oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ellström, Daniel
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    When service turns smart: Implications for customer-firm relationships2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management, Department of Marketing, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    A lean approach for service productivity improvements: synergy or oxymoron?2013In: Managing Service Quality, ISSN 0960-4529, E-ISSN 1758-8030, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 291-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Service productivity continues to receive ever-greater amounts of attention as service covers a greater portion of the economy. As competition increases, service productivity becomes increasingly important. This study aims to explore the applicability of lean principles in a service context and to conceptualize how these principles impact service productivity.

    Design/methodology/approach: This paper presents a conceptual analysis of the six most commonly used lean principles in manufacturing and their applicability to a service context for different types of services. Using this analysis, six propositions are developed to examine the influence of lean on service productivity.

    Findings: This study suggests promising synergies, as well as important obstacles, for applying lean principles in services. Standardizing services and increasing reliability in service processes through lean principles can increase efficiency. However, the customer's active role in certain services and, simultaneously, high diversity make the application of lean principles increasingly difficult. Also, customer satisfaction must be considered when improving service productivity, otherwise the positive long-term effects of a lean approach in service will be absent.

    Practical implications: These findings are useful for organizations aiming to improve their service productivity Particularly, lean principles are invaluable to increase efficiency and customer satisfaction for services with low diversity and low customer participation. This paper suggests a direction for the proper use of lean principles for different service types, and how efficiency and customer satisfaction are affected through a lean approach.

    Originality/value: This study contributes to the research on service productivity and continues the discussion on prototypic characteristics of service and manufacturing orientations.

  • 3.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lean principles in business-to-business services: Synergy or oxymoron?2012In: Innovative Service Prespectives: Proceedings from the AMA SERVSIG International Service ResearchConference, Helsinki, Finland, June 7-9 2012 / [ed] Jacob Mickelsson and Anu Helkkula, Hanken School of Economics , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: As customer needs becomes more heterogeneous, and as the importance of service grows, customer-specific requirements have led to increased demand for efficient and customized services in many industry sectors. However, there is scant research on developing services that are both efficient and customized. The objective of the present study is to explore the applicability of Lean, one of the best-known practices for manufacturing efficiency, in business-to-business services.

    Design / Methodology / Approach: The empirical part consists of a multiple study of service-providing industrial companies in Northern Europe. Data was gathered through semi-structured interviews and participating observations.

    Findings: The study suggests promising synergies, but also important obstacles when applying Lean principles to business-to-business service operations. The ability to standardize service elements and increase reliability in service processes through Lean principles can increase service efficiency and ensure service quality. However, the active role of the customer in certain services makes it increasingly difficult to apply Lean. Furthermore, there are certain key differences in the view on value creation between a service perspective and a Lean principles perspective, which should be addressed.

    Practical Implications: The findings are useful for companies looking to improve their service deployment. In particular, Lean is a valuable tool with which to increase standardization and reliability in service processes.

    Originality / Value: The study contributes to the research on service efficiency and customization. It also contributes to the continuous discussion on prototypic characteristics of service and manufacturing orientations.

  • 4.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Division of Industrial Marketing, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Division of Industrial Marketing, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Division of Industrial Marketing, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Service innovation and new service development: An analysis of research 1986-20122013In: Proceedings of the QUIS13 International Research Symposium on Service Excellence in Management, 2013, p. 480-482Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Service modularity as an enabler for value co-creation2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Traditional notions of product and service modularity miss the link between the provider and customer. By recognizing the potential role of customer competences and activities in service modules, this study aims to investigate how modular services can enhance collaboration and value cocreation between the service provider and the customer.

    Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative study of four Swedish manufacturing firms moving into service and integrated solution fields was conducted, with modular business services as the unit of analysis. Data was collected through interviews, focus groups, and participant observations. The gathered data enabled a conceptualization of modular services based on provider and customer components, activities, and competences.

    Findings: The decomposition of services into modules is not only a decomposition of components; activities and competences must also be considered. In addition, given that services can be co-created, service modules may also include customer elements. This increases the complexity of the modules, but also the potential value for the customer and provider. The observation of customer-specific and supplier-specific parts of modules is an important finding with which to further develop modularity in a service context.

    Originality/Value: The paper contributes to the emerging research field of service modularity by providing empirical insights into how service modularity can help achieve more efficient services. In particular, the paper addresses the need to recognize customer-specific activities and competences as a pivotal part of modular services. Such insights are particularly relevant given the established views ofservice modules as a function of intra-firm components.

  • 6.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Marketing, CERS – Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    The evolution of service innovation research: a critical review and synthesis2014In: Service Industries Journal, ISSN 0264-2069, E-ISSN 1743-9507, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 373-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of service innovation articles has increased dramatically in the past 25 years. By reviewing 128 articles published between 1986 and 2010, primarily in leading marketing and innovation journals, this study analyzes the progression of service innovation research according to topicality and perspective. The authors summarize prior research by clustering it into three evolutional phases and drawing parallels with the evolution of the wider services marketing field. Overall, the view of service innovation has evolved, from a complement of traditional product innovation to a multidimensional, all-encompassing notion that entails several functions, both within and outside the firm.

