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  • 1.
    Abdallah Athumani, Ngenya
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Characterization of tick-born encephalitis and West Nile virus non-structural 5 protein interactions with host factors involved in immune evasion and cellular apoptosis.2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2.
    Abdi, Yasmin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Tinnitus i relation till livskvalité: En jämförande studie mellan personer med normal hörsel och personer med hörselnedsättning2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3.
    Abdullahi Ossoble, Rage
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Use of and patient satisfaction with removable partial dentures and the impact on oral health related quality of life; a cross-sectional survey study2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Removable partial dentures (PRD) are among the treatment options available for partially edentulous patients. The usage of RPD and patient satisfaction with the prosthesis relates to Oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL).

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of RPDs, satisfaction with the prostheses as well as OHRQoL in patients provided with a RPD in general practice. A further aim was to identify possible factors related to RPD usage, patient satisfaction and OHRQoL.

    Material and method: A cross-sectional survey study, utilizing a questionnaire regarding patient satisfaction with different aspects of the participants RPD, the Swedish version of OHIP-14 questionnaire and the usage of the prosthesis.

    Results: A majority of respondents, (83.6%) reported that they used their prosthesis daily or often. The overall satisfaction rate among respondents was 83.0% with 39.3% stating that they were highly satisfied with the prosthesis and the mean OHIP- 14 score was 8.5, SD 10.2. The chewing ability was reported to be improved by 58.9% but impairment in chewing was reported by 26.8%. Pain from supporting teeth and soft tissue, sociodemographic factors and dissatisfaction with pre-treatment information and personal treatment were associated with not using the RPD.

    Conclusions: In the present study, treatment with RPD was in most patients associated with improvement in chewing and appearance. Insufficient pretreatment information, perception of treatment and pain from supporting tissue was associated with reduced use of and satisfaction with the RPD.

  • 4.
    Abrahamsson, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Aldegren, Sandra
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kan musik pre- och intraoperativt lindra patientens postoperativa smärta? -en litteraturstudie2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 5.
    Abrahamsson, Ebba
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nyman, Emma
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Den hjälpande handen i arbetet: En intervjustudie om hörseltekniska hjälpmedel: konferenshjälpmedel2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 6.
    Abrahamsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Madelene
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Smärtlindrande metoder vid nålrelaterade procedurer på barn –en litteraturstudie2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 7.
    Abrahamsson, Linda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Redlund, Victoria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Sjuksköterskans upplevelse av treskiftarbete utifrån ett biopsykosocialt perspektiv. En intervjustudie2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 8.
    Adler, Madeleine
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Hugosson, Elin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Att vårda både barn och vuxna på en gemensam akutmottagning: - En fenomenografisk studie 2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 9.
    Adlitzer, Helena
    et al.
    Regionalt cancercentrum Stockholm Gotland, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden; Region Gotland, Visby, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Bertil
    Östersunds sjukhus, Östersund, Sverige; Umeå universitet, Umeå, Sverige.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Fridegren, Inger
    Nacka Närsjukhus, Nacka, Sverige.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Palliativt kompetenscentrum Östergötland, Vrinnevisjukhuset, Norrköping, Sverige; Linköpings Universitet,Linköping, Sverige.
    Fürst, Carl-Johan
    Palliativt utvecklingscentrum, Lunds universitet, Lund, sverige; Region Skåne, Kristianstad, Sverige.
    Heedman, Per-Anders
    Palliativt kompetenscentrum i Östergötland, Vrinnevisjukhuset, Norrköping, Sverige.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborg, Sverige; Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    FoU Centrum, Skaraborgs sjukhus, Skövde, Sverige.
    Löfdahl, Elisabet
    Palliativa sektionen Stockholms Universitet, Stockholm, Sverige; Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Mittuniversitetet, Östersund, Sverige.
    Molander, Ulla
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Persson, Hans
    Danderyds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Pessah-Rasmussen, Hélène
    Skånes Universitetssjukhus (SUS), Lund, Sverige.
    Rasmussen, Birgit H
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige; Region Skåne, Kristianstad, Sverige.
    Schaufelberger, Maria
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Seiger Cronfalk, Berit
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola, stockholm, Sverige; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Silk, Gerd
    Kvalitets- och utvecklingsenheten, Region Gotland, Visby, Sverige.
    Strang, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet Stockholm, Sverige; Stockholms Sjukhem, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköpings universitetssjukhus, Linköping, Sverige.
    Tavemark, Sofia
    Örebro kommun, Örebro, Sverige.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Wennman-Larsen, Agneta
    Sophiahemmet Högskola, Stockholm, Sverige; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm,Sverige.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala Universitet, Uppsala, Sverige.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal högskola, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Palliativ vård i livets slutskede: Nationellt vårdprogram2016Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Adolfsson, Adam
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Ideellt engagemang: En studie om motivationen bakom det ideella engagemanget inom idrotten2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 11.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University College of Southeast Norway, Tonsberg, Norway.
    Hagander, Anna
    University College, Skövde, Sweden.
    Mahjoubipour, Farzane
    University College, Skövde, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden; University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    How Vaginal Infections Impact Women's Everyday Life: Women's Lived Experiences of Bacterial Vaginosis and Recurrent Vulvovaginal Candidiasis2017In: Advances in Sexual Medicine, ISSN 2164-5205, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reoccurring symptoms and persistent problems that continue post treatment can becharacteristic of the vaginal infections Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) and recurrent vulvovaginalcandidiasis (RVVC). The purpose of this study was to describe women’s lifeexperiences in managing the symptoms of bacterial vaginosis and Candida. Sixteenwomen were recruited and participated in an interview study when they contacted aSwedish gynecology clinic with vaginal complaints that ranged from and includedabnormal discharge, irritation itching along with serious malodor. An interpretivephenomenological approach was used with an individual interview to get a more intimateunderstanding of the women experiencing these problems. The finding of thisstudy shows that managing the recurrent symptoms of the infections remains to be achallenge for women as it has a clearly negative impact on the quality of their lives.Four themes developed: frustration and mood disorders, intimacy changes in the relationship,exposure, hope and relief. The women had high hopes of eliminating thesymptoms within the six-month study period. The treatment program, with itswell-developed guidelines and continuity of care within the context of the studygreatly improved the quality of life of these women. Women had feelings of frustrationand anxiety when nothing could cure their problem while they had also a greathope to get rid of the symptoms with a long striking treatment. Well-developedguidelines and continuity of care can help these women to have an improved qualityof life.

  • 12.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Jordmorfag, Innen
    Fakultet for helsevitenskap, Institutt for sykepleievitenskap – Vestfold, University College of Southeast, Kongsberg, Norway.
    The EKC-Model Provides Empathy, Knowledge and Care for Women that Encounter Health issues During the Reproductive Life2016In: International Journal of Gynecology & Clinical Practices, ISSN 2394-4986, Vol. 3, article id 121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The EKC model (Empathy, Knowledge and Care) provides the necessary empathy, knowledge andcare for the women who encounter health issues during their reproductive life. This approach to caring requires that healthcare workers are knowledgeable in order to confirm that a patient has suffered a miscarriage or a IUFD (Intra-uterine fetus death). Through understanding and training in the EKC model the healthcare professional increases their ability to be sympathetic and empathetic to a patient’s needs. The workers get training in sexual and reproductive health in order to intimately understand how they affect the lives of individuals and their families.                                                                            l

    Sexual and reproductive health is a cross-sectional science that includes medicine, psychology, sociology and the caring sciences. Some of the more commonly experienced issues are in the areas of spontaneous abortion, miscarriages, invitrofertilization and adoption. Issues such as sexual abuse and violence towards women is another issue that is treatable with the EKC model. Pregnant women with diabetes type 1 fall under “maternity and diabetes” issues.

    Intimate knowledge about how the grieving process works is essential to be able to provide the necessary support to the patient. It is possible that the support will give them the courage and motivation to try and conceive again. One key aspect of the EKC model is to provide open and clear communication between the healthcare personnel and the patient, whether that communication is done face-to-face or otherwise. The structured EKC conversation provides a viable tool to help healthcare professionals assist their patients in coming to terms and resolving their loss.

  • 13.
    Adolfsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Emil
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Beskrivning av interventioner för rökavvänjning för individer med KOL diagnos: - En litteraturstudie2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 14.
    Adrelius, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Schultz, Ellinor
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Omvårdnadspersonals upplevelser i vårdandet av personer med självskadebeteende2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 15.
    Ahl, Hanna
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Norman, Elisabeth
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjöström Strand, Annica
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Olsson, Emma
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bruschettini, Matteo
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Pain scales in clinical trials in newborn infants: a mapping of the evidence2018Other (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Radiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Maret, Eva
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Radiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan E.
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Center of Image Science and Visualization, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Development and validation of a questionnaire evaluating patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging: the Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ)2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: MR examinations of the heart are sometimes negatively affected by anxiety that could have been detected by the pre-scan administration of a suitable questionnaire and psychological support given. To better understand patient experience during the examination and to evaluate psychological intervention, use of general anxiety scales is unsuitable and an MR-specific questionnaire was developed.

    Methods: A new questionnaire, MRI-AQ, was designed from patient expressions of anxiety in MRI-scanners. The patient sample was recruited between October 2012 and October 2014. Factor structure was evaluated with exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency with Cronbach’s alpha. Criterion-related validity, known-group validity and test-retest was evaluated. The new instrument was compared with the Spielberg State Anxiety Index (STAI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD), and with nine statements from the Fear Survey Schedule developed by Lukins et al.

    Results: In total, 247 participants (54.7 ± 14.3 years), referred for MRI examinations of either the spine or the heart, accepted to participate in the study. The development and validation of MRI-AQ resulted in 15 items which could be used as an overall global score or as two sub scale scores. Cronbach’s alpha was found to be high (a = 0.90). MRI-AQ correlated higher with instruments measuring anxiety than with depression scales. Known-group validity demonstrated a higher level of anxiety for patients undergoing MRI scan of the heart than for those examining the spine (p < 0.01). Test-retest reliability demonstrated acceptable level for the scale (ICC = 0.90; CCC = 0.90). Conclusions: MRI-AQ bridges a gap among existing questionnaires, making it a simple and useful tool for measuring patient anxiety during MRI examinations.

  • 17.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Center of Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Maret, Eva
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Positive effect on patient experience of video information given prior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: A clinical trial2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, Ryhov County Hosptial, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Center of Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Maret, Eva
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institutet, stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Positive effect on patient experience of video-information given prior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, a clinical trial2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 5-6, p. 1250-1261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To evaluate the effect of video information given before cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging on patient anxiety and to compare patient experiences of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging versus myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. To evaluate whether additional information has an impact on motion artefacts.

    Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy are technically advanced methods for the evaluation of heart diseases. Although cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is considered to be painless, patients may experience anxiety due to the closed environment.

    Design: A prospective randomised intervention study, not registered.

    Methods: The sample (n = 148) consisted of 97 patients referred for cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, randomised to receive either video information in addition to standard text-information (CMR-video/n = 49) or standard text-information alone (CMR-standard/n = 48). A third group undergoing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (n = 51) was compared with the cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging-standard group. Anxiety was evaluated before, immediately after the procedure and 1 week later. Five questionnaires were used: Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, MRI Fear Survey Schedule and the MRI-Anxiety Questionnaire. Motion artefacts were evaluated by three observers, blinded to the information given. Data were collected between April 2015–April 2016. The study followed the CONSORT guidelines.

    Result: The CMR-video group scored lower (better) than the cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging-standard group in the factor Relaxation (p =.039) but not in the factor Anxiety. Anxiety levels were lower during scintigraphic examinations compared to the CMR-standard group (p <.001). No difference was found regarding motion artefacts between CMR-video and CMR-standard.

    Conclusion: Patient ability to relax during cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging increased by adding video information prior the exam, which is important in relation to perceived quality in nursing. No effect was seen on motion artefacts.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Video information prior to examinations can be an easy and time effective method to help patients cooperate in imaging procedures.

  • 19.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Maret, Eva
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Center of Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Magnetkameraundersökning av hjärtat2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Röntgenavdelningen, Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Maret, Eva
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden; Center of Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Magnetkameraundersökning av hjärtat: bildkvalitet, mätnoggrannhet och patientupplevelse2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syfte:

    Att utvärdera bildkvaliteten vid magnetkamera undersökning av hjärtat (hjärt-MR) genom val av sekvens vid undersökning av infarktutbredning hos patienter med förmaksflimmer och vid studie av hjärtmuskelns genomblödning, samt eventuell inverkan av given information.

    Att studera patientens upplevelse vid hjärt-MR med målet att kunna förbättre patientupplevelsenoch bildkvaliteten.

    Material och metoder:

    På 20 patienter med förmaksflimmer och genomgången hjärtinfarkt har två viabilitetssekvenser jämförts, en segmenterad (bilden samlas in under flera hjärtslag) och en single shot (bilden samlas in under ett hjärtslag).

    På 60 patienter remitterade för hjärtscintigrafi gjordes även hjärt-MR. Perfusionssekvenser utfördes under Adenosine-stress. Två olika sekvenser användes, SSFP och GRE-EPI. Undersökningarna har utvärderats både visuellt och semi-kvantitativt med hjärtscintigrafi som referensmetod.

    Med resultatet från en studie av Erna Törnqvist et al (2006), har ett skattningsinstrument konstruerats, Magnetic Resonance Imaging - Anxiety Questionnaire (MRI-QA). För validering har 247 patienter remitterade för MR-undersökning av rygg (n=193) och hjärta (n=54) besvarat frågorna.

    På två grupper av patienter remitterade för hjärt-MR har informationens betydelse utvärderats. En grupp erhöll video information (n=49) och en standard information (n=48). Likaså utvärderades informationens betydelse för bildkvaliteten.

    Resultat:

    Single shot sekvensen hade bättre bildkvalitet än den segmenterade. Hjärtinfarktens utbredning överensstämde mellan de båda sekvenserna.

    Trots att SSFP sekvensen hade bättre signal brus och kontrast brus förhållande överensstämde GREEPI sekvensen bäst med myokardscintigrafin både vid visuell och vid semi-kvantitativ bedömning.

    MRI-AQ resulterade i 15 påståenden. Det består av två faktorer, en som mäter ångest (12 påståenden) och en som mäter avslappning (tre påståenden). Det har psykometriska förutsättningar att kunna värdera patienters upplevelse av MR-undersökning.

    Patienter som fick utökad information i form av en film var signifikant mer avslappnade under undersökningen än patienter som fick standardinformation. Däremot påverkade inte den utökade informationen bildkvaliteten.

    Konklusion:

    Vid undersökning av infarktstorleken hos patienter med förmaksflimmer hade single shot sekvensen högre bildkvalitet än den segmenterade sekvensen.

    Vid bedömning av ischemi överensstämde hjärt-MR bättre med myokardscintigrafin om GRE-EPI sekvensen användes jämfört med SSFP sekvensen. Detta gällde både vid visuell och semi-kvantitativ bedömning.

    MRI-AQ bedöms som ett tillförlitligt instrument att använda för att utvärdera effekter av intervention vid MR-undersökning.

    Utökad information med video gör patienten mer avslappnad i undersökningssituationen men har ingen påverkan på bildkvaliteten.

  • 21.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Jönköping County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Maret, Eva
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Video information prior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging improves patient experience which still remains more challenging than in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) are two technically advanced methods for imaging cardiac diseases. Although CMR is considered to be painless, considerable patient cooperation is necessary during scanning. Some patients may experience anxiety because of the closed environment of the procedure.

    The aims of this paper were to evaluate the potential effect on patient anxiety and on motion artefacts by adding a 5 min video sequence to the standard written information given before CMR. Additionally, the patient experience of CMR was compared to that of MPS.

    Methods: The sample (n=146) consisted of 97 patients randomized to receive either video information in addition to standard written information (CMR-video/n=49) or standard written information alone (CMR-standard/n=48). A third group undergoing MPS (n=51) was used to compare CMR-standard and MPS. Anxiety was evaluated before, immediately after the procedure and one week later. Four questionnaires were used: State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory, Hospital-Anxiety and Depression-scale, MRI-Fear-Survey-Schedule and the MRI-Anxiety-Questionnaire (MRI-AQ). Motion artefacts were evaluated by three observers, blinded to the information given. Motion artefacts due to arrhythmia were not considered.

    Results: Measured with MRI-AQ, the CMR-video and the CMR-standard groups did not score significantly different on the factor Anxiety. However, CMR-video scored lower (=better) in the factor Relaxation (p=0.039). Younger patients and women scored a higher level of anxiety in most scales. Anxiety levels (MRI-AQ) were lower during MPS examinations compared to the CMRstandard group (p < 0.001 ). The presence of motion artefacts was similar in the CMR-video compared to the CMR-standard group.

    Conclusions: Patient ability to relax during CMR increased by adding video information prior to the exam. This positive effect on patient experience is important to enable technologists to obtain full patient cooperation. An apparent lack of effect on motion artefact could possibly be due to the addition of compensatory extra scans when a low image quality was recognized by the technologists.

  • 22.
    Ahlberg, Rickard
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Skårberg, Kurt
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Addiction Center.
    Brus, Ole
    Kjellin, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Auricular acupuncture for substance use: a randomized controlled trial of effects on anxiety, sleep, drug use and use of addiction treatment services2016In: Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, ISSN 1747-597X, E-ISSN 1747-597X, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A common alternative treatment for substance abuse is auricular acupuncture. The aim of the study was to evaluate the short and long-term effect of auricular acupuncture on anxiety, sleep, drug use and addiction treatment utilization in adults with substance abuse.

    Method: Of the patients included, 280 adults with substance abuse and psychiatric comorbidity, 80 were randomly assigned to auricular acupuncture according to the NADA protocol, 80 to auricular acupuncture according to a local protocol (LP), and 120 to relaxation (controls). The primary outcomes anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory; BAI) and insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index; ISI) were measured at baseline and at follow-ups 5 weeks and 3 months after the baseline assessment. Secondary outcomes were drug use and addiction service utilization. Complete datasets regarding BAI/ISI were obtained from 37/34 subjects in the NADA group, 28/28 in the LP group and 36/35 controls. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Analysis of Variance, Kruskal Wallis, Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance, Eta square (η(2)), and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests.

    Results: Participants in NADA, LP and control group improved significantly on the ISI and BAI. There was no significant difference in change over time between the three groups in any of the primary (effect size: BAI, η(2) = 0.03, ISI, η(2) = 0.05) or secondary outcomes. Neither of the two acupuncture treatments resulted in differences in sleep, anxiety or drug use from the control group at 5 weeks or 3 months.

    Conclusion: No evidence was found that acupuncture as delivered in this study is more effective than relaxation for problems with anxiety, sleep or substance use or in reducing the need for further addiction treatment in patients with substance use problems and comorbid psychiatric disorders. The substantial attrition at follow-up is a main limitation of the study.

    Trial registration: Clinical Trials NCT02604706 (retrospectively registered).

  • 23.
    Ahlm, Johanna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Frick, Elin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Sjuksköterskestudenters erfarenhet av relationen till handledare inom verksamhetsförlagd utbildning på sjukhus2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 24.
    Ahlström, Klara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Dahlin, Ida
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Det är ett monster i mina öron: Tinnitus hos barn - en litteraturstudie2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 25.
    Ahmad, Sheni
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Temperaturens påverkan på n. medianus och n. ulnaris vid elektroneurografi (ENeG)2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 26.
    Ahmed, Fatima
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Transkutan syretrycksmätning i samband med perifer blodtrycksmätning: Jämförelse av transkutan syretrycksmätning mellan tre olika kärlområden på fotryggen2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 27.
    Ahmetbasic, Dennis
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Användning av lek inom arbetsterapi för barn med motoriska funktionsnedsättningar: En litteraturstudie2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 28.
    Ajdin, Duro
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Huss, Oscar
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Betydelsen av fysisk aktivitet för individer med diabetes mellitus typ 22016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 29.
    Akimana, Clarisse
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Weldegiorgis, Finan
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kommunikation mellan röntgensjuksköterska och patient i samband med radiologiska undersökningar2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 30.
    Akner-Koler, Cheryl
    et al.
    Industridesignprogrammet, Konstfack, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Integrating Sensitizing Labs in an Educational Design Process for Haptic Interaction2016In: FORMakademisk, ISSN 1890-9515, E-ISSN 1890-9515, ISSN 1890-9515, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New design methods for educating designers are needed to adapt the attributes of haptic interaction to fit the embodied experience of the users. This paper presents educationally framed aesthetic sensitizing labs: 1) a material-lab exploring the tactile and haptic structures of materials, 2) a vibrotactile-lab exploring actuators directly on the body and 3) a combined materials- and vibrotactile-lab embedded in materials. These labs were integrated in a design course that supports a non-linear design process for embodied explorative and experimental activities that feed into an emerging gestalt. A co-design process was developed in collaboration with researchers and users who developed positioning and communications systems for people with deafblindness. Conclusion: the labs helped to discern attributes of haptic interactions which supported designing scenarios and prototypes showing novel ways to understand and shape haptic interaction.

  • 31.
    Al-atia, Mohassad
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Can oral contrast enhance image quality at MRCP? A literature review2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 32.
    Alawi, Ali
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Bodewall, Emelie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kvinnors upplevda livssituation efter en hjärtinfarktEn litteraturstudie2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 33.
    Aldén, Matilda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kvinnors upplevelser vid ofrivillig barnlöshet ur ett hälsoperspektiv- En litteraturstudie2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 34.
    Alexopoulou, Sofia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Fart, Frida
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Jonsson, Ann-Sofie
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Karni, Liran
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Kenalemang, Lame Maatla
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Krishna, Sai
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lindblad, Katarina
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lundin, Elin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Samzelius, Hanna
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Schoultz, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Spang, Lisa
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Söderman, Annika
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Tarum, Janelle
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Tsertsidis, Antonios
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Widell, Bettina
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Nilsson, Kerstin (Editor)
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Successful ageing in an interdisciplinary context: popular science presentations2018Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Alexopoulou, Sofia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Pavli, Antonia
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    ‘Beneath this mask, there is more than flesh, beneath this mask there is an idea’: The 19th International Roundtable for the Semiotics of Law (IRSL 2018). Örebro, Sweden, May 23-252018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Once upon a time, there was the legend of Robin Hood, the English folklore hero who was not only a skillful archer but also swordsman. Not surprisingly, the famous outlaw didn’t act alone in the deep Sherwood Forest but with the help of his band of Merry Men. His mission was to steal money from the rich and give it back to the poor. Therefore, the peasants considered Hood both as their protector and friend. Even today, Robin Hood represents in our minds a clear exemplar against any sort of oppressive authority, which in his time took the form of the Sheriff of Nottingham. Do modern heroes still exist to get inspiration by? The answer to this question is not trouble-free. A great part of people would say that the group of ‘Anonymous’ -known as ‘Anons’- falls into the category of contemporary heroes. Anons could be discerned as a ‘reincarnation’ of the digital version of Robin Hood since they fight against corruption, repression, and injustice, as he did. More precisely, the group of Anonymous is a global, Internet-based social movement of mostly young and dissatisfied people who decided to provide their own answer towards the established global governance and order. This paper will investigate the latest hacking activity of the Anonymous against a number of governmental websites in Greece. The purpose of Anonymous -as stated on their Facebook page- was to protect/defend the Greek citizens who sternly suffer because of the financial crisis and to give a ‘strong lesson’ to the elected politicians in office. Drawing on material from newspapers articles, weblogs and videos, this article aims to understand whether the group of Anonymous continues the long tradition of Robin Hood as a heroic figure/icon, or it symbolizes something radically new.

  • 36.
    Alfredsson, Anton
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Sjuksköterskors upplevelser av triage vid telefonrådgivning2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 37.
    Alfredsson, Liselott
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kartläggning av avvikelserapportering vid en akutmottagning2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 38.
    Alfsson Stjernlöf, Maria
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Muminovic Kurtovic, Minela
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Orsaker som påverkar patienters följsamhet till egenvårdsråd vid diabetes mellitus typ 22015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 39.
    Algesten Wessbo, Hanna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Börjesson, Lina
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Icke-farmakologiska åtgärder för att lindra patientens preoperativa oro. En litteraturstudie2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 40.
    Algilani, Samal
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    To be at one's best: The evolution of Optimal Functionality and its possible implementation in an ICT-platform2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    At the Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre for Optimal Health and Functionality through Life (NUPARC), a research gap was uncovered regarding the concept optimal functionality based on the older adult’s own perspective. The overall aim was to explore the concept of optimal functionality among older adults and the possibility of creating and developing an ICT-platform to measure it. Method: An existing cohort from NUPARC was used for recruitment in studies I-III and to some extent study IV. A scoping study design and framework was adopted for the inclusion of the articles in Study I. Study II had a descriptive design. Six focus group discussions were conducted and analysed using qualitative deductive content analysis to extend the qualitative understanding. Study III used a phenomenological approach describing the experience of mental health and its impact on the ability to function as optimally as possible. Six interviews were analysed using Giorgi’s phenomenological approach. Study IV was a feasibility study and included 8 older adults using an ICTplatform for a period of four weeks. Results: Optimal Functionality comprises three major corner stones: Body-related factors, Self-related factors and External factors (I) accompanied by nine aspects, and according to older adults it is a matter of functioning as optimally as possible (II). The three major cornerstones are intricately linked and all but the mental aspects were included in the discussions (II). Life situations affecting mental health, consequences of mental health and strategies for maintaining good mental health were described by older adults as having an impact on mental health and affecting their ability to function as optimally as possible (III). The older adults managed the usage of an ICT-tool well and it was perceived as meaningful (IV). Conclusion: Optimal functionality is holistic, subjective, dynamic and applicable to all older adults. Identification of the factors involved can help the older adults on their path to health. An ICT-platform can facilitate the identification of the factors for optimal functionality and the eventual measurement of it.

    List of papers
    1. Exploring the concept of optimal functionality in old age
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the concept of optimal functionality in old age
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, ISSN 1178-2390, E-ISSN 1178-2390, Vol. 7, p. 69-79Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Aging is characterized by loss of function and represents a perspective that puts the focus on the negative aspects of aging. Thus, it is fundamental to shift the focus from loss of function to maintaining good health and personal satisfaction through life; in other words, to promote optimal functionality at a level appropriate for older adults. However, it is not yet known what constitutes optimal functionality from the older adult's own perspective.

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the concept of optimal functionality in old age from the older adult's perspective (ie, people over 65 years of age) in industrialized Western countries.

    METHODS: We undertook a scoping review and searched two electronic databases (PubMed and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature [CINAHL]) from January 2002 to July 2013 for scientific studies, using the key search term personal satisfaction. In total, 25 scientific studies were analyzed.

    RESULTS: Only six of the included articles applied a qualitative methodology. By analyzing the results of these articles, three major themes were identified as cornerstones in the concept of optimal functionality at old age: 1) self-related factors (eg, mental well-being); 2) body-related factors (eg, physical well-being); and 3) external factors equal to demographic and environmental factors.

    CONCLUSION: There is a lack of qualitative studies in the current literature, and hence of what constitutes optimal functionality from the older adult's perspective. The results outlined in this review identify three cornerstones (self-related factors, body-related factors, and external factors) of what constitutes optimal functionality at old age. However, it is vital that these findings are taken further and are evaluated through qualitative studies to reflect older adults' opinions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Dove Medical Press, 2014
    Keywords
    optimal functionality, aging, personal satisfaction
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Medicine; Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-33866 (URN)10.2147/JMDH.S55178 (DOI)24516333 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84893293812 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2014-02-20 Created: 2014-02-20 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Increasing the qualitative understanding of optimal functionality in older adults: a focus group based study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increasing the qualitative understanding of optimal functionality in older adults: a focus group based study
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 70Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased independence and loss of functional ability are issues regarded as inevitably connected to old age. This ageism may have negative influences on older adults' beliefs about aging, making it difficult for them to focus on their current ability to maintain a good health. It is therefore important to change focus towards promoting Optimal Functionality (OF). OF is a concept putting the older adult's perspective on health and function in focus, however, the concept is still under development. Hence, the aim was to extend the concept of optimal functionality in various groups of older adults.

