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  • 1.
    Hodza-Beganovic, Ruhija
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. International Medical Program-IMP, Centre for Teaching and Research inDisaster Medicine, Region Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Berggren, P.
    International Medical Program-IMP, Centre for Teaching and Research inDisaster Medicine, Region Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden; Linköping University, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hugelius, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Survey-based experiential learning - means of raising professional awareness in developing countries2019In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 29, no Suppl. 4, p. 586-586, article id ckz186.547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Healthcare in post-war Balkans is still under development. Healthcare changes towards more complex clinical scenarios that need different competencies around patients. This study reports on survey based learning to increasing professional awareness for developing sustainable healthcare settings using an experiential learning approach.

    Methods: In this study, researchers and educators identified non-technical skills concepts on individual, team, and organizational levels. These concepts were contextualized into the local setting through interactive workshops. Two pediatric surgery clinics in Kosovo and Bosnia and Herzegovina participated who were part of an international clinical skills training project. The tools and surveys were: Johari window, Kolb’s learning style questionnaire, team members exchange quality scale, the IPEC framework for interprofessional competence, Team STEPPS observation tool and organizational models.

    Results: A model is developed for contextualizing core concepts on professional awareness into a local developing healthcare setting. It entails three steps conducted in consecutive workshops: Identifying research-based concepts on professional compe-tence on individual, team and organizational levels. Facilitating local contextualization of these concepts by using surveys in interactive workshops. Agreeing on indicators to maintain high professional awareness.

    Conclusions: Capacity-building in public health can be conducted through increasing professional awareness. Professional awareness can be approached in individual, team and organizational dimensions. Established core concepts of non-technical skills can be contextualized in other cultures through a survey-based experiential learning approach.

    Key messages:

    • Professional individual, team and organizational awareness is a vital part of conducting efficient healthcare.
    • The professional awareness can be enhanced through processing core concepts in a local context through facilitated workshops.
  • 2.
    Hugelius, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Disaster response for recovery: survivors experiences, and the use of disaster radio to promote health after natural disasters2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Disasters occur all over the world, and affect a rising number of people. The health effects of natural disasters depend on several factors present before, during, and after a disaster event. However, there is only limited knowledge of survivors experiences, needs, and health after natural disasters. Disaster radio means a temporary radio station that broadcasts information, music, and support to the affected population. Disaster radio has the potential to function even in a severely affected area, but its effects need to be further evaluated from a health perspective. The context of this thesis was the Haiyan supertyphoon that hit parts of the Philippines in November 2013.

    The overall aim was to describe survivors’ and health professionals’ experiences during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster, the health effects from such a disaster, and how disaster radio as a disaster response intervention can be used and evaluated from a health perspective. The thesis includes four studies using qualitative research methods, including content analysis and a phenomenological hermeneutic method, and quantitative methods with statistical analysis.

    The results show that the Haiyan typhoon affected physical, psychological, and social dimensions of health. Disaster radio was used to broadcast health-related information and psychosocial support, and made a positive contribution to recovery from the perspective of the survivors. Being a health professional deployed during the disaster was an experience of being both a helper and a victim. The use of a self-selected internetbased sample recruited via Facebook for a web-based survey mitigated several practical challenges related to disaster research, but also raised questions about the generalizability of the results.

    Based on the findings, the importance of an integrated physical, psychological, and social health response to natural disasters is emphazized. Also, the health care system should prepare to use disaster radio as disaster response. In addition, the results suggest that disaster training for health professionals should include personal preparation and coping strategies. Internet-based methods in disaster research need to be further evaluated.

    List of papers
    1. Disaster Radio for Communication of Vital messages and Health-related Information: Experiences from the Haiyan typhoon, The Philippines
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disaster Radio for Communication of Vital messages and Health-related Information: Experiences from the Haiyan typhoon, The Philippines
    2016 (English)In: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, ISSN 1935-7893, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 591-597Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Crisis communication is seen as an integrated and essential part of disaster management measures. After Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) in the Philippines 2013, radio was used to broadcast information to the affected community. The aim of this study was to describe how disaster radio was used to communicate vital messages and health-related information to the public in one affected region after Typhoon Haiyan.

    Methods: Mixed-methods analysis using qualitative content analysis and descriptive statistics was used to analyze 2587 logged radio log files.

    Results: Radio was used to give general information and to demonstrate the capability of officials to manage the situation, to encourage, to promote recovery and foster a sense of hope, and to give practical advice and encourage self-activity. The content and focus of the messages changed over time. Encouraging messages were the most frequently broadcast messages. Health-related messages were a minor part of all information broadcast and gaps in the broadcast over time were found.

    Conclusion: Disaster radio can serve as a transmitter of vital messages including health-related information and psychological support in disaster areas. The present study indicated the potential for increased use. The perception, impact, and use of disaster radio need to be further evaluated.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, USA: Cambridge University Press, 2016
    Keywords
    Communication, disaster, natural disasters, health communication, psychosocial support
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Caring Sciences w. Medical Focus
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47270 (URN)10.1017/dmp.2015.188 (DOI)000381283000015 ()26940871 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84960112370 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2016-01-01 Created: 2016-01-01 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    2. "To silence the deafening silence": Survivor's needs and experiences of the impact of disaster radio for their recovery after a natural disaste
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>"To silence the deafening silence": Survivor's needs and experiences of the impact of disaster radio for their recovery after a natural disaste
    2016 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 28, p. 8-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the aftermath of the Haiyan typhoon, disaster radio was used to spread information and music to the affected population. The study described survivors' experiences of being in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster and the impact disaster radio made on recovery from the perspective of the individuals affected. Twenty eight survivors were interviewed in focus groups and individual interviews analyzed with phenomenological-hermeneutic method. Being in disaster mode included physical and psychosocial dimensions of being in the immediate aftermath of the disaster. Several needs among the survivors were expressed. Disaster radio contributed to recovery by providing facts and information that helped the survivor to understand and adapt. The music played contributed to emotional endurance and reduced feelings of loneliness. To re-establish social contacts, other interventions are needed. Disaster radio is a positive contribution to the promotion of survivors' recovery after disasters involving a large number of affected people and severely damaged infrastructure. Further studies on the use and impact of disaster radio are needed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2016
    Keywords
    Disaster, needs, psychosocial support, radio, recovery, biopsychosocial model
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Caring sciences; Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47268 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2015.11.009 (DOI)000383526700002 ()26724170 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-01-01 Created: 2016-01-01 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
    3. Being Both Helpers and Victims: Health Professionals' Experiences of Working During a Natural Disaster
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being Both Helpers and Victims: Health Professionals' Experiences of Working During a Natural Disaster
    2017 (English)In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In November 2013, the Haiyan typhoon hit parts of the Philippines. The typhoon caused severe damage to the medical facilities and many injuries and deaths. Health professionals have a crucial role in the immediate disaster response system, but knowledge of their experiences of working during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster is limited. Aim The aim of this study was to explore health professionals' experiences of working during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster.

    Method: Eight health professionals were interviewed five months after the disaster. The interviews were analyzed using phenomenological hermeneutic methods.

    Results: The main theme, being professional and survivor, described both positive and negative emotions and experiences from being both a helper, as part of the responding organization, and a victim, as part of the surviving but severely affected community. Sub-themes described feelings of strength and confidence, feelings of adjustment and acceptance, feelings of satisfaction, feelings of powerless and fear, feelings of guilt and shame, and feelings of loneliness.

    Conclusion: Being a health professional during a natural disaster was a multi-faceted, powerful, and ambiguous experience of being part of the response system at the same time as being a survivor of the disaster. Personal values and altruistic motives as well as social aspects and stress-coping strategies to reach a balance between acceptance and control were important elements of the experience. Based on these findings, implications for disaster training and response strategies are suggested. Hugelius K , Adolfsson A , Örtenwall P , Gifford M . Being both helpers and victims: health professionals' experiences of working during a natural disaster.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, USA: Cambridge University Press, 2017
    Keywords
    disaster medicine; disasters; health professionals; phenomenological hermeneutic method; relief work
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54391 (URN)10.1017/S1049023X16001412 (DOI)000398228600002 ()28043240 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85007572037 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Fortifikationsföreningens Forskningsfond (Foundation of Fortification-Related Research)

    Örebro County Council Research Committee (Örebro, Sweden)

    Available from: 2017-02-07 Created: 2017-01-10 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    4. Health among disaster survivors 30 months after Typhoon Haiyan, using a selfselected Internet sample in a web-based survey
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health among disaster survivors 30 months after Typhoon Haiyan, using a selfselected Internet sample in a web-based survey
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56205 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-03-10 Created: 2017-03-08 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Hugelius, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    HESPER Web; A web based survey to assess experienced needs in disasters and humanitarian emergencies2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Hugelius, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    The HOPE model for disaster nursing: a result from a systematic literature review2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Hugelius, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    The link between disaster radio and health in disaster affected commmunities2018In: World Radio Day, UN Geneva, 2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Hugelius, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Adams, Mike
    First Response Radio, Frome, UK.
    Romo-Murphy, Eila
    Health Communication Resources (UK), UK.
    The Power of Radio to Promote Health and Resilience in Natural Disasters: A Review2019In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 14, article id E2526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humanitarian radio has been used in humanitarian aid efforts and after natural disasters over the last 15 years. However, the effects have barely been evaluated, and there are few scientific reports on the impact of radio as a disaster health response intervention. Therefore, this study aimed to provide an overview of the use and impact of humanitarian radio in natural disasters from a health perspective. A literature review of 13 scientific papers and grey literature resources was conducted. The results show that humanitarian radio could be used to promote both physical and psychosocial wellbeing by providing health-related information, advice and psychosocial support in natural disasters. Community resilience can be enhanced by the promotion of community engagement and can strengthen self-efficacy and community efficacy. Radio also has the potential to cost-effectively reach a large number of affected people in areas with severely damaged infrastructure. Radio could, therefore, contribute to health recovery and wellbeing from both individual and community perspectives. As such, health professionals; crises communication professionals, including radio journalists; and disaster-managing stakeholders should be prepared and trained to use humanitarian radio as an integrated part of the disaster health response in natural disasters.

  • 7.
    Hugelius, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Karlskoga Hospital, Karlskoga, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    The HOPE model for disaster nursing: A systematic literature review2019In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 45, p. 1-9Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Hugelius, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Karlskoga Hospital, Orebro County Council, Karlskoga, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Gifford, Mervyn
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Örtenwall, Per
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Facebook Enables Disaster Research Studies: The Use of Social Media to Recruit Participants in a Post-Disaster Setting2017In: PLOS Currents, ISSN 2157-3999, E-ISSN 2157-3999, Vol. 9, article id ecurrents.dis.f4a444e1f182776bdf567893761f86b8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Disaster research entails several methodological challenges, given the context of a disaster. This article aims to describe and evaluate the use of Facebook as a tool to recruit participants for a self-selected Internet sample using a web-based survey in a post-disaster setting in the Philippines after the Haiyan typhoon hit parts of the country in November 2013.

    METHOD: An invitation to a web-based survey about health was posted on several Facebook pages during a ten-day period.

    RESULTS: In total, 443 individuals who had survived the Haiyan typhoon participated in the study. The demographics of the study sample were similar to the general demographics in the Philippines, considering gender, age distribution and level of education.

    DISCUSSION: The study showed that the use of social media to recruit participants for disaster research could limit several of the practical and ethical challenges connected to disaster research. However, the method demands access to the Internet and requires several strategic considerations, particularly concerning non-probability sample biases and generalization as well as an active approach from the researcher.

  • 9.
    Hugelius, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Gifford, Mervyn
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Örtenwall, Per
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Social media can be used to recruit study participants in disaster research2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hugelius, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Karlskoga Hospital, Örebro Region County Council, Karlskoga, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Örtenwall, Per
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gifford, Mervyn
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Being Both Helpers and Victims: Health Professionals' Experiences of Working During a Natural Disaster2017In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In November 2013, the Haiyan typhoon hit parts of the Philippines. The typhoon caused severe damage to the medical facilities and many injuries and deaths. Health professionals have a crucial role in the immediate disaster response system, but knowledge of their experiences of working during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster is limited. Aim The aim of this study was to explore health professionals' experiences of working during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster.

    Method: Eight health professionals were interviewed five months after the disaster. The interviews were analyzed using phenomenological hermeneutic methods.

    Results: The main theme, being professional and survivor, described both positive and negative emotions and experiences from being both a helper, as part of the responding organization, and a victim, as part of the surviving but severely affected community. Sub-themes described feelings of strength and confidence, feelings of adjustment and acceptance, feelings of satisfaction, feelings of powerless and fear, feelings of guilt and shame, and feelings of loneliness.

    Conclusion: Being a health professional during a natural disaster was a multi-faceted, powerful, and ambiguous experience of being part of the response system at the same time as being a survivor of the disaster. Personal values and altruistic motives as well as social aspects and stress-coping strategies to reach a balance between acceptance and control were important elements of the experience. Based on these findings, implications for disaster training and response strategies are suggested. Hugelius K , Adolfsson A , Örtenwall P , Gifford M . Being both helpers and victims: health professionals' experiences of working during a natural disaster.

  • 11.
    Hugelius, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Anaesthesia, Karlskoga Hospital, Karlskoga, Sweden.
    Berg, Sara
    School of Health and Medical Science, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Ambulance Department, Värmland County Council, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Westerberg, Elin
    School of Health and Medical Science, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Ambulance Department, Värmland County Council, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Gifford, Mervyn
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Swedish ambulance managers descriptions of crisis support for ambulance staff after potentially traumatic events2014In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 589-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:Ambulance staff face complex and sometimes stressful or potentially traumaticsituations, not only in disasters but also in theirroutine daily work. The aim of this study wasto survey ambulance managers’ descriptions of crisis support interventions for ambulance staffafter potential traumatic events (PTEs).

    Methods:Semistructured interviews with a qualitative descriptive design were conductedwith six ambulance managers in a health care region in central Sweden. The data wasanalyzed using content analysis.

    Result:Five categories were found in the result: (1) description of a PTE; (2) descriptionand performance of crisis support interventions; (3) impact of working in potentiallytraumatic situations; (4) the ambulance managers’ role in crisis support interventions;and (5) the ambulance managers’ suggestions for improvement.Ambulance managersdescribed crisis support interventions after a PTE as a single, mandatory group meetingwith a structure reminiscent of debriefing. The ambulance managers also expressed doubtsabout the present structures for crisis support and mentioned an alternative approachwhich is more in line with present evidence-based recommendations.

    Conclusion:The results indicated a need for increased understanding of the importanceof the managers’ attitudes for ambulance staff; a need for further implementation ofevidence-based recommendations for crisis support interventions was also highlighted.

  • 12.
    Hugelius, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Gifford, Mervyn
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Örtenwall, Per
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Disaster radio: A tool to meet experienced needs after the Haiyan typhoon2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Hugelius, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Anesthesia, Karlskoga Hospital, Karlskoga, Sweden.
    Gifford, Mervyn
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Örtenwall, Per
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Disaster Radio for Communication of Vital messages and Health-related Information: Experiences from the Haiyan typhoon, The Philippines2016In: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, ISSN 1935-7893, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 591-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Crisis communication is seen as an integrated and essential part of disaster management measures. After Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) in the Philippines 2013, radio was used to broadcast information to the affected community. The aim of this study was to describe how disaster radio was used to communicate vital messages and health-related information to the public in one affected region after Typhoon Haiyan.

    Methods: Mixed-methods analysis using qualitative content analysis and descriptive statistics was used to analyze 2587 logged radio log files.

    Results: Radio was used to give general information and to demonstrate the capability of officials to manage the situation, to encourage, to promote recovery and foster a sense of hope, and to give practical advice and encourage self-activity. The content and focus of the messages changed over time. Encouraging messages were the most frequently broadcast messages. Health-related messages were a minor part of all information broadcast and gaps in the broadcast over time were found.

    Conclusion: Disaster radio can serve as a transmitter of vital messages including health-related information and psychological support in disaster areas. The present study indicated the potential for increased use. The perception, impact, and use of disaster radio need to be further evaluated.

  • 14.
    Hugelius, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Karlskoga Hospital, Karlskoga, Sweden.
    Gifford, Mervyn
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Örtenwall, Per
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Health among disaster survivors 30 months after Typhoon Haiyan, using a selfselected Internet sample in a web-based surveyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Hugelius, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Karlskoga Hospital, Örebro County Council, Karlskoga, Sweden.
    Gifford, Mervyn
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Örtenwall, Per
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Health among disaster survivors and health professionals after the Haiyan Typhoon: a self-selected Internet-based web survey2017In: International Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1865-1372, E-ISSN 1865-1380, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Natural disasters affected millions of people worldwide every year. Evaluation of disaster health and health response interventions is faced with several methodological challenges. This study aimed (1) to describe survivors' and health professionals' health, 30 months after a natural disaster using a web-based self-selected Internet sample survey designed and (2) to evaluate the health effects of disaster response interventions, in the present study with a focus on disaster radio.

    Methods: A web-based survey was used to conduct a cross-sectional study approximately 30 months after typhoon Haiyan. The GHQ-12, EQ-5D-3L, and EQ-VAS instruments were used in addition to study-specific questions. A self-selected Internet sample was recruited via Facebook.

    Results: In total, 443 survivors, from what 73 were health professionals, participated in the study. The Haiyan typhoon caused both physical and mental health problems as well as social consequences for the survivors. Mental health problems were more frequently reported than physical injuries. Health professionals reported worse overall health and a higher frequency of mental health problems compared to other survivors.

    Conclusions: There were short-term and long-term physical, psychological, and social consequences for the survivors as a result of the Haiyan typhoon. Mental health problems were more frequently reported and lasted longer than physical problems. Health professionals deployed during the disaster reported worse health, especially concerning mental health problems. The survey used was found useful to describe health after disasters. Keywords: Disaster, Natural disaster, Disaster medicine, Disaster response, Mental health, Health professionals

  • 16.
    Hugelius, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Gifford, Mervyn
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Örtenwall, Per
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    ”The turning point of everything”: Health professionals experiences of working during a natural disaster2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Hugelius, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Karlskoga Hospital, Karlskoga, Sweden.
    Gifford, Mervyn
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Örtenwall, Per
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Center for Woman’s, Family and Child Health, Faculty of Health Science, Buskerud & Vestfold University College, Kongsberg, Norway.
    "To silence the deafening silence": Survivor's needs and experiences of the impact of disaster radio for their recovery after a natural disaste2016In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 28, p. 8-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the aftermath of the Haiyan typhoon, disaster radio was used to spread information and music to the affected population. The study described survivors' experiences of being in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster and the impact disaster radio made on recovery from the perspective of the individuals affected. Twenty eight survivors were interviewed in focus groups and individual interviews analyzed with phenomenological-hermeneutic method. Being in disaster mode included physical and psychosocial dimensions of being in the immediate aftermath of the disaster. Several needs among the survivors were expressed. Disaster radio contributed to recovery by providing facts and information that helped the survivor to understand and adapt. The music played contributed to emotional endurance and reduced feelings of loneliness. To re-establish social contacts, other interventions are needed. Disaster radio is a positive contribution to the promotion of survivors' recovery after disasters involving a large number of affected people and severely damaged infrastructure. Further studies on the use and impact of disaster radio are needed.

  • 18.
    Hugelius, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Tapani, Jan
    Krishantering i praktiken2017 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    et al.
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jaensson, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Karuna
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Hugelius, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Postoperative recovery after general and regional anesthesia in patients undergoing day surgery: A mixed methods study2019In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 517-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate differences and describe experiences of postoperative recovery after day surgery between patients undergoing general anesthesia (GA) versus regional anesthesia (RA).

    Design: A mixed methods design.

    Methods: Day surgery patients (N = 401) were included. Postoperative recovery was assessed daily for 14 days using the Swedish Web Version of the Quality of Recovery questionnaire included in a mobile application. In addition, qualitative interviews were completed with 20 day surgery patients. Quantitative and qualitative data were first analyzed separately and then merged.

    Findings: There were significant differences in Swedish Web Version of the Quality of Recovery between GA and RA on days 1 to 13 (P < .05). These findings could not be confirmed in the qualitative findings, except for psychological issues as well as tiredness and fatigue. Unexpected issues contributed to a greater extent to the theme not feeling well Pain in the surgical wound was overall the biggest problem.

    Conclusions: There seems to be a poorer recovery after GA compared with RA. Tiredness or fatigue is present also after minor surgery in RA. Unexpected issues affect recovery negatively, and therefore should be addressed by health care.

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