oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Axelrad, Jordan E.
    et al.
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, NYU Langone Health, New York NY, USA; Division of Digestive and Liver Disease, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York NY, USA.
    Olén, Ola
    Sachs’ Children and Youth Hospital, Stockholm South General Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science and Education Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Askling, Johan
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lebwohl, Benjamin
    Division of Digestive and Liver Disease, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York NY, USA.
    Khalili, Hamed
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston Massachusetts, USA.
    Sachs, Michael C.
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Division of Digestive and Liver Disease, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York NY, USA; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Gastrointestinal Infection Increases Odds of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in a Nationwide Case-Control Study2019In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 1311-1322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Gastrointestinal infections have been associated with later development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, studies have produced conflicting results. We performed a nationwide case-control study in Sweden to determine whether gastroenteritis is associated with the development of Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC).

    METHODS: Using the Swedish National Patient Register, we identified 44,214 patients with IBD (26,450 with UC; 13,387 with CD; and 4377 with IBD-unclassified) from 2002 to 2014 and matched them with 436,507 individuals in the general population (control subjects). We then identified patients and control subjects with reported episodes of gastroenteritis (from 1964 to 2014) and type of pathogen associated. We collected medical and demographic data and used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for IBD associated with enteric infection.

    RESULTS: Of the patients with IBD, 3105 (7.0%) (1672 with UC, 1050 with CD, and 383 with IBD-unclassified) had a record of previous gastroenteritis compared with 17,685 control subjects (4.1%). IBD cases had higher odds for an antecedent episode of gastrointestinal infection (aOR, 1.64; 1.57-1.71), bacterial gastrointestinal infection (aOR, 2.02; 1.82-2.24), parasitic gastrointestinal infection (aOR, 1.55; 1.03-2.33), and viral gastrointestinal infection (aOR, 1.55; 1.34-1.79). Patients with UC had higher odds of previous infection with Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Campylobacter, or Clostridium difficile compared to control subjects. Patients with CD had higher odds of previous infection with Salmonella, Campylobacter, Yersinia enterocolitica, C difficile, amoeba, or norovirus compared to control subjects. Increasing numbers of gastroenteritis episodes were associated with increased odds of IBD, and a previous episode of gastroenteritis remained associated with odds for IBD more than 10 years later (aOR, 1.26; 1.19-1.33).

    CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of the Swedish National Patient Register, we found previous episodes of gastroenteritis to increase odds of later development of IBD. Although we cannot formally exclude misclassification bias, enteric infections might induce microbial dysbiosis that contributes to the development of IBD in susceptible individuals.

  • 2.
    Malmborg, Petter
    et al.
    Sach’ Children and Youth Hospital, South General Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mouratidou, Natalia
    Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sachs, Michael C.
    Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hammar, Ulf
    Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Khalili, Hamed
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston Massachusetts, USA.
    Neovius, Martin
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hjern, Anders
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Health Equity Studies, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Askling, Johan
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Olén, Ola
    Sach’ Children and Youth Hospital, South General Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Effects of Childhood-onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease on School Performance: A Nationwide Population-based Cohort Study Using Swedish Health and Educational Registers2019In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 1663-1673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Childhood-onset inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) might negatively impact academic school performance. We conducted a nationwide study to examine the association between childhood-onset IBD and school results.

    Methods: Our study population was selected from Swedish health registers. In the National Patient Register (1990 to 2013), we identified 2827 children with IBD: Crohn's disease (CD), n = 1207, and ulcerative colitis (UC), n = 1370. Patients were matched with 10 reference individuals by age, sex, birth year, and place of residence (n = 28,235). Final compulsory school grades (0 to 320 grade points) and qualification for high school (yes or no) were obtained through the National School Register. Regression models controlling for socioeconomic factors were used to analyze the association of IBD with school performance.

    Results: Children with IBD had a lower final grade point average (adjusted mean grade difference [AMGD] -4.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] -7.1 to -2.6) but not a significantly higher risk to not qualify for high school (odds ratio [OR] 1.14, CI 0.99-1.31). The results were similar in children with UC (AMGD -5.5, CI -8.7 to -2.3) and CD (AMGD -4.7, CI -8.2 to -1.2). Underperformance was more common in subsets of IBD children characterized by markers associated with long-standing active disease (eg, >30 inpatient days [AMGD-18.1, CI -25.8 to -10.4]).

    Conclusion: Most children with IBD achieve comparable results in the final year of compulsory school as their healthy peers. Care should be improved for the subgroup of children for which IBD has a stronger negative impact on school performance.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf