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  • 1.
    Bayfield, Hannah
    et al.
    Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Colebrooke, Laura
    University of Exeter, Exeter, England.
    Pitt, Hannah
    Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Stutter, Natalia
    UK Civil Serv, London, England.
    Awesome women and bad feminists: the role of online social networks and peer support for feminist practice in academia2020In: Cultural Geographies, ISSN 1474-4740, E-ISSN 1477-0881, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 415-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In her book, 'Bad Feminist', Roxane Gay claims this label shamelessly, embracing the contradictory aspects of enacting feminist practice while fundamentally being 'flawed human[s]'. This article tells a story inspired by and enacting Roxane Gay's approach in academia, written by five cis-gendered women geographers. It is the story of a proactive, everyday feminist initiative to survive as women in an academic precariat fuelled by globalised, neoliberalised higher education. We reflect on what it means to be (bad) feminists in that context, and how we respond as academics. We share experiences of an online space used to support one another through post-doctoral life, a simple message thread, which has established an important role in our development as academics and feminists. This article, written through online collaboration, mirrors and enacts processes fundamental to our online network, demonstrating the significance and potential of safe digital spaces for peer support. Excerpts from the chat reflect critically on struggles and solutions we have co-developed. Through this, we celebrate and validate a strategy we know that we and others like us find invaluable for our wellbeing and survival. Finally, we reflect on the inherent limitations of exclusive online networks as tools for feminist resistance.

  • 2.
    Brydges, Taylor
    et al.
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    An "Orphan" Creative Industry: Exploring the Institutional Factors Constraining the Canadian Fashion Industry2017In: Growth and Change, ISSN 0017-4815, E-ISSN 1468-2257, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 942-962Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, tier-two fashion countries have been making gains in the global fashion industry, with hip young brands, buzz-worthy fashion weeks and export-oriented designers. The Canadian fashion industry, on the other hand, continues to fall behind and instead has experienced recent high-profile closures of leading domestic fashion names. This paper explores why this is the case by considering a wide range of factors from a historical and institutional perspective. We argue that Canadian fashion is facing a number of systemic problems relating to wider institutional and policy weaknesses, rather than a lack of talent and know-how within the entrepreneurs and businesses in the sector. While the fashion industry is indeed global, we argue that it is in fact national and local level factors—political, economic, and cultural—that structure and constrain the Canadian fashion industry for independent designers. Through exploring the experiences of this group of actors—entrepreneurial fashion designers—in this particular context, we not only learn about Canada as an economy but also what is needed in order to develop the fashion industry more broadly. We provide a framework for analysing the range of socio-economic, historical, and political factors at the national level which affect the performance of the fashion sector and the operation of fashion designers as the entrepreneurial actors at the heart of the industry.

  • 3.
    Cai, Yuzhuo
    et al.
    School of Management, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Liu, Cui
    College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang, China.
    A framework for analysing the role of innovation policy in regional innovation system development2017In: International Journal of Innovation and Regional Development, ISSN 1753-0660, E-ISSN 1753-0679, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 237-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops a framework for analysing the role of innovation policy in regional innovation system (RIS) development. It specifically focuses on the influence of policy on a set of enabling conditions for RIS that have not been taken fully into account in previous innovation policy studies. Drawing on relevant literature on innovation systems, such as innovation policy, triple helix and policy mix etc., the enabling conditions for RIS development identified include both tangible and intangible dimensions of regional contexts, hinging around a range of wider institutional backdrops. The framework proposed provides an effective analytical tool for innovation policy evaluation and for designing innovation policies.

  • 4.
    Huggins, Robert
    et al.
    Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
    Regional Competitiveness and Schumpeterian Development: Policy Evolution in Wales2015In: Strategies for shaping territorial competitiveness / [ed] Jesús M. Valdaliso and James R. Wilson, Routledge , 2015, p. 131-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Kautonen, Mika
    et al.
    Research Centre for Knowledge, Science, Technology and Innovation Studies [TaSTI], School of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Raunio, Mika
    Research Centre for Knowledge, Science, Technology and Innovation Studies [TaSTI], School of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Transformation of regional innovation policies: from ‘traditional’ to ‘next generation’ models of incubation2017In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 620-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores a widely - employed instrument of regional innov a- tion policy: the innovation incubator. It proposes th at incubation approaches are moving away from a “traditional” approach strongly premised of physical infr a- structure and high - technology, to a more interactive, participatory, and social mode of innovation , in line with broader developments in innovation policy and theory . To practically illustrate this shift , we take two cases: a “traditional ” style of incubation in Wales, UK, and a “next generation” incubation programme in Fi n land. This paper reflect s on incub a tors as a mode of regional innovation policy, both past developments and future trends , to ensure that new policies and pr o- gramme s lea rn from best (and indeed , worst ) practice and build on , rather than replicate , past approaches.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Transformation of regional innovation policies: from ‘traditional’ to ‘next generation’ models of incubation
  • 6.
    Lundmark, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Economic development and place attractiveness: The case of Karlskoga in Sweden2020In: Siirtolaisuus-Migration, ISSN 0355-3779, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 21-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this short paper we introduce a research project currently underway exploring the industrial development, and accompanying socio-economic changes, in an industrial town in Sweden: Karlskoga. Here we consider specifically the confluence of factors and issues around economic development on the one hand, and population and migration on the other hand. We illustrate, through the Karlskoga case of a town that has experienced profound ups and downs both in its economic trajectory but also in accompanying population and migration trends, the importance of considering these two elements in harmony. We posit that to undertake sustainable economic development in the future, old industrial towns such as Karlskoga need to centre their efforts around quality of life and place attractiveness, and not only think of industrial development in a narrow sense. This is an introductory work relating to a project which is ongoing.

