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  • 1.
    Bazargani, Farhan
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Orthodontics, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jacobson, Sven
    Department of Orthodontics, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lennartsson, Bertil
    Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    A comparative evaluation of lingual retainer failure bonded with or without liquid resin: A randomized clinical study with 2-year follow-up2012In: Angle orthodontist, ISSN 0003-3219, E-ISSN 1945-7103, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 84-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To prospectively evaluate and compare the effect of liquid resin on lingual retainer failure after a 2-year follow-up.

    Materials and Methods: Fifty-two patients (26 males, 26 females) with a mean age of 18.3 +/- 1.3 years at follow-up, were randomized into two groups: the resin group and the nonresin group. The lingual retainers in the resin group were bonded to the enamel surfaces with two-step bonding resin, Optibond FL, and Tetric EvoFlow. The nonresin group followed the same procedure of bonding retainers but without applying the Optibond FL. Retainer failure, calculus accumulation, and discoloration of composite pads adjacent to the retainers during the 2-year observation period were registered, compared, and statistically analyzed with a Fisher's exact test and chi-square test.

    Results: In the resin group, the incidence of retainer failure was 4% and occurred at the composite-wire interface; in the nonresin group, the incidence was 27% and occurred at the enamel-composite interface. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (P =.049). The incidences of calculus accumulation and discoloration adjacent to the composite pads were 27% and 69% (P =.003 and P <.001) higher in the nonresin group, respectively.

    Conclusion: Application of resin in bonding of lingual retainers appears to reduce the incidence of retainer failure as well as the incidence of calculus accumulation and discoloration adjacent to the composite pads. (Angle Orthod. 2012;82:84-87.)

  • 2.
    Bazargani, Farhan
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Orthodont, Postgrad Dent Educ Ctr, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Clin Epidemiol & Biostat Unit, Örebro Univ Hosp, Örebro, Sweden.
    Dolati, Ali
    Dept Orthodont, Postgrad Dent Educ Ctr, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lennartsson, Bertil
    Dept Orthodont, Postgrad Dent Educ Ctr, Örebro, Sweden.
    Palatally displaced maxillary canines: factors influencing duration and cost of treatment2013In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 310-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the relationship between the initial position of palatally displaced canines (PDCs) on panoramic radiographs and the duration of the orthodontic treatment and further to estimate the costs of the treatment. Data from panoramic radiographs and patient records of 66 consecutive patients (mean age 14.9 +/- 1.7 years) with PDC were analysed. The initial position of the canine, the distance between the canine cusp tip and the occlusal plane, and the inclination of the canine were significantly associated with treatment duration both unadjusted and adjusted for background characteristics. The average estimated cost of the treatment of PDC was euro3200 per case. The total annual cost for treatment of PDC in Sweden may therefore be estimated at euro600 0000. In this study, duration of treatment averaged 17 months for canines displaced in impaction zone 1 or 2, 2.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) -1.0 to 6.2] months longer for those in impaction zone 3, and 7.6 (95% CI 4.1-11.1) months longer for canines displaced in impaction zone 4 or 5. This information makes it easier, through study of the panoramic radiograph, to estimate the duration of treatment and to give patients more precise information about the expected length of their treatment.

  • 3.
    Branzén, Marie
    et al.
    Specialist Clinic of Orthodontics, Public Dental Health Service, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Alf
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Dental Research Department, Public Dental Health Service, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bazargani, Farhan
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Orthodontics, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Implant-Supported Single Crowns Replacing Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A 5-Year Follow-Up2015In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 1134-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Knowledge of the long-term survival of single implants in cases of congenitally missing lateral incisors in the maxilla is limited.

    Purpose: This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the 5-year survival of implants and implant-supported crowns (ISCs) and to assess the functional and aesthetic outcomes from the professional and patient perspectives.

    Materials and Methods: From a total of 46 patients with congenitally missing upper lateral incisors, 36 patients treated with 54 Branemark (R) (Nobel Biocare AB, Goteborg, Sweden) implants and ISCs participated in the study. A clinical examination, California Dental Association (CDA) evaluation, and patient questionnaire were used to rate and compare the objective and subjective evaluations of the ISCs.

    Results: The survival of implants and ISCs was 100%. The CDA ratings were satisfactory for all ISCs, with 70% being rated excellent. The patient rating was also high for the overall satisfaction item, with 21 being completely satisfied and 14 fairly satisfied. However, 12 patients wished for the replacement of their ISCs. Logistic regression analysis indicated that a less optimal embrasure fill was the most discriminating factor though not statistically significant (p = .082).