  • 7.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Carlborg, Per
    Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Service selling in industrial organizations: An exploratory study of challenges and opportunities2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Industriell marknadsföring och industriell ekonomi, Linköpings universitet,Linköping, Sweden.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Industriell marknadsföring och industriell ekonomi, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Carlborg, Per
    Industriell marknadsföring och industriell ekonomi, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    An increased focus on service selling: Implications for the sales function2011In: QUIS 12: Advances in service quality, innovation, and excellence / [ed] Bo van der Rhee, Liana Victorino, Cornell University Press, 2011, p. 136-139Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Marketing, Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Carlborg, Per
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Triadic Value Propositions: When It Takes More Than Two to Tango2016In: Service Science, ISSN 2164-3962, E-ISSN 2164-3970, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 282-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Value propositions are reciprocal resource-integration promises and value alignment mechanisms operating to and from actors seeking an equitable exchange. In a business triad, any change in the relationship between two actors also affects relationships with the third actor, influencing resource integration and value creation at the value constellation level. This study of the development of a triadic value proposition analyzes how the discontinuous effects of a new service initiative alter the relationships among actors in a manufacturer-dealer-user triad. A qualitative empirical inquiry examines a 10-year process, in which a leading industry incumbent enters the service business by crafting a triadic value proposition. As the value proposition evolves over time, the network ties-and thus the interdependence among manufacturer, dealer, and user-strengthen. The findings offer firms a better understanding of how to involve and collaborate with key actors to initiate discontinuous changes at the firm and network levels. These insights are particularly timely in light of the difficulties that product firms face when intermediaries are decisive for the success of their service-led growth initiatives.

  • 10.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Windahl, Charlotta
    Department of Marketing, The University of Auckland Business School, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Business Innovation, Environmental Social Science Department, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (EAWAG), Dübendorf, Switzerland.
    What service transition?: A critical analysis of servitization processes2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of servitization processes in product-based firms generally describe a transition process from basic, product-oriented services towards more advanced, process-oriented ones, eventually leading to the provision of integrated solutions. The concept of firms going through a service transition is frequently used in both academia and practice. However, using case study research based on longitudinal analysis of servitization and innovation processes in ten product-based firms, we question the generalizability of these established conceptualizations. Instead, we argue that servitization is not always about moving from less to more advanced services. A firm offering a wide range of services may nevertheless have fragmented service operations in a product-based business, an opaque service organization, and unsystematic service development, thereby constantly failing to meet sales targets and profitability expectations. The number and range of services offered should therefore not be a sole proxy of a firm’s servitization efforts. Furthermore, servitization is not only a matter of moving from less to more advanced services but also about utilizing the knowledge gained from the largest, most advanced service contracts and solutions; there is often an inherent potential in downsizing, standardizing, and formalizing elements of the most advanced services and solutions, and to make use of these when offering also less complex services in an efficient and effective manner.

  • 11.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Department of Marketing, CERS – Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Windahl, Charlotta
    Department of Marketing, The University of Auckland Business School, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    EAWAG, Switzerland, Business Innovation, Environmental Social Science Department, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Dübendorf, Switzerland.
    What service transition?: Reconceptualizing service infusion processes in product-dominant firms2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 AMA SERVSIG International Service Research Conference, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Department of Marketing, CERS – Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Industriell ekonomi, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Windahl, Charlotta
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The University of Auckland Business School, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    EAWAG, Switzerland, Business Innovation, Environmental Social Science Department, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Dübendorf, Switzerland.
    What service transition?: Rethinking established assumptions about manufacturers’ service-led growth strategies2015In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 45, p. 59-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both academics and practitioners emphasize the importance for product firms of implementing service-led growth strategies. The service transition concept is well established, namely a unidirectional repositioning along a product-service continuum—from basic, product-oriented services towards more customized, process-oriented ones—ultimately leading to the provision of solutions. We challenge this service transition assumption and develop alternative ones regarding how product firms should pursue service-led growth. Using ‘problematization methodology’, and drawing on findings from thirteen system suppliers, we identify three service-led growth trajectories: (1) becoming an availability provider, which is the focus of most transition literature; (2) becoming a performance provider, which resembles project-based sales and implies an even greater differentiation of what customers are offered; and, (3) becoming an ‘industrializer’, which is about standardizing previously customized solutions to promote repeatability and scalability. Based on our critical inquiry, we develop two alternative assumptions: (a) firms need to constantly balance business expansion and standardization activities; and (b) manage the co-existence of different system supplier roles. Finally, we consider the implications for implementing service-led growth strategies of the alternative assumptions.

  • 13.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Network pictures and resource integration: cognitive alignment in extended service offerings2010Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf