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  • 1.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Cheah, Charissa S. L.
    Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.
    Mothers’ Reactions to Preschoolers’ Proactive and Reactive Aggressive Behaviors2017In: Infant and Child Development, ISSN 1522-7227, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 26, no 2, article id UNSP e1972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study was designed to examine mothers' emotional reactions, causal attributions, and socialization strategies in response to preschool children's engagement in proactive and reactive physical aggression with peers during free play at school. Participants were 84 mothers (Mage=31.83, SD=4.48) with preschool-aged children (Mage=4.92, SD=0. 97), residing in Ankara, Turkey. Supporting our expectations, mothers reacted with negative emotions to both functions of aggressive behaviours, with less anxiety, disappointment, embarrassment, and guilt for reactive aggression. They also believed that reactive aggression is more contextually dependent and intentional and reported more indirect (e.g., asking the child, teacher, or other children to find out more about the situation and aggressive episode) and other-oriented strategies (e.g., telling the other child to behave properly) to address these behaviours. Overall, our findings suggest that Turkish mothers' feelings, perceptions, and socialization approaches to childhood aggression vary depending on the functions of aggression, and mothers perceive preschool-aged children's engagement in reactive aggression in the school setting as relatively more acceptable than proactive aggression.

  • 2.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.
    Cheah, Charissa S. L.
    Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.
    Turkish mothers’ parenting beliefs in response to preschoolers’ aggressive and socially withdrawn behaviors2015In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 687-702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to examine Turkish mothers’ reactive parenting beliefs (reactive emotional appraisals, causal attributions, anticipated strategies, and underlying goals for their anticipated strategies) in response to children’s aggressive and socially withdrawn behaviors. Participants included 84 mothers with preschool-aged children residing in Ankara, Turkey. Supporting our expectations, the results showed that the degree of mothers’ negative emotional responses varied based on the child maladaptive behaviors. Moreover, mothers perceived aggressive behaviors as more temporary and contextually dependent, but intentional than withdrawn behaviors. More directive strategies and parent-centered goals were reported for aggression, whereas more indirect strategies and emphatic goals were reported for social withdrawal. Overall, the present study provided evidence that Turkish mothers’ perceptions and evaluations of maladaptive behaviors may have universal characteristics as well as aspects that are particular to the Turkish socio-cultural context.

  • 3.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Cheah, Charissa S. L.
    University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA.
    Coplan, Robert J.
    Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada.
    Conceptualization and assessment of multiple forms of social withdrawal in Turkey2015In: Social development (Oxford. Print), ISSN 0961-205X, E-ISSN 1467-9507, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 142-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the meaning, assessment, and implications of different forms of social withdrawal in Turkey across two studies. In study 1, semi-structured interviews were conducted with children, mothers, and teachers to identify descriptors of social withdrawal. Shyness and unsociability were confirmed through content analyses, and regulated withdrawal, a new subtype characterized by overregulation of behaviors and suppression of own desires during social interactions, was revealed. Based on these findings, the child social preference scale, an established North American measure of social withdrawal, was revised. In study 2, a confirmatory factor analysis on a sample of 599 9–11-year-old children revealed three distinct forms of social withdrawal. Shyness was related to a wider range of child adjustment difficulties than unsociability and regulated withdrawal, although all forms of withdrawal were associated with child adjustment difficulties, providing support for the importance of children's active involvement in social relationships for their positive development and well-being.

  • 4.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Cheah, Charissa S. L.
    University of Maryland, Baltimore County MD, USA.
    Coplan, Robert J.
    Carleton University, Ottawa ON, Canada.
    Processes and conditions underlying the link between shyness and school adjustment among Turkish children2017In: British Journal of Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0261-510X, E-ISSN 2044-835X, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 218-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the underlying processes and conditions that contribute to the school adjustment of shy children in Turkey, where children's interpersonal relationships in social settings and academic achievement are highly emphasized. First, we examined the unique mediating roles of children's feelings of social anxiety, depressive symptoms, and loneliness in the associations between shyness and indices of school outcomes (academic achievement and school liking/avoidance). Second, we explored the moderating role of children's peer acceptance in these associations. Fourth- and fifth-grade children (N = 599; Mage  = 10.11 years, SD = 0.65; 48% girls) provided information on shyness, social anxiety, depressive symptoms, loneliness, and school liking/avoidance. Head teachers in each classroom reported on students' academic performance. The peer nomination method was used to assess children's peer relationships. Results revealed that when children displayed shy behaviours, they reported more depressive symptoms that were, in turn, associated with poorer academic performance, less school liking, and higher school avoidance. Moreover, shyness negatively predicted school liking at low levels of peer acceptance, suggesting that difficulties in peer relationships increased shy children's risk of school dissatisfaction. Overall, our findings support the importance of the interpersonal relationship context for children's adjustment within the Turkish cultural context. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Shy children have difficulties initiating and maintaining social interactions, which put them at risk for a wide range of socio-emotional difficulties. Shy children have poor academic performance and experience school adjustment difficulties in North America. What does this study add? Shyness is an important risk factor for poorer academic performance and adjustment among children in Turkey. The association between shyness and difficulties at school is explained by children's experience of depressive symptoms. Difficulties with peer relationships increase shy children's risk of school dissatisfaction.

  • 5.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Why and when is ethnic harassment a risk for immigrant adolescents´ school adjustment?: understanding the processes and conditions2014In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 1252-1265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnically harassed immigrant youth are at risk for experiencing a wide range of school adjustment problems. However, it is still unclear why and under what conditions experiencing ethnic harassment leads to school adjustment difficulties. To address this limitation in the literature, we examined two important questions. First, we investigated whether self-esteem and/or depressive symptoms would mediate the associations between ethnic harassment and poor school adjustment among immigrant youth. Second, we examined whether immigrant youths' perception of school context would play a buffering role in the pathways between ethnic harassment and school adjustment difficulties. The sample (n = 330; M age  = 14.07, SD = .90; 49 % girls at T1) was drawn from a longitudinal study in Sweden. The results revealed that experiencing ethnic harassment led to a decrease in immigrant youths' self-esteem over time, and that youths' expectations of academic failure increased. Further, youths' relationships with their teachers and their perceptions of school democracy moderated the mediation processes. Specifically, when youth had poor relationships with their teachers or perceived their school context as less democratic, being exposed to ethnic harassment led to a decrease in their self-esteem. In turn, they reported low school satisfaction and perceived themselves as being unsuccessful in school. Such indirect effects were not observed when youth had high positive relationships with their teachers or perceived their school as offering a democratic environment. These findings highlight the importance of understanding underlying processes and conditions in the examination of the effects of ethnic devaluation experiences in order to reach a more comprehensive understanding of immigrant youths' school adjustment.

  • 6.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Youth's Initiations of Civic and Political Discussions in Class: Do Youth's Perceptions of Teachers' Behaviors Matter and Why?2016In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 45, no 11, p. 2233-2245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers are thought to play an important role in fostering youth civic engagement; however, the current literature is limited with regard to providing concrete suggestions as to what teachers can do to promote youth civic engagement and why teachers have an impact on youth. To address these limitations, we simultaneously tested three alternative explanations to identify the critical way(s) in which perceived teachers' behaviors might contribute to youth civic engagement in school. We also investigated the underlying processes that may explain why youth's perceptions of teachers' behaviors matter, by focusing on the mediating roles of young people's feelings about politics and their political efficacy beliefs. The sample included 7th (n = 876, M age  = 13.42, SD = .71; 51 % girls) and 10th grade students (n = 857, M age  = 16.62, SD = .71; 51 % girls) residing in Sweden. Among the different aspects of perceived teacher behaviors, only an engaged and inspiring teaching style fostered youth's initiations of civic and political discussions in class over time among both early and late adolescents. Moreover, youth's feelings about politics significantly mediated the effect of perceived teachers' behaviors on youth civic engagement in class. Contrary to our expectation, youth's political efficacy did not act as a mediator. The present study sheds light on what teachers can do to promote youth civic and political engagement in a school setting.

  • 7.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Sun, Shuyan
    Baltimore County, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD, USA.
    Korol, Liliia
    National University of Ostroh Academy, Ostroh, Ukraine.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Adolescents' Engagement in Ethnic Harassment: Prejudiced Beliefs in Social Networks and Classroom Ethnic Diversity2018In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1151-1163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on ethnic victimization to date has done little to identify the reasons why adolescents victimize their peers due to their ethnic background. To address this limitation, we examined: (1) the extent to which prejudiced attitudes within adolescents' close and larger social networks determine their engagement in ethnic harassment, and (2) the extent to which classroom ethnic diversity plays a role in any such link. Our sample included 902 Swedish adolescents (M age  = 14.40, SD = .95; 50.3% girls). We found that Swedish adolescents who held negative attitudes toward immigrants or who were surrounded by prejudiced peers were more likely to be involved in ethnic harassment, particularly in classrooms with high ethnic diversity. Adolescents in classrooms with a high anti-immigrant climate were more likely to harass their immigrant peers. These findings suggest that prejudiced beliefs in youth social networks put young people at risk of engaging in ethnic harassment, particularly in ethnically diverse classrooms.

  • 8.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ethnic Harassment and Immigrant Youth's Engagement in Violent Behaviors: Understanding the Risk Factors2017In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to examine whether ethnic harassment was related to violent behaviors among immigrant youth over time and to identify the risk factors. The sample comprised immigrant adolescents living in Sweden (N = 365; Mage  = 13.93, SD = 0.80). Results showed that the more youth were ethnically harassed, the more they engaged in violent acts over time. A separated identity significantly moderated the effect of ethnic harassment on youth's engagement in violent behaviors. Specifically, ethnic harassment positively predicted engagement in violent behaviors only at high levels of separated identity. Impulsivity and school ethnic composition did not act as moderators. The findings suggest that preventing violent behaviors among immigrant youth requires a focus on promoting positive interethnic relationships, and multicultural identity among immigrant youth.

  • 9.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    What does make youth with negative attitudes towards immigrants bully their immigrant peers?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    What makes youth harass their immigrant peers?: understanding the risk factors2016In: Journal of Early Adolescence, ISSN 0272-4316, E-ISSN 1552-5449, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 601-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    mmigrant youth are at risk of experiencing harassment in school; however, we have only limited understanding of what makes youth harass their peers on ground of their ethnic origin. To address this major limitation, we examined (a) whether youth’s negative attitudes toward immigrants impact their engagement in ethnic harassment over time and (b) whether youth’s impulsivity, their tendencies to engage in risky behaviors, and a chaotic surrounding school environment moderate the link between their negative attitudes toward immigrants and their involvement in ethnic harassment. The sample included 583 Swedish youth (Xage = 13.93, SD = .71). Youth with negative attitudes toward immigrants ethnically were found to harass their immigrant peers when they had high levels of impulsivity and violent tendencies. Contrary to our expectation, youth perceptions of school atmosphere did not act as a moderator. The present study highlights the importance of identifying risk factors to reach a comprehensive understanding of ethnic harassment.

  • 11.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Why and when ethnic harassment is a risk for immigrant adolescents?: understanding the processes and conditions2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immigrant adolescents who experience ethnic devaluation are prone to having adjustment difficulties, including school dissatisfaction and low academic performance. However, it is unclear why and under what conditions experiencing ethnic harassment lead to school adjustment difficulties. This lack of understanding limits our ability of developing strategies to reduce negative consequences of ethnic harassment. To address this limitation, we examined the mediating roles of self-esteem and depressive symptoms in the association between ethnic harassment and immigrant youths’ school outcomes, including school satisfaction, perceived academic failure, and cutting classes. We also explored whether youths’ relationship with their teachers or democratic school environment buffer these processes.

    The data are part of a longitudinal study on youths’ experiences inside and outside of school and their relationships with their parents, peers, and teachers. The sample included 394 first- and second-generation immigrant youths (50% girls; M = 14.08, SD = .90).

    The findings suggested that immigrant youths who experienced ethnic harassment decreased in self-esteem, and so became less satisfied with school, and increased in expectations of academic failure. In addition, youths’ relationship with their teachers and their perception of school democracy moderated these mediation processes. When youths had low positive relationships with their teachers or perceived their school context as less democratic, being exposed to ethnic harassment leaded to a decrease in their self-esteem, and so they reported low school satisfaction and perceived themselves as not being successful in school. Contrary, youths’ self-esteem did not significantly decrease in the face of ethnic harassment when they had supportive relations with teachers or perceived the school as a democratic environment. These findings highlight the importance of understanding the underlying processes and conditions when examining the effects of migration related risk factors in order to reach a more comprehensive understanding of immigrant youths’ school adjustment.

  • 12.
    Cheah, Charissa S. L.
    et al.
    University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.
    Leung, Christy Y. Y.
    University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.
    Predicting filial behaviors of Chinese-Malaysian adolescents from perceived parental investments, filial emotions, and parental warmth and support2012In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 628-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined the mediating role of perceived parental warmth and support in predicting Chinese Malaysian adolescents' filial behaviors from their age, perceived parental investments, and positive filial emotions toward their parents. The effects of these predictors were examined separately for mothers and fathers. Participants included 122 Chinese adolescents (. M = 13.14 years; . SD = 2.22) in Malaysia. Adolescents' perceived parental investments, filial emotions, and warmth and support from each parent were positively, and age was negatively associated with their filial behaviors. No gender differences were found. Perceived maternal warmth and support significantly mediated the effect of age, perceived investments from, and filial emotions toward mothers on adolescents' filial behaviors, but perceived paternal warmth and support did not have a mediating role. The present study sheds light on the unique maternal versus paternal filial role, and important familial processes in Chinese-Malaysian children and adolescents from a cultural perspective.

  • 13.
    Cheah, Charissa S. L.
    et al.
    University of Maryland, College Park MD, USA.
    Leung, Christy Y. Y.
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Chinese Malaysian Adolescents’ Social Cognitive Reasoning regarding Filial Piety Dilemmas2018In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 383-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the social-cognitive reasoning of 52 Chinese Malaysian preadolescents (9-12 years old; M = 11.02, SD = 0.94) and 68 adolescents (13-18 years old; M = 14.76, SD = 1.39) in resolving filial dilemmas within the personal and moral domain. Preadolescents deferred to parental authority, whereas adolescents endorsed filial obligation reasoning to justify compliance in the personal domain. Both appealed to filial obligation, pragmatic, or welfare and safety reasoning to justify compliance but fairness or rights reasoning to justify their noncompliance, for the moral issue. Distinctions between authoritarian and reciprocal filial piety reasoning were revealed. Findings demonstrated complex decision-making and cognitive reasoning processes among Chinese Malaysian adolescents as they negotiate their filial obligations and autonomy development.

  • 14.
    Cheah, Charissa S. L.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD, United States.
    Yu, Jing
    Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD, United States.
    Hart, Craig H.
    Human Development, School of Family Life, Brigham Young University, Provo UT, United States.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Sun, Shuyan
    Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD, United States.
    Zhou, Nan
    Department of Early Childhood Education, Capital Normal University, Beijing, China.
    Olsen, Joseph A.
    College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences, Brigham Young University, Provo UT, United States.
    Sunohara, Momoka
    Department of Psychology, Concordia University, Montréal, Canada.
    Parenting hassles mediate predictors of Chinese and Korean immigrants' psychologically controlling parenting2016In: Journal of applied developmental psychology, ISSN 0193-3973, E-ISSN 1873-7900, Vol. 47, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined: (1) the mediating role of parenting daily hassles in the associations between three predictors (child temperament, maternal psychological well-being, and marital quality) and psychologically controlling practices in two Asian immigrant samples. We also explored the moderating role of maternal acculturation in the path from parenting daily hassles to psychological control. Participants were 152 Chinese and 165 Korean immigrant mothers with preschool children in the U.S. Multi-group path analysis revealed that easier child temperament, higher psychological well-being, and better marital quality were each associated with fewer parenting daily hassles, which in turn were associated with less psychological control. These general mediating effects held for both groups. However, the indirect effects of child temperament, maternal psychological well-being, and marital quality through parenting daily hassles were further moderated by acculturation for Chinese immigrant mothers, but not Korean immigrant mothers. The culturally similar and different findings across the two groups were discussed.

  • 15. Demir, Melikşah
    et al.
    Orthel, Haley
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Friendship and happiness among young adults2015In: Friendship and happiness: across the life-span and cultures / [ed] Melikşah Demir, Springer, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16. Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Farcas, Diana
    Kosic, Marianna
    Mastrotheodoros, Stefanos
    Michalek, Justyna
    Stefenel, Delia
    Is There a Paradox of Adaptation in Immigrant Children and Youth across Europe?: A Literature Review2017In: Well-being of Youth and Emerging Adults Across Cultures: Novel Approaches and Findings from Europe, Asia, Africa and America / [ed] Radosveta Dimitrova, Springer International Publishing , 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Jaf, Darun
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Why are immigrant youths less involved in organized sports than their native peers?: The role of parenting behaviors2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Seo, You Jung
    et al.
    University of Maryland, Baltimore MD, United States.
    Cheah, Charissa S. L.
    University of Maryland, Baltimore MD, United States.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hart, Craig H.
    Brigham Young University, Provo UT, United States.
    Leung, Christy Y. Y.
    University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago IL, United States.
    Sun, Shuyan
    University of Maryland, Baltimore MD, United States.
    The Mediating Role of Korean Immigrant Mothers' Psychological Well-Being in the Associations between Social Support and Authoritarian Parenting Style2018In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 979-989Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the mediating role of Korean immigrant mothers' psychological well-being in the associations between mothers' emotional vs. instrumental support received from their kin, and their authoritarian parenting style with their preschoolers using longitudinal data. First-generation Korean immigrant mothers with preschool-aged children (N = 158; M (maternal age) = 36.11 years, SD = 3.90; M (child age) = 4.43 years, SD = 1.10) residing in Maryland, U.S., participated in three assessment waves. Each assessment wave was 6 months apart. Mothers reported on the amount of perceived emotional and instrumental support they received from their kin, their behavioral acculturation towards the American culture, and their family demographic information at Wave 1, their psychological well-being at Wave 2, and their authoritarian parenting style at Wave 3. The results revealed that higher levels of perceived instrumental support (but not emotional support) received from kin predicted higher levels of maternal psychological well-being 6 months later, which in turn predicted lower levels of reported authoritarian parenting style 6 months later. Our findings highlighted the importance of psychological well-being as a mechanism that explains how instrumental support can impact Korean immigrant mothers' parenting style, and the importance of distinguishing between types of support. Services providing instrumental support (e.g., childcare assistance) for first-generation immigrant mothers, particularly those with smaller or less effective kin networks, appear important to implement.

  • 19. Seo, You Jung
    et al.
    Cheah, Charissa S. L.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hart, Craig
    Leung, Christy
    Sun, Shuyan
    A longitudinal examination of Korean immigrant mothers’ social support, psychological well-being, and authoritarian parenting styleIn: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Shin, Ji Youn
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA.
    Lee, Janet
    Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA.
    Cheah, Charissa S. L.
    Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA.
    The parenting practices and child outcomes of Korean immigrant mothers with different acculturative strategies2010In: Korean Journal of Child Studies, ISSN 1226-1688, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 179-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [ko]

    Downloadable article in English: http://ocean.kisti.re.kr/downfile/volume/kacs/ODHHBP/2010/v31n1/ODHHBP_2010_v31n1_179.pdf

    미국의한국계이민가정이해마다증가하고있으나부모의문화적응과자녀양육에관한연구는미흡한실정이다.본연구는미국동부지역의88명의한인이민어머니와(M=35.9세SD=3.77)2-6세유아를(M=4.29세SD=1.06;49.4%여아)대상으로실시되었다.어머니의문화적응유형에따라1)양육실제에어떠한차이가있는지,2)유아의사회ᆞ정서적행동에는어떠한차이가있는지,3)양육실제와아동의사회ᆞ정서적행동간에어떠한상관이있는지를살펴보았다.연구결과,한국과미국문화를균형지게통합한어머니들이미국문화에서고립되거나,두문화에서모두소외된어머니들보다자녀에게더욱긍정적인(애정표현,합리적문제해결,자율성격려)양육실제를사용하였으며자녀들또한정서적문제행동은적은반면친사회적행동은높은것으로나타났다

  • 21.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Physical Appearance and Sexual Activity Mediate the Link between Early Puberty and Sexual Harassment Victimization in Male Adolescents2016In: Sex Roles, ISSN 0360-0025, E-ISSN 1573-2762, Vol. 75, no 7-8, p. 339-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contrary to common belief, research shows that male adolescents are frequent targets of sexual harassment. According to some prior studies, early puberty puts male adolescents at a particular risk for being sexually harassed. In this cross-sectional study, we tested two competing explanations of the link between male pubertal timing and sexual harassment in early adolescence. The explanations were based on evolutionary and feminist theories. The sample included 704 seventh-grade Swedish male adolescents (Mage = 13.37, SD = .59). We found that looking more mature and being sexually active significantly mediated the link between pubertal timing and sexual harassment. The magnitude of the indirect effects did not differ significantly from each other. These findings largely replicate prior research for female adolescents, and they suggest that early pubertal timing is linked to victimizing sexual phenomena in early adolescence through young men’s normative sexually mature appearance and sexual activities. Tolerance and respect for differences should be central components of interventions aimed at reducing sexual harassment among young people of any gender.  

  • 22.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Understanding the Link between Pubertal Timing in Girls and the Development of Depressive Symptoms: The Role of Sexual Harassment2016In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 316-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The link between sexual maturation, or pubertal timing, in girls and adolescent depressive symptoms is well-documented, but the underlying processes remain unclear. We examined whether sexual harassment, which has previously been linked to both pubertal timing and depressive symptoms, mediates this link, using a two-wave longitudinal study including 454 girls in 7th (Mage = 13.42, SD = .53) and 8th grade (Mage = 14.42, SD = .55). Pubertal timing was linked to depressive symptoms in both age groups, and predicted an increase in depressive symptoms among the 7th graders. Sexual harassment significantly mediated the link between pubertal timing and depressive symptoms among the 7th, but not the 8th grade girls. Together, our findings suggest that one way to prevent depressive symptoms among early-maturing girls could be to address sexual harassment in preventive intervention in early adolescence.

  • 23.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bayram-Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Explaining why early-maturing girls are more exposed to sexual harassment in early adolescence2016In: Journal of Early Adolescence, ISSN 0272-4316, E-ISSN 1552-5449, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 490-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we tested two competing explanations of the previously established link between early female puberty and sexual harassment in early adolescence. The sample included 680 seventh-grade Swedish girls (Mage = 13.40, SD = .53). Findings revealed that looking more sexually mature and being sexually active mediated the link between pubertal timing and sexual harassment. The magnitude of the indirect effect through sexually mature appearance was greater than that through engagement in sexual behaviors. Apparently, early-maturing girls are sexually harassed as a result of natural and normative sexual development, which happens earlier than for most of their peers. The findings have clear implications for prevention of sexual harassment in adolescence

  • 24.
    Özdemir, Metin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Youth & Society (YeS) .
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Youth & Society (YeS).
    The Role of School Context in Adolescents’ Attitudes Towards Immigrants and Inter-ethnic Friendships2017In: The Mechanisms of Tolerance: An anthology / [ed] Erik Lundberg, Stockholm: The Living History Forum , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 24 of 24
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