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  • 1.
    Almqvist, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Academy for Education, Communication and Culture, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Små barns psykiska hälsa2011In: Psykisk hälsa, ISSN 0033-3212, no 3, p. 10-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Andersson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    The School of Education, Culture and Communication, and Special Education, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Bagger, Anette
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lillvist, Anne
    The School of Education, Culture and Communication, and Special Education, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Looking through the kaleidoscope of inclusion in policy on students with intellectual disabilities2023In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the Compulsory School for Students with Intellectual Disabilites (CSSID) is currently experiencing political change, as this type of school is being renamed and is undergoing organisational changes. The inclusion of children with intellectual disabilities (ID) in schooling, and in general society, has been challenged and debated for decades; such debates are at the heart of some of these changes. In this study, we have systematically investigated the policy work (e.g. government reports and statements) preceding and governing the changes. Hence, the purpose of the study is to contribute knowledge on how policy documents inscribe meaning to the inclusion of children with ID. Results show that discourses on inclusion are connected to neoliberal values and practices, such as assessment, global comparison, and accountability. It has been suggested that this may have a profound and long-term effect on how children with ID are fabricated and hence, how the child with ID and their education can be understood in terms of being included in the idea of ‘all students’ in policy, and in addition, in practice.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Bagger, Anette
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The stealth policy of inclusion of students with intellectual disability2022In: EDUCATION AND INVOLVEMENT IN PRECARIOUS TIMES: ABSTRACT BOOK. NERA CONFERENCE 2022 / [ed] Mikael Dal, School of Education, University of Iceland , 2022, p. 1039-1039Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish school system is currently undergoing a change, one in which issues of inclusion for students with ID are at stake. Policy documents mirror ideas, beliefs and value systems that are expressed in the society. In order to better understand the processes of in(ex)clusion of students with ID there is a need to analyze policy. In this study we have analyzed 61 parliamentary texts, such as propositions, decisions and investigations from 2011- 2021 considering compulsory school for students with intellectual disabilities, CSSID (Grundsärskola). Specifically, the analysis focused on how inclusion and students with intellectual disability were fabricated by contemporary policy discourses. Findings indicated that inclusion was fabricated as equal rights to schooling, as the right to be assessed and accountability and as being closer to the norm. Furthermore, the results show a strive for alignment of the structure of schools for children without ID and children with ID to synchronize the work between the school forms, and that much emphasis is put on students’ equal participation in the assessment of knowledge. This seems to mean “sameness” regarding hours, and systems in place for assessment. From this our conclusion is that inclusion is above all to be an active neoliberal subject and the most important thing is then that the organizational structures are in alignment. Hence/ this is example on what Allan (2015) calls the Stealth bureaucracy in Sally Tomlinsson’s irresistible rise of the SEN industry. 

    Allan, J. (2015).  Stealth bureaucracy in Sally Tomlinsson’s irresistible rise of the SEN industry. In (Eds.), Chris Forlin, Phyllis Jones & Scott Danforth, Foundations of inclusive education research, International perspectives on inclusive education vol 6, p37-52. Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited. 

    The Open Parliament Laboratory (2021). Örebro universitets analystjänst för riksdagsdata. www.riksdagsdata.oru.se

     

       

  • 4.
    Bagger, Anette
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Mediala diskurser om inkludering: En berättelse om (gem)ensamhet2021In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 45-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discourses on Inclusion in Media. This article explores discourses on inclusion in articles about education in Sweden’s four largest newspapers, and how these discourses position children, students, teachers, and schools. The findings indicate that the journalistic practices of agendization, accountabilization, factualization, emphasizing, and sensationalization have impacted arguments and increased the newsworthiness of the subject. Inclusion is often discussed in a sporadic and inconsistent way and students and teachers are often positioned out of a deficit perspective. Discourses were demarcated on three interrelated levels: an individual level, an organisational level, and a societal level. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Mediala diskurser om inkludering: En berättelse om (gem)ensamhet
  • 5.
    Björck-Åkesson, E
    et al.
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wilder, J
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Granlund, M
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Pless, M
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Simeonsson, R
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, M
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Almqvist, L
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Augustine, L
    Swedish Institute of Public Health, Östersund, Sweden.
    Klang, N
    Academy for Education, Communication and Culture, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Academy for Education, Communication and Culture, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the version for children and youth as a tool in child habilitation/early childhood intervention - feasibility and usefulness as a common language and frame of reference for practice2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, no S1, p. S125-S138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early childhood intervention and habilitation services for children with disabilities operate on an interdisciplinary basis. It requires a common language between professionals, and a shared framework for intervention goals and intervention implementation. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and the version for children and youth (ICF-CY) may serve as this common framework and language. This overview of studies implemented by our research group is based on three research questions: Do the ICF-CY conceptual model have a valid content and is it logically coherent when investigated empirically? Is the ICF-CY classification useful for documenting child characteristics in services? What difficulties and benefits are related to using ICF-CY model as a basis for intervention when it is implemented in services? A series of studies, undertaken by the CHILD researchers are analysed. The analysis is based on data sets from published studies or master theses. Results and conclusion show that the ICF-CY has a useful content and is logically coherent on model level. Professionals find it useful for documenting children's body functions and activities. Guidelines for separating activity and participation are needed. ICF-CY is a complex classification, implementing it in services is a long-term project.

