oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alm, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jaensson, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Lundeberg, Stefan
    Pain Treatment Service, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Adherence to Swedish guidelines for pain treatment in relation to pediatric tonsil surgery: A survey of the multidisciplinary team2017In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 101, p. 123-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pain management in children after tonsil surgery is essential, and optimal pain treatment has been discussed for many years. Data from the National Tonsil Register in Sweden (NTRS) and a national mapping system have demonstrated the need for national pain treatment guidelines for pediatric tonsil surgery. As a result, Swedish national guidelines, together with updated patient information on the website tonsilloperation.se, were developed and implemented in 2013.

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the professionals’ opinions of and adherence to pain treatment guidelines for pediatric tonsil surgery patients in a two-year follow-up.

    Method: This descriptive cross-sectional study was based on data from an inter-professional questionnaire, which was validated by an expert group using a content validity index (S-CVI 0.93). The questionnaire was sent to all Swedish ear, nose and throat (ENT) departments (n=49) that the NTRS identified as performing tonsil surgery on children younger than 18 years of age. In each clinic, we asked for responses from staff in each of the following professions: ENT physicians, anesthesia physicians, registered nurse anesthetists, and registered nurses in the ENT departments.

    Results: Respondents from 48 ENT departments participated, and 139/163 (85%) completed questionnaires were returned. The guidelines were reported as being clear, ensuring patient safety and providing optimal pharmacological treatment. Treatment was given according to the guidelines: Half of the departments gave pre- or intraoperative treatment with clonidine, betamethasone and high-dose paracetamol (acetaminophen). A multimodal pain approach (paracetamol and COX inhibitors) after hospital discharge was prescribed by all departments after tonsillectomy and, more extensively, after tonsillotomy. One-third of the departments prescribed paracetamol with a higher normal dose for the first three postoperative days. Half of the departments prescribed rescue analgesics, clonidine or opioids after tonsillectomy. None of the departments prescribed codeine or tramadol, drugs that are discouraged in the guidelines. The majority of the departments used the website tonsilloperation.se to provide information to the patients and their caregivers.

    Conclusion: The respondents' opinions of and the ENT departments adherence to the Swedish national guidelines were considered to be good. The national implementation process in Sweden has impacted the manner in which ENT departments treat pain after tonsil surgery.

  • 2.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Brattwall, Metha
    Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Lundeberg, Stefan
    Pain treatment service, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Swedish guidelines for the treatment of pain in tonsil surgery in pediatric patients up to 18 years2015In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 443-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Surgery of the tonsils often causes severe pain lasting for many days as been shown by data from the National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden. Tonsillotomy is associated with fewer readmissions due to bleeding, number of days requiring analgesics and health care contacts due to pain compared to tonsillectomy. The register data demonstrate the necessity of better-evidenced based pain treatment guidelines for tonsil-surgery.

    Objectives: To develop evidenced based pain treatment guidelines for tonsil-surgery in Sweden.

    Methods: The evidence based guidelines were designed by an updated literature review and from the clinical expertise in the pediatric pain field, which thereafter were reviewed by ENT-doctors and anesthetists from each ENT-clinic in Sweden.

    Results: A multimodal pain treatment approach is advocated, including premedication and administration during anesthesia, with paracetamol (acetaminophen), clonidine and betamethasone. If not given as a premedication the combination can be administered intravenously in the initial phase of anesthesia. At the end of surgery, if no bleeding problems, cox-inhibitors can be given.After discharge from hospital, the recommendations for pain relief are paracetamol combined with cox-inhibitors (ibuprofen, diclofenac) and if needed oral clonidine in favor of opioids. When pain intensity decreases, discontinue the analgesic treatment in the following order: opioid, clonidine, paracetamol and at last ibuprofen. The need for analgesic treatment after tonsillectomy is usually 5-8 days, after tonsillotomy only 3-5 days.Parents are recommended to contact the hospital if the child has difficulties in drinking or eating adequately and/or suffers from pain despite taking the recommended medication regularly.

    Conclusions: Swedish guidelines for tonsil-surgery provide practical evidence-based pain treatment recommendations.

  • 3.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping; Department of clinical and experimental medicine, Division of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Linköping University, Linköping.
    Lundeborg, Inger
    Department of clinical and experimental medicin, Division of speech and language pathology, Linköping University, Linköping.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Department of clinical and experimental medicine, Division of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Linköping University, Linköping.
    Child Behavior and quality of life before and after tonsillotomy versus tonsillectomy2009In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 73, no 9, p. 1254-1262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Compare two techniques for pediatric tonsil surgery with respect to postoperative pain and morbidity and changes in sleep behavior, health related quality of life (HRQL) and benefits due to surgery.

    Methods: 67 children (4.5–5.5 years) with tonsillar hypertrophy and obstructive sleep-disordered breathing with or without recurrent tonsillitis were randomized to either regular tonsillectomy (TE) (n = 32) or intracapsular tonsillectomy/tonsillotomy (TT) (n = 35) with Radiofrequency surgical technique (ellman Int.). Before TT/TE, the parents completed a validated Quality of Life survey of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea, the OSA-18 (Obstructive Sleep Apnea-18) and a standardized assessment of their children’s behavior with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Six months after surgery, the parents repeated these measurements, and assessed the health related benefits of the surgery using the Glasgow Children’s Benefit Inventory (GCBI).

    Results: In the TT group, the children recorded less pain from the first day after surgery on wards, used fewer doses of painkillers and were pain-free 3 days earlier than the children in the TE group. Six months after surgery, there were no significant difference between TT and TE with regard to snoring and ENT-infections. The differences in the total scores and in all the individual domains between the initialOSA-18 and postsurgery scores were all significant (P < 0.0001). The improvement in the total problem score measured with CBCL was also significant (P < 0.01) and there was no difference between the TT and TE children. The improvements in all subscores of the GCBI indicated a significant health benefit of both TT and TE.

    Conclusions: TT with RF-surgery causes less pain and postoperative morbidity than regular TE and has an equal effect on snoring and recurrent infections. Pre-school children with tonsillar hypertrophy and obstructive sleep-disordered breathing all show an impact on HRQL and behavior before surgery and improve dramatically just as much after TT as after TE. Therefore TT would be considered for treatment of small children

  • 4.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Wadsby, Marie
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköpings universitet.
    Pre-surgical Child Behavior Ratings and Pain Management after Two Different Techniques of Tonsil Surgery2006In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 70, no 10, p. 1749-1758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare child behavior before surgery with experience of pain and anxiety in relation to two techniques of tonsil surgery, to relate previous experiences of surgery/tonsillitis with anxiety and pain, and to compare the children's, parent's and nurse's rating of pain.

    Method

    Ninety-two children (5–15 years) with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and with or without recurrent tonsillitis were randomized to partial tonsil resection/tonsillotomy (TT) or full tonsillectomy (TE). Measures: Parents: Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Children: State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC) and seven-point Faces Pain Scale (FPS). Parents/staff: seven-point Verbal Pain Rating Scale (VPRS). Pain relievers were opoids, paracetamol and diclophenac.

    Results

    These children with SDB scored significantly higher on CBCL than did normative groups, but no connection was observed between CBCL rating and experience of pain. There was no relation between pre-operative anxiety and pain. The post-operative anxiety level (STAIC) correlated with pain. The TE-group scored higher on STAIC after surgery. Previous experience of surgery or tonsillitis did not influence post-operative pain. The TE-group rated higher experience of pain despite more medication. The nurses scored pain lower than the parents/children and under-medicated.

    Conclusion

    SDB may influence children's behavior, but with no relation to post-operative pain. The surgical method predicts pain better than does the child's behavior rating. The nurses underestimated the pain experienced by the child.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Bramhagen, Ann-Cathrine
    Fakulty of Health and Society, Department of Care Science, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Fakulty of Health and Society, Department of Care Science, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Self-reported postoperative recovery in children after tonsillectomy compared to tonsillotomy2017In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 96, p. 47-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Tonsil surgery is associated with significant morbidity during recovery. Patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) are the golden standard for the planning and follow-up of delivered care, which should also be an axiom for children. The current aims were to describe self-reported postoperative recovery in children after tonsil surgery, and to compare tonsillotomy and tonsillectomy in this respect.

    Methods: In total, 238 children (4–12 years old) with a history of obstructive problems and/or recurrent tonsillitis, and undergoing tonsil surgery were included. Forty-eight per cent were operated with partial tonsil resection/tonsillotomy (TT) and 52% with total tonsillectomy (TE), all in day surgery.

    Postoperative recovery was assessed on days 1, 4 and 10 using the validated self-rating instrument PRiC, Postoperative Recovery in Children. This includes 23 items covering different aspects of recovery after tonsil surgery. A higher score indicates worse status in the respective items.

    Results: Daily life activities (sleeping, eating and playing), physical symptoms (e.g., headache, stomach ache, sore throat, otalgia, dizziness, nausea, defecation, urination), and emotional aspects (sadness, frightening dreams) were affected during the recovery period.

    The TE-girls showed higher scores than the boys regarding stomach ache, defecation and dizziness.

    Children above 6 years of age reported higher values for the physical comfort variables, while the younger group showed worse emotional states.

    Postoperative recovery improved from day 1–10 in all surgical groups. The TE-group showed lower recovery compared to the TT-group (p < 0.01–0.001) in most items.

    Conclusion: The goal of postoperative management is to minimize or eliminate discomfort, facilitating the recovery process and avoiding complications. Children are able to describe their recovery, and thus, PRiC seems to be able to serve as a PROM to obtain patient-centered data after tonsil surgery. The recovery process after TT causes less postoperative morbidity and a quicker return to normal activity compared to TE.

  • 6. Flynn, Traci
    et al.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Jönsson, Radoslava
    Lohmander, Anette
    The high prevalence of otitis media with effusion in children with cleft lip and palate as compared to children without clefts2009In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 73, no 10, p. 1441-1446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Children with cleft lip and palate universally present with otitis media with effusion. This prevalence has not been systematically studied. The purpose of the present study was to examine and compare the prevalence of otitis media with effusion, hearing sensitivity, and audiometry method utilised for assessment in children with and without clefts. METHODS: Two groups of children (children with unilateral cleft lip and palate, N=22, and children without clefts, N=20) were followed prospectively and longitudinally from 1 to 5 years of age. Data were collected at four points (1, 1.5, 3, and 5 years of age). Assessments at each of the four points included: (1) otomicroscopy, (2) tympanometry, and (3) hearing assessment. RESULTS: Overall the children with unilateral cleft lip and palate demonstrated a significantly higher prevalence of otitis media with effusion (121 ears, 74.7%) than children without clefts (31 ears, 19.4%) (p<0.001). This higher prevalence was also significant at 1, 1.5, 3, and 5 years of age (p<0.001). Of those ears with otitis media with effusion, 83.1% of the ears exhibited a hearing loss (PTA >20dB), with this loss more prevalent in the cleft group (89.7% UCLP and 70.0% non-cleft). The hearing loss was significantly more pronounced in the cleft (group 35.71dB HL UCLP and 26.41dB HL non-cleft group). Children with unilateral cleft lip and palate utilised a lower age-appropriate audiometry testing method than age-matched children with no cleft at 1, 1.5, and 3 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: Children with unilateral cleft lip and palate present with a significantly higher prevalence of otitis media with effusion than children without cleft. Also, the hearing loss associated with otitis media with effusion is demonstrated in this study. Furthermore, the method of audiometry has been examined and children with unilateral cleft lip and palate had to be assessed with a lower level of method than children without cleft.

  • 7.
    Frölander, Hans-Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD) Graduate School, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden;.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Audiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre HEAD, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden.
    Marshall, Jan D.
    The Jackson laboratory, Bar Harbor ME, USA.
    Sundqvist, Annette
    Department of Behavioral Science and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Ctr HEAD, Linköping, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre HEAD, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rönnåsen, Berit
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD) Graduate School, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Falkensson, Lil
    The Swedish National Expert Team for the Diagnoses of Deafblindness, National Resource Centre, Lund, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Department of Behavioral Science and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre HEAD, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Theory-of-mind in adolescents and young adults with Alström Syndrome2014In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 530-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The study focuses on theory-of-mind in adolescents and young adults with Alström syndrome (ALMS). ALMS, an autosomal recessive syndrome causes juvenile blindness, sensorineural hearing loss, cardiomyopathy, endocrinological disorders and metabolic dysfunction. Theory-of-mind (ToM) refers to the ability to impute mental states to one self and to others. Clinical observations have revealed an increased occurence of deviances in mental state understanding in ALMS. In the present study ToM will be examined and related to working memory (WM), verbal ability and sensory loss.

    Methods: Twelve young individuals (16-37 years) with ALMS and 24 nondisabled individuals matched on age, gender and educational level participated. ToM was assessed by means of a multiple task that taxes the ability to understand thoughts and feelings of story chraracters´. WM was examined by means of a reading span task and verbal ability by means of a vocabulary test.

    Results: The ALMS group performed at significantly lower levels in ToM tasks and displayed a higher variability in performance than the control group. Individuals with ALMS and a relatively poor level performance provided fewer correct mental state inferences in ToM tasks than ALMS individuals with relatively higher performance levels. ALMS individuals with relatively high performance levels made as many correct inferences in ToM tasks as the control group, but their inferences were more often incomplete. Vocabulary skills and educational level, but not WM-capacity predicted ToM performance. Degree of deafblindness did not have an impact on ToM. Age of onset of visual loss but not hearing loss related to ToM.

    Conclusions: The individuals with ALMS display a high degree of heterogeneity in terms of ToM, where some individuals reached performance levels comparable to nondisabled individuals. The results are discussed with respect to how cognitive and verbal abilities and factors related to the disability affect ToM.

  • 8.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, ,Sweden; Linnaeus Centre for Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD), Växjö, Sweden; Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, ,Sweden; Linnaeus Centre for Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD), Växjö, Sweden; Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, ,Sweden; Linnaeus Centre for Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD), Växjö, Sweden; Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre for Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD), Växjö, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre for Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD), Växjö, Sweden; Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Cognitive skills in children with Usher syndrome typ 1 and cochlear implants2012In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 76, no 10, p. 1449-1457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Usher syndrome is a genetic condition causing deaf-blindness and is one of the most common causes of syndromic deafness. Individuals with USH1 in Sweden born during the last 15 years have typically received cochlear implants (CI) as treatment for their congenital, profound hearing loss. Recent research in genetics indicates that the cause of deafness in individuals with Usher type 1 (USH1) could be beneficial for the outcome with cochlear implants (CI). This population has not previously been the focus of cognitive research.

    Objective: The present study aims to examine the phonological and lexical skills and working memory capacity (WMC) in children with USH1 and CI and to compare their performance with children with NH, children with hearing-impairment using hearing-aids and to children with non-USH1 deafness using CI. The participants were 7 children aged 7-16 years with USH1 and CI.

    Methods: The participants performed 10 sets of tasks measuring phonological and lexical skills and working memory capacity.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that children with USH1 and CI as a group in general have a similar level of performance on the cognitive tasks as children with hearing impairment and hearing aids. The group with USH1 and CI has a different performance profile on the tests of working memory, phonological skill and lexical skill than children with non-USH1 deafness using CI, on tasks of phonological working memory and phonological skill.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf