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  • 1.
    Ramström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Södergren, Anna L.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Tomas L.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Platelet Function Determined by Flow Cytometry: New Perspectives?2016In: Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis, ISSN 0094-6176, E-ISSN 1098-9064, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 268-281Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow cytometry enables studies of several different aspects of platelet function in response to a variety of platelet agonists. This can be done using only a small volume of whole blood, and also in blood with low platelet counts. These properties, together with the increasing number of flow cytometers available in hospitals worldwide, make flow cytometry an interesting option for laboratories interested in studies of platelet function in different clinical settings. This review focuses on practical issues regarding the use of flow cytometry for platelet function testing. It provides an overview of available activation markers, platelet agonists, and experimental setup issues. The review summarizes previous experience and factors important to consider to perform high-quality platelet function testing by flow cytometry. It also discusses its current use and possibilities and challenges for future use of flow cytometry in clinical settings.

  • 2.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    et al.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Transfusion Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Chemistry, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wallstedt, Maria
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Södergren, Anna L.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Faxälv, Lars
    Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Clin Chem, Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Ramström, Sofia
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Chemistry, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Platelet adhesion changes during storage studied with a novel method using flow cytometry and protein-coated beads2015In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 177-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to set up and evaluate a novel method for studies of platelet adhesion and activation in blood and platelet suspensions such as platelet concentrate (PC) samples using protein-coated polystyrene beads and flow cytometry. To demonstrate its usefulness, we studied PCs during storage. PCs were prepared by aphaeresis technique (n = 7). Metabolic variables and platelet function was measured on day 1, 5, 7 and 12 of storage. Spontaneous and TRAP-6-induced adhesion to fibrinogen-and collagen-coated beads was analyzed by flow cytometry. P-selectin and phosphatidyl serine (PS) expression was assessed on platelets bound to beads as well as on non-adherent platelets. Platelet adhesion to fibrinogen beads had increased by day 12 and adhesion to collagen beads at day 7 of storage (p<0.05). TRAP-6 stimulation significantly increased the platelet adhesion to fibrinogen beads (p<0.05) as well as the P-selectin and PS exposure on platelets bound to beads (p<0.01) during the first 7 days of storage, but by day 12, significant changes were no longer induced by TRAP-6 stimulation. We demonstrate that our adhesion assay using protein-coated polystyrene beads can be used to assess the adhesion properties of platelets during storage without the addition of red blood cells. Therefore it may offer a useful tool for future studies of platelet adhesive capacity in transfusion medicine and other settings.

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