  • 6.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wilder, Jenny
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Granlund, Mats
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Pless, Mia
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Simeonsson, Rune
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Swedish Institute of Public Health, Östersund, Sweden.
    Klang, Nina
    Academy for Education, Communication and Culture, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Academy for Education, Communication and Culture, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the version for children and youth as a tool in child habilitation/early childhood intervention: Feasibility and usefulness as a common language and frame of reference for practice2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, no SUPPL. 1, p. 125-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early childhood intervention and habilitation services for children with disabilities operate on an interdisciplinary basis. It requires a common language between professionals, and a shared framework for intervention goals and intervention implementation. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and the version for children and youth (ICF-CY) may serve as this common framework and language. This overview of studies implemented by our research group is based on three research questions: Do the ICF-CY conceptual model have a valid content and is it logically coherent when investigated empirically? Is the ICF-CY classification useful for documenting child characteristics in services? What difficulties and benefits are related to using ICF-CY model as a basis for intervention when it is implemented in services? A series of studies, undertaken by the CHILD researchers are analysed. The analysis is based on data sets from published studies or master theses. Results and conclusion show that the ICF-CY has a useful content and is logically coherent on model level. Professionals find it useful for documenting children's body functions and activities. Guidelines for separating activity and participation are needed. ICF-CY is a complex classification, implementing it in services is a long-term project

  • 7.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lee, A.
    Ståhl, Ylva
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Children in need of special support - a functional approach2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Patterns of participation and support in preschool settings for children with and without need for additional support2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    CHILD, Institute of Disability Research, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; Department of Special Education, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    Lillvist, Anne
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Factors influencing participation by preschool children with mild intellectual disabilities in Sweden: with or without diagnosis2015In: Research and practice in intellectual and developmental disabilities, ISSN 2329-7018, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 126-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the conceptualisation of mild intellectual disability and developmental delay in young children in Sweden, particularly in regard to children's participation and possible stigmatisation in preschool. A diagnosis of intellectual disability is more likely to ensure that preschool staff received targeted external support. However, children with or without a diagnosis can exhibit the same functional problems. Current research in the area suggests that a diagnosis itself will not guarantee that external support is provided for the child. Nor does a diagnosis always lead to stigmatisation. Research indicates that the manner in which special support is delivered may contribute to stigmatisation. The current provision of special support can mean that a child does not participate in the same activities as other children, when ideally special support should facilitate participation in the same activities as others. Other means to identify children for targeted support may be necessary in order to provide targeted services earlier.

  • 10.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    CHILD Institute of Disability Research School of Healt Science, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    School of Education, Culture and communication, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Factors influencing participation by preschool children with mild intellectual disability in Sweden: With or without the diagnosis2015In: Research and practice in intellectual and developmental disabilities, ISSN 2329-7018, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 126-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the conceptualisation of mild intellectual disability and developmental delay in young children in Sweden, particularly in regard to children's participation and possible stigmatisation in preschool. A diagnosis of intellectual disability is more likely to ensure that preschool staff received targeted external support. However, children with or without a diagnosis can exhibit the same functional problems. Current research in the area suggests that a diagnosis itself will not guarantee that external support is provided for the child. Nor does a diagnosis always lead to stigmatisation. Research indicates that the manner in which special support is delivered may contribute to stigmatisation. The current provision of special support can mean that a child does not participate in the same activities as other children, when ideally special support should facilitate participation in the same activities as others. Other means to identify children for targeted support may be necessary in order to provide targeted services earlier.

  • 11.
    Heikkilä, M
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University, Åbo, Finland.
    Lindberg, M
    Luleå Technical University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Andersson Schaeffer, J
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Saler, K
    Lycklig Arkitektur AB, Sweden.
    Towards norm-creative environments in early childhood education settings2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Heikkilä, Mia
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University, Åbo, Finland.
    Furu, Ann-Christin
    Åbo Akademi, Åbo, Finland.
    Hellman, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Rantala, Anna
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Barns deltagande i förskole- och daghemskontext under inledningen av coronavirusets utbrott i Finland och Sverige2020In: Barn, ISSN 0800-1669, E-ISSN 2535-5449, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 13-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The corona pandemic is a new social crisis that is sparsely researched, and different perspectives on the corona virus are needed. This article helps to deepen the knowledge of children’s expres-sion of the corona virus. It highlights staff’s descriptions of children’s expressions regarding the coronavirus outbreak in Finland and Sweden in early childhood education contexts in March 2020. The empirical material consists of 79 questionnaires from early childhood education staff. The concepts participation and resilience have been used as theoretical background and these are discussed in the article. The analysis highlights four different forms of participation in relation to the outbreak of the virus. The article contributes to putting children’s participation in relation to a social crisis like the corona pandemic and shows a multifaceted participation. This can have implications both on attitudes and working methods in relation to crises.

  • 13.
    Heikkilä, Mia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Flerspråkig identitetsutveckling som pedagogisk grund för en multietnisk förskola2017In: Flerspråkighet för lärande i förskola, förskoleklass och årskurs ett: Perspektiv från tre samproduktionsprojekt / [ed] Mia Heikkilä, Anne Lillvist, Västerås: School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University , 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Heikkilä, Mia
    et al.
    Utbildningsvetenskap och Matematik, Mälardalens högskola, Västerås.
    Lillvist, AnneMälardalens högskola, Utbildningsvetenskap och Matematik, Västerås.
    Flerspråkighet för lärande i förskola, förskoleklass och årskurs ett: Perspektiv från tre samproduktionsprojekt2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Flerspråkighet för lärande i förskola, förskoleklass och årskurs ett: Perspektiv från tre samproduktionsprojekt
  • 15.
    Heikkilä, Mia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Norling, Martina
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Wetso, Gun-Marie
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Perspektiv från tresamproduktionsprojekt: en introduktion2017In: Flerspråkighet för lärande i förskola, förskoleklass och årskurs ett: perspektiv från tre samproduktionsprojekt / [ed] Mia Heikkilä, Anne Lillvist, Västerås: School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University , 2017, p. 10-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Jonsson, Kristina
    et al.
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Promoting social learning in the Swedish leisure time centre2019In: Education Inquiry, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 243-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish leisure time centres (LTCs) are included in the Swedish Education Act and are used by almost every pupil in the age range of 6–9 years. They are governed by national policy documents with a certain emphasis on social learning. This article aims to highlight the LTC staff’s perspectives on their work of promoting social learning in the Swedish LTC. The article is based on a qualitative study, with data from group interviews with 21 LTC staff. The data are analysed with an abductive approach, with Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological systems theory as a theoretical point of departure. Our results show that the work is directed both by the staff’s beliefs and by the structural conditions of the activities, which the staff seldom feel able to influence. This causes frustration among staff and, owing to a lack of didactic reflections, social learning among pupils is not optimised. We argue that the LTC needs to be further explored, at the municipal and local management levels, to enable optimised social learning for pupils in the LTC.

  • 17.
    Lillvist, Anne
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    A functional approach to social competence in children in need of special support2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Lillvist, Anne
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Att leka och vara med andra: Social kompetens hos förskolebarn2007In: Specialpedagogisk tidskrift : att undervisa, ISSN 2000-429X, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Observations of social competence of children in need of special support based on traditional disability categories versus a functional approach2010In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 180, no 9, p. 1129-1142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Traditional disability categories may reveal little of the functional characteristics and social competence of a child. Objective: To compare the social competence of typically developing children, children with established disabilities and undiagnosed children identified by a functional approach to be in need of special support. Methods: Observations were conducted during free play using the Child Observation in Preschools, COP. Results: The variables positive emotion, social emotional warmth, teacher rated engagement and verbal to other children significantly discriminated the three groups. In a discriminant analysis based on group membership only 68% of all cases were correctly classified. Conclusions: Difficulties in classifying undiagnosed children in need of special support and children with established disabilities leads to the question of the fruitfulness of using traditional categories when assessing social competence. Instead a functional approach sensitive to the individual profile of each child is recommended.

  • 20.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Scientifically ground and didactically sound?: Preschool staff ́s views of the concept scientific ground2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Social kompetens och barn i behov av särskilt stöd2014In: Med sikte på förskolan: Barn i behov av stöd / [ed] Sandberg, Anette, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 2Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Social kompetens och barn i behov av särskilt stöd2009In: Med sikte på förskolan: Barn i behov av stöd / [ed] Sandberg, Anette, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Academy for Education, Communication and Culture, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Svårigheter att samspela och kommunicera – vad är hönan och vad är ägget?2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The applicability of a functional approach to social competence in preschool children in need of special support2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the thesis, with four empirical studies, was to test the applicability of a functional approach in investigating social competence of children in need of special support within the preschool context. The main theoretical framework was systems theory. Study I and II investigated preschool teachers’ definitions of children in need of special support and social competence respectively. Study III was a prevalence study investigating the number of children in need of special support based on traditional disability categories and functional difficulties. In study IV the social competence of children perceived to be in need of special support based on traditional categories and functional difficulties was compared using an observational method. The results in study I showed that teachers adopt either a child perspective or an organizational perspective in defining children in need of special support. The child perspective was related to a greater number of children in need of special support in the preschools, indicating that in preschools with several children in need of special support, teachers are more prone on seeing the needs of individual children, as opposed to the needs of the organisation. Study II found that teachers define social competence in young children in terms of intrapersonal skills, or as interpersonal relations. Study III found that the majority of children in need of special support are undiagnosed children with functional difficulties related to speech- and language and peer interaction. Study IV found similar profiles of social competence between diagnosed children and undiagnosed children perceived to be in need of special support. Overall, the results yielded support for adopting a functional approach in studying the social competence of children in need of special support.

    List of papers
    1. "Special Support" in preschools in Sweden: preschool staff's definition of the construct
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Special Support" in preschools in Sweden: preschool staff's definition of the construct
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: International journal of disability, development and education, ISSN 1034-912X, E-ISSN 1465-346X, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 43-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the definitions of the construct oyoung children in need of special supporto given by preschool staff in Sweden in 540 preschool units. The study has a mixed-methods design based on qualitative analysis of an open-ended question and quantitative analysis of questionnaire responses. The results reveal two general perspectives in definitions of the construct, a child perspective and an organisational perspective. Units with a child perspective had a higher proportion of children in need of special support, especially girls. The study highlights that the term ochildren in need of special supporto is partially socially constructed and is partially based on perceived child characteristics. The perceptions of what is considered to be a child in need of special support held by staff in a unit may impact on the services provided to children in need of special support.

    Keywords
    child perspective, preschool, organisational perspective, young children in need of special support
    National Category
    Psychology
    Research subject
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15392 (URN)10.1080/10349120903537830 (DOI)000274552700004 ()2-s2.0-76649090322 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2011-04-27 Created: 2011-04-27 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
    2. The construct of social competence: how preschool teachers define social competence in young children
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The construct of social competence: how preschool teachers define social competence in young children
    2009 (English)In: International Journal of Early Childhood, ISSN 0020-7187, E-ISSN 1878-4658, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 51-68Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Preschool teachers share their environment with young children on a daily basis and interventions promoting social competence are generally carried out in the preschool setting. The aim was to find out if and how preschool teachers’ definitions of social competence are related to factors in the preschool environment like: a) the number of children having problems related to social competence; b) the support provided to the children; and c) the preschool environment and current research definitions.Method: 481 preschools from 22 municipalities in Sweden participated. Data was analyzed using a mixed methods design in which a qualitative content analysis was followed by group comparisons using quantitative methods.Results: Preschool teachers defined social competence mainly as intrapersonal skills, or as interpersonal relations. The definitions of social competence were not related to the numbers of children having problems related to social skills or social competence in units, the amount of the support provided to the children or the preschool environment.Conclusion: Preschool teachers’ definitions of social competence are partly multidimensional, which implies that the interventions aimed at promoting children’s social skills and social competence also should be multidimensional. Preschool teachers’ definitions of social competence have little relevance to environmental factors, which indicate that social competence, as a construct is more dependent upon perceptions of the individual than on contextual factors.

    National Category
    Psychology
    Research subject
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15395 (URN)10.1007/BF03168485 (DOI)
    Available from: 2011-04-27 Created: 2011-04-27 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
    3. Preschool children in need of special support: prevalence of traditional disability categories and functional difficulties
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preschool children in need of special support: prevalence of traditional disability categories and functional difficulties
    2010 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 131-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate the prevalence of children who are in need of special support in the total population of children attending preschools (CA 1-6) in two Swedish counties, and the functional problems exhibited by the children in relation to demographical and environmental factors in the preschool context. Method: Survey distributed to (N = 1138) preschools in two Swedish counties. Results: The majority of children perceived by preschool teachers and in need of special support were undiagnosed children with functional difficulties related to speech, language and interaction with peers. Conclusion: Undiagnosed and diagnosed children share the same type of difficulties. Thus, in estimating the prevalence of children in need of special support in a preschool context, traditional disability categories capture only a small proportion of the children experiencing difficulties. Therefore, a functional approach in studies of children in need of special support is recommended.

    Keywords
    Disability categories, Functional approach, Point prevalence, Preschool children, Special support
    National Category
    Psychology
    Research subject
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15393 (URN)10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01494.x (DOI)000272565800032 ()2-s2.0-71949116698 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2011-04-27 Created: 2011-04-27 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
    4. Observations of social competence of children in need of special support based on traditional disability categories versus a functional approach
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Observations of social competence of children in need of special support based on traditional disability categories versus a functional approach
    2010 (English)In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 180, no 9, p. 1129-1142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Traditional disability categories may reveal little of the functional characteristics and social competence of a child. Objective: To compare the social competence of typically developing children, children with established disabilities and undiagnosed children identified by a functional approach to be in need of special support. Methods: Observations were conducted during free play using the Child Observation in Preschools, COP. Results: The variables positive emotion, social emotional warmth, teacher rated engagement and verbal to other children significantly discriminated the three groups. In a discriminant analysis based on group membership only 68% of all cases were correctly classified. Conclusions: Difficulties in classifying undiagnosed children in need of special support and children with established disabilities leads to the question of the fruitfulness of using traditional categories when assessing social competence. Instead a functional approach sensitive to the individual profile of each child is recommended.

    National Category
    Psychology
    Research subject
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15394 (URN)10.1080/03004430902830297 (DOI)2-s2.0-77956961731 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2011-04-27 Created: 2011-04-27 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
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  • 25.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Ciric, Anna-Maria
    A systems approach to understanding social skills, educational development and health in preschool children2016In: Preschool Children: Social Skills, Educational Development and Health Disparities / [ed] Deanna Arnold, Nova Science Publishers, Inc. , 2016, p. 1-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter aims to discuss the concept of social skills and relating concepts like social competence and socio-emotional learning and the status of these concept in Early Childhood Education and Care, ECEC internationally and within the Swedish preschool context in special. With a theoretical stance in systems theory and bio-ecological models, recent research on the impact of social skills on educational development and children’s health will be explored and discussed in the chapter. The impact of intrapersonal factors such as resilience as well as interpersonal relations and factors on different systems levels that reciprocally influence the everyday functioning of the child are presented. The aim of the chapter is also to share a general discussion of some of the many existing educational programs for teachers and/or parents aiming at strengthening the social skills of children, with a specific focus on their implications for the practice. The chapter ends with a discussion of how practitioners working with preschool children can adopt a holistic view of the capabilities of the child, thus strengthening the social skills and promoting educational development and health.

  • 26.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Sch Sustainable Dev Soc & Technol, Malardalen Univ, Västerås, Sweden; Res Program CHILD, Jönköping Univ, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping Univ, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Preschool children in need of special support: prevalence of traditional disability categories and functional difficulties2010In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 131-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate the prevalence of children who are in need of special support in the total population of children attending preschools (CA 1-6) in two Swedish counties, and the functional problems exhibited by the children in relation to demographical and environmental factors in the preschool context. Method: Survey distributed to (N = 1138) preschools in two Swedish counties. Results: The majority of children perceived by preschool teachers and in need of special support were undiagnosed children with functional difficulties related to speech, language and interaction with peers. Conclusion: Undiagnosed and diagnosed children share the same type of difficulties. Thus, in estimating the prevalence of children in need of special support in a preschool context, traditional disability categories capture only a small proportion of the children experiencing difficulties. Therefore, a functional approach in studies of children in need of special support is recommended.

  • 27.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Heikkilä, M
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Multilingual practices and teacher-parent cooperation: A case study of a Swedish preschool2017In: 27th EECERA Annual Conference: Abstract Book, 2017, p. 77-78Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explore the teacher-parent cooperation with a special focus on language development at one multiethnic preschool in Sweden. Previous research has shown that the growing ethnical diversity in the society palaces high demands on the competence of educators to warrant high quality education for all children (Björk-Willén & Cromdal, 2009, Kultti 2012). Further, high quality ECE has been linked to well establish preschool-parent collaboration strategies, indicating that parent collaboration is a valuable resource in adopting a culturally relevant pedagogy (Tobin, Arzubiaga and Adir, 2013). The theoretical framework rests upon Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological systems model and the concepts of relational agency and boundary space as described by Edwards (2006, 2011). The project was conducted with an interactive case study approach, with field observations and interviews conducted with preschool staff at one multiethnic preschool unit. The study was conducted in accordance with the ethical guidelines of the Swedish Research Council, regarding informed consent, dissemination of results, and confidentiality. The study shows the importance of parent-collaboration in itself and concerning children's multilingual identity development. The informal parent-collaboration turned out to be most efficient compared to formal forms of collaboration. The teachers' beliefs about multilingualism being a "good thing" made the preschool unit work to highlight children's multilingualism and here parent-collaboration had a part. Knowledge about language development of dual language learnersand multiethnicity need to be more focused on both in teacher education programmes as well as in facilitating development of cultural awareness and competence in all educators.

  • 28.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Heikkilä, Mia
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    En fallstudie om föräldrasamverkan kring barns språkutveckling på en multietnisk förskoleavdelning2017In: Flerspråkighet för lärande i förskola, förskoleklass och årskurs ett: Perspektiv från tre samproduktionsprojekt / [ed] Mia Heikkilä, Anne Lillvist, Västerås: School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University , 2017, p. 93-113Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta kapitel är det andra kapitlet i denna antologi som bygger på samproduktionssprojektet med titeln ”Förskolans samverkan med hemmet gällande barns språkutveckling, med särskilt fokus på multietnicitet”. Projektet har resulterat dels i kapitlet ”Flerspråkig identitetsutveckling som pedagogisk grund för en multietnisk förskola”, dels i detta kapitel som fokuserar på föräldrasamverkan. Utgångspunkten för dessa kapitel är den interaktiva fallstudie som genomförts på en multietnisk förskoleavdelning, där dokumentation av det dagliga arbetet skett genom intervjuer, observationer och samtal med avdelningens personal och förskolechefen. Således är de avsnitt som beskriver projektets design och metod snarlika i de två kapitlen. Däremot skiljer de sig åt i huvudsakligt fokus, där detta kapitel tar utgångspunkt i föräldrasamverkan och personalens gränsdragning kring den egna yrkesrollen vid sam-verkan med vårdnadshavare. Inledningsvis görs en presentation av studiens bakgrund samt tidigare forskning kring föräldrasamverkan ur ett multietniskt perspektiv, och därefter redogörs för det bioekologiska perspektivet samt relationellt aktörskap och gränsutrymme (Edwards, 2005:2011) som analytiska begrepp vilka guidat resultatanalysen. Kapitlet avslutas med en diskussion av resultaten i ett vidare perspektiv.

  • 29.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Heikkilä, Mia
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Vad är ett hemland?: Förskolan som arena för barns identitet2018In: Den interkulturella förskolan: mål och arbetssätt / [ed] Lahdenperä, Pirjo, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, 1, p. 44-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Early childhood education in Sweden: Policies, curriculum, quality and future challenges2018In: Handbook of International Perspectives on Early Childhood Education / [ed] Jaipaul L. Roopnarine, James E. Johnson, Suzanne Flannery Quinn, and Michael M. Patte, Routledge, 2018, p. 341-349Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The first Swedish preschool for young children was established in 1836 to provide a practical solution to the problem of child supervision during the Industrial Revolution. During this period of intense industrialization, women began working in urban factories and thus required daytime childcare. A century later, in the 1930s, the Swedish idea of family policy was challenged by sociologists Alva and Gunnar Myrdal. They had a political vision of public childcare and championed a scientific approach to child development. A social pedagogical preschool was developed, emphasizing children’s right to an inspiring environment outside of the home. National reforms were implemented, establishing child health centers, child benefits for all children, and municipal grants for preschool teachers’ salaries.

  • 31.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Play in a Swedish preschool context2015In: International perspectives on children's play / [ed] Jaipaul L. Roopnarine, Michael M. Patte, James E. Johnson and David Kuschner, Open University Press , 2015, 1, p. 175-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Anette
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    The construct of social competence: How preschool teachers define social competence in young children2009In: International Journal of Early Childhood, ISSN 0020-7187, E-ISSN 1878-4658, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 51-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preschool teachers share their environment with young children on a daily basis and interventions promoting social competence are generally carried out in the preschool setting. The aim was to find out if and how preschool teachers' definitions of social competence are related to factors in the preschool environment like: a) the number of children having problems related to social competence; b) the support provided to the children; and c) the preschool environment and current research definitions. Method: 481 preschools from 22 municipalities in Sweden participated. Data was analyzed using a mixed methods design in which a qualitative content analysis was followed by group comparisons using quantitative methods. Results: Preschool teachers defined social competence mainly as intrapersonal skills, or as interpersonal relations. The definitions of social competence were not related to the numbers of children having problems related to social skills or social competence in units, the amount of the support provided to the children or the preschool environment. Conclusion: Preschool teachers' definitions of social competence are partly multidimensional, which implies that the interventions aimed at promoting children's social skills and social competence also should be multidimensional. Preschool teachers' definitions of social competence have little relevance to environmental factors, which indicate that social competence, as a construct is more dependent upon perceptions of the individual than on contextual factors.

  • 33.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sheridan, Sonja
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Williams, Pia
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Play competence: a window to preschool teachers competence2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Department of Education, Communication and Culture, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Anette
    Department of Education, Communication and Culture, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sheridan, Sonja
    Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Williams, Pia
    Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Preschool teacher competence viewed from the perspective of students in early childhood teacher education2014In: Journal of Education for Teaching, ISSN 0260-7476, E-ISSN 1360-0540, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 3-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines contemporary issues in early childhood teacher education in Sweden. The aim of the study was to explore dimensions of the construct of preschool teachers' competence as reported by 810 students enrolled in early childhood teacher education at 15 Swedish universities. The results showed that students' definitions of preschool teacher competence were composed of six different dimensions: a general pedagogical competence, specific content competence, distinct teacher competence, play competence, competence of child perspective, and collaborative and social competence. In general, there were quite large variations in how students perceived the concept of preschool teacher competence and the extent to which they believed they developed these competences during the course of their education. The different dimensions of preschool teacher competence are discussed in relation to the content of the early childhood teacher education in Sweden, the curriculum for the preschool and the concept of professionalism in Early Childhood Education and Care.

  • 35.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Sandberg, Annette
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Granlund, Mats
    The construct of social competence: how preschool teachers define social competence in young children2009In: International Journal of Early Childhood, ISSN 0020-7187, E-ISSN 1878-4658, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 51-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preschool teachers share their environment with young children on a daily basis and interventions promoting social competence are generally carried out in the preschool setting. The aim was to find out if and how preschool teachers’ definitions of social competence are related to factors in the preschool environment like: a) the number of children having problems related to social competence; b) the support provided to the children; and c) the preschool environment and current research definitions.Method: 481 preschools from 22 municipalities in Sweden participated. Data was analyzed using a mixed methods design in which a qualitative content analysis was followed by group comparisons using quantitative methods.Results: Preschool teachers defined social competence mainly as intrapersonal skills, or as interpersonal relations. The definitions of social competence were not related to the numbers of children having problems related to social skills or social competence in units, the amount of the support provided to the children or the preschool environment.Conclusion: Preschool teachers’ definitions of social competence are partly multidimensional, which implies that the interventions aimed at promoting children’s social skills and social competence also should be multidimensional. Preschool teachers’ definitions of social competence have little relevance to environmental factors, which indicate that social competence, as a construct is more dependent upon perceptions of the individual than on contextual factors.

  • 36.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Collaboration in transition: Young children with learning disabilities in Sweden2014In: 24th EECERA Annual Conference: Abstract Book, 2014, p. 62-62Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Focus lies on the transition from preschool to special schools for children with learning disabilities and the collaboration between special schools, preschools and parents. Scarce research exists internationally about the transition into special school for young children with learning disabilities, independent of the age and time of transition. The concept of transitions rests upon Peters (2010) theoretical concepts of borderland and learning journeys. Collaboration will be analysed and discussed by the frame regulation, organisation and different viewpoints or approaches developed by Danermark (Danermark & Germundsson, 2011), and the ecological framework of development as theorized by Bronfenbrenner (1999). Questionnaire data from approximately 200 teachers in special schools focusing on the pre- and post-transition of children with disabilities aged 6-7 years beginning special schools. Questions concerned collaboration between micro environments, exchange of knowledge and experiences of policies and practices in transitions. Ethical approval from Swedish Ethical Review Board has been given Nr 2013:512. No information about individual children, names of schools or teachers has been collected. Group-level data will be presented. Preliminary results will be presented at the conference. The result will focus on regulation, organisation and viewpoints of special school teachers and collaboration and work in transitions across micro environments. The study will give knowledge about the collaborative process during transitions of young children with learning disabilities transitioning from preschool to special school, from the perspectives of teachers. This study is part of a research project focusing on diversity and inclusion in the learning journeys of children with learning disabilities in Sweden.

  • 37.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Från förskola till särskola2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Same Same But Different? Educational transitions of young children with intellectual disabilities2015In: Children and young people in school and society / [ed] Sandberg, Anette & Garpelin, Anders, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc. , 2015, p. 135-154Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In previous research transitions have been described in many different ways; as a sensitive period (Rimm-Kaufman & Pianta, 2000), as critical moments (Garpelin, 2014) and rites of passage (van Gennep, 1960). Dockett (2014) describes educational transitions as the "change in the identity and agency of individuals as they engage in different educational settings and adopt different roles" (p. 189). Although no shared definitions exist, the common feature for all definitions of transition is the notion of processes of change. This chapter draws upon findings from an ongoing project investigating the transitions from preschool to compulsory school for students with intellectual disabilities (CSSID) and for young children with intellectual disabilities in Sweden. In the following sections we will first describe some key points highlighted in the transition research today, such as the meaning of positive transition. This is followed by viewing transitions from the perspective of the bioecological model and the developmental niche. The chapter ends with a discussion of the key points and challenges regarding transitions for young children with intellectual disabilities.

