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  • 1.
    Gorcenco, Sorina
    et al.
    Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurology, Lund, Sweden.
    Vaz, Frédéric M.
    Laboratory of Genetic Metabolic Diseases, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Tracewska-Siemiatkowska, Anna
    Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; DNA Analysis Laboratory, Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth
    Department of Clinical Genetics, The Kennedy Centre, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Denmark; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cremers, Frans P. M.
    Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Ygland, Emil
    Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurology, Lund, Sweden.
    Kicsi, Jeno
    Section for Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Central Hospital, Växjö, Sweden.
    Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl
    Department of Clinical Genetics, The Kennedy Centre, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Denmark.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Audiology.
    Kjellström, Ulrika
    Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Ophthalmology, Lund, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Sten
    Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Ophthalmology, Lund, Sweden.
    Puschmann, Andreas
    Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurology, Lund, Sweden.
    Oral therapy for riboflavin transporter deficiency: What is the regimen of choice?2019In: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, ISSN 1353-8020, E-ISSN 1873-5126, Vol. 61, p. 245-247Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Johansson, Dongni
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thomas, Ilias
    Department of Micro-data Analysis, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Anders
    RISE Acreo, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Anders
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Medvedev, Alexander
    Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Nyholm, Dag
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Fredrik
    RISE Acreo, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Senek, Marina
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Spira, Jack
    Sensidose AB, Sollentuna, Sweden.
    Westin, Jerker
    Department of Micro-data Analysis, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Filip
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Evaluation of a sensor algorithm for motor state rating in Parkinson's disease2019In: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, ISSN 1353-8020, E-ISSN 1873-5126, Vol. 64, p. 112-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: A treatment response objective index (TRIS) was previously developed based on sensor data from pronation-supination tests. This study aimed to examine the performance of TRIS for medication effects in a new population sample with Parkinson's disease (PD) and its usefulness for constructing individual dose-response models.

    Methods: Twenty-five patients with PD performed a series of tasks throughout a levodopa challenge while wearing sensors. TRIS was used to determine motor changes in pronation-supination tests following a single levodopa dose, and was compared to clinical ratings including the Treatment Response Scale (TRS) and six sub-items of the UPDRS part III.

    Results: As expected, correlations between TRIS and clinical ratings were lower in the new population than in the initial study. TRIS was still significantly correlated to TRS (rs = 0.23, P < 0.001) with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 1.33. For the patients (n = 17) with a good levodopa response and clear motor fluctuations, a stronger correlation was found (rs = 0.38, RMSE = 1.29, P < 0.001). The mean TRIS increased significantly when patients went from the practically defined off to their best on state (P = 0.024). Individual dose-response models could be fitted for more participants when TRIS was used for modelling than when TRS ratings were used.

    Conclusion: The objective sensor index shows promise for constructing individual dose-response models, but further evaluations and retraining of the TRIS algorithm are desirable to improve its performance and to ensure its clinical effectiveness.

  • 3.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. School of Technology and Business Studies, Computer Engineering, Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Westin, Jerker
    School of Technology and Business Studies, Computer Engineering, Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Nyholm, Dag
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Spiral drawing during self-rated dyskinesia is more impaired than during self-rated off2013In: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, ISSN 1353-8020, E-ISSN 1873-5126, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 553-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine repeated measures of fine motor function in relation to self-assessed motor conditions in Parkinson's disease (PD).

    Methods: One-hundred PD patients, 65 with advanced PD and 35 patients with different disease stages have utilized a test battery in a telemedicine setting. On each test occasion, they initially self-assessed their motor condition (from 'very off' to 'very dyskinetic') and then performed a set of fine motor tests (tapping and spiral drawings).

    Results: The motor tests scores were found to be the best during self-rated On. Self-rated dyskinesias caused more impaired spiral drawing performance (mean = 9.8% worse, P < 0.001) but at the same time tapping speed was faster (mean = 5.0% increase, P < 0.001), compared to scores in self-rated Off.

    Conclusions: The fine motor tests of the test battery capture different symptoms; the spiral impairment primarily relates to dyskinesias whereas the tapping speed captures the Off symptoms.

  • 4. Törnqvist, Anna Lena
    et al.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Widner, Håkan
    Rehncrona, Stig
    Fulfilment of patients' goals after thalamic deep brain stimulation: a follow-up study2007In: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, ISSN 1353-8020, E-ISSN 1873-5126, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the ventrolateral thalamus (VIM) is shown to reduce tremor in essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Our aim was to evaluate the results of VIM DBS from the patients' perspective. Sixteen consecutively included patients (8 ET and 8 PD) described their own outcome goals preoperatively and evaluated the fulfilment 1, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. We conclude that the patients could do specific activities that are of importance to them such as eating, drinking and socializing, and perceived either partial or total fulfilment of their goals. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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