  • 7.
    Nordling, Nadja
    et al.
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Human Geography.
    Beyond the 'usual suspects' - Alternative qualitative methods for innovation policy studies2019In: African Journal of Science, Technology, Innovation and Development (AJSTID), ISSN 2042-1338, E-ISSN 2042-1346, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 513-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we make three points about the current state and promising future directions of qualitative research in our field of innovation policy research. First, we argue that research design and methods are dealt with quite superficially in most innovation policy studies papers and journals providing little guidance to new scholars as to how to approach their research. Secondly we argue that when methods are discussed, it tends to be a narrow range of qualitative methods that are used - most commonly a case study approach drawing on interviews and document analysis. Thirdly, we suggest broadening our approach to contain more participatory and action-based research; these are suggested as ways to include more groups in the research design, increase the impact of our work and allow us a deeper understanding of the formulation and development of innovation policy as is possible. We do not argue that the old methods should be put aside but that new additional approaches could be considered to capture the essence of innovation policy formulation.

  • 8.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Beyond top-down recipes to connected innovative places2016In: Regional Studies, Regional Science, E-ISSN 2168-1376, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 114-120Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Lancaster University Management School, Bailrigg, Lancashire, UK.
    "Old wine in new bottles"?: Smart Specialisation in Wales2014In: Regional Studies, Regional Science, E-ISSN 2168-1376, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 152-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the translation and implementation of Smart Specialisation in Wales. It finds that rather than taking a new approach to innovation policy, Welsh policy-makers are following a largely cluster-based rationale, which omits the important entrepreneurial discovery process to identify the real strengths of the region. The fresh idea presented by this paper is that a replication of past policy approaches that have been tried and found wanting is taking place rather than a new approach to innovation policy across Europe.

  • 10.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Questioning the implementation of smart specialisation: Regional innovation policy and semi-autonomous regions2018In: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, ISSN 2399-6544, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 530-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers the recent developments in regional innovation policy pertaining to the smart specialisation agenda from the perspective of a peripheral and semi-autonomous region – Wales in the UK. Through a case study of innovation policy developments in Wales over the past 20 years, and also a consideration of extant literature pertaining to regional innovation policy and smart specialisation, this paper finds a number of issues or shortcomings in the current predominant smart specialisation approach. These are traced back to the strong regional innovation system logic existing in European policy; a number of unresolved theoretical problems that could undermine the efficacy of innovation policy are identified. Both conceptual and rhetorical issues with the concept of the region are highlighted, and questions are asked about the applicability and tenability of smart specialisation approaches in semi-autonomous, cross-border regions, and for policymakers operating in circumstances of multi-level governance. This paper illustrates how such regions provide us with a lens or alternative perspective through which to reconsider our predominant theoretical and practical policy approaches, and highlights a number of potential problems with smart specialisation as it is applied in a diverse range of regional settings.

  • 11.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Universities and economic development in lagging regions: ‘triple helix’ policy in Wales2017In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 51, no 7, p. 982-993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This paper considers the applicability and relevance of triple helix-based policy and theory, in the weaker region context of Wales,where the success of such approaches has been questionable. It calls for a broader appreciation of the roles ofuniversities in weaker regions beyond a narrow ‘third mission’ conceptualization, moving away from a normativeapplication of the triple helix in contexts very different from those in which it was originated. Instead, it supports thebroadening of the original theory beyond the three key actors of university, government and business, and anincreasing focus on diverse regional settings and spaces.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Universities and Economic Development in Lagging Regions: ‘triple helix’ policy in Wales
  • 12.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department for Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Who Speaks for Economic Geography?2018In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 50, no 7, p. 1525-1531Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ida
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Personality and Place as resources for regional development: Alfred Nobel’s Karlskoga2023In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In “Alfred Nobel’s Karlskoga”, Sweden, the municipality has placed its most famous former resident at the heart of its economic development strategy. Through an in-depth qualitative case study, we examine the tensions and complexities surrounding this process and fill an existing research gap around personality-based place-branding for regional development purposes. The findings suggests that even with a world-famous figure as talisman, personality-based place branding is a complex endeavor, where old rivalries, tightknit social structures and economic dependencies makes us question – is it even possible to build a brand which is both inclusive and truly representative of a place?

  • 14.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    et al.
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Chiarini, Tulio
    Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome, Italy.
    Innovation studies: a North–South global perspective2018In: Innovation and Development, ISSN 2157-930X, E-ISSN 2157-9318, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 227-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The student of innovation studies is faced with a vast, multi-national and interdisciplinary field on which she must gain an overview and make a novel contribution. There exist a plethora of academic journals, networks, conferences and fora wherein researchers of innovation discuss and advance the topic. How to manage and understand this is a major challenge. This paper helps to make sense of this often confusing and ever-shifting field by reviewing the major developments over the past 20 years, highlighting the present ‘state of the art’ and identifying some important trends going forwards. It does this through a review of the published themes of two major international conferences in the field–Danish Research Unit for Industrial Dynamics (DRUID) and Global Network for the Economics of Learning, Innovation, and Competence Building Systems (GLOBELICS) – to gain a global view on the field. At the heart of the exploration is whether the sphere of innovation studies has evolved coherently worldwide, or there are geographic differences.

  • 15.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    et al.
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hamilton, Eleanor
    Department of Entrepreneurship, Strategy, and Innovation, Lancaster University Management School, Lancaster, UK.
    Jack, Sarah
    Department of Entrepreneurship, Strategy, and Innovation, Lancaster University Management School, Lancaster, UK.
    Gibbons, Amy
    Faculty of Science and Technology, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
    A step into the unknown: universities and the governance of regional economic development2016In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 1357-1373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the social and economic landscape changes, universities are coming under growing pressure to contribute to the economic development of their localities. This paper explores the increasing trends towards universities as key actors in the governance of regional economic development through activities to support economic and entrepreneurship development in their regions. A case study is presented of an institution in the UK which is increasingly situating itself in the economic governance sphere. Drawing on the experiences of those working at the coalface of economic governance activities, the opportunities and potential challenges faced by a university when engaging in such activities are explored. The ultimate goal of this paper is to shed light on universities' activities in the realm of regional economic governance, an area currently under-explored in extant literature.

  • 16.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lamine, Wadid
    Toulouse Business School, Toulouse, France; Univ Ottawa, Telfer Sch Management, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
    Jack, Sarah
    Lancaster university, Lancaster, United Kingdom; Stockholm Sch Econ, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Hamilton, Eleanor
    Lancaster university, Lancaster, UK.
    The entrepreneurial university and the region: what role for entrepreneurship departments?2018In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 1835-1855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the concept of the entrepreneurial university by examining roles of academic entrepreneurship departments in driving regional economic development outcomes. While a wealth of research investigates the role, activities and function of the entrepreneurial university, very little which focuses specifically on academic entrepreneurship departments, where much of the research, teaching and knowledge exchange concerning entrepreneurship takes place. Two case studies of large and active entrepreneurship departments are presented to illustrate the different roles and activities they undertake in the sphere of economic development in their regions or locales. A dual model of engagement is proposed, whereby the entrepreneurship department operates within the framework of the entrepreneurial university, but also as a regional actor in its own right.

    Download full text (pdf)
    The entrepreneurial university and the region: what role for entrepreneurship departments?
  • 17.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    et al.
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    MacKenzie, Niall G.
    Hunter Centre for Entrepreneurship, Strathclyde Business School, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Jones-Evans, Dylan
    Faculty of Business and Society, University of South Wales, Pontypridd, UK.
    From ‘Techniums’ to ‘emptiums’: the failure of a flagship innovation policy in Wales2018In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 1009-1020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the use of European Union Structural Funds to support the development of innovation policy within Wales during the period 2000-06. Drawing on data from the Welsh government and interviews with key stakeholders, it focuses specifically on the Technium programme, a high-profile technology-based innovation intervention that took a predominantly supply-side approach to supporting innovation, resulting in its eventual failure. Consistent within this is an analysis of the efficacy of supply-side policies using European Union funds to support research and development activities to aid economic growth in peripheral, weaker regions.

  • 18.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Soetanto, Danny
    Department of Entrepreneurship and Strategy, Lancaster University Management School, Lancaster University, Bailrigg Lancaster, UK.
    Jack, Sarah L.
    Department of Entrepreneurship and Strategy, Lancaster University Management School, Lancaster University, Bailrigg Lancaster, UK.
    Hamilton, Eleanor
    Department of Entrepreneurship and Strategy, Lancaster University Management School, Lancaster University, Bailrigg Lancaster, UK.
    Developing local entrepreneurial ecosystems through integrated learning initiatives: the Lancaster case2019In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers a concept gaining popularity: entrepreneurial ecosystems. It finds a significant lacuna in the concept as it stands as it does not sufficiently consider learning within regional ecosystems. Considering the established centrality of learning for entrepreneurial activity and regional development, it is surprising that the entrepreneurial ecosystem literature does not yet incorporate how learning occurs in time and space within regional ecosystems. This paper presents research conducted in the North West of England over (20) years examining programmes to support entrepreneurial and regional development. It argues that learning, and the pro-active support thereof, is crucial within an entrepreneurial ecosystem and should be fully considered within theoretical frameworks and policy blueprints designed to support and encourage entrepreneurship within regions. As a tangible suggestion of how to theoretically incorporate learning into entrepreneurship ecosystem development efforts, we present an integrated learning model developed by entrepreneurship scholars through collaborations with practitioners.

  • 19.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    et al.
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Thomas, Elisa
    Center for Innovation Research, Business School, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.
    Moving, settling and becoming: A conversation about mobility between two early career researchers2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Raunio, Mika
    et al.
    Migration Institute of Finland, Turku/Seinäjoki, Finland Academic Coordinator of Globelics Academy Tampere, at Research Center for Knowledge, Science, Technology and Innovation Studies (TaSTI), School of Social Science, Tampere University, Finland.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Centre for Urban and Regional Studies.
    Sheikh, Fayaz Ahmad
    The Center for Studies in Science Policy, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India.
    Egbetokun, Abiodun
    National Center for Technology Management, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.
    INTRODUCTION: Importance of methodological diversity for innovation system studies2019In: African Journal of Science, Technology, Innovation and Development (AJSTID), ISSN 2042-1338, E-ISSN 2042-1346, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 465-467Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Thomas, E.
    et al.
    University of Stavanger Business School, Stavanger, Norway.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    From ‘entrepreneurial’ to ‘engaged’ universities: social innovation for regional development in the Global South2020In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 54, no 12, p. 1631-1643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regional roles of universities in the Global South have been under-explored, and it is not clear how relevant are concepts originating from the Global North when applied in this context. The paper interrogates the concept of the ‘entrepreneurial university’ and its regional impact and engagement via a case study in Brazil. It is found that, in addition to purely entrepreneurial and economic activities and roles, initiatives relating to social innovation and entrepreneurship to solve profound regional problems are a key part of the university’s work. 

  • 22.
    Tsvetkova, Alexandra
    et al.
    OECD Trento Centre for Local Development, Trento, Italy.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Schmutzler, Jana
    Universidad del Norte,, Barranquilla, Colombia.
    Beyond global hubs: Broadening the application of systems approaches2019In: Local Economy, ISSN 0269-0942, E-ISSN 1470-9325, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 755-766Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Valdmaa, Kaija
    et al.
    Ragnar Nurkse Department of Innovation and Governance, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Müür, Jaanus
    Ragnar Nurkse Department of Innovation and Governance, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Challenges with strategic placed-based innovation policy: implementation of smart specialization in Estonia and Wales2021In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 681-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the implementation of smart specialization in Europe and exposes challenges arising from moving towards a more strategic (directional and non-neutral), place-based, and bottom-up mode of regional innovation policy. The analysis focuses on two small European nations - Wales and Estonia - and discusses the challenges that they have experienced with designing and implementing directional and non-neutral policies of smart specialization. Through a decade of research, drawing on interviews and documentary analysis, we find that in both cases, the entrepreneurial discovery process (EDP) was not conducted as it was envisioned. Furthermore, the undertaking of smart specialization has not necessarily delivered on the promise of orienting regional policy towards a more sustainable, place-based, and bottom-up approach. This has led to a situation where local problems as well as opportunities have been overlooked and local smart specialization agendas have instead been shaped by centrally chosen broad values and directions in a top-down manner.

  • 24.
    Zetterlund, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mathisen, Tina
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Lisa
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hinchcliffe, Gabriela
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Book Review: Living a Feminist Life2019In: Gender, Place and Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography, ISSN 0966-369X, E-ISSN 1360-0524, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 602-606Article, book review (Other academic)
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