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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ridicule as a strategy for the recontextualization of the working class: a multimodal analysis of class-making on swedish reality television2015In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 20-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the role of reality television in the ongoing transformation of Swedish workingclass discourse. This transformation is linked to a neoliberal political project and concerns a shifting relationship between discourses of exclusion and inclusion. The key argument is that working-class people are now portrayed through ‘a moral underclass discourse’ in which the working class is devalued and delegitimized, and given moral blame for their own structural situation. This discussion is based on a multimodal critical discourse analysis of participants who appear to be ‘ordinary’ working-class people in Ullared, a docu-soap that follows the goings-on at, and in the vicinity of a popular, rural low-cost outlet (called Gekås). Hence it puts participants’ consumption and consumer behaviour in the foreground, and these activities are ridiculed through a mode of production best described as the ‘middle-class gaze’. Ordinary participants are presented as flawed or pathological consumers and become signifiers of a morally flawed lifestyle.

  • 2.
    Krzyzanowski, Michal
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. School of English, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland.
    Ethnography and critical discourse analysis: towards a problem-oriented research dialogue2011In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 231-238Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Krzyzanowski, Michal
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. School of English, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland.
    Political communication, institutional cultures and linearities of organisational practice: a discourse-ethnographic approach to institutional change in the European Union2011In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 281-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to present an approach to analysing organisational practices and identities in complex institutional spaces of the European Union (EU). On the example of the 2002-2003 European Convention, the article targets new types of institutional organisms enacted in the EU in recent years. It does so in order to analyse to what extent such new, short-lived institutional bodies have the ability to develop their own, distinct institutional practices and inasmuch their everyday doings are in fact based on patterns adopted from other, more permanent institutional milieus (in the case of the EU - the European Commission, the European Council or the European Parliament). While analysing Convention's institutional reality by means of extensive fieldwork and ethnography, the article looks at the discursive construction of institutional cultures and identities by means of institutional practices as well as through discourses of officials involved in the work of the European institutions. © 2011 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  • 4.
    Ledin, Per
    et al.
    Department Culture and Education, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Machin, David
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Doing critical discourse studies with multimodality: from metafunctions to materiality2018In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Critical Discourse Studies (CDS) and in other linguistics oriented scholarly journals we now see more research which draws upon multimodality as part of carrying out analyses of how texts make meaning, in order to draw out the ideologies which they carry. However, much of multimodality is itself based closely on one theory of language called Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL). And despite calls from some scholars there has been no real interrogation of the concepts and models drawn from this theory as regards how suitable they are both for analyzing different forms of communication and for answering concrete research questions of the nature asked in CDS. In this paper we assess the core principles, taken from SFL into multimodality. Using examples we consider which are more or less suitable for the kinds of work we do in CDS. We make a case that SFL has a narrow notion of ‘texts’ and a weak notion of context. We show how we can address such problems to deal with what we call the ‘materiality’ of multimodal communication.

  • 5.
    Ledin, Per
    et al.
    Department of Culture and Learning, Sodertorn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Machin, David
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    HOW LISTS, BULLET POINTS AND TABLES RECONTEXTUALIZE SOCIAL PRACTICE: A multimodal study of management language in Swedish universities2015In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 463-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In critical discourse analysis, we have learned much about the nature of the marketized language that now dominates public institutions such as universities, playing a role in changing their identities. But less is known about the processes whereby this language enters the everyday practices of these institutions through documents that are used to manage teaching and research. What is the role of language in the shift to the way these activities are internally organized, managed, run and evaluated in terms of productivity and market-based principles? In this paper we analyse a chain of documents taken from a wider corpus of management documents in Swedish universities to show how this language recontextualizes the practices of teaching and research. Our focus is on the important role played by lists, bullet points and tables and how these are central to decoupling language from work processes and so legitimizing this marketized discourse. The affordances of these multimodal structures allow complex processes and social relations to be abstracted, fragmented and treated as things. They are also important in allowing documents to form a complex self-referential information infrastructure.

  • 6.
    Machin, David
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    What is multimodal critical discourse studies?2013In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 347-355Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Machin, David
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Mayr, Andrea
    Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK.
    Personalising crime and crime-fighting in factual television: an analysis of social actors and transitivity in language and images2013In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 356-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the lack of work on media and crime in Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), using an example of a factual television crime report. The existing research in media studies and criminology points to the way that the media misrepresents crime by distorting public understandings and backgrounding structural issues, such as poverty, which are related to crime thereby legitimising a criminal justice system that serves the interests of the powerful in society. Using social actor and transitivity analysis, this article shows how multimodal CDA can make an important contribution as it reveals the more subtle linguistic strategies and visual representations by which this process is accomplished, showing how each plays a part in the recontextualisation of social practice. This programme backgrounds which crimes are committed but foregrounds mental states and the neutrality of policing

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