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  • 1.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    A reflexive look at reflexivity in environmental sociology2017In: Environmental Sociology, ISSN 2325-1042, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 6-16, article id Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reflexivity is a central concept in environmental sociology, as in environmental social science in general. The concept is often connected to topics such as modernity, governance, expertise, and consumption. Reflexivity is presented as a means for taking constructive steps towards sustainability as it recognizes complexity, uncertainty, dilemmas, and ambivalence. Critical discussion of the conceptual meaning and usage of reflexivity is therefore needed. Is it a useful theoretical concept for understanding various sustainability issues? Is ‘more reflexivity’ relevant and useful advice that environmental sociologists can give in communicating with other disciplines, policymakers, and practitioners? This article explores the conceptual meaning of reflexivity and assesses its relevance for environmental sociology. In particular, it reviews its usages in three research fields; expertise, governance, and citizen-consumers. The paper furthermore discusses the spatial and temporal boundaries of reflexivity. It concludes by discussing how the concept can be a useful analytical concept in environmental sociology, at the same time as it warns against an exaggerated and unreflexive use of the concept.

  • 2.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    A sociology of environmental representation2016In: Environmental Sociology, ISSN 2325-1042, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 355-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The environment cannot plead its own case but must be represented. The aim of this paper is to elaborate on the concept of representation and demonstrate its relevance for environmental sociology. Drawing on Pitkin’s classic work on representation, we discuss representation as both ‘acting for’ and ‘standing for’. We also make a distinction between actors (representatives) and devices used as representations (e.g. descriptions, graphs and images), while discussing the intertwinement of these two aspects in representative practices. This paper stresses the performativity dimension and social embeddedness of representative practices. It sheds light on different meanings and implications of environmental representation, examining issues of claimmaking and what it means to represent the environment in various instances. Given the complex, durable and transboundary character of many topical environmental problems, the paper argues that it is essential to recognize and understand environmental representation in all its variety. It is moreover argued that a sociological elaboration of the concept of representation provides a basis for understanding the conditions for environmental politics, governance, management and

  • 3.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hansson, Viktor
    Örebro University. Örebro universitet Holding AB .
    Environmental representatives: whom, what, and how are they representing?2018In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 114-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Literature on environment and representation in politics, management, and deliberation has paid little attention on the people involved: environmental representatives. The aim of this paper is to illuminate how environmental representatives in various organizational and professional contexts understand their role as representatives, and how they are shaped by their contexts. The paper argues that it is crucial to learn about the everyday reality of individual representatives to better understand the limitations and possibilities they face. The study is based on 19 interviews with environmental representatives from five organizational and professional contexts: the state, civil society, business, science, and media in Sweden. The paper concludes that some differences in experiences, for example, in freedom and constraint, can be understood in relation to the representatives’organizational and professional affiliation. Other experiences are common: (i) all categories stated the importance of being impartial and well read; (ii) complex layers of affiliation imply that representation requires sensitivity and adjustment between different situations; and (iii) the performative aspects of representation include the representatives’claims-making, others’attributions, and long-term learning of their role. The article contributes an understanding of organizational conditions and the often paradoxical, layered, multifaceted, and cautious representation these individual actors perform.

  • 4.
    Elander, Ingemar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Inledning2009In: Global uppvärmning och lokal politik / [ed] Ylva Uggla, Ingemar Elander, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2009, 1, p. 7-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Höijer, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Facing dilemmas: sense-making and decision-making in late modernity2006In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 350-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today the certainties of modernity are dissolving and there is little guidance on how to act. In late modernity, individuals and organisations are forced to take standpoints and make choices on the basis of uncertain knowledge and diverse views. It is argued that we therefore often are confronted with dilemmas. In this article, the concept of dilemma is presented as a way to understand and analyse processes of sense-making and decision-making by contemporary institutions and people. With reference to various current meanings, the concept of dilemma is elaborated and a definition is proposed that encompasses both the cognitive-emotional and the socio-cultural side of dilemma. Emphasising this duality, a research approach is suggested for empirically analysing the multidimensional dilemmas people and institutions are confronted with in late modernity. By way of conclusion, it is stated that the challenge is to not only acknowledge dilemmas, but to use them as means for opening up spaces where stakeholders can deliberate upon desirable futures.

  • 6.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Löfmarck, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Forestry and the environment: Tensions in a transforming modernity2017In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 283-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is often described as an environmental forerunner and one of the most ecologically modernized countries in the world, one where social welfare, economic growth and environmental protection mutually support each other. Examining the case of Swedish forestry, we discuss a number of tensions in this sector that mirror some general tensions in Swedish society and explore how these tensions can be understood as part of a transforming modernity.

  • 7.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Soneryd, Linda
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Knowledge, power and control: studying environmental regulation in late modernity2005In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 89-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the same time as increased demands for standardization and control occur within the environmental field, regulation is being confronted by tendencies towards contextualization and fragmentation. This paper examines the question of how these seemingly opposing tendencies can be understood. The aim of this paper is to develop an approach for the study of risk regulation in contemporary society. Four elements are stressed as vital to consider when approaching environmental regulation: (i) the varying roles of science and expertise in regulation; (ii) the decisive role of intentional actors and regulatory organizations; (iii) the decisive but not exclusive role of the nation-state; and (iv) regulation as a process in which knowledge, risk and public concerns are constructed. In conclusion, the paper states that even if regulation is currently dispersed, the concepts of knowledge, power and control are still central to the study of environmental regulation.

  • 8.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Soneryd, Linda
    Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Transboundary risk governance2010 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Governing environmental risk, particularly large-scale transboundary risks associated with climate change and pollution, is one of the most pressing problems facing society.This book focuses on a set of key questions relating to environmental regulation: How are activities regulated in a fragmented world - a world of nation states, regulators, domestic and international law and political contests - and one in which a range of actors, such as governments, corporations and NGOs act in order to influence regulations in specific policy areas? How are complex and trans-boundary environmental issues managed? What role does expert knowledge play in regulating this kind of issues? What give rules authority? In short, how do actors try to render an issue governable?

    Drawing on regulation theory, discourse theory and science and technology studies, and employing original research, the authors analyse the regulation of four kinds of complex and trans-boundary environmental issues: oil protection in the Baltic Sea, mobile phones and radiation protection, climate change adaptation and genetically modified crops. The outcomes include insights for policymakers, regulators and researchers into how dominant frames are constructed, legitimate actors are configured and authority is established. This in turn exposes the conditions for, and possibility of, developing regulation, making authoritative rules and shaping relevant knowledge in order to govern complex environmental risks.

  • 9.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Göran
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Risk, expertis och demokrati: allmänhetens inflytande i samhällets riskhantering2005Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lokalt klimatarbete: kommunen som lärande organisation2009In: Global uppvärmning och lokal politik / [ed] Ylva Uggla, Ingemar Elander, Stockholm: Santérus Academic Press , 2009, p. 63-81Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Mercury waste management in Sweden: historical perspectives and recent trends2000In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 561-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the development of Swedish policy for mercury waste management. Starting with a description of the development of the policy for hazardous waste management in Sweden, the paper examines the process which led to the parliamentary decision that mercury waste should be gathered and safely disposed of. Special emphasis is placed on how the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency deals with questions of uncertainties and risks connected to deep disposal, and to what extent the government considers that people living close to the disposal should have the opportunity to influence the decision process. The paper concludes that this policy may be hard to implement. The proposed solution may create new problems which concern to what extent and in what way the local population will trust authorities when it comes to the assertion that deep disposal will not constitute any risk for themselves or their local environment.

  • 12.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    När det förväntade inträffar: oljekatastrofer och senmodern riskreglering2004In: Nordisk Samhällsgeografisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0282-4329, no 38, p. 43-65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Soneryd, Linda
    Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Making transboundary risks governable: reducing complexity, constructing spatial identity, and ascribing capabilities2011In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 111-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental problems that cross national borders are attracting increasing public and political attention; regulating them involves coordinating the goals and activities of various governments, which often presupposes simplifying and standardizing complex knowledge, and finding ways to manage uncertainty. This article explores how transboundary environmental problems are dealt with to render complex issues governable. By discussing oil pollution in the Baltic Sea and the gas pipeline between Russia and Germany, we elucidate how boundaries are negotiated to make issues governable. Three processes are found to be particularly relevant to how involved actors render complex issues governable: complexity reduction, construction of a spatial identity for an issue, and ascription of capabilities to new or old actor constellations. We conclude that such regulation is always provisional, implying that existing regulation is always open for negotiation and criticism.

  • 14.
    Lifvergren, Thomas
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Suèr, Pascal
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Critical remarks concerning the method used in Sweden for risk assessment of contaminated soils (MIFO)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Löfmarck, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Freedom with what?: Interpretations of “responsibility” in Swedish forestry practice2017In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 75, p. 34-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Responsibility is a key aspect of all regulation, and forest regulation is no exception. Howshould responsibility be understood and used in a time characterized by complexity and uncertainty? This paper develops a typology that distinguishes six notions of responsibility and then employs it in analyzing interpretations of responsibility in Swedish forestry practice. The Swedish forest management system is a deregulated system structured by the governing principle of “freedom with responsibility.” By investigating how responsibility is understood and enacted by forest consultants and forest owners, we demonstrate the practical fluidity of the responsibility concept. We emphasize the need for an understanding of responsibility that fosters sensitivity and adaptiveness to external issues and actors in the face of uncertainty, and identify obstacles in current forestry policy and practice to enacting such an understanding.

  • 16.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Offentlig kommunikation om klimatförändring2009In: Global uppvärmning och lokal politik / [ed] Ylva Uggla, Ingemar Elander, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2009, p. 43-62Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Soneryd, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Green governmentality and responsibilization: new forms of governance and responses to "consumer responisibility"2015In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 913-931Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An extensive literature examines political or green consumption, attending to how people make sense of their consumption relative to norms of individual responsibility and pro-environmental behaviour. Similarly, a small but growing literature addresses green governmentality, focusing on new governance forms and responsibilization processes. These two strands seldom meet, resulting in poor understanding of the links between consumption governance and people’s sense-making and actions relative to the moral imperative of being ‘responsible consumers’. We address this weakness by juxtaposing these two strands of literature, improving our understanding of the processes of responsibilization and some of their consequences. We argue that, to understand the effects of this form of governance, we must realize that subjects are not inevitably positioned and predetermined by a hegemonic discourse. At the same time, we must acknowledge that responsibilization processes give rise to compliance and to a range of ambivalences and forms of resistance.

  • 18.
    Soneryd, Linda
    et al.
    Sociologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Klimatfrågan och individualiserat ansvar2012In: Power landscapes / [ed] Linda Soneryd, Labyrint Press , 2012, p. 23-26Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Soneryd, Linda
    et al.
    Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    (O)möjliga livsstilar: samhällsvetenskapliga perspektiv på individualiserat miljöansvar2011Book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Soneryd, Linda
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Politics as a struggle over definition: two case studies2000In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 277-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our modern society the production of material welfare causes new kinds of ecological problems. This paper investigates the decision-making process in two cases which are characterised by complex technology and dependence upon science. These cases have implementation on a local level, but are of wider interest. The consequences of the facilities are defined in different ways by different actors at different levels (the national, regional, and the local level). The question is what kind of problems that are generated in relation to these new kinds of ecological problems and how they are handled within present political structures. The findings raise questions about the problem of limited political accountability and tensions between different policy levels. By way of conclusion there is a need for new forms of political responsibility that can respond to the new types of problems that arise in our time.

  • 21.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Det vattennära byggandets problematik2014In: PLAN, ISSN 0032-0560, no 3, p. 48-49Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Change, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research (CSPR), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The practice of settling and enacting strategic guidelines for climate adaptation in spatial planning: lessons from ten Swedish municipalities2015In: Regional Environmental Change, ISSN 1436-3798, E-ISSN 1436-378X, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 1133-1143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatial planning is increasingly expected to address climate change adaptation. In a Swedish context, this has meant a predominant focus on risks of flooding, erosion and sea-level rise. Gradually, regulatory mechanisms and concrete strategies are evolving to support practical mainstreaming. The aim of this paper was to analyze how frontline planners approach climate change adaptation in an urban context, emphasizing the process of settling and enacting strategic guidelines in spatial planning. The study suggests that municipalities are being preactive, i.e., preparing to act by settling guidelines rather than proactively implementing change when planning for new settlements. Further, the process of accommodating climate risks involves problems. Settling strategic guidelines and determining appropriate levels for what to adapt to are but the start of approaching climate change. Guidelines represent more of an endeavor than settling absolute limits and actually applying the guidelines involves challenges of accessibility and esthetics where the new waterfront limits meets older city structures. Further, guidelines are seen as negotiable since an overarching principle is to maintain flexibility in planning to allow for continued waterfront planning. Pursuing this path is motivated by current demand and previous urban settlement patterns. Also, as future protective measures are needed to secure existing urban areas at risk of flooding and erosion, planners see no use in preventing further waterfront development. Although settling guidelines are important in preparing to act, their practical effectiveness all fall back to how they are actually implemented in daily planning. This leads us to problematize the role of strategic guidelines to secure a climate-proof spatial planning.

  • 23.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Att avgifta ett kretslopp: om svensk kvicksilverpolitik2004In: Är vi på rätt väg?: Studier om miljöfrågans lösning / [ed] Magnus Boström, Eva Sandstedt, Stockholm: Forskningsrådet Formas, 2004, p. 97-109Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Att styra med skuld och skam2009In: ETC Örebro, ISSN 2000-4664, no 06-24Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    När samhälleliga mål ska uppnås genom individuella val inriktas styrningen på att forma medborgarnas fria val i önskad riktning. Skuld och skam fungerar som styrningsmekanismer in i minsta vrå av den privata sfären.

  • 25.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Construction of 'nature' in urban planning: a case study of Stockholm2012In: Town planning review, ISSN 0041-0020, E-ISSN 1478-341X, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 69-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In European planning, the reaction to urban sprawl has been a trend towards concentration, which raises questions concerning the role of green space in the city. The aim of this paper is to analyse how the urban and nature are constructed in urban planning. The paper includes analysis of the comprehensive plan for Stockholm. The analysis shows that the concept of urban nature simultaneously represents something desirable and problematic. This tension is concealed in the comprehensive plan, making it function as a catalyst for change of planning direction towards increased urban density.

  • 26.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Discussion of risk and safety in mercury and radioactive waste disposalManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Environmental planning and politics in urban development: useful theoretical concepts2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Environmental politics and the enchantment of modernity: mercury and radioactive waste disposal in Sweden2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Current Swedish environmental policy embraces the notion of sustainable development and the discourse of ecological modernisation, both of which stress the role of modern institutions in environmental protection work. In pursuing ecological sustainability, the Swedish Government assigns importance to the issue of domestic, safe, final disposal of mercury and radioactive waste; responsibility for mercury and radioactive waste management must not be passed to future generations. This political message is not particularly controversial. Yet, siting conflicts tend to arise when the policy is going to be put into practice.

     

    The aim of this thesis is to relate the emergence and course of siting conflicts concerning mercury and radioactive waste disposal to discursive aspects of its context. The societal context in which the siting process takes place contains contemporaneous, sometimes incompatible and competing discourses. The questions raised in the thesis are: What does the political message of safe, final waste disposal and sustainable development entail? What are the implications of this particular framing of the issue?

    The policy proposing final disposal of mercury and radioactive waste in repositories deep in the bedrock requires local implementation. In the local implementation process the parties involved in the siting conflict struggle over definition of the suggested project, with the core of the conflict being the issue of risk versus safety. In this sense, the local conflict echoes contemporaneous and partly incompatible discourses within modernity, as well as the tension between demands for safety and uncertainties in calculations and management connected to proposals for the final disposal of mercury and radioactive waste.

    The overall handling of environmental threats within the discourse of ecological modernisation can be characterised as a presentation of problems with ultimate, possible win-win solutions and an economic, technological and scientific framing of the problems. This results in a reduction of the complexity of the issue at stake, concealing its political dimensions. In the process of policy implementation, however, there emerge deferred political issues and value questions, as well as unresolved societal issues, all of which tends to result in local siting conflicts.

    List of papers
    1. Mercury waste management in Sweden: historical perspectives and recent trends
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mercury waste management in Sweden: historical perspectives and recent trends
    2000 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 561-572Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the development of Swedish policy for mercury waste management. Starting with a description of the development of the policy for hazardous waste management in Sweden, the paper examines the process which led to the parliamentary decision that mercury waste should be gathered and safely disposed of. Special emphasis is placed on how the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency deals with questions of uncertainties and risks connected to deep disposal, and to what extent the government considers that people living close to the disposal should have the opportunity to influence the decision process. The paper concludes that this policy may be hard to implement. The proposed solution may create new problems which concern to what extent and in what way the local population will trust authorities when it comes to the assertion that deep disposal will not constitute any risk for themselves or their local environment.

    National Category
    Sociology
    Research subject
    Sociology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-4603 (URN)10.1080/713676572 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-09-22 Created: 2008-09-22 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Risk society and secure culture conceptions of the possibilities and task of politics
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk society and secure culture conceptions of the possibilities and task of politics
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Sociology
    Research subject
    Sociology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15940 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-06-15 Created: 2011-06-15 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    3. Discussion of risk and safety in mercury and radioactive waste disposal
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discussion of risk and safety in mercury and radioactive waste disposal
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Sociology
    Research subject
    Sociology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15941 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-06-15 Created: 2011-06-15 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    4. Mercury and radioactive waste disposal in Sweden: political handling at the local level
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mercury and radioactive waste disposal in Sweden: political handling at the local level
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Sociology
    Research subject
    Sociology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-21172 (URN)
    Available from: 2012-01-18 Created: 2012-01-18 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    5. Institutional thinking in siting conflicts: the case of Stripa mine
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Institutional thinking in siting conflicts: the case of Stripa mine
    2004 (English)In: Facility siting: risk, power and identity in land use planning / [ed] Boholm, Åsa and Löfstedt, Ragnar E., London: Earthscan / James & James, 2004, p. 44-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Earthscan / James & James, 2004
    Series
    Risk, society, and policy series
    Keywords
    Siting conflicts, mercury, hazardous waste
    National Category
    Sociology
    Research subject
    Sociology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15944 (URN)1-84407-146-4 (ISBN)9781849771306 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2011-06-15 Created: 2011-06-15 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
  • 29.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Environmental protection and the freedom of the high seas: The Baltic Sea as a PSSA from a Swedish perspective2007In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 251-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2005, the Baltic Sea, except for its Russian waters, was designated as a Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) by the International Maritime Organization (IMO). The previous designation of the Western European waters as a PSSA – intensely debated within the IMO – had repercussions for this process. Reviewing the case exposes the conflict between the fundamental principles, territorial sovereignty, and freedom of the high seas that international law seeks to balance. Likewise, review indicates that the PSSA concept is under almost constant reconceptualization as it is put to test in practice.

  • 30.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Evironmental Sociology Section.
    Framing and visualising biodiversity in EU policy2018In: Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences, ISSN 1943-815X, E-ISSN 1943-8168, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 103-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks insights into how biodiversity is framed and visualised in EU policy. The paper presents analysis of both the visual content and written text of two brochures summarising two central EU biodiversity policy documents. The study illustrates how the two modes of communication differ. First, the written text primarily presents an anthropocentric and economic framing of biodiversity values, whereas the visual material generally features the beauty and wonders of nature. Second, the written text strongly emphasises the threats to biodiversity and the detrimental side of human activity, whereas the visual material generally shows close relationships between humans and nature, with humans engaged in small-scale outdoor activities. The analysis illustrates how various representations of biodiversity intersect in the same context, and that the visual representation decontextualises the issue of biodiversity loss from the human exploitation of natural resources and the concrete actions and processes causing it.

  • 31.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Framtiden är inte längre vad den varit: anpassning till ett förändrat klimat2009In: Global uppvärmning och lokal politik / [ed] Ylva Uggla, Ingemar Elander, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2009, p. 109-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Global concern with local implications: the role of 'urban nature' in biodiversity preservation and the construction of 'nature' in urban planning2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In urban planning there is a new trend with concentration in reaction to urban sprawl. This tendency raises the question of the role & function of green sites in the city. The urban often is depicted as the anti-thesis of nature, implying a firm distinction between nature & culture. Although, such a distinction is anything but given, the modern definition of nature as “the other” of human society & culture is apparent in the relationship between humans & their environment, whether it concerns humans’ mas- tery over nature or humans as its keeper. The notion of “urban nature” is an oxymoron that alludes both to people’s well-being (parks & recreation areas in the city are often pointed out as important places for comfort & good health) and to environmental concerns (e.g. “green corridors” are stressed & promoted as vital in the endeavour to preserve biodiversity in urban areas). The aim of this paper is to analyze the construction of “na- ture” in urban planning. What are the arguments for a certain nature care in urban areas? What function and values are attached to “urban nature”? What negotiations between sometimes contradictory social, cultural & environmental values are taking place in the planning process? The paper includes a case study of Stockholm, where a new general outline plan is under construction. This planning process evinces a redefinition of green sites & their function in the city, implying a shift from an ideal of the “green city” towards an ideal of the “compact city”. Furthermore, this shift in planning ideal indicates an emphasis on the notion of urbanity, referring to values such as density & cultural diversity at the expense of green spaces for recreational purposes & not least at the expense of greenfield sites & “wildlife corridors” for environmental reasons. Keywords: bio- diversity, urban planning, urban nature, nature-culture divide

  • 33.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hedging against future risk: social planning and local adaptation to climate change in Sweden2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Institutional thinking in siting conflicts: the case of Stripa mine2004In: Facility siting: risk, power and identity in land use planning / [ed] Boholm, Åsa and Löfstedt, Ragnar E., London: Earthscan / James & James, 2004, p. 44-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Institutional thinking in siting conflicts: the case of Stripa mine2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Is it possible to see, feel or experience biodiveristy?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Legitimacy and accountability in risk regulation2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Local implementation of national and global environmental goals: platform for research within the profile area: Human environment, communicative processes and democracy2003Report (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Making uncertainty governable: social planning and integrative approaches to climate change2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Mercury and radioactive waste disposal in Sweden: political handling at the local levelManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Mercury and radioactive waste disposal in Sweden: political handling at the local level2002In: Journal of Environmental Assessment Policy and Management, ISSN 1464-3332, E-ISSN 1757-5605, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 425-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper analyses the political handling of mercury and radioactive waste disposal at the local level, and includes a case study of a Swedish community where there is a conflict concerning a planned deep repository of mercury. The analysis is based on two contrasting lines of planning theory, the trajectory of rational planning and the trajectory of communicative planning. In politics and planning on environmental matters, the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is a means of involving various actors in consultation. EIA refers both to a document that provides the basis for decisions and a working process, which can be seen as an endeavour to integrate the divergent trajectories of planning. Experiences from mercury and radioactive waste disposal, however, show a bias towards rational planning, giving scientific and technological expertise precedence to define the issue at stake. Likewise, the process of policy implementation shows a course with weak political commitment at the national as well as the local level of government.

  • 42.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Negotiating responsible forestry: forest owners’ understanding of responsibility for multiple forest values2018In: Environmental Sociology, ISSN 2325-1042, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 358-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The governance trend toward decentralization, which implies transfer of responsibility to market actors to voluntarily respond to socio-environmental issues, is evident in forest policy. Parallel to this trend, mandatory environmental legislation circumscribes forest owners’ scope of action. Drawing on the example of Sweden and based on qualitative interviews, this study examined how non-industrial private forest owners understand and construct their responsibility for multiple forest values in an ambiguous policy situation. By juxtaposition of the concepts of governmentality and discursive negotiation of responsibility, the study contributes insights into not only how people are governed but also how they express dissent or resistance. The results of this study clearly elucidate that individuals are never fully controlled by discourse and that responsibilization of individual forest owners cannot guarantee a certain outcome. Additionally, the study contributes some insights into the predicament of being simultaneously addressed as an autonomous, capable actor and subject to direction and mandatory rules.

  • 43.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Nya former för riskreglering: En stat på väg från hybris till hjälplöshet?2006In: Om demokratins villkor: volym 1 / [ed] Mats Ekström et al., Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2006, 1, p. 223-243Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Politics as struggle over definition2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Protecting urban greenery: the case of Stockholm's National City Park2014In: City & Community, ISSN 1535-6841, E-ISSN 1540-6040, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 360-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes two phases of the history of the National City Park in Stockholm: the process preceding formal park establishment and the ongoing place construction following park establishment. With thematic narrative analysis, I show that constructing the National City Park as a “place” relied on considerable abstraction. Similarly, the construction of the park's uniformity relied on an organizing principle that eliminated many entities and activities from the narrative of the place. This case study also demonstrates that “nature” might need allies in the endeavor to protect urban greenery. The framing of the narrative in historical and cultural heritage terms was a key factor in the effort to protect the National City Park from urban development.

  • 46.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Rational decision-making and institutional thinking: theoretical discussions in the field of siting conflicts2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Risk and safety analysis in long-term perspective2004In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 549-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses how the tension between safety demands and uncertainties in calculations and management is dealt with in discussions of mercury and radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. Mercury and radioactive waste management can be seen as extreme cases where modern notions of risk management and control are called into question. The hazards associated with these categories of waste entail a request for safe handling over an unusually long time span; at the same time, it is infeasible to fully predict the consequences of a chosen method of waste disposal. In safety analyses, uncertainties are dealt with with reference to margins, further research, dilution in time and space, the role of nature and by consideration of the risk and prolonged time perspective relative to other risks and even longer time spans. The suggested solutions to the waste problem are moulded and defined to correspond to the demands of long-term safety. However, even though the definition of the suggested solutions to the waste problem as safe is politically satisfactory at rhetorical level, it will not necessarily be successful when the waste disposal policies are put into practice.

  • 48.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Risk society and culture of safety.: understandings of the task and possibilities of politics2002In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 104-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses three different periods with the Swedish Social Democratic Party in office (1960-1965, 1970, 1975 and 1995-2000). The paper analyses how questioning of modernity and the role of science and technology is dealt with in policy documents, such as speeches from the throne, governmental declarations and party programmes. In this discussion the environmental issue is of special interest, since it in a special way challenge the modernistic ideas of progress and possibility to control the future. The analysis shows an increasing emphasis of the modern in the late 1990s. This could be defined as a modernistic answer to the challenges modern society and its institutions have met during the latest decades. Furthermore, environmental protection work - by aid of science and new technology - is defined as a springboard to economic prosperity, which in turn is seen as the basis for the safety of the citizens. In this line the politics of the 1990s is a reminiscens of the 1960s optimistic belief in progress.

  • 49.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Risk society and secure culture conceptions of the possibilities and task of politicsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Risk, uncertainty, and spatial distinction: a study of urban planning in Stockholm2010In: Theoretical and Empirical Researches in Urban Management, ISSN 2065-3913, Vol. 5, no 6(15), p. 48-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines urban planning in Stockholm, focusing on the proposal for a new comprehensive plan. It explores the problems urban planning has set out to solve and whether – and if so, how – the concepts of risk and uncertainty form part of the planning discourse. A departure point is that both urban planning ideals and the problems these ideals claim to address are constructed. Explicitly or implicitly, planning creates demarcations that make places and activities appear safe or risky, attractive or problematic, etc. Analysis of the proposal for a new comprehensive plan for Stockholm identifies at least three such boundaries or spatial distinctions: between centre and periphery, green areas and other parts of the city, and risky or unsafe areas and other areas. Likewise, the analysis finds evidence of a tension between rational planning and normative ideas of the “good city” in urban planning.

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