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  • 1.
    Abdallah Athumani, Ngenya
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Characterization of tick-born encephalitis and West Nile virus non-structural 5 protein interactions with host factors involved in immune evasion and cellular apoptosis.2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2.
    Abdullahi Ossoble, Rage
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Use of and patient satisfaction with removable partial dentures and the impact on oral health related quality of life; a cross-sectional survey study2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Removable partial dentures (PRD) are among the treatment options available for partially edentulous patients. The usage of RPD and patient satisfaction with the prosthesis relates to Oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL).

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of RPDs, satisfaction with the prostheses as well as OHRQoL in patients provided with a RPD in general practice. A further aim was to identify possible factors related to RPD usage, patient satisfaction and OHRQoL.

    Material and method: A cross-sectional survey study, utilizing a questionnaire regarding patient satisfaction with different aspects of the participants RPD, the Swedish version of OHIP-14 questionnaire and the usage of the prosthesis.

    Results: A majority of respondents, (83.6%) reported that they used their prosthesis daily or often. The overall satisfaction rate among respondents was 83.0% with 39.3% stating that they were highly satisfied with the prosthesis and the mean OHIP- 14 score was 8.5, SD 10.2. The chewing ability was reported to be improved by 58.9% but impairment in chewing was reported by 26.8%. Pain from supporting teeth and soft tissue, sociodemographic factors and dissatisfaction with pre-treatment information and personal treatment were associated with not using the RPD.

    Conclusions: In the present study, treatment with RPD was in most patients associated with improvement in chewing and appearance. Insufficient pretreatment information, perception of treatment and pain from supporting tissue was associated with reduced use of and satisfaction with the RPD.

  • 3.
    Abrahamsson, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Aldegren, Sandra
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kan musik pre- och intraoperativt lindra patientens postoperativa smärta? -en litteraturstudie2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 4.
    Abrahamsson, Ebba
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nyman, Emma
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Den hjälpande handen i arbetet: En intervjustudie om hörseltekniska hjälpmedel: konferenshjälpmedel2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 5.
    Adler, Madeleine
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Hugosson, Elin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Att vårda både barn och vuxna på en gemensam akutmottagning: - En fenomenografisk studie 2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 6.
    Adlitzer, Helena
    et al.
    Regionalt cancercentrum Stockholm Gotland.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    Axelsson, Bertil
    Östersunds sjukhus; Umeå universitet.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Fridegren, Inger
    Nacka Närsjukhus.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Palliativt kompetenscentrum Östergötland, Vrinnevisjukhuset; Linköpings Universitet .
    Fürst, Carl-Johan
    Palliativt utvecklingscentrum, Lunds universitet och Region Skåne.
    Heedman, Per-Anders
    Palliativt kompetenscentrum i Östergötland.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska akademin; Göteborgs universitet.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    FoU Centrum, Skaraborgs sjukhus, Skövde.
    Löfdahl, Elisabet
    Palliativa sektionen SU/Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Molander, Ulla
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Persson, Hans
    Danderyds sjukhus.
    Pessah-Rasmussen, Hélène
    Skånes Universitetssjukhus (SUS).
    Rasmussen, Birgit H
    Lunds universitet och Region Skåne.
    Schaufelberger, Maria
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset.
    Seiger Cronfalk, Berit
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola; Karolinska Institutet.
    Silk, Gerd
    Kvalitets- och utvecklingsenheten Region Gotland.
    Strang, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet och Stockholms Sjukhem, Stockholm.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköpings universitetssjukhus.
    Tavemark, Sofia
    Örebro kommun.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola, Stockholm.
    Wennman-Larsen, Agneta
    Sophiahemmet Högskola; Karolinska Institutet.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal högskola.
    Palliativ vård i livets slutskede: Nationellt vårdprogram2016Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Adolfsson, Adam
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Ideellt engagemang: En studie om motivationen bakom det ideella engagemanget inom idrotten2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 8.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University College of Southeast Norway, Tonsberg, Norway.
    Hagander, Anna
    University College, Skövde, Sweden.
    Mahjoubipour, Farzane
    University College, Skövde, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden; University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    How Vaginal Infections Impact Women's Everyday Life: Women's Lived Experiences of Bacterial Vaginosis and Recurrent Vulvovaginal Candidiasis2017In: Advances in Sexual Medicine, ISSN 2164-5205, Vol. 7, no 1, 1-19 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reoccurring symptoms and persistent problems that continue post treatment can becharacteristic of the vaginal infections Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) and recurrent vulvovaginalcandidiasis (RVVC). The purpose of this study was to describe women’s lifeexperiences in managing the symptoms of bacterial vaginosis and Candida. Sixteenwomen were recruited and participated in an interview study when they contacted aSwedish gynecology clinic with vaginal complaints that ranged from and includedabnormal discharge, irritation itching along with serious malodor. An interpretivephenomenological approach was used with an individual interview to get a more intimateunderstanding of the women experiencing these problems. The finding of thisstudy shows that managing the recurrent symptoms of the infections remains to be achallenge for women as it has a clearly negative impact on the quality of their lives.Four themes developed: frustration and mood disorders, intimacy changes in the relationship,exposure, hope and relief. The women had high hopes of eliminating thesymptoms within the six-month study period. The treatment program, with itswell-developed guidelines and continuity of care within the context of the studygreatly improved the quality of life of these women. Women had feelings of frustrationand anxiety when nothing could cure their problem while they had also a greathope to get rid of the symptoms with a long striking treatment. Well-developedguidelines and continuity of care can help these women to have an improved qualityof life.

  • 9.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Jordmorfag, Innen
    Fakultet for helsevitenskap, Institutt for sykepleievitenskap – Vestfold, University College of Southeast, Norway.
    The EKC-Model Provides Empathy, Knowledge and Care for Women that Encounter Health issues During the Reproductive Life2016In: International Journal of Gynecology & Clinical Practices, ISSN 2394-4986, Vol. 3, 121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The EKC model (Empathy, Knowledge and Care) provides the necessary empathy, knowledge andcare for the women who encounter health issues during their reproductive life. This approach to caring requires that healthcare workers are knowledgeable in order to confirm that a patient has suffered a miscarriage or a IUFD (Intra-uterine fetus death). Through understanding and training in the EKC model the healthcare professional increases their ability to be sympathetic and empathetic to a patient’s needs. The workers get training in sexual and reproductive health in order to intimately understand how they affect the lives of individuals and their families.                                                                            l

    Sexual and reproductive health is a cross-sectional science that includes medicine, psychology, sociology and the caring sciences. Some of the more commonly experienced issues are in the areas of spontaneous abortion, miscarriages, invitrofertilization and adoption. Issues such as sexual abuse and violence towards women is another issue that is treatable with the EKC model. Pregnant women with diabetes type 1 fall under “maternity and diabetes” issues.

    Intimate knowledge about how the grieving process works is essential to be able to provide the necessary support to the patient. It is possible that the support will give them the courage and motivation to try and conceive again. One key aspect of the EKC model is to provide open and clear communication between the healthcare personnel and the patient, whether that communication is done face-to-face or otherwise. The structured EKC conversation provides a viable tool to help healthcare professionals assist their patients in coming to terms and resolving their loss.

  • 10.
    Adolfsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Emil
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Beskrivning av interventioner för rökavvänjning för individer med KOL diagnos: - En litteraturstudie2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 11.
    Adrelius, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Schultz, Ellinor
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Omvårdnadspersonals upplevelser i vårdandet av personer med självskadebeteende2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 12.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Radiology, Ryhov County, Jönköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Center of Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden..
    Maret, Eva
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institutet, and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Positive effect on patient experience of video-information given prior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, a clinical trial2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ahlberg, Rickard
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Skårberg, Kurt
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Addiction Center.
    Brus, Ole
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kjellin, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Auricular acupuncture for substance use: a randomized controlled trial of effects on anxiety, sleep, drug use and use of addiction treatment services2016In: Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, ISSN 1747-597X, E-ISSN 1747-597X, Vol. 11, no 1, 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A common alternative treatment for substance abuse is auricular acupuncture. The aim of the study was to evaluate the short and long-term effect of auricular acupuncture on anxiety, sleep, drug use and addiction treatment utilization in adults with substance abuse.

    Method: Of the patients included, 280 adults with substance abuse and psychiatric comorbidity, 80 were randomly assigned to auricular acupuncture according to the NADA protocol, 80 to auricular acupuncture according to a local protocol (LP), and 120 to relaxation (controls). The primary outcomes anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory; BAI) and insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index; ISI) were measured at baseline and at follow-ups 5 weeks and 3 months after the baseline assessment. Secondary outcomes were drug use and addiction service utilization. Complete datasets regarding BAI/ISI were obtained from 37/34 subjects in the NADA group, 28/28 in the LP group and 36/35 controls. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Analysis of Variance, Kruskal Wallis, Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance, Eta square (η(2)), and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests.

    Results: Participants in NADA, LP and control group improved significantly on the ISI and BAI. There was no significant difference in change over time between the three groups in any of the primary (effect size: BAI, η(2) = 0.03, ISI, η(2) = 0.05) or secondary outcomes. Neither of the two acupuncture treatments resulted in differences in sleep, anxiety or drug use from the control group at 5 weeks or 3 months.

    Conclusion: No evidence was found that acupuncture as delivered in this study is more effective than relaxation for problems with anxiety, sleep or substance use or in reducing the need for further addiction treatment in patients with substance use problems and comorbid psychiatric disorders. The substantial attrition at follow-up is a main limitation of the study.

    Trial registration: Clinical Trials NCT02604706 (retrospectively registered).

  • 14.
    Ahlm, Johanna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Frick, Elin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Sjuksköterskestudenters erfarenhet av relationen till handledare inom verksamhetsförlagd utbildning på sjukhus2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 15.
    Ahlström, Klara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Dahlin, Ida
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Det är ett monster i mina öron: Tinnitus hos barn - en litteraturstudie2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 16.
    Ahmad, Abrar
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Clinical Research, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Venizelos, Nikolaos
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Research.
    Hahn-Strömberg, Victoria
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Clinical Research, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Prognostic Effect of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor +936C/T Polymorphism on Tumor Growth Pattern and Survival in Patients Diagnosed with Colon Carcinoma2016In: Journal of Tumor Research, Vol. 2, no 1, 1-6 p., 1000108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered as endothelial cell-specific mitogen that plays an important role in the process of angiogenesis, thereby affecting the prognosis of tumor as angiogenesis is a crucial phase in tumor growth and metastasis. Accordingly, we carried out a case-control study to assess whether VEGF rs3025039 polymorphism affects the growth pattern and susceptibility to colon carcinoma.

    Materials and methods: One hundred and fifty, formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from patients diagnosed with colon carcinoma and the same number of blood controls were used in the present study. VEGF +936 C>T (rs3025039) polymorphism was evaluated by pyrosequencing. Computer image analysis was used to analyse the growth pattern of the colon carcinoma tumor by using cytokeratin-8 stained slides.

    Results: A heterozygous genotype TC in rs3025039 polymorphism was found as a significantly protective genotype as compared to homozygous genotypes (CC and TT). However we found no significant correlation between investigated polymorphisms, tumor growth pattern, 5 years survival and other clinicopathological parameters.

    Conclusion: We concluded that the heterogenous genotype of VEGF rs3025039 polymorphism appears to be a protective factor for colon carcinoma that could be a useful marker in follow-up studies and may be a genetic determinant for colon carcinoma.

  • 17.
    Ahmad, Sheni
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Temperaturens påverkan på n. medianus och n. ulnaris vid elektroneurografi (ENeG)2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 18.
    Ahmed, Fatima
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Transkutan syretrycksmätning i samband med perifer blodtrycksmätning: Jämförelse av transkutan syretrycksmätning mellan tre olika kärlområden på fotryggen2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 19.
    Ahmetbasic, Dennis
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Användning av lek inom arbetsterapi för barn med motoriska funktionsnedsättningar: En litteraturstudie2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 20.
    Ajdin, Duro
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Huss, Oscar
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Betydelsen av fysisk aktivitet för individer med diabetes mellitus typ 22016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 21.
    Akimana, Clarisse
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Weldegiorgis, Finan
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kommunikation mellan röntgensjuksköterska och patient i samband med radiologiska undersökningar2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 22.
    Al-atia, Mohassad
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Can oral contrast enhance image quality at MRCP? A literature review2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 23.
    Alfredsson, Anton
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Sjuksköterskors upplevelser av triage vid telefonrådgivning2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 24.
    Alfsson Stjernlöf, Maria
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Muminovic Kurtovic, Minela
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Orsaker som påverkar patienters följsamhet till egenvårdsråd vid diabetes mellitus typ 22015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 25.
    Algesten Wessbo, Hanna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Börjesson, Lina
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Icke-farmakologiska åtgärder för att lindra patientens preoperativa oro. En litteraturstudie2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 26.
    Algilani, Samal
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    To be at one's best: The evolution of Optimal Functionality and its possible implementation in an ICT-platform2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    At the Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre for Optimal Health and Functionality through Life (NUPARC), a research gap was uncovered regarding the concept optimal functionality based on the older adult’s own perspective. The overall aim was to explore the concept of optimal functionality among older adults and the possibility of creating and developing an ICT-platform to measure it. Method: An existing cohort from NUPARC was used for recruitment in studies I-III and to some extent study IV. A scoping study design and framework was adopted for the inclusion of the articles in Study I. Study II had a descriptive design. Six focus group discussions were conducted and analysed using qualitative deductive content analysis to extend the qualitative understanding. Study III used a phenomenological approach describing the experience of mental health and its impact on the ability to function as optimally as possible. Six interviews were analysed using Giorgi’s phenomenological approach. Study IV was a feasibility study and included 8 older adults using an ICTplatform for a period of four weeks. Results: Optimal Functionality comprises three major corner stones: Body-related factors, Self-related factors and External factors (I) accompanied by nine aspects, and according to older adults it is a matter of functioning as optimally as possible (II). The three major cornerstones are intricately linked and all but the mental aspects were included in the discussions (II). Life situations affecting mental health, consequences of mental health and strategies for maintaining good mental health were described by older adults as having an impact on mental health and affecting their ability to function as optimally as possible (III). The older adults managed the usage of an ICT-tool well and it was perceived as meaningful (IV). Conclusion: Optimal functionality is holistic, subjective, dynamic and applicable to all older adults. Identification of the factors involved can help the older adults on their path to health. An ICT-platform can facilitate the identification of the factors for optimal functionality and the eventual measurement of it.

    List of papers
    1. Exploring the concept of optimal functionality in old age
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the concept of optimal functionality in old age
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    2014 (English)In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, ISSN 1178-2390, E-ISSN 1178-2390, Vol. 7, 69-79 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Aging is characterized by loss of function and represents a perspective that puts the focus on the negative aspects of aging. Thus, it is fundamental to shift the focus from loss of function to maintaining good health and personal satisfaction through life; in other words, to promote optimal functionality at a level appropriate for older adults. However, it is not yet known what constitutes optimal functionality from the older adult's own perspective.

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the concept of optimal functionality in old age from the older adult's perspective (ie, people over 65 years of age) in industrialized Western countries.

    METHODS: We undertook a scoping review and searched two electronic databases (PubMed and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature [CINAHL]) from January 2002 to July 2013 for scientific studies, using the key search term personal satisfaction. In total, 25 scientific studies were analyzed.

    RESULTS: Only six of the included articles applied a qualitative methodology. By analyzing the results of these articles, three major themes were identified as cornerstones in the concept of optimal functionality at old age: 1) self-related factors (eg, mental well-being); 2) body-related factors (eg, physical well-being); and 3) external factors equal to demographic and environmental factors.

    CONCLUSION: There is a lack of qualitative studies in the current literature, and hence of what constitutes optimal functionality from the older adult's perspective. The results outlined in this review identify three cornerstones (self-related factors, body-related factors, and external factors) of what constitutes optimal functionality at old age. However, it is vital that these findings are taken further and are evaluated through qualitative studies to reflect older adults' opinions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Dove Medical Press, 2014
    Keyword
    optimal functionality, aging, personal satisfaction
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Medicine; Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-33866 (URN)10.2147/JMDH.S55178 (DOI)24516333 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84893293812 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2014-02-20 Created: 2014-02-20 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    2. Increasing the qualitative understanding of optimal functionality in older adults: a focus group based study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increasing the qualitative understanding of optimal functionality in older adults: a focus group based study
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, no 1, 70Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased independence and loss of functional ability are issues regarded as inevitably connected to old age. This ageism may have negative influences on older adults' beliefs about aging, making it difficult for them to focus on their current ability to maintain a good health. It is therefore important to change focus towards promoting Optimal Functionality (OF). OF is a concept putting the older adult's perspective on health and function in focus, however, the concept is still under development. Hence, the aim was to extend the concept of optimal functionality in various groups of older adults.

    Methods: A qualitative study was conducted based on focus group discussions (FGD). In total 6 FGDs were performed, including 37 older adults from three different groups: group 1) senior athletes, group 2) free living older adults, group 3) older adults living in senior living homes. All data was transcribed verbatim and analyzed following the process of deductive content analysis.

    Results: The principal outcome of the analysis was "to function as optimally as you possibly can", which was perceived as the core of the concept. Further, the concept of OF was described as multifactorial and several new factors could be added to the original model of OF. Additionally the findings of the study support that all three cornerstones comprising OF have to occur simultaneously in order for the older adult to function as optimal as possible.

    Conclusions: OF is a multifaceted and subjective concept, which should be individually defined by the older adult. This study further makes evident that older adults as a group are heterogeneous in terms of their preferences and views on health and should thus be approached as such in the health care setting. Therefore it is important to promote an individualized approach as a base when caring for older adults.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London, United Kingdom: BioMed Central, 2016
    Keyword
    Older adults, optimal functionality, person centered care, focus group discussions
    National Category
    Geriatrics
    Research subject
    Geriatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49605 (URN)10.1186/s12877-016-0244-z (DOI)000372822200002 ()27007861 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Knowledge Foundation, 20110225
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Olle Engkvist Byggmästare Foundation

    Faculty of Medicine and Health at Örebro University

    Available from: 2016-04-02 Created: 2016-04-02 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    3. Mental health as a prerequisite for functioning as optimally as possible in old age: a phenomenological approach
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental health as a prerequisite for functioning as optimally as possible in old age: a phenomenological approach
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50048 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-04-29 Created: 2016-04-29 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    4. An interactive ICT-platform for early assessment and management of patient-reported concerns among older adults living in Ordinary Housing: Development and Feasibility
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>An interactive ICT-platform for early assessment and management of patient-reported concerns among older adults living in Ordinary Housing: Development and Feasibility
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50049 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-04-29 Created: 2016-04-29 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
  • 27.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Langius-Ekelöf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    An interactive ICT-platform for early assessment and management of patient-reported concerns among older adults living in Ordinary Housing: Development and FeasibilityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    An interactive ICT-platform for early assessment and management of patient-reported concerns among older adults living in ordinary housing: development and feasibility2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 11-12, 1575-1583 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives: To develop and test feasibility and acceptability of an interactive ICT-platform integrated in a tablet for collecting and managing patient reported concerns of older adults in home care.

    Background: Using different ICT-applications, e.g. interactive tablets for self-assessment of health and health issues, based on health monitoring as well as other somatic and psychiatric monitoring systems may improve quality of life, staff and patient communication and feelings of being reassured. The European Commission hypothesize that introduction of ICT-applications to the older population will enable improved health. However, evidence-based and user-based applications are scarce.

    Design: The design is underpinned by the Medical Research Council's complex intervention evaluation framework. A mixed-method approach was used combining interviews with older adults and healthcare professionals, and logged quantitative data.

    Methods: In cooperation with a health management company, a platform operated by an interactive application for reporting and managing health related problems in real time was developed. Eight older adults receiving home care were recruited to test feasibility. They were equipped with the application and reported three times weekly over four weeks, and afterwards interviewed about their experiences. Three nurses caring for them were interviewed. The logged data was extracted as a coded file.

    Results: The older adults reported as instructed, in total 107 reports (mean 13). The most frequent concerns were pain, fatigue and dizziness. The older adults experienced the application as meaningful with overall positive effects as well as potential benefits for the nurses involved.

    Conclusions The overall findings in this study indicated high feasibility among older adults using the ICT-platform. The study's results support further development of the platform, as well as tests in full-scale studies and in other populations.

    Relevance to practice: An ICT-platform increased the older adults' perception of involvement and facilitated communication between the patient and nurses.

  • 29.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Östlund-Lagerström, Lina
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Schoultz, Ida
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Mental health as a prerequisite for functioning as optimally as possible in old age: a phenomenological approachManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Östlund-Lagerström, Lina
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Schoultz, Ida
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Brummer, Robert J.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Increasing the qualitative understanding of optimal functionality in older adults: a focus group based study2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, no 1, 70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased independence and loss of functional ability are issues regarded as inevitably connected to old age. This ageism may have negative influences on older adults' beliefs about aging, making it difficult for them to focus on their current ability to maintain a good health. It is therefore important to change focus towards promoting Optimal Functionality (OF). OF is a concept putting the older adult's perspective on health and function in focus, however, the concept is still under development. Hence, the aim was to extend the concept of optimal functionality in various groups of older adults.

    Methods: A qualitative study was conducted based on focus group discussions (FGD). In total 6 FGDs were performed, including 37 older adults from three different groups: group 1) senior athletes, group 2) free living older adults, group 3) older adults living in senior living homes. All data was transcribed verbatim and analyzed following the process of deductive content analysis.

    Results: The principal outcome of the analysis was "to function as optimally as you possibly can", which was perceived as the core of the concept. Further, the concept of OF was described as multifactorial and several new factors could be added to the original model of OF. Additionally the findings of the study support that all three cornerstones comprising OF have to occur simultaneously in order for the older adult to function as optimal as possible.

    Conclusions: OF is a multifaceted and subjective concept, which should be individually defined by the older adult. This study further makes evident that older adults as a group are heterogeneous in terms of their preferences and views on health and should thus be approached as such in the health care setting. Therefore it is important to promote an individualized approach as a base when caring for older adults.

  • 31.
    Ali, Amna
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Autonomic dysfunction is associated with cardiac remodeling in heart failure patients – The HARVEST study2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is a cardinal sign of autonomic dysfunction, and a common comorbidity in patients with heart failure. The relationship between OH and structural cardiac anomalies has not been sufficiently explored.

    Purpose: To assess relations between orthostatic blood pressure (BP) responses during active standing and echocardiographic findings in patients with heart failure.

    Methods: 149 patients hospitalized for heart failure (mean age: 74.0 years; mean ejection fraction (EF) 40±16%) were examined with conventional echocardiograms and active-standing test. Associations between left atrial volume, right atrial volume, left ventricular mass, left ventricular diameter and right ventricular diameter and the difference between supine and standing systolic/diastolic BP were examined.

    Results: A total of 33 patients met conventional OH criteria i.e. systolic/diastolic BP decrease ≥20/10 mmHg. In linear regression models, decrease in systolic BP upon standing was associated with greater left ventricular mass. Decrease in systolic BP was also borderline significant associated with greater left atrial volume.

    Conclusions: Orthostatic decline in systolic BP among older heart failure patients is associated with structural cardiac changes such as increased left ventricular mass, independently of traditional risk factors and LVEF.

  • 32.
    Ali, Sihaam
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Validering av metod för IgG eller IgM bestämning hos anti-M immuniserade gravida kvinnor2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 33.
    Alizadeh Big, Nima
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kudoori, Rami
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Tinnitus hos CI-användare: En systematisk litteraturstudie2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 34.
    Allvin, Renée
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rawal, Narinder
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Johanzon, Eva
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bäckström, Ragnar
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Open versus Laparoscopic Surgery: Does the Surgical Technique Influence Pain Outcome? Results from an International Registry2016In: Pain Research and Treatment, ISSN 2090-1542, E-ISSN 2090-1550, 4087325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postoperative pain management relevant for specific surgical procedures is debated. The importance of evaluating pain with consideration given to type of surgery and the patient's perspective has been emphasized. In this prospective cohort study, we analysed outcome data from 607 patients in the international PAIN OUT registry for assessment and comparison of postoperative pain outcome within the 24 first hours after laparoscopic and open colonic surgery. Patients from the laparoscopic group scored minimum pain at a higher level than the open group (P = 0.012). Apart from minimum pain, no other significant differences in patient reported outcomes were observed. Maximum pain scores >3 were reported from 77% (laparoscopic) and 68% (open) patients (mean >= 5 in both groups). Pain interference with mobilization was reported by 87-93% of patients. Both groups scored high levels of patient satisfaction. In the open group, a higher frequency of patients received a combination of general and regional anaesthesia, which had an impact of the minimum pain score. Our results from registry data indicate that surgical technique does not influence the quality of postoperative pain management during the first postoperative day if adequate analgesia is given.

  • 35.
    Alm, Fredrik
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Följsamhet av nationella riktlinjer för behandling av smärta och illamående hos barn i samband med toncilloperation2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 36.
    Alm, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care.
    Jaensson, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Lundeberg, Stefan
    Pain Treatment Service, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Adherence to Swedish guidelines for pain treatment in relation to pediatric tonsil surgery: A survey of the multidisciplinary team2017In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 101, 123-131 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pain management in children after tonsil surgery is essential, and optimal pain treatment has been discussed for many years. Data from the National Tonsil Register in Sweden (NTRS) and a national mapping system have demonstrated the need for national pain treatment guidelines for pediatric tonsil surgery. As a result, Swedish national guidelines, together with updated patient information on the website tonsilloperation.se, were developed and implemented in 2013.

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the professionals’ opinions of and adherence to pain treatment guidelines for pediatric tonsil surgery patients in a two-year follow-up.

    Method: This descriptive cross-sectional study was based on data from an inter-professional questionnaire, which was validated by an expert group using a content validity index (S-CVI 0.93). The questionnaire was sent to all Swedish ear, nose and throat (ENT) departments (n=49) that the NTRS identified as performing tonsil surgery on children younger than 18 years of age. In each clinic, we asked for responses from staff in each of the following professions: ENT physicians, anesthesia physicians, registered nurse anesthetists, and registered nurses in the ENT departments.

    Results: Respondents from 48 ENT departments participated, and 139/163 (85%) completed questionnaires were returned. The guidelines were reported as being clear, ensuring patient safety and providing optimal pharmacological treatment. Treatment was given according to the guidelines: Half of the departments gave pre- or intraoperative treatment with clonidine, betamethasone and high-dose paracetamol (acetaminophen). A multimodal pain approach (paracetamol and COX inhibitors) after hospital discharge was prescribed by all departments after tonsillectomy and, more extensively, after tonsillotomy. One-third of the departments prescribed paracetamol with a higher normal dose for the first three postoperative days. Half of the departments prescribed rescue analgesics, clonidine or opioids after tonsillectomy. None of the departments prescribed codeine or tramadol, drugs that are discouraged in the guidelines. The majority of the departments used the website tonsilloperation.se to provide information to the patients and their caregivers.

    Conclusion: The respondents' opinions of and the ENT departments adherence to the Swedish national guidelines were considered to be good. The national implementation process in Sweden has impacted the manner in which ENT departments treat pain after tonsil surgery.

  • 37.
    Alm, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Jaensson, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Lundeberg, Stefan
    Astrid Lindgrens barnsjukhus, Karolinska universitetssjukhus, Stockholm.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Sollentuna Specialist Clinic, Stockholm.
    Hessén-Söderman, Anne-Charlotte
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology Aleris Sabbatsberg Stockholm; Division of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Nerfeldt, Pia
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Huddinge.
    Odhagen, Erik
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg; Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology Ryhov County Hospital, Futurum-The Academy for health and care, Conuty Council, Jönköping.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhus, Göteborg.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Adherence to Swedish Guidelines for Pain Treatment in Tonsil Surgery in Pediatric Patients2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: As shown by data from the National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden, tonsil surgery often causes severe pain that lasts for many days. The register data demonstrate the necessity for better evidence-based pain treatment guidelines for tonsil surgery. The guidelines, introduced in 2013, consist of both pharmacological and non-pharmacological recommendations. In the guidelines, a multimodal analgesic approach and combination of analgesics are recommended to provide effective pain treatment with limited side effects. Two national multi-professional education days on pain, pharmacology and the guidelines were offered. Web-based information about pharmacological treatment (www.tonsililloperation.se) was designed for patients and next-of-kin. The current aims were to describe adherence to the Swedish guidelines for pain treatment in tonsil surgery in pediatric patients < 18 years

    Method: An inter-professional questionnaire was developed, including questions linked to the relevant guidelines. The questions came from a national mapping before the guidelines were designed. The items were discussed by an expert group, and content validity was evaluated using the content validity index.ENT-and anesthesia physicians and nurses from all 50 ENT clinics in Sweden were enrolled.

    Results: Most clinics had received the guidelines, but there was a discrepancy between the professions. More than half had perused the literature review performed before the guidelines were designed, and attended themulti-professional education day. Pre- and perioperative treatment usually included paracetamol, clonidine and betamethasone. A multimodal pain approach after discharge from hospital (tonsillectomy and tonsillotomy) was used, combining paracetamol with cox-inhibitors. Most clinics used paracetamol, with a higher dose for the first 3 days (healthy children and acceptable nutrition), and a reduced dose from day 4.In case of inadequate analgesia after tonsillectomy, oral clonidine or opioids were used. Several clinics followed the recommendation to use clonidine as first choice and secondly an opioid. No respondents prescribed codeine compared to 80% at the mapping before the guidelines were designed. The guidelines were experienced as clear, safe and sufficient. The web-based information was used by most of the clinics to improve quality of care and provide facilitating tools for patients, relatives and caregivers.

    Conclusion: Swedish guidelines for tonsil surgery provide practical evidence-based pain treatment recommendations. To achieve a change, multi-professional education is necessary. This needs to be repeated for a wider spread.

    Future research should include evaluation through pain diaries and questionnaires to next-of-kin and children. There should be matching of data from the quality registers at each clinic, with pain variables such as unplanned health care contacts due to pain, number of days with analgesics, and return to normal diet

  • 38.
    Alm, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Ajman, United Arab Emirates.
    Nerfeldt, Pia
    Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Patient reported outcome of pain after tonsil surgery: An analysis of 32,225 children from the National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden 2009-20162017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tonsil surgery is common surgical procedure in children and cause significant pain under postoperative recovery. The objective of this register study was to explore factors affecting pain after pediatric tonsil surgery, using patient-reported outcomes from questionnaires in the National Tonsil Surgery Registry in Sweden, 30 days after surgery. A total of 32,225 tonsil surgeries on children (aged 1-18 years) during January 2009- November 2016 were included; 13,904 tonsillectomies with or without adenoidectomy (TE±A) and 18,321 tonsillotomies with or without adenoidectomy (TT±A). In surgery cases of indication obstruction, the TT±A stopped taking painkillers and returned to normal eating habits sooner, and had less contact with health care services due to pain, compared to TE±A. After TE±A, the indication infection group had more days on analgesics and more contacts with health care services due to pain, compared to the indication obstruction group. TE±A with cold-dissection technique resulted in fewer days on painkillers compared to warm-technique, and reduced the number of contacts with health care services due to pain. Older children were affected by more days of morbidity than the younger ones, but there was no gender difference after adjustment for age, dissection technique and hemostasis technique. Implementation of national guidelines for pain treatment (2013) and patient information on the website tonsilloperation.se seems to have increased the days on analgesics after surgery. Pain after tonsil surgery depends on the surgical procedure and technique, as well as factors such as the patient’s age and surgical indication. More studies including pain interventions are needed to improve the care of tonsillectomy patients.

  • 39.
    Alm, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Ajman, United Arab Emirates.
    Nerfeldt, Pia
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Patient reported pain-related outcome measures after tonsil surgery: an analysis of 32,225 children from the National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden 2009–20162017In: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, ISSN 0937-4477, E-ISSN 1434-4726, Vol. 274, no 10, 3711-3722 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to describe factors affecting pain after pediatric tonsil surgery, using patient reported pain-related outcome measures (pain-PROMs) from the National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden. In total, 32,225 tonsil surgeries on children (1 to\18 years) during 2009–2016 were included; 13,904 tonsillectomies with or without adenoidectomy (TE ± A), and 18,321 tonsillotomies with or without adenoidectomy (TT ± A). Adjustments were made for variables included in the register to compensate for contributable factors in the analysis. When compared to TE ± A for surgical indication obstruction, TT ± A resulted in lower pain-PROMs, shorter use of postoperative analgesics, earlier return to regular food intake, and lower risk for contact with health care services due to pain. Children who underwent TE ± A because of obstruction problems stopped taking painkillers and returned to normal eating habits sooner, compared to children who underwent TE ± A for infectious indications. In both indication groups, TE ± A performed with hot rather than cold technique (dissection and haemostasis) generally resulted in higher pain-PROMs. Older children reported more days on analgesics and a later return to regular food intake after TE ± A than younger ones. No clinically relevant difference between sexes was found. Between 2012 and 2016 (pre-and post-implementation of Swedish national guidelines for pain treatment), the mean duration of postoperative analgesic use had increased. In conclusion, TE ± A caused considerably higher ratings of pain-related outcome measures, compared to TT ± A. For TE ± A, cold surgical techniques (dissection and haemostasis) were superior to hot techniques in terms of pain-PROMs. Older children reported higher pain-PROMs after TE ± A than younger ones.

  • 40.
    Alm, Moa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Malmskär, Matilda
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Att vara patient på en akutmottagning En litteraturstudie2017Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 41.
    Almer Carlsson, Sandra
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Malin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Traditionell styrketräning och kombinerad styrke- och sprintträning - Hur påverkar de landsvägscyklisters prestationsförmåga?2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Sammanfattning

    Som landsvägscyklist krävs i första hand en hög aerob kapacitet, då tävlingarna ofta pågår i många timmar. Samtidigt behöver cyklister ha god anaerob kapacitet och anaerob effekt, då det är genom spurter och långa branta stigningar som tävlingsloppen avgörs. Under senare år har forskningen slutit sig till att cyklister har nytta av att styrketräna, då det kan leda till prestationsförbättringar genom främst förbättrad arbetsekonomi och anaeroba förmågor. Fram tills nyligen var traditionell tung styrketräning den vanligaste typen av styrketräning bland cyklister, men nu har olika varianter av kombinerad träning blivit allt vanligare, exempelvis där tunga benövningar varvas med explosiva sprinter på cykel.

    Syftet med denna studie var att undersöka effekterna av kombinerad styrke- och sprintträning (KT) samt traditionell styrketräning (TS), som tillägg till ordinarie konditionsträning 2 ggr/vecka under 6 veckor, på olika delar av prestationsförmågan hos landsvägscyklister på motionärsnivå. Prestationsförmågan utvärderades före och efter interventionen genom ett anpassat VO2max-test, Wingate-test samt ett estimerat 1RM-test i liggande benpress där arbetsekonomi, maximal syreupptagningsförmåga, andra ventilatoriska tröskeln, peak power, mean power, power drop och benstyrka registrerades för analys.

    Vid analys av samtliga parametrar efter interventionen kunde ingen effekt av varken KT eller TS observeras. På individnivå kunde en viss förbättring observeras för peak power, benstyrka samt den andra ventilatoriska tröskeln där TS hade fler individer med förbättring. En ökning i power drop kunde också observeras där individer i TS uppvisade en större försämring än KT som presterade likvärdigt vid för- och eftertester.

    Slutsatsen i denna studie är att de observerade resultaten ej stödjer hypotesen om att kombinerad styrke- och sprintträning skulle vara effektivare för utveckling av arbetsekonomi, anaerob effekt samt anaerob kapacitet. Vidare tyder resultaten på att ingen av träningsmetoderna har en positiv effekt på gruppernas medelvärden, men stora individuella skillnader finns där båda träningsmetoderna gett positiva och negativa effekter hos försökspersonerna för de registrerade parametrarna.

  • 42.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Meckbach, Jane
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    How Wii Teach Physical Education and Health2016In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 6, no 4, 1-16 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     The use of educational computer games in physical education (PE) has become more popular in recent years and has attracted research interest. The aim of the article is to investigate how physical activities and images of the human body are offered by the game. The results show how the “teacher” constituted in the games is one who instructs and encourages the players to exercise and think about their bodies, but not a “teacher” who can help students to investigate, argue, or discuss images of health and the human body. We argue that the use of a wide range and variety of ways of teaching would make the teaching richer and offer a deeper understanding about the body and health.

  • 43.
    Almström, Johanna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Ann-Charlotte
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Skolsköterskans upplevelse av att möta barn med risk för övervikt2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 44.
    Almér, Susanne
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Hagsten, Malin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Sjuksköterskors erfarenhet av generell behandling vid smärta, prehospitalt samt på akutmottagning2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 45.
    Alsarve, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    A repertoire of possibilities: visualized masculinities in a Swedish sportsclub 1908-092015In: Book of abstracts / [ed] Radmann, A., Hedenborg, S., Tsolakidis, E., European College of Sport Science , 2015, 280-280 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and aim When designing our identities we are inclined to use images of our selves, as well as pictures of ’the others’. Images are interwoven with our culture and society, as well as with definitions of history and truth. The overall aim of this study is to analyse, by using a visual method, masculinizing and de-masculizing processes. More specific, the objective is to study how a dominant masculinity manifested itself in associative visuals (and texts), and how these images of domination changed during from 1908 to 1989. Theory and method Drawing inspiration from Bourdieu (2001) and Connell (1995), the theoretical perspective is based on the production and reproduction of a dominant and hegemonic masculinity manuscript at a associative level. Results from their work reveal that images and expectations about men and women make us asymmetrically associated with e. g. sexuality or age. This means that the norms of masculinity dictate how athletics are visualised or objectified. In turn, the norms and actions of masculinity are hierarchical, i.e. men see themselves in relation to a dominant masculinity or an alternative femininity. (This process always includes several other potential power perceptions.) From this perspective ideals and identities can vary both between men and within the same man, when, for example, the context changes. The method is a textual and visual analysis of how the hegemonic manuscript conditions and permeates the images and texts, e. g. in what is being captured or why, how a photograph is taken, how the athlete is portrayed and so on. More specific, the numerical representations of men and women respectively are counted along with more qualitative characteristics of how men and women were portrayed. Results and discussion The photography of a man always contains a potential to construct and categorise differences of gender. The ambition of the study is to say something universal about the mechanisms of the (re)production of male dominance in an organisation. The overall conclusion shows the difference in being objectified or portrayed, visually and textually, with and without respectively, a preserved subject position and status. Although, there are arguments for a changeable masculinity, sometimes the ideal masculine identity shows little variance. The changing aspects are particularly interesting as the study object grasps over an 80- year period. The discussion will focus on what power mechanisms are being used to reproduce a dominant, masculine order in the association. References Bourdieu, Pierre. (2001). Masculine domination. Cambridge: Polity. Connell, Raewyn. (1995). Masculinities. Berkeley: University of California Press.

  • 46.
    Alsarve, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Addressing gender equality: enactments of gender and hegemony in the educational textbooks used in Swedish sports coaching and educational programmes2017In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport is often described as a field containing competitive and hierarchy shaping activities. However, in Sweden and elsewhere, this field is also permeated by democratic principles where, for example, everybody has the right to participate in children’s and youth sports regardless of gender, ethnicity or physical ability. In Sweden, there are distinct objectives for gender equality, where women/girls and men/boys should ideally be treated and recognised equally. The aim of this paper is twofold: to examine how gender is enacted in the textbooks used in Swedish sports coaching and educational programmes and to identify whether any of the enactments reflect a hegemonic masculinity. The textbooks used in two of the most extensive courses arranged by the Swedish Sports Confederation, ‘The Platform’ [Plattformen] and ‘Basic Coach Education’ [Grundtränarutbildning] are in focus. The theoretical framework and methodological approach are inspired by research on sport, gender and the hegemonic masculinity thesis. In the process of analysis, the hegemonic perspective is central. During the analysis, four themes are identified as expressions of a hegemonic masculinity and, thus, as obstacles to gender equality. Firstly, the binary sex norm poses a real challenge for the implementation of gender equality because it helps to shape a hierarchy that privileges men and masculinities. Secondly and thirdly, the themes ‘puberty’ and ‘the coach’ appear to be important, in that they support and contest a gendered hierarchy. Finally, there are examples of men, like sport coaches, appearing as genderless, which is interpreted as a hegemonic acceptance of the category of men (as universal and genderless subjects). By critically illuminating these themes, the paper adds to the wider research field of sport, coaching and education programmes and the complexity of gender mainstreaming in sport.

  • 47.
    Alsarve, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Review of Men of the World: genders, globalizations, transnational times by Jeff Hearn2016In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 11, no 1, 66-68 p.Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Alsarve, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    The Art of Being Big, Strong and Full of Power: Swedish Combat Sports, Norms and Gender from the 1990s up until today2016In: 9th Meeting of the Transnational Working Group for the Study of Gender and Sport: 24th-26th November 2016, Bochum, Germany, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Generally, men have dominated the field of modern sports. Consequently, many sports carry associations where traditional ‘male’ characteristics and qualities are valued and traditional ‘female’ characteristics and qualities are devalued (see eg Messner, 1992). More precisely, many sports ‘create’ men and ideals of masculinities. In this paper combat sports (MMA, boxing, karate, Japanese jujitsu etcetera) are studied as examples of sports that shape gender and body ideals. Combat sports express at least two typical ideals of masculinity: muscle strength and (sanctioned) control of violence (Brace-Govan , 2004; Gill, 2007). Women who have exercised these sports have thus been challenging men’s ‘monopoly’ of being strong, big, violent and powerful and other traditionally ‘male’ norms. The aim of this paper is to study, from a gender perspective, how Swedish combat sports have changed since the 1990s. The main question is: How is the increased number of women in combat sports to be understood? Is it a sign of a (feminist) emancipation or has the inclusion of women been on exclusive terms - that is, do men’s domination find new ways to exercise its powers? In the end, this paper also raises questions of the changing contents of violence and muscularity. In so far, the material consists of focus group interviews and individual interviews with combat sports women, from the elite to the recreational level. Magazines will be analysed during 2016-2017. Theoretically, the paper draws on theories of hegemony and gender (Connell, 1983, 2005, Hearn, 2015). The preliminary results show that women, on one hand, portray active subjects that challenge male (sporting) traditions and male norms. Combat sports, some women tell, are increasing ones self-esteem and self-confidence. On the other hand, the female versions of combat sports are not taken as seriously as the male version, which becomes obvious by lower compensation and less media attention. Women are also expected to act as feminine subjects and are thereby ‘forced’ to relate their bodies, clothes etcetera to social and more general understandings of feminine ideals (cf. Clasen, 2001).

  • 49.
    Alshamari, Muhammed
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Low-dose computed tomography of the abdomen and lumbar spine2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiography is a common radiologic investigation despite abundant evidence of its limited diagnostic value. On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) has a high diagnostic value and is widely considered to be among the most important advances in medicine. However, CT exposes patients to a higher radiation dose and it might therefore not be acceptable simply to replace radiography with CT, despite the powerful diagnostic value of this technique. At the expense of reduced CT image quality, which could be adjusted to the diagnostic needs, low-dose CT of abdomen and lumbar spine can be performed at similar dose to radiography. The aim of the current thesis project was to evaluate low-dose CT of the abdomen and lumbar spine and to compare it with radiography. The hypothesis was that CT would give better image quality and diagnostic information compared to radiography at similar dose levels. Firstly, the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT of the abdomen was evaluated. Results showed that low-dose CT of abdomen has a high sensitivity and specificity compared to radiography, i.e., it has higher diagnostic accuracy. Similar results were obtained from our systematic review. Secondly, in a phantom study, an ovine phantom was scanned at various CT settings. The image quality was evaluated to obtain a protocol for the optimal settings for low-dose CT of lumbar spine at 1 mSv. This new protocol was then used in a clinical study to assess the image quality of low-dose CT of the lumbar spine and compare it to radiography. Results showed that low-dose CT has significantly better image quality than radiography. Finally, the impact of Iterative reconstruction (IR) on image quality of lumbar spine CT was tested. Iterative reconstruction is a recent CT technique aimed to reduce radiation dose and/or improve image quality. The results showed that the use of medium strength IR levels in the reconstruction of CT image improves image quality compared to filtered back projection. In conclusion, low-dose CT of the abdomen and lumbar spine, at about 1 mSv, has better image quality and gives diagnostic information compared to radiography at similar dose levels and it could therefore replace radiography.

    List of papers
    1. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review
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    2016 (English)In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 26, no 6, 1766-1774 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels.

    Methods: Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present.

    Results: Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %.

    Conclusions: Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    Key points: • Low-dose CT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • A systematic review shows that CT has better diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • Radiography has no place in the workup of acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York: Springer, 2016
    Keyword
    X-ray computed tomography, abdominal radiography, sensitivity and specificity, abdominal pain, abdomen, acute
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Research subject
    Radiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47089 (URN)10.1007/s00330-015-3984-9 (DOI)000376100100030 ()26385800 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84942013953 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    Region Örebro County

    Available from: 2015-12-16 Created: 2015-12-16 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    2. Low-dose computed tomography of the lumbar spine: a phantom study on imaging parameters and image quality
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low-dose computed tomography of the lumbar spine: a phantom study on imaging parameters and image quality
    2014 (English)In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 55, no 7, 824-832 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lumbar spine radiography has limited diagnostic value but low radiation dose compared with computed tomography (CT). The average effective radiation dose from lumbar spine radiography is about 1.1 mSv. Low-dose lumbar spine CT may be an alternative to increase the diagnostic value at low radiation dose, around 1 mSv.

    Purpose: To determine the optimal settings for low-dose lumbar spine CT simultaneously aiming for the highest diagnostic image quality possible.

    Material and Methods: An ovine lower thoracic and lumbar spine phantom, with all soft tissues around the vertebrae preserved except the skin, was placed in a 20 L plastic container filled with water. The phantom was scanned repeatedly with various technical settings; different tube potential, reference mAs, and with different convolution filters. Five radiologists evaluated the image quality according to a modification of the European guidelines for multislice computed tomography (MSCT) quality criteria for lumbar spine CT 2004. In a visual comparison the different scans were also ranked subjectively according to perceived image quality. Image noise and contrast were measured.

    Results: A tube potential of 120 kV with reference mAs 30 and medium or medium smooth convolution filter gave the best image quality at a sub-millisievert dose level, i.e. with an effective dose comparable to that from lumbar spine radiography.

    Conclusion: Low-dose lumbar spine CT thus opens a possibility to substitute lumbar spine radiography with CT without obvious increase in radiation dose.

    Keyword
    conventional radiography; CT; spine; structures; techniques
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Research subject
    Radiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38243 (URN)10.1177/0284185113509615 (DOI)000342575300008 ()2-s2.0-84907878366 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2014-11-03 Created: 2014-10-30 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    3. Low dose CT of the lumbar spine compared with radiography: a study on image quality with implications for clinical practice
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low dose CT of the lumbar spine compared with radiography: a study on image quality with implications for clinical practice
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 57, no 5, 602-611 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lumbar spine radiography is often performed instead of CT for radiation dose concerns.

    Purpose: To compare image quality and diagnostic information from low dose lumbar spine CT at an effective dose of about 1 mSv with lumbar spine radiography.

    Material and Methods: Fifty-one patients were examined by both methods. Five reviewers scored all examinations on eight image quality criteria using a five-graded scale and also assessed three common pathologic changes.

    Results: Low dose CT scored better than radiography on the following: sharp reproduction of disc profile and vertebral end-plates (odds ratio [OR], 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-2.5), intervertebral foramina and pedicles (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 3.1-5.9), intervertebral joints (OR, 139; 95% CI, 59-326), spinous and transverse processes (OR, 7.0; 95% CI, 4.3-11.2), sacro-iliac joints (OR, 4.2; 95% CI, 3.2-5.7), reproduction of the adjacent soft tissues (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 2.1-4.0), and absence of any obscuring superimposed gastrointestinal gas and contents (OR, 188; 95% CI, 66-539). Radiography scored better on sharp reproduction of cortical and trabecular bone (OR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.2-0.4). The reviewers visualized disk degeneration, spondylosis/diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) and intervertebral joint osteoarthritis more clearly and were more certain with low dose CT. Mean time to review low dose CT was 204 s (95% CI, 194-214 s.), radiography 152 s (95% CI, 146-158 s.). The effective dose for low dose CT was 1.0-1.1 mSv, for radiography 0.7 mSv.

    Conclusion: Low dose lumbar spine CT at about 1 mSv has superior image quality to lumbar spine radiography with more anatomical and diagnostic information.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London, United Kingdom: Sage Publications, 2016
    Keyword
    Radiation dose, radiography, tomography, X-ray computed, axial skeleton
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Research subject
    Radiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47090 (URN)10.1177/0284185115595667 (DOI)000374327600014 ()26221055 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-12-16 Created: 2015-12-16 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    4. Impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality of low-dose CT of the lumbar spine
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality of low-dose CT of the lumbar spine
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Surgery
    Research subject
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49423 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-03-17 Created: 2016-03-17 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
  • 50.
    Alshamari, Muhammed
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Radiology.
    Geijer, Mats
    Department of Radiology, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund; Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Norrman, Eva
    Department of Medical Physics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lidén, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Krauss, Wolfgang
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Jenderberg, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Geijer, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality of low-dose CT of the lumbar spineManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1234567 1 - 50 of 948
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