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  • 1.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Källström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Physical Violence in Family Sub-Systems: Links to Peer Victimization and Long-Term Emotional and Behavioral Problems2019In: Journal of family Violence, ISSN 0885-7482, E-ISSN 1573-2851, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 423-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although childhood violence by any person is negative for children, little is known about whether violence by different family members is linked differently to problems in young adulthood, as family relationships might play different roles in children’s individual development. In this study, we examine parent and sibling violence and associations with emotional and behavioral problems, directly and indirectly via peer victimization. We used retrospective reports from 347 young adults (aged 20–24) who all reported childhood family physical violence, and we performed a path analysis using Mplus. The results showed that participants who had been victimized by a sibling only or by both a sibling and parent were more likely to report peer victimization than were participants who had been victimized by parents only. Peer victimization was, in turn, linked to more aggres- sion, criminality, and anxiety. Theoretical and clinical implications of these results are discussed.

  • 2.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Moberg Stephenson, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Barn och unga som brottsoffer2019In: Barns och ungas utsatthet: Våld och kränkningar i barns och ungas relationer / [ed] Björn Johansson & Åsa Källström, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, p. 107-124Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Källström, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Glatz, Terese
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Physical Violence in Family Sub-Systems: Links to Peer Victimization and Long-Term Emotional and Behavioral Problems2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although childhood violence by any person is negative for children little is known about whether violence by different family members is linked differently to problems in young adulthood as family relationships might play different roles in children’s individual development. In this study we examine parent and sibling violence and associations with emotional and behavioral problems directly and indirectly via peer victimization. We used retrospective reports from 347 young adults (aged 20–24) who all reported childhood family physical violence and we performed a path analysis using Mplus. The results showed that participants who had been victimized by a sibling only or by both a sibling and parent were more likely to report peer victimization than were participants who had been victimized by parents only. Peer 127 victimization was in turn linked to more aggression criminality and anxiety. Theoretical and clinical implications of these results are discussed.

  • 4.
    Källström, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    “Like an Equal, Somehow”: What Young People Exposed to Family Violence Value in Counseling2019In: Journal of family Violence, ISSN 0885-7482, E-ISSN 1573-2851, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 553-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One way for young people to reduce the risk of problems associated with having experienced family violence is to talk about their experiences with a counselor. However, little is known about how young people judge the quality of such relationships. The aim of this study was to analyze what young people describe as valuable in their relationship with the counselor with whom they talked about experiences of family violence. Fourteen semi-structured interviews with nine young people between the ages 12 and 19 years were analyzed using a thematic method. The participants were recruited within an evaluation of a treatment program in Sweden. The thematic analysis revealed four distinct themes about what the young people described as particularly valuable aspects of the counseling relationship: the opportunity to talk, a model for other relationships, and going "in and out of" the topic of violence, which was valued by the younger teenagers; and being listened to "almost like an adult", which was valued by the older teenagers. The abstracted common thread was the importance for the young people of feeling equal to others somehow. The quality of the relationship between helper and helped is of central importance for young people and what specifically, from young people’s point of view, constitutes such quality for younger and older teenagers respectively. The results indicate the benefit of counselors being especially flexible with young people exposed to violence and being able to establish trustful relationships with them.

  • 5.
    Nordlöf, Kerstin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Barn i rättsprocessen med anledning av brott2019In: Barns och ungas utsatthet: Våld och kränkningar i barns och ungas relationer / [ed] Björn Johansson & Åsa Källström, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, p. 169-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Att stödja unga utsatta2019In: Barns och ungas utsatthet: Våld och kränkningar i barns och ungas relationer / [ed] Björn Johansson & Åsa Källström, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, p. 125-138Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ideas in Action: Some Reflections Concerning Teaching Language Skills to Social Work Students2019In: Social Work Education, ISSN 0261-5479, E-ISSN 1470-1227, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 282-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been a decline in language skills among the younger population in Sweden. Within several different academic programs it has been observed that students arriving at the universities do not have the skills needed to make use of what is taught. This raises a number of problems, especially within social work education, because language skills, both written and oral, are important tools for practicing social work. This article presents a way of meeting this challenge and improving the students’ skills by including them in discussions on how to write academically as part of teaching method called language guidance. The students reflect upon their own and other students’ texts, and discuss how they can be improved with regard to spelling, grammar, paragraphing, and clarity. Overall, the resources devoted to improving students’ language skills have resulted in improvements in the essays the student write later on in their education.

  • 8.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Konsekvenser av kategoriseringar i relationsbaserat stöd – exemplet brottsutsatta ungdomar2018In: Relationer i socialt arbete: i gränslandet mellan profession och person / [ed] Anders Bruhn och Åsa Källström, Stockholm: Liber , 2018, p. 154-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Need and Understanding – Young Victims’ Experiences of Processing Victimization 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Victimization early in life can result in both short and long term consequences such as mental health problems or behavioral changes. For this reason the young victims might need support to handle their victimization and move on after it. However, from previous research it is known that both professional support (e.g. psychologists, social workers) and support from family and friends have varying effect.

    Objectives: For this reason, the aim was to investigate which needs of support young victims in Sweden express, both verbally and non-verbally, and how these needs have been matched with, to them, available support services. Method: 19 narrative interviews with young victim of crime.

    Results: The results show that the victims want professionals and their family and friends to understand what they are going through, and that they want information about what is going to happen in the police investigation and upcoming trial. These two aspects then laid the foundation for how the victimization was processed, with those who received information and understanding for their situation, moved on from it faster than those who did not receive it.

    Conclusion: Information and understanding from other people are importance aspects when young victims process their victimization. Implications for both practice and research are discussed.

  • 10.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Unga brottsutsattas positionering: Narrationer om offerskap och stöd2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Varje år utsätts ett antal unga personer för brott av varierande allvarlighet. I relation till detta konstruerar de sitt eget offerskap genom att positionera sig i relation till exempelvis ålders- och offerkategorier. Från tidigare forskning är det känt att hur unga konstruerar sitt offerskap får konsekvenser för hur de ses som offer. I denna studie undersöks därför hur unga personer förhandlar och positionerar sig i relation till offerkategorier och hur det påverkar tillgången till och deras mottaglighet för stöd. Narrativ analys har genomförts av fyra unga personers berättelser av att ha varit utsatta för brott. Analyserna visar på komplexiteten av konstruktionen av offerskap, där några positioner har mer tillgång till stödinsatser än andra. Till detta finns även tidsaspekten, där unga personer skiftar i positionering över tid. Även detta påverkar tillgången till och mottagligheten för stöd, men det omvända förhållandet föreligger också som i sin tur även det påverkar hur unga positionerar sig. Dessa resultat är av vikt för den fortsatta utvecklingen av stödinsatser till unga brottsutsatta och för att understryka att ett initialt avvisande av stöd inte nödvändigtvis betyder att stöd inte behövs.

  • 11.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ungdomars positionering som brottsoffer och tillgång till stöd2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Victimization, Positioning, and Support2018In: En forskningskonferens kring föräldraskap och föräldra-barnrelationen, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Victimization, Positioning, and Support - Young Victims' Experiences of Crime2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Who cares?: A study of the Social Services’ Responsibility for Crime Victims2014In: Brottsoffer i fokus: de vinnande bidragen i Brottsoffermyndighetens uppsatstävling 2014, Umeå: Brottsoffermyndigheten , 2014, p. 97-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I socialtjänstlagen (2001:453) framgår att brottsoffer ska vara en prioriterad grupp för socialtjänsten och att de har ansvar för att se till att brottsoffer får hjälp och stöd. Syftet med denna studie var att undersöka hur socialtjänsten uppfyller sitt ansvar för det psykosociala stödet till brottsoffer, genom att undersöka samverkan mellan socialtjänsten och Brottsofferjouren. Studien genomförs genom intervjuer med brottsoffersamordnare, socialsekreterare och brottsoffer. Det framkommer att socialtjänsten, enligt socialtjänstlagen, har det övergripande ansvaret för det psykosociala stödet till brottsoffer. Resultatet från studien visar dock att socialtjänsten i många fall inte ger hjälp och stöd till brottsoffer, då det finns ett synsätt att de inte har ansvar för detta. Istället hänvisas brottsoffren till olika stödorganisationer såsom Brottsofferjouren, utan att socialtjänsten har någon djupare kunskap om vad dessa organisationer erbjuder för stöd. Vidare menar socialtjänsten i vissa kommuner att det inte finns någon möjlighet att samverka med Brottsofferjouren på grund av sekretess, trots att andra kommuner kan göra det. Samverkan kan vara ett bra sätt att spara resurser, samtidigt som kunskapen och medvetenheten kring brottsoffers behov ökar. Detta kan på sikt göra att brottsoffer får ett bättre omhändertagande, vilket i sin tur kan resultera i kortare återhämtningstider efter den kris som kan ha uppstått i samband med brottsupplevelsen.

  • 15.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Young Victims Narrate Their Processing of Victimization2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Victimization early in life can result in both short and long­ term consequences such as mental health problems or behavioral changes, leading to a need of support from, for example, social work professionals or family and friends. The aim of this study is to investigate, using 19 narrative interview, what support means to young victims of crime. The results show that young victims’ want to be respected and understood in relation to their unique situation, and that they need information to understand what is happening around them, for example, in the judicial process. Using agency and communal bonds as theoretical concepts, it is clear that support cannot focus on just one type of need, as the needs often follow on each other. Support becomes a restoration of communal bonds that result in a possibility to exercise agency. For this reason, support need to be adapted to the individual in his or her social context to make sure that support is actually perceived as support.

  • 16.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Youths’ Positioning as Victims and its Consequences for the Receptivity and Availability of Support2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every year, a number of youths are victims of crimes with different severity. To cope with the victimization, these young victims are often offered support from their social network or professionals. However, in previous research it is known that they rarely seek support for a number reasons, such as shame and not wanting to be seen as victims as it has negative connotations. This study therefore address how youths position themselves in relation to the victimization, and which consequences this might have for both their receptivity and the availability of support. Narrative analyses was conducted, with four youths in focus. The analysis shows the complexity of constructing victimhood, where some positions as victims grant more support than others. Adding to this is the time aspect, where the victims shift between positions over time, which affects both the receptivity and the availability of support, but also the other way around; affecting the positioning. These results are of importance to further develop support services for young victims, and to make sure that an initial refusal of support by a youth does not necessary mean that support is not needed.

  • 17.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Youths’ Positioning as Victims and its Consequences for the Receptivity and Availability of Support2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Every year, a number of youths are victims of crimes with different severity. To cope with the victimization, these young victims are often offered support from their social network or professionals. However, in previous research it is known that they rarely seek support for a number reasons, such as shame and not wanting to be seen as victims as it has negative connotations. This study therefore address how youths position themselves in relation to the victimization, and which consequences this might have for both their receptivity and the availability of support. Narrative analyses was conducted, with four youths in focus. The analysis shows the complexity of constructing victimhood, where some positions as victims grant more support than others. Adding to this is the time aspect, where the victims shift between positions over time, which affects both the receptivity and the availability of support, but also the other way around; affecting the positioning. These results are of importance to further develop support services for young victims, and to make sure that an initial refusal of support by a youth does not necessary mean that support is not needed.

  • 18.
    Thunberg, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ahonen, Lia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, USA.
    Degner, Jürgen
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Crime victims in limbo: the importance of collaboration between the municipal social services and victim support organisations2016In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 53-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Becoming a victim of crime can be a traumatic experience, which calls for post-victimisation psychosocial support. In Sweden, this kind of support is offered by both governmental, for example, municipal social services (MSS), and nongovernmental organisations such as Victim Support (VS). The present study investigates (a) how many municipalities have a written agreement to collaborate with other organisations, and what kind of services they offer within their own organisation, (b) if there are differences between what support the MSS offer to victims depending on collaboration and (c) how do MSS staff, VS staff and crime victims describe the actual collaboration and support? Publicly available information from the National Board of Health and Welfare was analysed, in addition to a case study of three municipalities’ work with victims of crime. The case study consists of nine interviews with social workers from MSS, crime victim coordinators from VS and crime victims. The results from the survey indicate that collaboration between the MSS and VS is occurring in some municipalities to access missing competence or to outsource services from the MSS. However, results show that collaboration does not exist in every municipality, and one reason for this, according to interview information, is to protect the confidentiality of the clients. The challenges and advantages of collaboration between the MSS and VS are discussed together with practical implications for the crime victim field.

  • 19.
    Thunberg, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ahonen, Lia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, USA.
    Degner, Jürgen
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Crime victims in limbo: when collaboration between the municipal social services and victim support fails 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Becoming a crime victim is a traumatic experience, and victims often need psychosocial support in the aftermath of the incident. In Sweden, the municipal social services (MSS) have a responsibility to ensure that victims receive post victimization support; however in reality, nongovernmental organizations such as Victim Support often execute the support services. The aim of the study was to investigate how the MSS fulfill their responsibility for psychosocial support to crime victims. Further, the aim was to explore to what extent and in what way they collaborate with Victim Support. In total, nine interviews were conducted with social workers from the MSS, crime victim coordinators from Victim Support, and crime victims; from three medium-sized municipalities. Results show that the MSS are not successful in fulfilling their responsibility; the main reason being that social workers do not see this service as their primary responsibility. As a result, victims are referred directly to Victim Support, as they are more experienced supporting crime victims. However, this distinct diversion is not as apparent in municipalities who, instead of just referring to, collaborate with Victim Support. Here, there is a clear, shared responsibility for the support, through collaboration and coordination of interventions, to ensure that the victims receive the best support. The results also show that social workers within the MSS lack knowledge about crime victims’ reactions and needs, which calls for extended collaboration with mental health experts, to ensure that victims receive adequate support. One of the difficulties with collaboration is the confidentiality issue. The victim themselves need to give active consent for collaboration if it takes place on an individual level. This issue is analyzed from a structural view point, and solutions and obstacles are discussed. This is of great importance to policy makers in their decisions regarding support to crime victim organizations.

  • 20.
    Thunberg, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Young victims’ positioning: Narrations of victimhood and support2019In: International Review of Victimology, ISSN 0269-7580, E-ISSN 2047-9433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aims to analyze how young people narratively negotiate their position as victims, how their social surroundings react to their victim positioning and what types of support they are offered. It is argued that those who position themselves as innocent victims receive support, while those who do not position themselves as such are left to fend for themselves. It is concluded that receiving support functions as a way for young victims to keep intact their narratives of who they are; while young people who did not receive support and acceptance for their positioning needed to re-negotiate their narrative to make sense of who they are after the victimization. Thereby, the victimizing event was incorporated into their narrative identity.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-06-19 07:46
  • 21.
    Thunberg, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Cater [Källström Cater], Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Family and Friends: An Important Resource to Receive Psychosocial Support after Victimization as a Youth2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies show that young crime victims might need psychosocial support to cope with their experiences. However, few youth victims actually seek help; either because they do not need it, or because the benefits of support to not way up costs of acknowledging victimization. This study therefore aim to investigate (1) From whom have youth victimized to different types and amounts of types of crimes and/or abuse sought and received professional and/or network support?(2) To what extent do youth victimized to different amounts of types of crimes and/or abuse judge the professional support as having met their expectations? And, (3) to what extent do victims that have received professional or network support after different amounts of types of victimization report emotional problems? In total, 2,500 20-24 year-olds were asked about their experiences of lifetime victimization and connected help-seeking, where the present study focus on the 2,160 participants who had been exposed to property crime, physical, verbal and/or sexual abuse. The results show that most youth victims had received support from family and friends, even though some also sought help from public institutions or non-profit organizations. These results appears for both specific types of crimes and for multiple victimization for different types of crimes. Further, most of the victims feel that the support was right for them and that it had made a positive difference; however, those who had been victimized of three or four types of offences were more negative. When it comes to mental health in adulthood, overall, most of the victims who had received either professional or network support, have few symptoms of problems; although, those with multiple victimization, have more symptoms. The results from the study is of importance for both support providers and the research community, to understand where young victims seek and receive support post-victimization in relation to well-being in early adulthood, which can lead to support services being better matched with the needs of the victim.  

  • 22.
    Thunberg, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Johansson, Björn
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Utsatthet på fritiden och i det offentliga2019In: Barns och ungas utsatthet: Våld och kränkningar i barns och ungas relationer / [ed] Björn Johansson & Åsa Källström, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, p. 81-89Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Thunberg, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Källström Cater, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Post-victimization support in Sweden: from which organizations can young victims of crime expect to receive psychosocial support?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies have shown that victims of crime might need professional help and psychosocial support post-victimization. However, studies also show that victims not always receive the support they need and wish to have, due to public institutions and non-profit organizations being unclear about their different roles and responsibilities. This study therefore seeks to investigate the relationship between which organizations/support providers young female and male victims of different crimes have sought help from, from whom they received it, and whether they were satisfied with what they received. Data consists of 2,500 survey responses from 20-24 year-olds about their experiences of victimization during childhood and adolescence and connected help-seeking. The implications for public welfare institutions, such as social welfare and psychiatry, and non-profit organizations, such as the Association for Victim Support, are discussed.

  • 24.
    Thunberg, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Källström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Corrigendum: Correction to: Thunberg, S., & Källström, Å. (2017). Does Professional or Social Network Support Meet the Needs of Victimized and Polyvictimized Youths in Sweden? (vol 13, pg 390, 2017)2018In: Victims & Offenders, ISSN 1556-4886, E-ISSN 1556-4991, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 449-449Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Thunberg, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Källström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Does Professional or Social Network Support Meet the Needs of Victimized and Polyvictimized Youths in Sweden?2018In: Victims & Offenders, ISSN 1556-4886, E-ISSN 1556-4991, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 390-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors use survey data on 2,160 young victims of crime and/or abuse in Sweden to examine whether professional psychosocial and/or social network support meets their needs. The results show that the likelihood of having sought and/or received professional psychosocial support increases with being a victim of more types of crime and/or abuse, as does the likelihood of experiencing anxiety and/or posttraumatic stress.

  • 26.
    Thunberg, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Källström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Var söker och erhåller ungdomar stöd efter utsatthet för brott?2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Thunberg, Sara (Author of introduction, etc.)
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Uhnoo, Daniel (Author of introduction, etc.)
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bruhn, Anders (Author of introduction, etc.)
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nationell forskningskonferens i socialt arbete: Abstractsammanställning2018Report (Other academic)
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