    Conclusions: One-third of the patients wished for the replacement of their ISCs. Soft tissue adaptation seems to be an important factor for overall satisfaction.

  • 4.
    Magnius, Magdalena
    et al.
    Orthodontic Clinic, Public Dental Service, Gävleborg County Council, Gävle, Sweden.
    Bazargani, Farhan
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Orthodontics, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Effects of oil-based and oil-free enamel prophylactic agents on bracket failure - a prospective randomized clinical trial2014In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 87-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluates and compares the effects of enamel prophylaxis using either oil-free pumice or oil-containing prophylaxis paste on the incidence of bracket failure in orthodontic patients.

    Forty-six orthodontic patients participated in this prospective clinical trial. A cross-mouth method was used in each patient, in which two diagonal quadrants (i.e. upper right and lower left or vice versa) were randomly assigned to the pumice group and the contralateral diagonal quadrants to the Prophy Paste (R) group. A total of 836 teeth were bonded using Transbond XT (3M Unitek) and monitored for an average of 23 months for bond failure. Chi-square analysis was used to compare the number of bracket failures between the groups.

    Overall, 26 bond failures occurred by the end of the trial. Fifteen bracket failures were observed in the Prophy Paste group (3.6%) and 11 in the pumice group (2.6%). The failure rates were fairly evenly distributed between the upper and lower jaws. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups (P = 0.43).

    This study showed that enamel prophylaxis using either pumice or Prophy Paste before orthodontic bonding works equally well in a clinical setting.

  • 5.
    Neveus, Tryggve
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Leissner, Lena
    University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rudblad, Stig
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Bazargani, Farhan
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Orthodontics, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Orthodontic widening of the palate may provide a cure for selected children with therapy-resistant enuresis2014In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 11, p. 1187-1191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: According to a number of small case series, orthodontic treatment may have anti-enuretic effects. Thus, we evaluated whether widening of the palate can alleviate enuresis and whether prognostic information can be gained from examining children's nocturnal respiration and nasal airway dimensions.

    Methods: Children with therapy-resistant enuresis underwent polysomnography, focusing on nocturnal respiration, and had their nasal airways examined. Rapid maxillary expansion was performed, widening the maxilla by approximately 0.5cm. The dental appliance was removed after 6months. Enuresis frequency was evaluated four times: at baseline, with the orthodontic apparatus in situ, after completed maxillary expansion and 1year post-treatment.

    Results: Of the 34 children recruited, one dropped out due to oral discomfort. The numbers of wet nights per week on the four assessment occasions were 5.481.48, 5.12 +/- 1.73, 3.09 +/- 2.49 and 2.63 +/- 2.81; p<0.001. The proportions of responders, intermediate responders and non-responders during treatment were 21.2%, 27.3% and 51.5%, respectively. Responders were found to have a lower enuresis frequency at baseline (p=0.001) and to have larger nasal airway dimensions (p=0.01).

    Conclusion: Orthodontic widening of the palate may be curative in a subgroup of children with therapy-resistant enuresis.

  • 6.
    Neveus, Tryggve
    et al.
    Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Leissner, Lena
    Dept Neurol, Univ Hosp Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rudblad, Stig
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bazargani, Farhan
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Orthodont, Postgrad Dent Educ Ctr, Örebro, Sweden..
    Respiration during sleep in children with therapy-resistant enuresis2014In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 3, p. 300-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimAlthough there is a known association between enuresis and snoring or sleep apnoeas, respiration during sleep has not been thoroughly studied in enuretic children. This study was performed with the aim of filling this gap in our knowledge. MethodsThirty-four children with therapy-resistant enuresis, but no history of heavy snoring or sleep apnoeas, underwent sleep registrations, including standard electroencephalography (EEG) and electrooculography (EOG) as well as registration of oxygen saturation, respiratory effort and nasal air flow. To assess nasal airway patency, rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry were performed before and after nasal decongestion. ResultsThe children were found to have a higher than expected apnoea hypopnoea index (AHI), due to a high frequency of hypopnoeas. They were also noted to have a tendency for respiratory arousals. Standard polysomnographic variables were normal. ConclusionWe provide baseline data of nocturnal respiration in enuretic children. The children were found to have subclinical signs of disordered respiration. This may be one of the explanations for their high arousal thresholds.

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