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  • 1.
    Alnemo, John
    et al.
    Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, the Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jarl, Gustav
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. 1Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Attitudes and attributes of women and men using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications2019Ingår i: 8th International symposium on diabetic foot: Absttaract book, 2019, s. 117-117, artikel-id P35.05Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Therapeutic shoes can prevent diabetic foot reulcerations but their use is complicated by the fact that shoes have psychological and social meanings, which is believed to put a larger burden on women than men. The aim was to compare attitudes and attributes of women and men using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications.

    Methods: A questionnaire was posted to 1230 people with diabetes who had been fitted with therapeutic shoes. Women's and men's answers were compared using t-tests, Mann-Whitney U tests and chi-square tests with Fischer's exact tests. P-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.

    Results: Questionnaires from 443 (36.0%) respondents (294 men, 149 women, mean age 69.2 years) were analyzed. More men than women (p < 0.05) had paid employment (20.4% vs 9.4%), had someone who reminded them to wear their therapeutic shoes (27.6% vs 10.0%), and had a history of foot ulcers (62.9% vs 46.3%) or minor amputation (17.7% vs 6.7%). More women than men received disability pension (18.8% vs 10.2%). Women reported worse general health, lower internal locus of control regarding ulcer prevention, and more negative attitudes to the appearance and price of therapeutic shoes and how they felt about wearing them in public. Other comparisons were non-significant: other shoe attributes, education, diabetes type, current foot ulcers, major amputations, satisfaction with shoe services, understanding of neuropathy as a risk factor, locus of control regarding ulcer healing, belief in the shoes' efficacy to prevent and heal ulcers, worries about ulcer healing and new ulcerations, self-efficacy, depression, shoe use/adherence, paying a fee for therapeutic shoes, and social support.

    Conclusions: Men had worse foot complications. Women had worse general health, lower internal locus of control regarding ulcer prevention, and more negative attitudes toward therapeutic shoes. Clinicians should pay more attention to their female patients' concerns. Future research and development should focus on improving the weight and appearance of therapeutic shoes, particularly for women. Research is also needed on how to facilitate the adaption and reevaluation process where patients change from viewing shoes purely as items of clothing to also viewing them as medical interventions

  • 2.
    Alnemo, John
    et al.
    Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, the Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Jarl, Gustav
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Are the left and right limbs unequally affected by diabetic foot complications?2019Ingår i: 8th International symposium on diabetic foot: Abstract book, 2019, s. 140-140, artikel-id P45.04Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: There is some debate about laterality for diabetic foot complications, that is, whether the right and left limbs are unequally affected. Coxon and Gallen (1) found that more amputations were performed on the right limb and Evans et al. (2) interpreted this in the context of foot dominance: they found that most foot ulcers occured on the dominant limb (which for most people is the right one) and speculated that the dominant limb may be more exposed to mechanical stresses and injuries. However, Demetriou et al. (3) did not find any laterality in foot ulcer location. The aim was to investigate laterality for foot ulcers and amputations. Methods: A questionnaire was posted to 1245 people who had diabetes, experience of using therapeutic shoes, and who had attended one of two prosthetics and orthotics clinics during a 12 months’ period. The number of ulcers or amputations on the right and left limb were compared with a two-sided chi-square test. Results: 469 (37.7%) questionnaires were returned. 118 (25.2%) participants reported unilateral foot ulcers, 54 (11.5%) reported unilateral minor amputation, and 21 (4.5%) reported unilateral major amputation. There was no statistically significant right-left difference in foot ulcers, minor amputations or major amputations (Table 1, p-values 0.713-1.000). Conclusions: Our results do not support the hypothesis about laterality for foot ulcers and amputations.

  • 3. Alnemo, John
    et al.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Jarl, Gustav
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Are the left and right limbs unequally affected by diabetic foot complications?2019Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 4.
    Arnell, Susann
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center (UFC) Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jerlinder, K.
    Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle , Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. University Health Care Research Center (UFC) Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Participation in physical activities: a multilevel challenge for adolescents with autism spectrum disorders2017Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Physical inactivity is one of the biggest current public health problems. Few adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) achieve the recommendation of daily physical activity (PA). The reasons for not being physically active depend on several complex factors, yet not comprehensively described from the adolescents’point of view. The absence of their perspective means that intervention strategies for health enhancing physical activity may not encompass the experiences of the adolescents themselves. Therefore the purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of the perceptions, experiences and reflections of adolescents with ASDs’participation in PA.

    Participants and methods: Twenty-four adolescents, diagnosed with ASD without a co-occurring intellectual disability, aged 12-16 years, participated in the study.Data was collected using qualitative interviews and inductively analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Adolescents with ASD were a heterogeneous group in regard to their current PA habits and preferences. Their willingness to participate in PA was conditioned regarding; what, where, when and with whom. They described challenges in the activity and the social context during PA, especially during the mandatory physical education. Perceived demands, freedom of choice, physical ability and sense of control affected their PA participation.

    Conclusion: Findings indicate that the adolescents’willingness to participate was associated with interacting and individual-related conditions, which can be misinterpreted as unwillingness to participate in PA. Thus aspects of autonomy and knowledge about individual conditions and needs have to be recognized when intervention strategies for health enhancing physical activities are planned for this population.

  • 5.
    Arnell, Susann
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    School of Health Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; School of Health Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Perceptions of Physical Activity Participation Among Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Conceptual Model of Conditional Participation2018Ingår i: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 48, nr 5, s. 1792-1802Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are less physically active compared to typically developing peers. The reasons for not being physically active are complex and depend on several factors, which have not been comprehensively described from the adolescent's perspective. Therefore, the aim was to describe how adolescents with an ASD perceive, experience and reflect on their participation in physical activity. Interviews with 24 adolescents diagnosed with high-functioning ASD, aged 12-16 years, were analysed with qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach. They expressed a variety of reasons determining their willingness to participate, which were conceptualized as: Conditional participation in physical activities. The present study presents an alternative perspective on participation in physical activity, with impact on intervention design.

  • 6.
    Brunt, David
    et al.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjövik, Norway.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Rask, Mikael
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Residents' Perceptions of Quality in Supported Housing for People with Psychiatric Disabilities2019Ingår i: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, nr 8, s. 697-705Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The residents' perspective of the quality of housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities living in congregate supported housing has been studied and a comparison has been made with the findings from those from a previous study in ordinary housing with outreach support. One-hundred and seventy-eight residents from 27 supported housing facilities in eight Swedish municipalities completed the Quality of Psychiatric Care-Housing (QPC-H) instrument. The highest quality ratings were found for: Secluded Environment, Encounter and Support, while Participation, Housing Specific and Secure Environment were rated at lower levels. Despite relatively high ratings, a majority of items did not attain the 80% cutoff point deemed as defining satisfactory quality of service. The residents in ordinary housing with outreach support rated higher levels for the majority of the QPC-H dimensions in comparison with those in supported housing. A conclusion is that the quality of care in supported housing facilities has a number of deficiencies that need to be addressed. Supported housing is generally rated as having a lower quality of care than in ordinary housing with outreach support. Suggestions for the content of staff training are made based on the results.

  • 7.
    Domkin, Dmitry
    et al.
    Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Richter, Hans O.
    Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Low Vision Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden; Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden; .
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Effect of reduced visual acuity on precision of two-dimensional tracing movements2016Ingår i: Journal of Optometry, ISSN 1888-4296, Vol. 9, nr 2, s. 93-101Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: We intended to assess consequences of reduced visual acuity for performance in a natural simple motor task (tracing) using objective kinematic performance measures. Specifically, we intended to elucidate the kind of relationship between the task performance and best corrected binocular visual acuity and to determine the threshold of visual acuity when task performance starts to deteriorate.

    Methods: Ninety-five individuals with different best corrected visual acuity participated in the study (age 49±12 years, mean±SD, 27 men and 68 women). The participants manually traced maze-like visual patterns of different spatial complexity presented on the screen of a portable notebook computer using Clinical Kinematic Assessment Tool software. Tracing error was computed as performance measure in each trial with a spatial pattern matching technique - rigid point set registration method.

    Results: The segmented linear regression analysis showed that the relation between visual acuity and tracing errors was best described with a regression function having a break point between two data segments. Tracing performance was unaffected by values of visual acuity below 0.2 on logMAR scale, but when logMAR values increased above this critical limit (i.e. when visual acuity is further reduced), tracing errors linearly increased. The rate of the increase of the tracing error correlated with the complexity of visual stimulus shape.

    Conclusion: Testing of fine motor functions with objective kinematic measures during visuomotor tasks may help differentiating between actual effects of reduced visual acuity on eye-hand coordination in individuals with similar levels of impairment of visual acuity.

  • 8.
    Edvinsson, Siv E.
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Prevalence of orofacial dysfunction in cerebral palsy and its association with gross motor function and manual ability2016Ingår i: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 58, nr 4, s. 385-394Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate the prevalence of orofacial dysfunction (OFD) and explore factors associated with OFD in young individuals with cerebral palsy (CP).

    Method: We conducted a cross-sectional study on a population with CP in a Swedish county (132 individuals, mean age 14y 2mo [SD 4y 5mo], range 5-22y) using the Nordic Orofacial Test - Screening (NOT-S), Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), and Manual Ability Classification System (MACS). The NOT-S interview was completed by 129 individuals (76 males, 53 females) of whom 52 (30 males, 22 females) also agreed to complete the NOT-S examination.

    Results: OFD occurred in at least one NOT-S domain in about 80% of the individuals and was present in all subdiagnoses, GMFCS levels, and MACS levels. Prevalence of OFD increased with increasing levels of GMFCS and MACS from level I=55% to level V=100%. Within the 12 NOT-S domains, the prevalence of OFD varied between 19% and 69%, wherein seven of them were at least 40%: 'Drooling', 'Nose breathing', 'Chewing and swallowing', 'Face at rest', 'Oral motor function', 'Speech', and 'Facial expression' (in ascending order).

    Interpretation: OFD is common in CP. The use of OFD screening in health service planning would assist detection of areas in need of further evaluation.

  • 9.
    Edvinsson, Siv Elisabet
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Child and Youth Habilitation Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden; Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Region Örebro län. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Inter-rater and intra-rater agreement on the Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening examination in children, adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy2014Ingår i: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 72, nr 2, s. 120-129Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate inter-rater and intra-rater agreement on the Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S) examination applied to children, adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP).

    Materials and methods. Using the NOT-S examination, two speech and language pathologists independently assessed video recordings of 48 subjects with CP aged 522 years and representing all CP sub-diagnoses and levels of gross motor function and manual ability. Thirty-one subjects were reassessed. Fifteen out of 17 items in the NOT-S examination domains (1) Face at rest, (2) Nose breathing, (3) Facial expression, (4) Masticatory muscle and jaw function, (5) Oral motor function and (6) Speech were rated using a 'yes' (dysfunction observed)/'no' format, generating an overall score of 0-6.

    Results. Inter-rater agreement: Twelve out of 15 items and five out of six domains showed acceptable unweighted kappa values (kappa = 0.46-1.00). The lowest kappa value was found for domain 4 (kappa = -0.04), although it had high inter-rater agreement (92%). The linear weighted kappa value for the overall NOT-S examination score was 0.65 (95% CI = 0.49-0.82). Intra-rater agreement: All items and domains showed acceptable unweighted kappa values (items 0.58-1.00 and 0.59-1.00, domains 0.81-1.00 and 0.62-0.89) for both raters. The linear weighted kappa value for the overall NOT-S examination score was 0.81 (95% CI = 0.63-0.99) for rater A and 0.54 (95% CI = 0.25-0.82) for rater B.

    Conclusions. The NOT-S examination has acceptable inter-rater and intra-rater agreement when used in young individuals with CP.

  • 10.
    Edvinsson, Siv
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Association between orofacial function, gross motor function and manual ability in children and young adults with cerebral palsy2011Ingår i: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 97, nr Suppl 1, s. eS302-eS303Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 11.
    Edvinsson, Siv
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Reliability of the Nordic orofacial test: screening in children and youth with cerebral palsy2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 12.
    Jarl, Gustav
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics; University Health Care Research Center.
    Alnemo, John
    Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, the Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Gender differences in attitudes and attributes of people using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications2019Ingår i: Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, ISSN 1757-1146, Vol. 12, artikel-id 21Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Therapeutic shoes can prevent diabetic foot reulcerations but their use is complicated by the fact that shoes have psychological and social meanings, which is believed to put a larger burden on women than men. The aim was to compare attitudes and attributes of women and men using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications.

    Methods: A questionnaire was posted to 1230 people with diabetes who had been fitted with therapeutic shoes. Women's and men's answers were compared using t-tests, Mann-Whitney U tests and chi-square tests with Fischer's exact tests. P-values<0.05 were considered statistically significant.

    Results: Questionnaires from 443 (36.0%) respondents (294 men, 149 women, mean age 69.2years) were analyzed. More men than women (p<0.05) had paid employment (20.4% vs 9.4%), had someone who reminded them to wear their therapeutic shoes (27.6% vs 10.0%), and had a history of foot ulcers (62.9% vs 46.3%) or minor amputation (17.7% vs 6.7%). More women than men received disability pension (18.8% vs 10.2%). Women reported worse general health, lower internal locus of control regarding ulcer prevention, and more negative attitudes to the appearance and price of therapeutic shoes and how they felt about wearing them in public. Other comparisons were non-significant: other shoe attributes, education, diabetes type, current foot ulcers, major amputations, satisfaction with shoe services, understanding of neuropathy as a risk factor, locus of control regarding ulcer healing, belief in the shoes' efficacy to prevent and heal ulcers, worries about ulcer healing and new ulcerations, self-efficacy, depression, shoe use/adherence, paying a fee for therapeutic shoes, and social support.

    Conclusions: Men had worse foot complications. Women had worse general health, lower internal locus of control regarding ulcer prevention, and more negative attitudes toward therapeutic shoes. Clinicians should pay more attention to their female patients' concerns. Future research and development should focus on improving the weight and appearance of therapeutic shoes, particularly for women. Research is also needed on how to facilitate the adaption and reevaluation process where patients change from viewing shoes purely as items of clothing to also viewing them as medical interventions.

  • 13.
    Jarl, Gustav
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes: a systematic review and reflections2016Ingår i: Patient Preference and Adherence, ISSN 1177-889X, E-ISSN 1177-889X, Vol. 10, s. 1521-1528Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Therapeutic shoes are prescribed to prevent diabetic foot ulcers, but adherence to wearing the shoes is often poor.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to review the literature on factors that are associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes and construct a model of adherence to aid future research and development in the field.

    Methods: We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO for quantitative studies on factors associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes.

    Results: Six studies were included in the review. The studies focused mainly on patient-, therapy-, and condition-related adherence factors. There is some evidence (three to five studies) that sex, diabetes duration, and ulcer history are not associated with adherence. The evidence for or against the other factors was weak (only one or two studies) or conflicting.

    Conclusion: There is no conclusive evidence for using any factor to predict adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes, but there is some evidence against using certain factors for predicting adherence. Future studies should include a broader range of factors, including health system and social/economic factors, and they should investigate perceived costs and benefits of wearing therapeutic shoes in comparison with other shoes or no shoes. A seesaw model is presented illustrating the complex phenomenon of adherence. Further research is needed to identify factors associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes, to enable the development of interventions to improve adherence and thereby reduce ulceration rates among people with diabetic foot complications.

  • 14.
    Jarl, Gustav
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Centre, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    An alternative perspective on assistive technology: the Person-Environment-Tool (PET) model2018Ingår i: Assistive technology, ISSN 1040-0435, E-ISSN 1949-3614Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The medical and social models of disability are based on a dichotomy that categorizes people as able-bodied or disabled. In contrast, the biopsychosocial model, which forms the basis for the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), suggests a universalistic perspective on human functioning, encompassing all human beings. In this article we argue that the artificial separation of function-enhancing technology into assistive technology (AT) and mainstream technology might be one of the barriers to a universalistic view of human functioning. Thus, an alternative view of AT is needed. The aim of this article was to construct a conceptual model to demonstrate how all human activities and participation depend on factors related to the person, environment, and tools, emphasizing a universalistic perspective on human functioning. In the Person-Environment-Tool (PET) model, a person's activity and participation are described as a function of factors related to the person, environment, and tool, drawing on various ICF components. Importantly, the PET model makes no distinction between people of different ability levels, between environmental modifications intended for people of different ability levels, or between different function-enhancing technologies (AT and mainstream technology). A fictive patient case is used to illustrate how the universalistic view of the PET model lead to a different approach in rehabilitation. The PET model supports a universalistic view of technology use, environmental adaptations, and variations in human functioning.

  • 15.
    Jarl, Gustav
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Beyond dichotomous thinking: a process perspective on diabetic foot disease2017Ingår i: Diabetic Foot & Ankle, ISSN 2000-625X, Vol. 8, nr 1, artikel-id 1380477Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diabetic foot (DF) disease causes severe suffering around the world, and appropriate self-care activities are needed to prevent and treat this condition. However, all too often, self-care activities are less than optimal and clinicians find themselves unable to influence them in a positive direction. Clinicians' and researchers' mental models of the DF tend to be dichotomous: either the patient has or does not have an active ulcer or other DF disease. This mode of thinking hides the long-term perspective of DF disease, where patients' previous experiences and expectations for the future influence their current behavior. Thus, there is a need for a different perspective on DF disease to better understand patients' perspectives and thereby improve self-care, leading to more effective prevention and treatment.

    Objective: To present a novel framework, the process perspective on the DF, which can explain inadequate self-care behaviors not easily understood with a dichotomous perspective, and how they can be changed.

    Results: Three fictive clinical examples are used to illustrate how the process perspective on the DF can be used to understand how patients' previous experiences and expectations for the future influence their current behavior. In particular, this process perspective is used to understand how patients' beliefs and behaviors are sometimes self-reinforcing, resulting in stable behavior patterns, here referred to as 'DF cycles'. These cycles are quite common in clinical practice but are difficult to analyze using a dichotomous perspective on DF disease. The process perspective on the DF is used to analyze specific 'vicious' DF cycles of inadequate patient behavior and to find ways to transform them into 'virtuous' DF cycles, resulting in effective prevention and treatment.

    Conclusions: The process perspective on the DF seems suitable for understanding inadequate patient behaviors not easily understood with a dichotomous perspective on DF disease, opening up new avenues for clinical practice and research to help patients live a life with long remission phases, few relapses, and a high quality of life.

  • 16.
    Jarl, Gustav
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Understanding patients: a process perspective on diabetic foot disease2019Ingår i: 8th International symposium on diabetic foot: Abstract book, 2019, s. 134-134, artikel-id P42.03Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Diabetic foot self-care activities are often less than optimal and clinicians may find themselves unable to influence them in a positive direction. The aim was to present a novel framework, the process perspective on the diabetic foot, which can explain inadequate self-care behaviors and how they can be improved.

    Methods: A literature analysis was conducted.

    Results: The central principle of the process perspective is that diabetic foot disease is not a dichotomy (treatment and prevention) but a process over time, including alternating phases of active and latent diabetic foot disease (Fig. 1a). Thus, the patient is standing in the midst of a process, with a history of experiences and expectations for the future, all relevant to the patient’s current self-care behavior. A fictive patient case illustrates how the process perspective can be used to understand patients’ situation and how beliefs and behaviors are sometimes self-reinforcing, resulting in stable behavior patterns (‘diabetic foot cycles’), which are difficult to understand from a dichotomous perspective. The process perspective can be used to analyze ‘vicious’ diabetic foot cycles (Fig. 1b) of inadequate patient behavior and to find ways to transform them into ‘virtuous’ diabetic foot cycles (Fig. 1c), resulting in effective prevention and treatment.

    Conclusions: The process perspective on the diabetic foot seems suitable for understanding inadequate patient behaviors not easily understood with a dichotomous perspective, opening up new avenues for clinical practice and research to help patients live a life with long remission phases, few relapses, and a high quality of life.

  • 17. Juslin, Patrik N.
    et al.
    Liljeström, Simon
    Västfjäll, Daniel
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    How does music evoke emotions?: Exploring the underlying mechanisms2010Ingår i: Handbook of music and emotion: theory, research, and applications / [ed] Patrik N. Juslin, John Sloboda, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010, s. 605-642Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 18.
    Lindner, Helen Y
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Lilienthal, Achim
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Karlsson, Gunilla
    Adult rehabilitation centre, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Centre.
    Eye gaze technology to gain access to cognitive processes in individuals with profound intellectual and physical disabilities (PIPD)2018Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Individuals with profound intellectual and physical disabilities (PIPD) often cannot speak for themselves and do things for themselves. Their level of cognitive abilities is unclear. Eye gaze technology has the potential to gain access to cognitive processes and eventually enable communication among these individuals.

    Method: Six individuals with PIPD were given multiple sessions of eye gaze training (9-36 sessions) between February 17 to October 18. They used a screen eye-tracker (Tobii pc eye-mini) to control the objects/icons on the screen. An eye-gaze training program with different levels of activities was used to teach cause and effect, give appropriate response, explore the whole screen, target specific objects, choosing objects AND turn taking.

  • 19.
    Lo Coco, Alida
    et al.
    Università degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Ingoglia, Sonia
    Università degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Region Örebro län.
    The assessment of susceptibility to emotional contagion: a contribution to the Italian adaptation of the emotional contagion scale2014Ingår i: Journal of nonverbal behavior, ISSN 0191-5886, E-ISSN 1573-3653, Vol. 38, nr 1, s. 67-87Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Emotional Contagion Scale (ECS; Doherty in J Nonverbal Behav 21(2):131-154, 1997) is a self-report instrument assessing susceptibility to emotional contagion. The study was aimed at examining its dimensionality, reliability, and validity in the Italian context. It was completed by 541 young adults (45 % men) in Study 1 and 649 young adults (40 % men) in Study 2. The results of a series of confirmatory factor analyses showed that a bi-factor model, with one general factor and four specific factors was supported. The general and specific factors were differentially related to self-other differentiation, empathy, emotional fragility, masculinity, and femininity. Notwithstanding, the results posited some questions about the ECS reliability and convergent validity. Implications for scoring of the ECS and the need to revise it are discussed.

  • 20.
    Lobenius Palmér, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sjöqvist, Birgitta
    University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Accelerometer-Assessed Physical Activity and Sedentary Time in Youth With Disabilities2018Ingår i: Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, ISSN 0736-5829, E-ISSN 1543-2777, Vol. 35, nr 1, s. 1-19Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared accelerometer-assessed habitual physical activity (PA), sedentary time, and meeting PA recommendations among 102 youth with disabilities (7-20 years) in four subgroups-physical/visual impairments, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders, and hearing impairment-and 800 youth with typical development (8-16 years). Low proportions of youth with disabilities met PA recommendations, and they generally were less physically active and more sedentary than youth with typical development. The hearing impairment and autism spectrum disorder groups were the most and least physically active, respectively. Older age and to some extent female sex were related to less PA and more sedentary time. Considering the suboptimal levels of PA in youth with disabilities, effective interventions directed at factors associated with PA among them are needed.

  • 21.
    Lobenius Palmér, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Sjöqvist Nätterlund, Birgitta
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Hurtig Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    How physically active are youth with disabilities compared to youth without disabilities?2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 22.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    A Swedish adaptation of the Emotional Contagion Scale: factor structure and psychometric properties2006Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, Vol. 47, s. 263-272Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Emotional Contagion Scale (ECS) is a self-report scale used to measure individual differences in susceptibility to converge towards the emotions expressed by others. The original American ECS (Doherty, 1997), translated into Swedish, was completed by 665 undergraduate students in two independent samples (N= 233 and N= 432, respectively). To investigate the factor structure of the ECS, confirmatory factor analyses of alternative models derived from previous research in emotion and emotional contagion were conducted. The results showed that the proposed one-dimensional structure of the ECS was not tenable. Instead a multi-facet model based on a differential emotions model and a hierarchal valence/differential emotions model was supported. Cross-validation on the second independent sample demonstrated and confirmed the multi-faceted property of the ECS and the equality of the factor structure across samples and genders. With regard to homogeneity and test-retest reliability, the Swedish version showed acceptable results and was in concordance with the original version.

  • 23.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Comparing quality of forensic psychiatric care in Denmark and Sweden2017Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Most industrialized countries measure, report, and improve the quality of medical care. Despite this, there is limited internationally comparable data available on quality of forensic psychiatric care. Collaboration between countries to produce internationally comparable data permits benchmarking and allows policymakers and clinicians to identify specific areas where individual countries could improve.

    Aim: The aim of the study is to compare the quality of forensic in-patient psychiatric care perceived by patients and staff in Denmark and Sweden.

    Method: A total of 1037 individuals in forensic psychiatry, 268 patients and 769 staff, in Denmark and Sweden completed the Quality of In-patient Forensic Care (QPC-FIP) and the Quality of In-patient Forensic Care (QPC-FIPS) instruments. The QPC-FIP and QPC-FIPS measures quality of care using 34 items across seven dimensions: Encounter, Participation, Discharge, Support, Secluded environment, Secure environment, and a Forensic-specific dimension. Confirmatory factor analyses show that the factor structure of the Danish versions of QPC-FIP and QPC-FIPS are equivalent with the original Swedish versions.

    Results: Staff in Denmark and Sweden generally perceived the quality of care higher than the patients except in Encounter and Secluded environment. In Encounter there were no differences in ratings between the Danish and Swedish participants. In Secluded environment the Danish patients rated the quality higher than the staff whereas in Sweden the staff rated the quality higher than the patients. There were few differences in perceived quality among patients. Danish patient’s rated Support and Secure environment higher than Swedish patients. Among staff, Danish staff rated the quality of care higher in all dimensions except in Secluded environment which was rated higher by the Swedish staff.

    Staff was generally more positive to the quality of care provided whereas the patients were less positive to the care they received. Staff and patients were however quite similar in their perceptions of the low quality of participation. Interestingly, the staff rated the quality of Secure environment lower than the patients, regardless of country.

    Conclusions: Although Denmark and Sweden are similar countries, there were large discrepancies between patients and staff perception of perceived quality of care. The present study thus reveals the importance of assessing both patients and staff perception of quality of care and it demonstrates the potential of using QPC for international benchmarking in forensic psychiatry.

  • 24.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Facial EMG reactions to facial expressions: a case of facial emotional contagion?1995Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 36, nr 2, s. 130-141Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore whether subjects exposed to stimuli of facial expressions respond with facial electromyographic (EMG) reactions consistent with the hypothesis that facial expressions are contagious. This study further examines whether males and females differ in facial EMG intensity. Two experiments demonstrated that subjects responded with facial EMG activity over the corrugator supercilii, the zygomatic major, the lateral frontalis, the depressor supercilii, and the levator labii muscle regions to stimuli of sad, angry, fearful, surprised, disgusted and happy faces, that, to large extent, were consistent with the hypothesis that facial expressions are contagious. Aspects of gender differences reported in earlier studies were found, indicating a tendency for females to respond with more pronounced facial EMG intensity.

  • 25.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Factors predicting social dysfunction in people with autism: a multiple mediation model approach2014Ingår i: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 27, nr 4, s. 326-326Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 26.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hyper-responsiveness to touch mediates social dysfunction in adults with autism spectrum disorders2015Ingår i: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 9, s. 13-20Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated whether hyper-responsiveness to touch serves as a mediating variable that predicts social dysfunction in adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Data were obtained from all adults with administratively defined intellectual disability in a region in Sweden (n = 915, where 143 had ASD). A multiple mediation modeling analysis revealed a well-fitted model (Satorra-Bentler scaled chi-square = 10.91, df = 7, p = 0.14, CFI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.025), demonstrating that social dysfunction among adults with ASD was completely mediated by hyper-responsiveness to touch followed by impairment of speech and aggressive/destructive behavior. The results demonstrated that in adulthood, the tactile sensory system is foundational for social functioning in people with ASD, with diagnosis and intervention implications.

  • 27.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län.
    Prevalence and risk markers of behavior problems among adults with intellectual disabilities: a total population study in Örebro County, Sweden2013Ingår i: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 34, nr 4, s. 1346-1356Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of behavior problems among people with administratively defined intellectual disability (ID) and identify possible risk markers for behavior problems using the Behavior Problems Inventory (BPI). Sixty-two percent of the ID population (n = 915) had a behavior problem (self-injurious, stereotyped, or aggressive/destructive behavior) and 18.7% had a behavior problem identified as challenging behavior, resulting in a prevalence of 80.3 per 100,000 in the base population. The most pronounced risk markers for behavior problems were severity of ID, autism, night sleep disturbances, sensory hypersensitivity, communication dysfunction, social deficits, psychiatry involvement, and psychotropic medication. About 50% of people with behavior problems were on psychotropic drugs. Protective markers were Down's syndrome and, to some extent, cerebral palsy. The results were largely consistent with those reported in previous studies. Findings not previously reported were that prevalence of aggressive/destructive behavior peaked among those ≥70 years. Highlighting groups within a population at particular risk has implications for management and treatment of individuals with behavior problems.

  • 28.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Psychometric properties and factor structure of the Behavior Problems Inventory (BPI-01) in a Swedish community population of adults with intellectual disability2011Ingår i: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 32, nr 6, s. 2295-2303Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Behavior Problems Inventory (BPI-01) in a community population. The Swedish version of the BPI-01 was administered by interviewing care staff of all adults (n = 915) with administratively defined intellectual disabilities (IDs) living in Orebro County, Sweden. sixty-two percent of the participants had at least one behavior problem. Altogether, 30.9% showed self-injurious behavior, 41.3% stereotyped behavior, and 34.8% aggressive/destructive behavior. All but the self-injurious behavior scale reached acceptable levels of internal consistency. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the unidimensionality of the subscales as well as the proposed three factor structure of the original BPI-01. The present study demonstrates that the three subscales are highly similar constructs across different language and cultural settings, and that the BPI-01 is applicable in research on populations with varying mental functioning, diagnoses, ages, and living arrangements. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 29.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för beteende-, social- och rättsvetenskap. Örebro Univ Hosp, Rehabil Res Ctr, Örebro, Sweden.
    The relationship between the Biosocial Model of Personality and susceptibility to emotional contagion: a structural equation modeling approach2008Ingår i: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 45, nr 1, s. 89-95Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Using structural equation modeling, the present study investigated the influences of personality, measured by the Temperament and Character Inventory, on susceptibility to emotional contagion, measured by the Emotional Contagion Scale (ECS), in a sample of 423 Swedish university students. Consistent with predictions of the Riosocial Model of Personality and the theory of emotional contagion, reward dependence influenced all basic emotion facets (anger, fear, sadness, happiness, and love) measured by the ECS, and harm avoidance influenced susceptibility to anger and fear, while the temperament dimensions of novelty seeking and persistence had no influence on susceptibility to emotional contagion. Among the character dimensions, self-directedness influenced susceptibility to positive emotions (happiness and love), while cooperativeness and self-transcendence had negative influences on susceptibility to anger and love (cooperativeness) and sadness (self-transcendence). The relation between susceptibility to emotional contagion and the behavior maintenance system proposed by the Biosocial Model of Personality is discussed. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 30.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Centre for Rehabilitation Research.
    Ahlström, G.
    Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Wilde-Larsson, B.
    Department of Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Hedmark University College, Hedmark, Norway.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Psychiatric Research Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    The patient's view of quality in psychiatric outpatient care2012Ingår i: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 19, nr 7, s. 629-637Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Accessible summary: This paper describes Swedish outpatients' perception of the quality of psychiatric care they received. A large number of patients (1340) from 15 outpatient clinics participated in the study. A newly developed and tested questionnaire, the Quality in Psychiatric Care Out-Patient, was used. The patients' highest ratings were for Encounter (staffpatient interaction), the lowest were for Discharge. Most notably, quality of care was rated higher by women, older people, those with a partner, those with a lower educational level and those who were gainfully employed. In relation to the visit to the clinic, higher quality of care was associated with shorter waiting time, better information and meeting with fewer professions. Older people and those gainfully employed reported better mental health. The longer the waiting time and the greater the number of professions met, the poorer mental health was reported. The conclusion was that although a majority of the patients rated the quality of outpatient care as high, aspects of it remain unsatisfactory. The Quality in Psychiatric Care Out-Patient offers an easy way to assess patients' perception of the quality of care they receive as an outpatient and has a useful role to play in quality-assurance evaluations. Abstract The influence of demographic characteristics on patients' ratings of the quality of psychiatric outpatient care has been given little attention in research. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the quality of psychiatric care among outpatients and investigate demographic and clinical factors associated with the way in which this quality is perceived. A sample of 1340 outpatients from 15 general adult psychiatric clinics in Sweden completed the Quality in Psychiatric Care Out-Patient (QPCOP), with a response rate of 71%. The patients' highest ratings were for Encounter; the lowest were for Discharge. Most notably, quality of care was rated higher by women, older people, those with a partner, those with a lower educational level and those who were gainfully employed. In regard to visits to the clinic, higher quality of care was associated with shorter waiting time, better information and fewer professions encounters. Older people and those gainfully employed reported better mental health. Thus the QPCOP was associated with both demographic and clinical factors. In particular, wanting to come back to the clinic was the single strongest predictor of quality.

  • 31.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Psychometric evaluation of the Ways of Coping Questionnaire as applied to clinical and nonclinical groups2006Ingår i: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 60, nr 5, s. 485-93Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe coping and evaluate the psychometric properties and the factor structure of the Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCQ) applied to clinical and nonclinical groups.

    Method: The responses of 510 subjects (chronically disabled patients, their next of kin, and students) who completed the Swedish version of the WCQ were the basis for confirmatory factor analyses of the original eight-factor model as well as of the model consistency across samples.

    Results: The coping patterns that emerged in the case of the patients were very similar to those of the next of kin. The exceptions were greater use of Distancing by patients and of Positive Reappraisal by next of kin. The results showed support for the original eight-factor model, but deviation from the equality of factor structures among the subsamples indicated a limited use of the WCQ in between-sample comparisons.

    Conclusion: Modifications to the eight-factor model adequately described the subsamples, supporting the use of the WCQ in within-sample settings. This was particularly evident from the evaluation of alternative factor structures based on previously described models derived from clinical samples.

  • 32. Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Andersson, Gunilla
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för beteende-, social- och rättsvetenskap.
    Viding, Jane
    Effects of vibroacoustic music on challenging behaviors in individuals with autism and developmental disabilities2009Ingår i: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 3, nr 2, s. 390-400Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Vibroacoustic music has been proposed to be an effective treatment for individuals with developmental disorders and challenging behaviors. The present study experimentally tested the effects of vibroacoustic music on self-injurious, stereotypical, and aggressive destructive behaviors in 20 individuals with autism spectrum disorders and developmental disabilities. The participants were randomized into two groups in a randomized controlled trial evaluation. The first group received 10–20 min sessions with vibroacoustic music treatment for 5 weeks. Then the second group received the same treatment during the next 5 weeks. Behavior was assessed using the Behavior Problems Inventory in all participants before the treatment, after the first group had completed their treatment, and again after the second group had completed their treatment. In order to evaluate each session, the accompanying assistants assessed behavior on different scales after each session. In addition, the sessions were videotaped and analyzed minute by minute for challenging behaviors. The results revealed that vibroacoustic music reduced self-injurious, stereotypic, and aggressive destructive behaviors in the participants. In addition, the results indicated that the effect of vibroacoustic music was to some extent dependent on the participants’ diagnosis. Implications for vibroacoustic music theory and practice are discussed.

  • 33.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Carlsson, Fredrik
    Hilmersson, Per
    Juslin, Patrik N.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Psychol, SE-75142 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Emotional responses to music: experience, expression, and physiology2009Ingår i: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 37, nr 1, s. 61-90Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A crucial issue in research on music and emotion is whether music evokes genuine emotional responses in listeners (the emotivist position) or whether listeners merely perceive emotions expressed by the music (the cognitivist position). To investigate this issue, we measured self-reported emotion, facial muscle activity, and autonomic activity in 32 participants while they listened to popular music composed with either a happy or a sad emotional expression. Results revealed a coherent manifestation in the experiential, expressive, and physiological components of the emotional response system, which supports the emotivist position. Happy music generated more zygomatic facial muscle activity, greater skin conductance, lower finger temperature, more happiness and less sadness than sad music. The finding that the emotion induced in the listener was the same as the emotion expressed in the music is consistent with the notion that music may induce emotions through a process of emotional contagion.

  • 34.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Brunt, David
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Rask, Mikael
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Psychiatric Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Quality of community-based day centre services for people with psychiatric disabilities: psychometric properties of the Quality in Psychiatric Care - Daily Activities (QPC-DA)2016Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 23, nr 2, s. 91-96Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aims: The aim of the present study was to test the psychometric properties and dimensionality of the instrument Quality in Psychiatric Care - Daily Activities (QPC-DA) and to briefly describe the day centre attendees' perception of the quality at community-based day centre services.

    Methods: A sample of 218 attendees from 14 community-based day centre services in seven municipalities in Sweden participated in the study.

    Results: Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the QPC-DA consists of six dimensions and has a factor structure that to a large extent corresponds to that found in other studies of quality in psychiatric care settings, such as inpatient, outpatient, forensic inpatient, and housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities. The internal consistency of the factors was satisfactory and thus the QPC-DA showed adequate psychometric properties. The attendees' ratings of quality of community-based day centre services were generally high. The highest rating was for the encounter dimension and the lowest for the participation and the secluded environment dimensions, indicating areas for improvement.

    Conclusion/significance: The QPC-DA includes important aspects of the attendees' assessment of quality of community-based day centre services and offers a simple and inexpensive way to evaluate quality from their perspective.

  • 35.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rask, Mikael
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Brunt, David
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjövik, Norway.
    The attendees' view of quality in community-based day centre services for people with psychiatric disabilities2018Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 25, nr 3, s. 162-171Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Community-based day centres in Sweden are well-established arenas for psychiatric rehabilitation, but little is known of the attendees' perception of the quality of the service provided. The aim of the study was thus to describe and investigate the quality of the services in community-based day centre for people with psychiatric disabilities.

    Methods: A sample of 218 attendees in 14 community-based day centre services in Sweden completed the Quality in Psychiatric Care - Daily Activities (QPC-DA).

    Results: The results showed that people with psychiatric disabilities perceived the quality of community-based day centre services as high. Most notably, quality of service was rated higher by those with lower educational level, had waited shorter time to attend the centre, and had better mental and physical health. However, particularly aspects of a secluded environment and participation (information) may be areas with potential for improvement.

    Conclusion/Significance: From an occupational science perspective, the results adhere to the importance of occupational balance, with periods of rest/privacy during the time at the centre.

  • 36.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Kevrekidis, Pantelis
    Factor structure of the Greek version of the Emotional Contagion Scale and its measurement invariance across gender and cultural groups2008Ingår i: Journal of Individual Differences, ISSN 1614-0001, E-ISSN 2151-2299, Vol. 29, nr 3, s. 121-129Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Theories regarding susceptibility to emotional contagion, which address the ease of "catching" the emotions expressed by others, have recently received growing interest in the field of social psychology and health. Despite the theoretical and empirical importance, reliable and valid instruments to assess emotional contagion in men and women from cultures outside the English-speaking world are not well developed. The present study examines the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Greek adaptation of the Emotional Contagion Scale (ECS), and is a first attempt to test its measurement invariance across gender and culture groups (Greece and Sweden). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of competing models supports a five-factor model that includes the five basic emotions of anger, fear, sadness, happiness, and love. Using multiple-group CFA and a sequence of nested tests, configural invariance and partial metric and partial scalar invariance across gender and culture groups of the five-factor model were demonstrated. The results show that meaningful comparisons of ECS can be made across men and women from different cultures and support the hypothesis that susceptibility to emotional contagion operates at a differential emotions level.

  • 37.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Region Örebro län. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindner, Helen Y
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Is the Autism-Spectrum Quotient a Valid Measure of Traits Associated with the Autism Spectrum?: A Rasch Validation in Adults with and Without Autism Spectrum Disorders2017Ingår i: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 47, nr 7, s. 2080-2091Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) is among the most widely used scales assessing autistic traits in the general population. However, some aspects of the AQ are questionable. To test its scale properties, the AQ was translated into Swedish, and data were collected from 349 adults, 130 with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 219 without ASD, and analysed with Rasch. Several scale properties of the AQ were satisfactory but it did not meet the criterion of a unidimensional measure of autistic traits. The Rasch analysis showed that the 50-item AQ could be reduced to a 12-item subset with little loss of explanatory power, with the potential to efficiently measure the degree to which adults with and without ASD show autistic traits.

  • 38.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Region Örebro län. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro City Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lorentzen, Kirsten
    Public Health and Quality Improvement Centre, Örebro City Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Riiskjaer, Erik
    Public Health and Quality Improvement Centre, Örebro City Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Psychiatric Research Centre, Örebro City Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    A Danish adaptation of the quality in psychiatric care-forensic in-patient questionnaire: psychometric properties and factor structure2014Ingår i: Journal of Forensic Nursing, ISSN 1939-3938, E-ISSN 1556-3693, Vol. 10, nr 3, s. 168-174Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aims of this study were to adapt and evaluate the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Danish version of the Quality in Psychiatric Care-Forensic In-Patient (QPC-FIP) questionnaire.

    Methods: A sample of 139 inpatients from 25 wards in Denmark who received care during 5 weeks in March and April 2012 participated in the study by completing the QPC-FIP instrument.

    Results: Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the factor structure of the Danish version was equivalent to that of the original Swedish QPC-FIP. The results indicate that the concept of quality of care expressed in the QPC-FIP is equivalent among forensic inpatients in nationally different healthcare systems and cultural contexts.

    Conclusion: The Danish version of QPC-FIP is a reliable and valid measurement instrument recommended for use in evaluating quality of care in forensic inpatient care.

  • 39. Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Rask, M.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    David, B.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Quality in community-based day center services for people with psychiatric disabilities from the attendees' perspective2017Ingår i: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 41, nr Suppl., s. S790-S790Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Community-based day centers in Sweden are well-established arenas for psychiatric rehabilitation. Little is, however, known of the attendees’ perception of the quality of the service provided. Therefore, the aim of the study was to describe and investigate the quality of community-based day center services for people with psychiatric disabilities. A sample of 218 attendees (44% females) between 18 and 71 years old in 14 community-based day center services in Sweden completed the quality in psychiatric care–daily activities (QPC-DA) instrument. The results showed that people with psychiatric disabilities perceived the quality of community-based day center services as high and 87% perceived the overall quality as satisfactory. The highest ratings were found in encounter followed by support, daily activity-specific, secure environment, participation, and the lowest quality was found in secluded environment dimensions of the QPC-DA. Most notably, quality of service was rated higher by those with lower educational level, had waited shorter time to attend the center, and had better mental and physical health. However, particularly aspects of a secluded environment and participation (information) may be areas with potential for improvement. In conclusion, the results adhere to the importance of occupational balance, with periods of rest/privacy during the time at the center.

  • 40.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Rask, Mikael
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Brunt, David
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. RNT, Fac Med & Hlth, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Univ Örebro, Örebro, Sweden..
    Measuring quality in community based housing support: the QPC-H instrument2016Ingår i: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, ISSN 0952-6862, E-ISSN 1758-6542, Vol. 29, nr 3, s. 267-275Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to test the psychometric properties and dimensionality of the instrument Quality in Psychiatric Care-Housing (QPC-H) and briefly describe the residents' perception of quality of housing support. Design/methodology/approach - A sample of 174 residents from 22 housing support services in nine Swedish municipalities participated in the study. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) revealed that the QPC-H consisted of six dimensions and had a factor structure largely corresponding to that found among other instruments in the Quality in Psychiatric Care (QPC) family of instruments. Findings - CFA revealed that the QPC-H consisted of six dimensions and had a factor structure largely corresponding to that found among other instruments in the QPC family of instruments. The internal consistency of the factors was acceptable except in the case of secure and secluded environment, probably due to few numbers of items. With this exception, the QPC-H shows adequate psychometric properties. Social implications - The residents' ratings of quality of housing service were generally high; the highest rating was for secluded environment and the lowest for participation. This dimension would thus seem to indicate an important area for improvement. Originality/value - The QPC-H includes important aspects of residents' assessment of quality of housing service and offers a simple and inexpensive way to evaluate housing support services from the residents' perspective.

  • 41.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Riiskjaer, Erik
    Public Health and Quality Improvement Centre, Central Denmark Region, Århus, Denmark.
    Lorentzen, Kirsten
    Public Health and Quality Improvement Centre, Central Denmark Region, Århus, Denmark.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Psychiatric Research Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Factor structure and psychometric properties of the Danish adaptation of the Quality in Psychiatric Care: Forensic In-patient Staff (QPC-FIPS)2014Ingår i: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, s. 878-885Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for an internationally standardized and psychometrically tested instrument to measure the perceptions of staff members on the quality of forensic inpatient care provided. The aim of the present study was to adapt the Swedish instrument Quality of Psychiatric Care-Forensic In-Patient Staff (QPC-FIPS) to the Danish context and to evaluate its psychometric properties and factor structure in this context. All permanently employed staff members at all 27 forensic inpatient wards in Denmark were invited to answer the Danish version of the QPC-FIPS. In total, 641 staff members participated, resulting in a response rate of 80%. The Danish version of the QPCFIPS showed adequate psychometric properties and excellent goodness of fit of the hypothesised factor structure. Hence, the Danish QPC-FIPS is an excellent instrument for evaluating quality of forensic inpatient care both in clinical practice and in cross-cultural research. The members of staff generally reported that the care provided to patients was of high quality. The quality of the forensic-specific dimension was rated the highest, followed by the support, secluded environment, encounter, discharge and participation. The quality of the secure environment dimension was perceived to be the worst. The QPC-FIPS includes important aspects of staff members’ assessments of quality of care and offers a simple and inexpensive way to evaluate psychiatric forensic inpatient care. The QPC-FIPS can be used together with the Quality of Psychiatric Care-Forensic In-Patient (QPC-FIP) instrument, which covers the same items and dimensions as the QPC-FIPS, to identify patients’ and staff members’ views on quality of care and to improve the quality of forensic psychiatric care and benchmarking.

  • 42.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Psychiatric Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Patient and staff views of quality in forensic psychiatric inpatient care2015Ingår i: Journal of Forensic Nursing, ISSN 1939-3938, E-ISSN 1556-3693, Vol. 11, nr 1, s. 51-58Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The study describes and compares perceived quality of care among patients and staff using the Quality in Psychiatric Care–Forensic In-Patient and the Quality in Psychiatric Care–Forensic In-Patient Staff questionnaires. The questionnaires are both based on the perception of the quality of the forensic psychiatric care given to the patients, but the wording is adjusted to fit patients or staff. The study sample consisted of 66 patients and 202 staff members from 12 forensic units in Sweden. Using multiple regression analyses to adjust for demographic variables, it was found that patients perceived the quality of support and secluded environment lower than did staff, whereas staff had lower perceptions than patients of the quality of secure environment. The combination of these questionnaires provides new possibilities for assessing the quality of forensic psychiatric care and evaluating interventions, important factors in the management and planning of forensic care.

  • 43.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Suryani,
    Faculty of Nursing, Padjajaran University, Padjajaran, Indonesia.
    Anna, Nur
    Faculty of Nursing, Padjajaran University, Padjajaran, Indonesia.
    Rafiyah, Imas
    Faculty of Nursing, Padjajaran University, Padjajaran, Indonesia.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Health Science, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjövik, Norway.
    Indonesian adaptation of the Quality in Psychiatric Care-Inpatient (QPC-IP) instrument: Psychometric properties and factor structure2018Ingår i: Asian Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 1876-2018, E-ISSN 1876-2026, Vol. 34, s. 1-5Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to adapt and evaluate the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Indonesian version of the Quality in Psychiatric Care - Inpatient (QPC-IP) instrument.

    Methods: The QPC-IP is based on a definition of quality of care from the patient's perspective; it consists of 30 items covering six factors. A sample of 150 inpatients at general psychiatric wards in Indonesia completed the QPC-IP questionnaire.

    Results: Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the factor structure of the Indonesian version was equivalent to that of the original Swedish QPC-IP, with the exception of the secluded environment factor. The results thus demonstrate that the concept of quality of care expressed in the QPC-IP is to a large extent equivalent among inpatients in fundamentally different health care systems and cultural contexts. Internal consistency for the full QPC-IP was adequate, but poor for the separate factors.

    Conclusion: The Indonesian QPC-IP is a useful instrument for evaluating psychiatric inpatient care, and thus contributes to health care improvement in the field of psychiatry.

  • 44.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Suryani, -
    Faculty of Nursing, Padjajaran University, Jatinangor, Indonesia.
    Hermiati, Dilfera
    Faculty of Nursing, Padjajaran University, Jatinangor, Indonesia.
    Sutini, Titin
    Faculty of Nursing, Padjajaran University, Jatinangor, Indonesia.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Health Science, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjövik, Norway.
    A psychometric evaluation of the Indonesian version of the Quality in Psychiatric Care-Inpatient Staff (QPC-IPS) instrument2019Ingår i: Asian Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 1876-2018, E-ISSN 1876-2026, Vol. 46, s. 29-33Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Indonesian version of the Quality of Psychiatric Care - Inpatient Staff (QPC-IPS) instrument.

    METHODS: A sample of 192 permanently employed members of staff at two general psychiatric wards in Indonesia completed the QPC-IPS, which consists of 30 items covering six dimensions of quality.

    RESULTS: Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the factor structure of the Indonesian version was equivalent to that proposed from the original Swedish QPC-IPS. Internal consistency for the full QPC-IPS was adequate, but poor for some of the factors. The results thus demonstrate that the concept of quality of care expressed in the QPC-IPS is to a large extent equivalent among staff in fundamentally different health care systems and cultural contexts.

    CONCLUSION: The Indonesian QPC-IPS is a useful instrument for evaluating staff perception of psychiatric inpatient care in Indonesia, and thus contributes to health care improvement in the field of psychiatry. The QPC-IPS can be used together with the Quality of Psychiatric Care- In-Patient (QPC-IP) instrument, which is completed by the inpatients themselves, to improve the quality of psychiatric inpatient care and national as well as international benchmarking.

  • 45.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Region Örebro län. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Low Vision Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Richter, Hans O.
    Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Effects of Feldenkrais Method on Chronic Neck/Scapular Pain in People With Visual Impairment: A Randomized Controlled Trial With One-Year Follow-Up2014Ingår i: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 95, nr 9, s. 1656-1661Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine whether the Feldenkrais method is an effective intervention for chronic neck/scapular pain in patients with visual impairment.

    Design: Randomized controlled trial with an untreated control group.

    Setting: Low vision center.

    Participants: Patients (N=61) with visual impairment (mean, 53.3y) and nonspecific chronic (mean, 23.8y) neck/scapular pain.

    Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned to the Feldenkrais method group (n=30) or untreated control group (n=31). Patients in the treatment group underwent one 2-hour Feldenkrais method session per week for 12 consecutive weeks.

    Main Outcome Measures: Blind assessment of perceived pain (visual analog scale [VAS]) during physical therapist palpation of the left and right occipital, upper trapezius, and levator scapulae muscle areas; self-assessed degree of pain on the Visual, Musculoskeletal, and Balance Complaints questionnaire; and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey bodily pain scale.

    Results: Patients undergoing FeldenIcrais method reported significantly less pain than the controls according to the VAS and Visual, Musculoskeletal, and Balance Complaints questionnaire ratings at posttreatment follow-up and 1-year follow-up. There were no significant differences regarding the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey bodily pain scale ratings.

    Conclusions: Feldenkrais method is an effective intervention for chronic neck/scapular pain in patients with visual impairment. (c) 2014 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

  • 46.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. The Low Vision Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden .
    Richter, Hans O.
    Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden .
    Reliability and Validity of the Visual, Musculoskeletal, and Balance Complaints Questionnaire2016Ingår i: Optometry and Vision Science, ISSN 1040-5488, E-ISSN 1538-9235, Vol. 93, nr 9, s. 1147-1157Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the reliability and validity of the 15-item Visual, Musculoskeletal, and Balance Complaints Questionnaire (VMB) for people with visual impairments, using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and with Rasch analysis for use as an outcome measure.

    Methods: Two studies evaluated the VMB. In Study 1, VMB data were collected from 1249 out of 3063 individuals between 18 and 104 years old who were registered at a low vision center. CFA evaluated VMB factor structure and Rasch analysis evaluated VMB scale properties. In Study 2, a subsample of 52 individuals between 27 and 67 years old with visual impairments underwent further measurements. Visual clinical assessments, neck/scapular pain, and balance assessments were collected to evaluate the convergent validity of the VMB (i.e. the domain relationship with other, theoretically predicted measures).

    Results: CFA supported the a priori three-factor structure of the VMB. The factor loadings of the items on their respective domains were all statistically significant. Rasch analysis indicated disordered categories and the original 10-point scale was subsequently replaced with a 5-point scale. Each VMB domain fitted the Rasch model, showing good metric properties, including unidimensionality (explained variances ≥66% and eigenvalues <1.9), person separation (1.86 to 2.29), reliability (0.87 to 0.94), item fit (infit MnSq's >0.72 and outfit MnSq's <1.47), targeting (0.30 to 0.50 logits), and insignificant differential item functioning (all DIFs but one <0.50 logits) from gender, age, and visual status. The three VMB domains correlated significantly with relevant visual, musculoskeletal, and balance assessments, demonstrating adequate convergent validity of the VMB.

    Conclusions: The VMB is a simple, inexpensive, and quick yet reliable and valid way to screen and evaluate concurrent visual, musculoskeletal, and balance complaints, with contribution to epidemiological and intervention research and potential clinical implications for the field of health services and low vision rehabilitation.

  • 47.
    Matérne, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Opportunities and barriers for successful return to work after acquired brain injury: A patient perspective2017Ingår i: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 56, nr 1, s. 125-134Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many people who suffer an acquired brain injury (ABI) are of working age. There are benefits, for the patient, the workplace, and society, to finding factors that facilitate successful return to work (RTW).

    Objective: The aim was to increase knowledge of opportunities and barriers for a successful RTW in patients with ABI.

    Method: Five men and five women with ABI participated. All had successfully returned to work at least 20 hours a week. Their experiences were gathered by semi-structured interviews, which were subsequently subjected to qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Three themes that influenced RTW were identified: individually adapted rehabilitation; motivation for RTW; and cognitive and social abilities. An individually adapted rehabilitation was judged important because the patients were involved in their own rehabilitation and required individually adapted support from rehabilitation specialists, employers, and colleagues. A moderate level of motivation for RTW was needed. Awareness of the person's cognitive and social abilities is essential, in finding compensatory strategies and adaptations.

    Conclusions: It seems that the vocational rehabilitation process is a balancing act in individualized planning and support, as a partnership with the employer needs to be developed, motivation needs to be generated, and awareness built of abilities that facilitate or hinder RTW.

  • 48.
    Matérne, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Successful return to work after acquired brain injury: opportunities and barriers from a patient perspective2016Ingår i: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 30, nr 5-6, s. 516-516Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Acquired brain injury (ABI) is often a lifelong disability that entails a marked change in a person’s life. It involves biopsychosocial levels and return to work (RTW) is one of the main goals for the person. Several of those suffering an ABI are of working age. The society and the individuals are both winners if the person could get back to work and sustain working.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to increase knowledge about the opportunities and barriers for successful RTW among individuals with ABI.

    Methods: Adults who have ABI and had participated in work rehabilitation were interviewed in regard to their experiences of the process. The informants (five females, five males) had participated in work rehabilitation, had successfully RTW and had worked at least 50% in at least a year after the injury. The interviews were transcribed, structured and analysed by latent content analysis with a hermeneutic approach.

    Results: Three main themes that influenced RTW after ABI were identified: (i) individually adapted rehabilitation process, (ii) motivation for RTW and (iii) cognitive abilities and inabilities. The results indicate that an individually adapted vocational rehabilitation (VR) process was an important issue. The individuals with ABI actively involved in their own rehabilitation process also required continuous support from the society, the specialists, their employers and colleagues; this support has to be designed for each individual. A moderate level of motivation for RTW was necessary for the best result to RTW, in other words it was important to achieve a balance between too high and too low motivation. Finally, a comprehensive knowledge about the cognitive abilities and inabilities of the individual after ABI helped the individuals and their employers to find compensatory strategies to handle their work tasks. One implication of the findings was the necessity of a good support system and a good VR that functions well and lasts for a longer period. When there are obstacles in the VR process, it is important to have strategies and awareness of how to proceed further.

    Conclusions: Consequently, the support built for a person individually, with a balanced motivation, knowledge about the cognitive abilities and awareness of how to proceed further in the process will help to build a successful and sustainable RTW.

  • 49.
    Matérne, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro County.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro County.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Successful return to work after acquired brain injury: support person’s perception of supporting2017Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and aim:

    Return to work (RTW) after acquired brain injury (ABI) is a demanding process for the client and need support. This study’s aim was to understand the support person’s perception of supporting clients with ABI to a successful RTW.

    Method:

    Nine persons who acted as support persons in the vocational rehabilitation (VR) process were chosen by clients with ABI participating in a previous study. Three of the support persons had a formal mandate to support the client by the employer and six of them were characterized as providing informal support. All the support persons had different kind of work. Semi structured interviews were conducted and analyzed by latent content analysis.

    Findings:

    The analysis elicited three themes describing the support person’s perception in the assistance for the client to successfully RTW: (i) Commitment, (ii) Adaptation and (iii) Cooperation. Within each of the theme multiple mechanisms were identified, reflecting the complexity that the VR process had for the client. The mechanisms were about strategic issues, reflection and decision making. The support persons experienced that their role was extra valuable for the client in contexts where adaptation and cooperation was required. Commitment built on social relations is linked to sustainability of the support.

    Conclusion:

    Support persons play a multi-dimensional role which is important for client with ABI to successfully RTW.

  • 50.
    Matérne, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center (UFC), Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center (UFC), Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. University Health Care Research Center (UFC), Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Successful return to work after acquired brain injury: support persons’ perception of supporting2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
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