avoidance group, more choice switching was associated with higher pain-related threat and fearfulness, and with more negative affect. These results of this study suggest that associations between choice behaviors, pain perception, and affect depend on conflict situation.

    Perspective: We present a first experimental demonstration of the relationship between pain-related choice behaviors, pain, and affect in different goal conflict situations. This experimental approach allows us to examine these relationships in a controlled fashion. Better understanding of pain-related goal conflicts and their resolution may lead to more effective pain treatment.

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