  • 39.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    School of Education, Communication and Culture, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Wilder, Jenny
    School of Education, Communication and Culture, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden; department of Special Education, Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Valued and performed or not? Teachers' ratings of transition activities for young children with learning disability2017In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 422-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stakeholder collaboration has been identified as a facilitator for positive transition outcomes for all children, and especially for children in need of special support. However, the type and extent of stakeholder collaboration have shown to be related to teachers' view of their transition practises. Thus, this study set out to examine the transition activities reported by 253 teachers in Compulsory School for Students with Learning Disabilities in Sweden. The purpose was to study the type of transition activities performed and how important teachers regarded these activities to be. The results show that overall teachers are engaged in transition activities that can be described as mainly traditional, as they do not differ from transition activities carried out in other educational settings. The results also show that untraditional transition activities, such as home visits and joint parent meetings with preschools, are viewed as important, but rarely executed. The results are discussed from an ecological systems perspective, emphasising the interconnectedness of individuals and their environment. Focus is given to individualised transition processes and developmentally appropriate transition activities for young children with learning disability.

  • 40.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Wilder, Jenny
    School of Education, Communication and Culture, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden; Department of Special Education, Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Varför behövs en bok om övergångar?2017In: Barns övergångar: förskola, förskoleklass, fritidshem, grundsärskola och grundskola / [ed] Lilllvist, A; Wilder, J, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, p. 15-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Mia, Heikkilä
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi, Åbo, Finland.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    Länsmuset Västmanland .
    Saler, Karin
    Lycklig Arkitektur .
    Lindberg, Malin
    Engman, Jens
    Lillvist, Anne
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Rum i förskolan: För barns lek och lärande2020 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    National Oral Disability Centre, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden; CHILD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Klingberg, Gunilla
    Departement of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Faulks, Denise
    CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Service d’Odontologie, Clermont-Ferrand, France; Clermont Universite ́, Universite ́d’Auvergne, Centre de Recherche en Odontologie Clinique, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Granlund, Mats
    CHILD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Oral health, medical diagnoses, and functioning profiles in children with disabilities receiving paediatric specialist dental care – a study using the ICF-CY2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 16-17, p. 1431-1438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe 0-16-year-old children with disabilities receiving paediatric specialist dental care from a biopsychosocial perspective, with focus on relationship between oral health, medical diagnosis, and functioning.

    Method: A questionnaire with an International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth version (ICF-CY) Checklist for Oral Health was completed using structured interview, direct observation, and information from dental records. Descriptive data analysis was performed together with principle component analysis to calculate factors of functioning used in cluster analysis in order to present functioning profiles.

    Results: Ninety-nine children with at least one major medical diagnosis were included. Twenty had previous caries experience. Two factors of functioning were calculated, labelled "Physical ability" and "Intellectual ability, communication, and behaviour". Based on functioning profiles three clusters were determined. There were no statistically significant differences in caries experience between medical diagnoses or clusters.

    Conclusion: It was possible to identify profiles of functioning in children with disabilities receiving specialist dental care. Despite complex disabilities, the children had good oral health. Neither medical diagnosis nor functioning was found to have a clear relationship with oral health. To understand the environmental context leading to high-quality oral health, further studies of dental management in relation to medical and oral diagnoses and child functioning are needed.

  • 43.
    Norling, Martina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Let´s play!: Play Events and Preschool Staffs Strategies and to Support Concept Development in Swedish preschools2015In: 43rd Nordic Educational Research Association Congress (NERA 2015): Abstract book, 2015, p. 224-225Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to make visible which events that may occur in literacy-related play activities and how the preschool staff support concept development in these play activities. The theoretical approach is based on Barton’s (2007) ecological perspective of emergent literacy and Bronfenbrenner’s (1999) bioecological theory of human development to explore emergent literacy learning and development in a social context that occurs everywhere, not within a particular time throughout the day in preschool. The child ́s learning and developmental process is related to a person’s internal thinking process and external learning environment (Vygotsky, 1962) in which the language mediates meaning-making and learning in social practices. The study is based on a qualitative approach where six preschool units participated distributed across three different cities in Sweden. Video observations was conducted, from fall 2010 to spring 2011. For the purpose of this study 39 two-minute video sequences were selected and analyzed. The analysis are based on a deductive and inductive approach in order to find how do preschool staff support children’s concept development in literacy-related play activities and the characteristic features of these literacy-related events and concepts. Six thematic categories of events were discerned in the analysis of iteracy-related play activities. However the result in this study shows that the events, artifacts and preschool staff ́s timing in communication as well as interaction have major role to support children ́s concept development. The results of this study contribute to reflections and discussions regarding preschool staff’s approaches and didactic strategies to support verbal language, communication, reading and writing in relation to the Swedish preschool curriculum (Ministry of Education and Science, Lpfö 98/2011). This study put the lens on preschool staff ́s efforts in language learning and children’s opportunity for learning and development of emergent literacy processes in Swedish preschools.

  • 44.
    Norling, Martina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Let´s play! Playevents and preschool staffs strategies to support concept development in Swedish preschools2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Norling, Martina
    et al.
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Literacy-related play activities and preschool staffs strategies to support children’s concept development2016In: World Journal of Education, ISSN 1925-0746, E-ISSN 1925-0754, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 49-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates language-promoting strategies and support of concept development displayed by preschool staffs´ when interacting with preschool children in literacy-related play activities. The data analysed consisted of 39 minutes of video, selected systematically from a total of 11 hours of video material from six Swedish preschool units. The selected sequences were play situations where preschool staff and child/children were present and teachers used strategies for creating a high instructional climate. The results show that spontaneous play, dramatic play, adult-initiated play and child-initiated play, as well as access to objects or toys offer numerous opportunities in literacy-related play activities to support children’s concept development. Results showed that during play activities, such events stimulated children’s language modelling and presented opportunities to increase the preschool children’s concept development. However, more research is needed in this area, especially concerning how preschool staffs´ participation, timing and sensitivity help support children in literacy-related play activities.

  • 46.
    Norling, Martina
    et al.
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Literacy-related play activities and preschool staffs strategies to support children’s concept development2016In: World Journal of Education, ISSN 1925-0746, E-ISSN 1925-0754, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 49-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates language-promoting strategies and support of concept development displayed by preschool staffs´ when interacting with preschool children in literacy-related play activities. The data analysed consisted of 39 minutes of video, selected systematically from a total of 11 hours of video material from six Swedish preschool units. The selected sequences were play situations where preschool staff and child/children were present and teachers used strategies for creating a high instructional climate. The results show that spontaneous play, dramatic play, adult-initiated play and child-initiated play, as well as access to objects or toys offer numerous opportunities in literacy-related play activities to support children’s concept development. Results showed that during play activities, such events stimulated children’s language modelling and presented opportunities to increase the preschool children’s concept development. However, more research is needed in this area, especially concerning how preschool staffs´ participation, timing and sensitivity help support children in literacy-related play activities.

  • 47.
    Norling, Martina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics, Västerås, Sweden.
    Literacy-related play events and preschool staff strategies to support Swedish language development in multilingual and Swedish speaking children2015In: 25th EECERA Annual Conference: Abstract Book, 2015, p. 70-71Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to make visible which language events may occur in literacy-related play activities in preschool and how multilingual and Swedish speaking preschool children are supported in these play activities. Previous research shows that preschool children have unique opportunities to develop their language and emergent literacy skills in literacy-related play activities in preschool (Nitecki & Chung, 2013; Saracho, 2004; Turnbull et al., 2009). The theoretical approach is based on Vygotsky’s social cultural theory and Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological theory which explores emergent literacy learning and development in a social context. In this study, data, in the form of video observations, was collected from six preschool units in three cities in Sweden, with children from one to five years old. Manifest content analysis, using both deductive and inductive approaches, was performed on the transcripts. The study was carried out in accordance with the ethical principles of social sciences research (Ministry of Education and Research, 2003). Preschool staff and 71 parents were personally and in writing informed about the study. The parents gave written permission for their children to be part of the data collection. The results show that mainly during play activities, children sought confirmation of language concepts, to make sense of, and understand, the concepts based on earlier experiences. The findings show six themes of events in the literacy-related play activities. This paper will contribute to better understanding the preschool staff’s presence in play events and the unique opportunities afforded to develop both multilingual and Swedish speaking children´s language.

  • 48.
    Sandberg, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap, Västerås, Sweden.
    Educational Support to Preschool Children in Need of Special Support2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49. Sandberg, Anette
    et al.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Granlund, Mats
    "Special Support" in preschools in Sweden: preschool staff's definition of the construct2010In: International journal of disability, development and education, ISSN 1034-912X, E-ISSN 1465-346X, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 43-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the definitions of the construct oyoung children in need of special supporto given by preschool staff in Sweden in 540 preschool units. The study has a mixed-methods design based on qualitative analysis of an open-ended question and quantitative analysis of questionnaire responses. The results reveal two general perspectives in definitions of the construct, a child perspective and an organisational perspective. Units with a child perspective had a higher proportion of children in need of special support, especially girls. The study highlights that the term ochildren in need of special supporto is partially socially constructed and is partially based on perceived child characteristics. The perceptions of what is considered to be a child in need of special support held by staff in a unit may impact on the services provided to children in need of special support.

  • 50.
    Sandberg, Anette
    et al.
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, The Research Program CHILD, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, The Research Program CHILD, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    Institute of Public Health, Östersund, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    School of Communication and Education, The Research Program CHILD, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    School of Health Sciences, The Research Program CHILD, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    ”Special support” in preschools in Sweden: preschool staff’s definition of the construct2010In: International journal of disability, development and education, ISSN 1034-912X, E-ISSN 1465-346X, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 43-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the definitions of the construct “young children in need of special support” given by preschool staff in Sweden in 540 preschool units. The study has a mixed‐methods design based on qualitative analysis of an open‐ended question and quantitative analysis of questionnaire responses. The results reveal two general perspectives in definitions of the construct, a child perspective and an organisational perspective. Units with a child perspective had a higher proportion of children in need of special support, especially girls. The study highlights that the term “children in need of special support” is partially socially constructed and is partially based on perceived child characteristics. The perceptions of what is considered to be a child in need of special support held by staff in a unit may impact on the services provided to children in need of special support.

12 1 - 50 of 63
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