    Methods: A qualitative study was conducted based on focus group discussions (FGD). In total 6 FGDs were performed, including 37 older adults from three different groups: group 1) senior athletes, group 2) free living older adults, group 3) older adults living in senior living homes. All data was transcribed verbatim and analyzed following the process of deductive content analysis.

    Results: The principal outcome of the analysis was "to function as optimally as you possibly can", which was perceived as the core of the concept. Further, the concept of OF was described as multifactorial and several new factors could be added to the original model of OF. Additionally the findings of the study support that all three cornerstones comprising OF have to occur simultaneously in order for the older adult to function as optimal as possible.

    Conclusions: OF is a multifaceted and subjective concept, which should be individually defined by the older adult. This study further makes evident that older adults as a group are heterogeneous in terms of their preferences and views on health and should thus be approached as such in the health care setting. Therefore it is important to promote an individualized approach as a base when caring for older adults.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London, United Kingdom: BioMed Central, 2016
    Keywords
    Older adults, optimal functionality, person centered care, focus group discussions
    National Category
    Geriatrics
    Research subject
    Geriatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49605 (URN)10.1186/s12877-016-0244-z (DOI)000372822200002 ()27007861 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Knowledge Foundation, 20110225
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Olle Engkvist Byggmästare Foundation

    Faculty of Medicine and Health at Örebro University

    Available from: 2016-04-02 Created: 2016-04-02 Last updated: 2018-04-27Bibliographically approved
    3. Mental health as a prerequisite for functioning as optimally as possible in old age: a phenomenological approach
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental health as a prerequisite for functioning as optimally as possible in old age: a phenomenological approach
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50048 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-04-29 Created: 2016-04-29 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    4. An interactive ICT-platform for early assessment and management of patient-reported concerns among older adults living in Ordinary Housing: Development and Feasibility
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>An interactive ICT-platform for early assessment and management of patient-reported concerns among older adults living in Ordinary Housing: Development and Feasibility
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50049 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-04-29 Created: 2016-04-29 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
  • 41.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Langius-Ekelöf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    An interactive ICT-platform for early assessment and management of patient-reported concerns among older adults living in Ordinary Housing: Development and FeasibilityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    An interactive ICT-platform for early assessment and management of patient-reported concerns among older adults living in ordinary housing: development and feasibility2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 11-12, p. 1575-1583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives: To develop and test feasibility and acceptability of an interactive ICT-platform integrated in a tablet for collecting and managing patient reported concerns of older adults in home care.

    Background: Using different ICT-applications, e.g. interactive tablets for self-assessment of health and health issues, based on health monitoring as well as other somatic and psychiatric monitoring systems may improve quality of life, staff and patient communication and feelings of being reassured. The European Commission hypothesize that introduction of ICT-applications to the older population will enable improved health. However, evidence-based and user-based applications are scarce.

    Design: The design is underpinned by the Medical Research Council's complex intervention evaluation framework. A mixed-method approach was used combining interviews with older adults and healthcare professionals, and logged quantitative data.

    Methods: In cooperation with a health management company, a platform operated by an interactive application for reporting and managing health related problems in real time was developed. Eight older adults receiving home care were recruited to test feasibility. They were equipped with the application and reported three times weekly over four weeks, and afterwards interviewed about their experiences. Three nurses caring for them were interviewed. The logged data was extracted as a coded file.

    Results: The older adults reported as instructed, in total 107 reports (mean 13). The most frequent concerns were pain, fatigue and dizziness. The older adults experienced the application as meaningful with overall positive effects as well as potential benefits for the nurses involved.

    Conclusions The overall findings in this study indicated high feasibility among older adults using the ICT-platform. The study's results support further development of the platform, as well as tests in full-scale studies and in other populations.

    Relevance to practice: An ICT-platform increased the older adults' perception of involvement and facilitated communication between the patient and nurses.

  • 43.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Östlund-Lagerström, Lina
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Schoultz, Ida
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Mental health as a prerequisite for functioning as optimally as possible in old age: a phenomenological approachManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Östlund-Lagerström, Lina
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Schoultz, Ida
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Brummer, Robert J.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Increasing the qualitative understanding of optimal functionality in older adults: a focus group based study2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased independence and loss of functional ability are issues regarded as inevitably connected to old age. This ageism may have negative influences on older adults' beliefs about aging, making it difficult for them to focus on their current ability to maintain a good health. It is therefore important to change focus towards promoting Optimal Functionality (OF). OF is a concept putting the older adult's perspective on health and function in focus, however, the concept is still under development. Hence, the aim was to extend the concept of optimal functionality in various groups of older adults.

    Methods: A qualitative study was conducted based on focus group discussions (FGD). In total 6 FGDs were performed, including 37 older adults from three different groups: group 1) senior athletes, group 2) free living older adults, group 3) older adults living in senior living homes. All data was transcribed verbatim and analyzed following the process of deductive content analysis.

    Results: The principal outcome of the analysis was "to function as optimally as you possibly can", which was perceived as the core of the concept. Further, the concept of OF was described as multifactorial and several new factors could be added to the original model of OF. Additionally the findings of the study support that all three cornerstones comprising OF have to occur simultaneously in order for the older adult to function as optimal as possible.

    Conclusions: OF is a multifaceted and subjective concept, which should be individually defined by the older adult. This study further makes evident that older adults as a group are heterogeneous in terms of their preferences and views on health and should thus be approached as such in the health care setting. Therefore it is important to promote an individualized approach as a base when caring for older adults.

  • 45.
    Ali, Amna
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Autonomic dysfunction is associated with cardiac remodeling in heart failure patients – The HARVEST study2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is a cardinal sign of autonomic dysfunction, and a common comorbidity in patients with heart failure. The relationship between OH and structural cardiac anomalies has not been sufficiently explored.

    Purpose: To assess relations between orthostatic blood pressure (BP) responses during active standing and echocardiographic findings in patients with heart failure.

    Methods: 149 patients hospitalized for heart failure (mean age: 74.0 years; mean ejection fraction (EF) 40±16%) were examined with conventional echocardiograms and active-standing test. Associations between left atrial volume, right atrial volume, left ventricular mass, left ventricular diameter and right ventricular diameter and the difference between supine and standing systolic/diastolic BP were examined.

    Results: A total of 33 patients met conventional OH criteria i.e. systolic/diastolic BP decrease ≥20/10 mmHg. In linear regression models, decrease in systolic BP upon standing was associated with greater left ventricular mass. Decrease in systolic BP was also borderline significant associated with greater left atrial volume.

    Conclusions: Orthostatic decline in systolic BP among older heart failure patients is associated with structural cardiac changes such as increased left ventricular mass, independently of traditional risk factors and LVEF.

  • 46.
    Ali, Sihaam
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Validering av metod för IgG eller IgM bestämning hos anti-M immuniserade gravida kvinnor2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 47.
    Alizadeh Big, Nima
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kudoori, Rami
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Tinnitus hos CI-användare: En systematisk litteraturstudie2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 48.
    Alm, Fredrik
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Följsamhet av nationella riktlinjer för behandling av smärta och illamående hos barn i samband med toncilloperation2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 49.
    Alm, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Pain and pain management after pediatric tonsil surgery2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Alm, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Smärta och smärtbehandling i samband med tonsillkirurgi på barn: ett ständigt pågående förbättringsarbete med ett multidisciplinärt ansvar2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Smärta efter tonsillkirurgi på barn har varit och är fortfarande en utmaning för ÖNH-professionen. Trots ett stort antal publikationer inom området saknas nationellt och internationellt konsensus om vad som är den optimala smärtbehandlingen. Registerdata i Sverige visar på hög andel patienter/närstående som kontaktar hälso- och sjukvården efter tonsillkirurgi pga. bristfällig smärtbehandling. Under de senaste åren har flera förbättringsarbeten utförts med implementering av nationella riktlinjer för smärtbehandling och patientinformation på hemsidan tonsilloperation.se. Mot denna bakgrund pågår nu ett forskningsprojekt där smärta och smärtbehandling i samband med tonsillkirurgi utvärderas från professionens, barnets och anhörigas perspektiv. Studier i projektet har visat att den svenska ÖNH-professionens åsikt om och följsamhet till de nationella riktlinjerna är god. Vidare visar analys av registerdata att implementeringen av nationella riktlinjer har gjort avtryck i tonsilloperationsregistrets smärtrelaterade variabler, med längre postoperativ analgetikabehandling och en viss minskning av oplanerade kontakter med hälso- och sjukvård. Samtidigt visar data från registret att operationsmetoder och tekniker, men även patientfaktorer som ålder och indikation för kirurgi, påverkar smärtutfallet. Preliminära resultat från en större kvantitativ datainsamling via åldersanpassade smärtdagböcker och kvalitativa intervjuer med barn och anhöriga visar att återhämtningen efter tonsillkirurgi påverkas av vilken typ av smärtbehandling barnet ordinerats.

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