oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Jónsdóttir, Thórunn
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, arolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zickert, Agneta
    Department of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, arolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundelin, Birgitta
    Department of Oncology and Pathology, Pathology and Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Elisabet Welin
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.
    Unit for Clinical Therapy Research, Inflammatory Diseases (ClinTRID), Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Department of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, arolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Long-term follow-up in lupus nephritis patients treated with rituximab: clinical and histopathological response2013In: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, E-ISSN 1462-0332, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 847-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the long-term clinical, histological and serological affects of B-cell-depleting therapy (BCDT) in patients with LN refractory to conventional treatment.

    METHODS: Twenty-five patients, followed for a mean time of 36 months (9-95 months), were included. Renal disease activity was evaluated with the BILAG index and renal response was determined according to the LN European consensus statement. Renal biopsies were performed for histological evaluation at baseline and follow-up.

    RESULTS: Partial response (PR) or complete renal response (CR) was observed in 22 of 25 after a median of 12 months. Sixteen patients achieved CR after a median of 24 months. Six patients experienced a renal relapse. Proteinuria decreased significantly (P = 0.0002) from baseline to 36 months. A noteworthy histological improvement was seen in nearly all patients with a significant reduction in activity index (P = 0.01). Longer depletion time and low baseline values of IgM were indicative of achieving clinical remission during the first year after treatment (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, respectively).

    CONCLUSION: In therapy-resistant LN, BCDT induced clinical and histological improvements in the majority of patients. Transition from PR to CR was mainly seen during the second year of follow-up. Patients with longer depletion time and low baseline levels of IgM were more likely to gain a faster remission, suggesting that the clinical benefit may be linked to suppression of autoreactive plasmablasts. Although formal evidence of BCDT in LN is lacking, our data may provide guidance to clinicians considering therapeutic options in patients with refractory LN.

  • 2.
    Pettersson, Susanne
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möller, Sonia
    Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Welin Henriksson, Elisabet
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Women's experience of SLE-related fatigue: a focus group interview study2010In: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, E-ISSN 1462-0332, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 1935-1942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe women's experience of SLE-related fatigue, how they express the feeling of fatigue, impact on life and strategies developed to manage fatigue in daily living.

    METHOD: Seven, semi-structured focus group discussions with 33 women were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed according to qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Perceptions of SLE-related fatigue were sorted into four themes. Nature of Fatigue, involved the sensation, occurrence and character. Aspects Affected by Fatigue described emotions that arose together with fatigue as well as aspects of work, family life, social contacts and leisure activities that were affected by fatigue. Striving Towards Power and Control concluded the array of ways used to manage daily life and were categorized into the mental struggle, structure, restrict and provide. Factors Influencing the Perception of Fatigue described understanding from their surroundings and pain as strongly influencing the experience and perception of fatigue.

    CONCLUSION: SLE-related fatigue was portrayed as an overwhelming phenomenon with an unpredictable character, resulting in the feeling that fatigue dominates and controls most situations in life. The choice of strategies was described as a balance with implications for how fatigue limited a person's life. Health care professionals are advised to take a more active role to empower people with SLE to find their own balance as a way to achieve a feeling of being in control.

  • 3.
    Regardt, Malin
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Karolinska Institutet, Care Sciences and Society, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Rheumatology Unit, Sweden; Department of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Welin Henriksson, Elisabet
    Department of Neurobiology, Karolinska Institutet, Care Sciences and Society, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Rheumatology Unit, Sweden.
    Alexanderson, Helene
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Rheumatology Unit, Sweden; Physical Therapy Department, Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Ingrid E.
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Rheumatology Unit, Sweden.
    Patients with polymyositis or dermatomyositis have reduced grip force and health-related quality of life in comparison with reference values: an observational study2011In: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, E-ISSN 1462-0332, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 578-585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to investigate hand function in PM and DM patients and compare this with reference values in healthy individuals and also to investigate if hand function correlated with activity performance and health-related quality of life.

    METHODS: An observational cross-sectional study was performed in 18 women and 13 men with PM or DM with established disease. Grip force and hand mobility were assessed by Grippit and Escola Paulista de Medicina-Range of Motion scale. Activity performance was measured with myositis activities profile and health-related quality of life by short form-36 (SF-36).

    RESULTS: Women and men with PM and DM with mean disease duration of 6.8 (5.5) years had a significantly lower grip force than gender- and age-matched healthy individuals (women 71% and men 60%). They also had significantly lower mean values in all dimensions of the health-related quality of life instrument SF-36 compared with the Swedish population. In patients with PM and DM, the grip force correlated significantly with the ability to perform domestic activities. In women with PM and DM, the grip force correlated significantly with the health-related quality of life dimensions vitality and mental health. There were no significant differences between patients with PM and DM regarding grip force, hand mobility, activity performance or health-related quality of life.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients with PM or DM have reduced grip force that could influence activity performance and health-related quality of life.

  • 4.
    Weiss, R. J.
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Broström, E.
    Department of Women and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stark, A.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wick, M. C.
    Department of Medicine, Section of Rheumatology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wretenberg, Per
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ankle/hindfoot arthrodesis in rheumatoid arthritis improves kinematics and kinetics of the knee and hip: a prospective gait analysis study2007In: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, E-ISSN 1462-0332, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1024-1028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of ankle/hindfoot arthrodesis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients on gait pattern of the knee and hip.

    Methods: In this prospective follow-up study, 14 RA patients scheduled for ankle/hindfoot arthrodesis (talo-calcaneal, talo-navicular, calcaneo-cuboid and/or talo-crural joints) and 14 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included. Three-dimensional gait analyses of joint angles, moments and work were performed at the index operation and after 13 months of follow-up. Each patient underwent clinical assessments of pain while walking, overall evaluation of disease activity, Health Related Quality of Life Questionnaire (EQ-5D), activity limitations, maximum walking distance, difficulty with walking surface and gait abnormality. For comparisons of pre- vs post-operative conditions, Wilcoxon's matched pairs test and Friedman ANOVA by rank test were used.

    Results: At follow-up after ankle/hindfoot fusion surgery, RA patients demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in mean range of joint motions, moments and work in the overlying joints such as the knee and hip. Moreover, there was significantly less pain, disease activity, activity limitation, difficulty with walking surface and gait abnormality. EQ-5D and maximum walking distance were also significantly improved at follow-up.

    Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that ankle/hindfoot arthrodesis in RA is an effective intervention to reduce pain and to improve Health Related Quality of Life and functional ability. Moreover, the overlying leg joints experience an improvement in joint motion, muscle-generated joint moments and work during walking. Three-dimensional gait analysis may assist future investigations of the effects of orthopaedic surgery on functional mobility in RA to prevent irreversible disablement.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf