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  • 1.
    Aass, Lisbeth Kjelsrud
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    Moen, Øyfrid Larsen
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    Skundberg-Kletthagen, Hege
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway; Faculty of Medicine and Health, University Health Care Research Center, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Family support and quality of community mental health care: Perspectives from families living with mental illness2022Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 31, nr 7-8, s. 935-948Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives: Describe patients' and family members' perceptions of family support from nurses and other mental healthcare professionals, and quality of care in community mental healthcare service. Further, compare the perceptions of patients and family members.

    Background: While patients value family involvement, family members feel unprepared and lack the necessary skills to be supportive. Since healthcare professionals predominantly focus on patients, they may fail to understand the complex needs of families. Family perceived support and quality of community mental health care may vary across patients and family members.

    Design and methods: Cross-sectional study with patients suffering from mental illness and family members in community mental healthcare services in Norway. Altogether 86 participants, of whom 33 patients and 33 family members had a family relationship-paired samples. Participants filled in the translated version of the Iceland Family Perceived Support Questionnaire (FPSQ-N) and Quality in Psychiatric Care-Community Out-Patient (QPC-COP) and Community Out-Patient Next of Kin (QPC-COPNK). STROBE checklist was used.

    Results: Family members scored family perceived support and quality of community mental health care lower than patients. Family members feel the loss of support. Patient and family members found the Patient-healthcare professionals' relationship to be of high quality, while family members gave low score to being respected and invited to take part in care by nurses and other mental healthcare professionals.

    Conclusion: Family members' unmet need of support highlights the need for nurses and other community mental healthcare professionals to assess complex family needs and to intervene. Barriers to collaboration exist, and family members need to be respected and invited into community mental health care. Relevance to clinical practice Contributes knowledge of how to meet the family's needs and provides a basis for further care and treatment development in similar contexts nationally and internationally.

  • 2.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Björkman, Eva
    Department of Care Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    A Psychometric Evaluation of the Family Collaboration Scale and an Investigation of How the Close Family of Frail Older Patients Perceive the Collaboration with Healthcare Professionals on Acute Medical Wards at Hospitals in Sweden2022Ingår i: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 10, nr 3, artikel-id 478Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The inclusion of family members in the acute care of older persons with complex needs results in better coordination of care and reduces the frequency and/or duration of rehospitalisation. Therefore, healthcare professionals need a tool to assess the collaboration with family members on acute hospital wards. The aims were to test the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Family Collaboration Scale (FCS), to investigate family members' perception of collaboration with healthcare professionals on acute medical wards in Sweden and to compare the data with the corresponding Danish results. Three hundred and sixty family members of frail patients aged 65 or older from 13 acute medical wards answered the FCS questionnaire. In addition to descriptive statistics, psychometric methods were applied. The internal consistency of the Swedish version of the FCS was excellent, and confirmatory factor analysis revealed that its factor structure was equivalent to that of the original Danish FCS. The respondents' ratings indicated better perceived collaboration than in the Danish case. Older age than 60 was associated with worse collaboration with healthcare professionals regarding Influence on discharge than younger respondents. Those with compulsory and health or nursing education showed better collaboration. The Swedish version of the FCS should be further evaluated for its retest reliability and as an outcome measure in intervention studies.

  • 3.
    Alnemo, John
    et al.
    Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, the Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jarl, Gustav
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Attitudes and attributes of women and men using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications2019Ingår i: 8th International symposium on diabetic foot: Absttaract book, 2019, s. 117-117, artikel-id P35.05Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Therapeutic shoes can prevent diabetic foot reulcerations but their use is complicated by the fact that shoes have psychological and social meanings, which is believed to put a larger burden on women than men. The aim was to compare attitudes and attributes of women and men using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications.

    Methods: A questionnaire was posted to 1230 people with diabetes who had been fitted with therapeutic shoes. Women's and men's answers were compared using t-tests, Mann-Whitney U tests and chi-square tests with Fischer's exact tests. P-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.

    Results: Questionnaires from 443 (36.0%) respondents (294 men, 149 women, mean age 69.2 years) were analyzed. More men than women (p < 0.05) had paid employment (20.4% vs 9.4%), had someone who reminded them to wear their therapeutic shoes (27.6% vs 10.0%), and had a history of foot ulcers (62.9% vs 46.3%) or minor amputation (17.7% vs 6.7%). More women than men received disability pension (18.8% vs 10.2%). Women reported worse general health, lower internal locus of control regarding ulcer prevention, and more negative attitudes to the appearance and price of therapeutic shoes and how they felt about wearing them in public. Other comparisons were non-significant: other shoe attributes, education, diabetes type, current foot ulcers, major amputations, satisfaction with shoe services, understanding of neuropathy as a risk factor, locus of control regarding ulcer healing, belief in the shoes' efficacy to prevent and heal ulcers, worries about ulcer healing and new ulcerations, self-efficacy, depression, shoe use/adherence, paying a fee for therapeutic shoes, and social support.

    Conclusions: Men had worse foot complications. Women had worse general health, lower internal locus of control regarding ulcer prevention, and more negative attitudes toward therapeutic shoes. Clinicians should pay more attention to their female patients' concerns. Future research and development should focus on improving the weight and appearance of therapeutic shoes, particularly for women. Research is also needed on how to facilitate the adaption and reevaluation process where patients change from viewing shoes purely as items of clothing to also viewing them as medical interventions

  • 4. Alnemo, John
    et al.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Jarl, Gustav
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Are the left and right limbs unequally affected by diabetic foot complications?2019Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 5.
    Alnemo, John
    et al.
    Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, the Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Jarl, Gustav
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Are the left and right limbs unequally affected by diabetic foot complications?2019Ingår i: 8th International symposium on diabetic foot: Abstract book, 2019, s. 140-140, artikel-id P45.04Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: There is some debate about laterality for diabetic foot complications, that is, whether the right and left limbs are unequally affected. Coxon and Gallen (1) found that more amputations were performed on the right limb and Evans et al. (2) interpreted this in the context of foot dominance: they found that most foot ulcers occured on the dominant limb (which for most people is the right one) and speculated that the dominant limb may be more exposed to mechanical stresses and injuries. However, Demetriou et al. (3) did not find any laterality in foot ulcer location. The aim was to investigate laterality for foot ulcers and amputations. Methods: A questionnaire was posted to 1245 people who had diabetes, experience of using therapeutic shoes, and who had attended one of two prosthetics and orthotics clinics during a 12 months’ period. The number of ulcers or amputations on the right and left limb were compared with a two-sided chi-square test. Results: 469 (37.7%) questionnaires were returned. 118 (25.2%) participants reported unilateral foot ulcers, 54 (11.5%) reported unilateral minor amputation, and 21 (4.5%) reported unilateral major amputation. There was no statistically significant right-left difference in foot ulcers, minor amputations or major amputations (Table 1, p-values 0.713-1.000). Conclusions: Our results do not support the hypothesis about laterality for foot ulcers and amputations.

  • 6.
    Arnell, Susann
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center (UFC) Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jerlinder, K.
    Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle , Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. University Health Care Research Center (UFC) Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Participation in physical activities: a multilevel challenge for adolescents with autism spectrum disorders2017Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Physical inactivity is one of the biggest current public health problems. Few adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) achieve the recommendation of daily physical activity (PA). The reasons for not being physically active depend on several complex factors, yet not comprehensively described from the adolescents’point of view. The absence of their perspective means that intervention strategies for health enhancing physical activity may not encompass the experiences of the adolescents themselves. Therefore the purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of the perceptions, experiences and reflections of adolescents with ASDs’participation in PA.

    Participants and methods: Twenty-four adolescents, diagnosed with ASD without a co-occurring intellectual disability, aged 12-16 years, participated in the study.Data was collected using qualitative interviews and inductively analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Adolescents with ASD were a heterogeneous group in regard to their current PA habits and preferences. Their willingness to participate in PA was conditioned regarding; what, where, when and with whom. They described challenges in the activity and the social context during PA, especially during the mandatory physical education. Perceived demands, freedom of choice, physical ability and sense of control affected their PA participation.

    Conclusion: Findings indicate that the adolescents’willingness to participate was associated with interacting and individual-related conditions, which can be misinterpreted as unwillingness to participate in PA. Thus aspects of autonomy and knowledge about individual conditions and needs have to be recognized when intervention strategies for health enhancing physical activities are planned for this population.

  • 7.
    Arnell, Susann
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Geidne, Susanna
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Experiences of stakeholder collaboration when promoting participation in physical activity among adolescents with autism spectrum disorder2022Ingår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 44, nr 9, s. 1728-1736Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Various stakeholders contribute to the development of healthy physical activity habits in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Parents and stakeholders seek collaborative actions but little is still known about such efforts. The purpose of this study was thus to explore how professionals from different services experience stakeholder collaboration when promoting participation in physical activity for these adolescents.

    METHOD: Five focus group discussions were held with 17 professionals from education, health care, community, and sports organizations, engaged in the promotion of physical activity in adolescents with ASD. The data were analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: . The professionals though experienced that this collaboration was hampered by the low priority given to physical activity issues within different organizations, by limited resources, lack of knowledge, and unclear roles.

    CONCLUSIONS: Notwithstanding the professionals' different roles, all agreed that physical activity issues need to be prioritized and that each stakeholder needs to acknowledge the shared responsibility of collaboration. However, more clear routines for collaboration that include joined efforts but also highlight the organization-specific responsibilities might enhance the collaborative efforts.

    • In-depth understanding of both the adolescents' needs and the environments in which physical activity is promoted is required if participation in physical activity among adolescents with ASD is to be enhanced.
    • Families and professionals within different organizations need to be supported to collaborate when mapping and meeting the adolescents' physical activity needs.
    • Issues regarding developing physical activity habits need to be prioritized.
    • Professionals, such as education, health, and community professionals who are important for the promotion of healthy physical activity habits need to be included in multi-stakeholder meetings.
  • 8.
    Arnell, Susann
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Feasibility of Using Q-Sort to Map Conditional Participation in Physical Activity in Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder2023Ingår i: Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, ISSN 0736-5829, E-ISSN 1543-2777, Vol. 40, nr 1, s. 63-85Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Participation in physical activity among adolescents with autism is often conditional. However, there is a lack of methods for identifying these specific conditions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop and investigate the feasibility of a Q-sort tool to map individual-specific conditions for participation in physical activity among adolescents with autism and to identify different viewpoints regarding conditions for such participation.

    METHOD: An exploratory mixed-methods design was employed to investigate the feasibility of using Q methodology and the Q-sort procedure to identify what individual-specific conditions are important for participation in physical activity for adolescents with autism.

    RESULTS: The adolescents ranked the statements with varying levels of ease. Two viewpoints were identified: Autonomous participation without surprises and Enjoyment of activity in a safe social context.

    CONCLUSION: Q-sort is a feasible method for mapping conditions for participation, which can guide the development of tailored physical activity interventions.

  • 9.
    Arnell, Susann
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR).
    Feasibility of using Q-sort to map conditional participation in physical activity in adolescents with autism spectrum disorderManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 10.
    Arnell, Susann
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Parents' perceptions and concerns about physical activity participation among adolescents with autism spectrum disorder2020Ingår i: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 24, nr 8, s. 2243-2255, artikel-id 1362361320942092Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The parents of adolescents with autism spectrum disorder have a vital and proactive role in encouraging healthy physical activity habits, and they possess important knowledge about the adolescents' needs when it comes to enhancing participation in physical activity. But promoting healthy physical activity habits in adolescents can be difficult. The purpose of this study was thus to describe parents' perceptions of their adolescent child's participation in physical activity and to describe the parental role in promoting such participation. Twenty-eight parents of adolescents aged 12-16 years with autism spectrum disorder were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed using an inductive content analysis approach. The parents described how challenging participation in physical activities could be for their adolescents. Despite this, they wanted to see their children participate more in physical activity but found the promotion of physical activity to be an overwhelming task that was difficult to cope with on their own. The results reveal a need for support and collaborative efforts among different actors to give these issues increased priority in order to promote the adolescents' physical activity participation. Lay abstract What is already known about the topic?The parents of adolescents with autism spectrum disorder have a vital and proactive role in encouraging healthy physical activity habits. But promoting healthy physical activity habits in adolescents can be difficult. The purpose of this study was thus to describe the parental perceptions of their adolescent child's participation in physical activity and to describe the parental role in promoting such participation. Twenty-eight parents of adolescents aged 12-16 years with autism spectrum disorder were interviewed. What this paper adds?The parents described how challenging participation in physical activities could be for their adolescents. Despite this, they wanted to see their children participate more in physical activity but found the promotion of physical activity to be an overwhelming task that was difficult to cope with on their own. Implications for practice, research, or policy.The results reveal a need for support and collaborative efforts among different actors to give these issues increased priority in order to promote the adolescents' physical activity participation.

  • 11.
    Arnell, Susann
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Participation in physical activities among adolescents with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: experiences from a parental perspective2019Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 12.
    Arnell, Susann
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Faculty of Medicine and Health, University Health Care Research Center, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; School of Health Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; School of Health Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    School of Health Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Faculty of Medicine and Health, University Health Care Research Center, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; School of Health Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden .
    Perceptions of Physical Activity Participation Among Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Conceptual Model of Conditional Participation2018Ingår i: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 48, nr 5, s. 1792-1802Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are less physically active compared to typically developing peers. The reasons for not being physically active are complex and depend on several factors, which have not been comprehensively described from the adolescent's perspective. Therefore, the aim was to describe how adolescents with an ASD perceive, experience and reflect on their participation in physical activity. Interviews with 24 adolescents diagnosed with high-functioning ASD, aged 12-16 years, were analysed with qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach. They expressed a variety of reasons determining their willingness to participate, which were conceptualized as: Conditional participation in physical activities. The present study presents an alternative perspective on participation in physical activity, with impact on intervention design.

  • 13.
    Brunt, David
    et al.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjövik, Norway.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Rask, Mikael
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Residents' Perceptions of Quality in Supported Housing for People with Psychiatric Disabilities2019Ingår i: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, nr 8, s. 697-705Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The residents' perspective of the quality of housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities living in congregate supported housing has been studied and a comparison has been made with the findings from those from a previous study in ordinary housing with outreach support. One-hundred and seventy-eight residents from 27 supported housing facilities in eight Swedish municipalities completed the Quality of Psychiatric Care-Housing (QPC-H) instrument. The highest quality ratings were found for: Secluded Environment, Encounter and Support, while Participation, Housing Specific and Secure Environment were rated at lower levels. Despite relatively high ratings, a majority of items did not attain the 80% cutoff point deemed as defining satisfactory quality of service. The residents in ordinary housing with outreach support rated higher levels for the majority of the QPC-H dimensions in comparison with those in supported housing. A conclusion is that the quality of care in supported housing facilities has a number of deficiencies that need to be addressed. Supported housing is generally rated as having a lower quality of care than in ordinary housing with outreach support. Suggestions for the content of staff training are made based on the results.

  • 14.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning (IBL), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Imms, Christine
    Apex Australia Chair of Neurodevelopment and Disability, Melbourne, Australia; The University of Melbourne, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning (IBL), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden; Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    King, Gillian
    Bloorview Research Institute, Toronto, Canada; Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
    Lyngbäck, Liz Adams
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; FUB Swedish National Association for People with Intellectual Disability, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Anna Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Arnell, Susann
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Centre for Research & Development Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden; Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Swedenvvvv.
    Brooks, Rob
    Faculty of Health Studies, University of Bradford, Bradford, UK.
    Eldh, Maria
    Norrköping Habilitation Centre, Region Östergötland, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Engde, Lisa
    Linköping Habilitation Centre, Region Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Engkvist, Helena
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Berglund, Ingalill Gimbler
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; College of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, UK.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Charlotte
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sjödin, Linda
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; Jönköping Habilitation Centre, Region Jönköpings län, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; Norwegian University of Natural Sciences and Technology, Trondheim, Gjøvik and Ålesund, Norway.
    A Systematic Review of Longitudinal Trajectories of Mental Health Problems in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities2024Ingår i: Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, ISSN 1056-263X, E-ISSN 1573-3580, Vol. 36, s. 203-242Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    To review the longitudinal trajectories - and the factors influencing their development - of mental health problems in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. Systematic review methods were employed. Searches of six databases used keywords and MeSH terms related to children with neurodevelopmental disabilities, mental health problems, and longitudinal research. After the removal of duplicates, reviewers independently screened records for inclusion, extracted data (outcomes and influencing factors), and evaluated the risk of bias. Findings were tabulated and synthesized using graphs and a narrative. Searches identified 94,662 unique records, from which 49 publications were included. The median publication year was 2015. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were the most commonly included population in retrieved studies. In almost 50% of studies, trajectories of mental health problems changed by < 10% between the first and last time point. Despite multiple studies reporting longitudinal trajectories of mental health problems, greater conceptual clarity and consideration of the measures included in research is needed, along with the inclusion of a more diverse range of populations of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities.

  • 15.
    Domkin, Dmitry
    et al.
    Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Richter, Hans O.
    Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Low Vision Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden; Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden; .
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Effect of reduced visual acuity on precision of two-dimensional tracing movements2016Ingår i: Journal of Optometry, ISSN 1888-4296, Vol. 9, nr 2, s. 93-101Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: We intended to assess consequences of reduced visual acuity for performance in a natural simple motor task (tracing) using objective kinematic performance measures. Specifically, we intended to elucidate the kind of relationship between the task performance and best corrected binocular visual acuity and to determine the threshold of visual acuity when task performance starts to deteriorate.

    Methods: Ninety-five individuals with different best corrected visual acuity participated in the study (age 49±12 years, mean±SD, 27 men and 68 women). The participants manually traced maze-like visual patterns of different spatial complexity presented on the screen of a portable notebook computer using Clinical Kinematic Assessment Tool software. Tracing error was computed as performance measure in each trial with a spatial pattern matching technique - rigid point set registration method.

    Results: The segmented linear regression analysis showed that the relation between visual acuity and tracing errors was best described with a regression function having a break point between two data segments. Tracing performance was unaffected by values of visual acuity below 0.2 on logMAR scale, but when logMAR values increased above this critical limit (i.e. when visual acuity is further reduced), tracing errors linearly increased. The rate of the increase of the tracing error correlated with the complexity of visual stimulus shape.

    Conclusion: Testing of fine motor functions with objective kinematic measures during visuomotor tasks may help differentiating between actual effects of reduced visual acuity on eye-hand coordination in individuals with similar levels of impairment of visual acuity.

  • 16.
    Domínguez Del Campo, Marta
    et al.
    Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Dr. Antoni Pujades 42, 08830, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain; Etiopatogenia I Tractament Dels Trastorns Mental Severs (MERITT), Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu, Santa Rosa 39-57, 08950, Esplugues de Llobregat, Spain; Fundació Privada Per La Recerca Sant Joan de Déu, Santa Rosa 39-57, 08950, Esplugues del Llobregat, Spain.
    Moreno-Poyato, Antonio R
    Public Health, Mental Health and Maternal-Infant Nursing Department, Nursing College, Universitat de Barcelona, Health Sciences Campus Bellvitge, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
    Puig-Llobet, Montserrat
    Public Health, Mental Health and Maternal-Infant Nursing Department, Nursing College, Universitat de Barcelona, Health Sciences Campus Bellvitge, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
    Lluch-Canut, Maria Teresa
    Public Health, Mental Health and Maternal-Infant Nursing Department, Nursing College, Universitat de Barcelona, Health Sciences Campus Bellvitge, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; Research Group GEIMAC (Consolidated Group 2017-1681: Group of Studies of Invarianza of the, Instruments of Measurement and Analysis of Change in the Social and Health Areas), Barcelona, Spain.
    Rodríguez Zunino, Nathalia
    Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Dr. Antoni Pujades 42, 08830, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain.
    Tomás-Jiménez, Manuel
    Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Dr. Antoni Pujades 42, 08830, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain.
    Sanchez-Balcells, Sara
    Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Dr. Antoni Pujades 42, 08830, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Care and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Escuder-Romeva, Gemma
    Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Dr. Antoni Pujades 42, 08830, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain; Etiopatogenia I Tractament Dels Trastorns Mental Severs (MERITT), Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu, Santa Rosa 39-57, 08950, Esplugues de Llobregat, Spain.
    Roldán-Merino, Juan
    Public Health, Mental Health and Maternal-Infant Nursing Department, Nursing College, Universitat de Barcelona, Health Sciences Campus Bellvitge, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; Campus Docent Sant Joan de Déu, Miret i Sans, 10-16, 08034, Barcelona, Spain; Research Group GIES (Grupo de Investigación en Enfermería, Educación y Sociedad), Barcelona, Spain.
    Cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric properties of the Spanish Quality in Psychiatric Care Forensic Inpatient Staff (QPC-FIPS) instrument2022Ingår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, nr 1, artikel-id 13302Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality in Psychiatric Care-Forensic Inpatient Staff (QPC-FIPS) is an instrument of Swedish origin validated to measure the perception of the quality of mental health care provided by forensic psychiatry professionals. The aim of this study was to cross-culturally adapt the QPC-FIPS instrument and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the instrument. A psychometric study was carried out. For validity, content validity, convergent validity and construct validity were included. For reliability, the analysis of internal consistency and temporal stability was included. The sample consisted of 153 mental health professionals from four Forensic Psychiatry units. The adapted Spanish version of the QPC-FIPS scale was configured with the same number of items and dimensions as the original. The psychometric properties, in terms of temporal stability and internal consistency, were adequate and the factor structure, such as the homogeneity of the dimensions of the Spanish version of the QPC-FIPS, was equivalent to the original Swedish version. We found that the QPC_FIPS-Spanish is a valid, reliable and easy-to-apply instrument for assessing the self-perception of professionals regarding the care they provide.

  • 17.
    Edvinsson, Siv E.
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Prevalence of orofacial dysfunction in cerebral palsy and its association with gross motor function and manual ability2016Ingår i: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 58, nr 4, s. 385-394Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate the prevalence of orofacial dysfunction (OFD) and explore factors associated with OFD in young individuals with cerebral palsy (CP).

    Method: We conducted a cross-sectional study on a population with CP in a Swedish county (132 individuals, mean age 14y 2mo [SD 4y 5mo], range 5-22y) using the Nordic Orofacial Test - Screening (NOT-S), Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), and Manual Ability Classification System (MACS). The NOT-S interview was completed by 129 individuals (76 males, 53 females) of whom 52 (30 males, 22 females) also agreed to complete the NOT-S examination.

    Results: OFD occurred in at least one NOT-S domain in about 80% of the individuals and was present in all subdiagnoses, GMFCS levels, and MACS levels. Prevalence of OFD increased with increasing levels of GMFCS and MACS from level I=55% to level V=100%. Within the 12 NOT-S domains, the prevalence of OFD varied between 19% and 69%, wherein seven of them were at least 40%: 'Drooling', 'Nose breathing', 'Chewing and swallowing', 'Face at rest', 'Oral motor function', 'Speech', and 'Facial expression' (in ascending order).

    Interpretation: OFD is common in CP. The use of OFD screening in health service planning would assist detection of areas in need of further evaluation.

  • 18.
    Edvinsson, Siv Elisabet
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Child and Youth Habilitation Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden; Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Region Örebro län. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Inter-rater and intra-rater agreement on the Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening examination in children, adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy2014Ingår i: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 72, nr 2, s. 120-129Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate inter-rater and intra-rater agreement on the Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S) examination applied to children, adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP).

    Materials and methods. Using the NOT-S examination, two speech and language pathologists independently assessed video recordings of 48 subjects with CP aged 522 years and representing all CP sub-diagnoses and levels of gross motor function and manual ability. Thirty-one subjects were reassessed. Fifteen out of 17 items in the NOT-S examination domains (1) Face at rest, (2) Nose breathing, (3) Facial expression, (4) Masticatory muscle and jaw function, (5) Oral motor function and (6) Speech were rated using a 'yes' (dysfunction observed)/'no' format, generating an overall score of 0-6.

    Results. Inter-rater agreement: Twelve out of 15 items and five out of six domains showed acceptable unweighted kappa values (kappa = 0.46-1.00). The lowest kappa value was found for domain 4 (kappa = -0.04), although it had high inter-rater agreement (92%). The linear weighted kappa value for the overall NOT-S examination score was 0.65 (95% CI = 0.49-0.82). Intra-rater agreement: All items and domains showed acceptable unweighted kappa values (items 0.58-1.00 and 0.59-1.00, domains 0.81-1.00 and 0.62-0.89) for both raters. The linear weighted kappa value for the overall NOT-S examination score was 0.81 (95% CI = 0.63-0.99) for rater A and 0.54 (95% CI = 0.25-0.82) for rater B.

    Conclusions. The NOT-S examination has acceptable inter-rater and intra-rater agreement when used in young individuals with CP.

  • 19.
    Edvinsson, Siv
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Association between orofacial function, gross motor function and manual ability in children and young adults with cerebral palsy2011Ingår i: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 97, nr Suppl 1, s. eS302-eS303Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 20.
    Edvinsson, Siv
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Reliability of the Nordic orofacial test: screening in children and youth with cerebral palsy2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 21.
    Granberg, Anette
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Duberg, Anna
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Matérne, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för beteende-, social- och rättsvetenskap.
    The influence of contextual factors on an intervention for people with disabilities from support persons’ and health personnel's perspectives: a focus group study2024Ingår i: Frontiers in Rehabilitation Sciences, E-ISSN 2673-6861, Vol. 5, artikel-id 1294990Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Contextual factors influence interventions in healthcare and pose a particular challenge in interventions designed for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). Exploring support persons’ and health personnel’s experience of an intervention may improve our understanding of the influence of contextual factors. Such exploration is important for revealing areas and focus points for future implementations. Therefore, the aim of this study is to explore support persons’ and health personnel’s experience of contextual factors during involvement in an intervention for people with PIMD.

    Methods: This focus group study includes eight groups, comprising a total of 34 support persons and health personnel, at habilitation centres at four regions in central Sweden. Data were analysed inductively using a content analysis approach.

    Results: Three themes emerged from the analysis of the informants’ perspectives on the contextual factors: (1) structure and support enhances intervention feasibility; (2) an intervention’s benefit for people with PIMD increases its acceptability; and (3) being engaged and involved increases support persons’ and health personnel’s motivation. Our findings show that the implementation of an intervention for people with PIMD should focus on the recipients of the intervention in its context, forming a clear communication plan. A training programme should be provided for the recipients and providers of the intervention.

    Discussion: Finally, the implementation process can be facilitated by creating space for staff to contribute and by encouraging participation and ownership for everyone involved. Using a co-design strategy can enable a shared responsibility to solve the identified challenges, while contributing to the development and design of future interventions for people with disabilities.

  • 22.
    Granberg, Anette
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Matérne, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Duberg, Anna
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. University Health Care Research Center.
    Navigating change - managers' experience of implementation processes in disability health care: a qualitative study2021Ingår i: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 21, nr 1, artikel-id 571Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Effective implementation processes play a central role in health care organizations and affect the care of patients. Managers are pivotal in facilitating the use of new practices, but their experience and how it affects the implementation outcome are still largely unknown. In the field of disability health care in particular, managers experiences have scarcely been investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study is to explore managers' experiences of the implementation process when transferring new practices into disability health care settings.

    METHODS: Semi-structured individual telephone interviews were conducted with managers at disability health care organizations in four administrative regions in central Sweden. A total of 23 managers with formal managerial responsibility from both public and private health care were strategically selected to be interviewed. The interviews were analysed using reflexive thematic analysis with an inductive approach.

    RESULTS: The analysis resulted in two themes about factors influencing the implementation process: firstly, Contextual factors set the agenda for what can be achieved, which highlighted aspects that hinder or enable the implementation process, such as internal and external conditions, the workplace culture, the employees and managers' attitudes and openness to change: secondly, Leadership in the winds of change, which described the challenges of balancing managerial tasks with leading the change, and the importance of a leadership that involves the participation of the employees.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study explored how and to what extent managers address and manage the implementation process and the many associated challenges. The findings highlight the importance of leadership support and organizational structure in order to transfer new practices into the work setting, and to encourage an organizational culture for leading change that promotes positive outcomes. We suggest that identifying strategies by focusing on contextual factors and on aspects of leadership will facilitate implementation processes.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: The SWAN (Structured Water Dance Intervention) study was retrospectively registered on April 9, 2019 and is available online at ClinicalTrials.gov (ID: NCT03908801).

  • 23.
    Granberg, Anette
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Matérne, Marie
    Universitetssjukvårdens Forskningscentrum, Region Örebro Län, Örebro, Sverige.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Universitetssjukvårdens Forskningscentrum, Region Örebro Län, Örebro, Sverige.
    Duberg, Anna
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    What hinders and enables implementation of research results in healthcare?2019Ingår i: Book of abstracts: Nobel Day's Festivities 2019, Örebro University , 2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 24.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    CHILD, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden.
    Imms, Christine
    Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    King, Gillian
    Bloorview Research Institute, Torornto, ON, Canada.
    Andersson, Anna Karin
    CHILD, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    CHILD, School of Health and Welfare, JönköpingThe Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; CHILD, School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Brooks, Rob
    School of Clinical and Applied Sciences, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, UK.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gothilander, Jennifer
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    CHILD, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Definitions and Operationalization of Mental Health Problems, Wellbeing and Participation Constructs in Children with NDD: Distinctions and Clarifications2021Ingår i: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, nr 4, artikel-id 1656Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with impairments are known to experience more restricted participation than other children. It also appears that low levels of participation are related to a higher prevalence of mental health problems in children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD). The purpose of this conceptual paper is to describe and define the constructs mental health problems, mental health, and participation to ensure that future research investigating participation as a means to mental health in children and adolescents with NDD is founded on conceptual clarity. We first discuss the difference between two aspects of mental health problems, namely mental disorder and mental illness. This discussion serves to highlight three areas of conceptual difficulty and their consequences for understanding the mental health of children with NDD that we then consider in the article: (1) how to define mental health problems, (2) how to define and assess mental health problems and mental health, i.e., wellbeing as separate constructs, and (3) how to describe the relationship between participation and wellbeing. We then discuss the implications of our propositions for measurement and the use of participation interventions as a means to enhance mental health (defined as wellbeing). Conclusions: Mental disorders include both diagnoses related to impairments in the developmental period, i.e., NDD and diagnoses related to mental illness. These two types of mental disorders must be separated. Children with NDD, just like other people, may exhibit aspects of both mental health problems and wellbeing simultaneously. Measures of wellbeing defined as a continuum from flourishing to languishing for children with NDD need to be designed and evaluated. Wellbeing can lead to further participation and act to protect from mental health problems. 

  • 25.
    Jarl, Gustav
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics; University Health Care Research Center.
    Alnemo, John
    Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, the Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Gender differences in attitudes and attributes of people using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications2019Ingår i: Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, ISSN 1757-1146, Vol. 12, artikel-id 21Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Therapeutic shoes can prevent diabetic foot reulcerations but their use is complicated by the fact that shoes have psychological and social meanings, which is believed to put a larger burden on women than men. The aim was to compare attitudes and attributes of women and men using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications.

    Methods: A questionnaire was posted to 1230 people with diabetes who had been fitted with therapeutic shoes. Women's and men's answers were compared using t-tests, Mann-Whitney U tests and chi-square tests with Fischer's exact tests. P-values<0.05 were considered statistically significant.

    Results: Questionnaires from 443 (36.0%) respondents (294 men, 149 women, mean age 69.2years) were analyzed. More men than women (p<0.05) had paid employment (20.4% vs 9.4%), had someone who reminded them to wear their therapeutic shoes (27.6% vs 10.0%), and had a history of foot ulcers (62.9% vs 46.3%) or minor amputation (17.7% vs 6.7%). More women than men received disability pension (18.8% vs 10.2%). Women reported worse general health, lower internal locus of control regarding ulcer prevention, and more negative attitudes to the appearance and price of therapeutic shoes and how they felt about wearing them in public. Other comparisons were non-significant: other shoe attributes, education, diabetes type, current foot ulcers, major amputations, satisfaction with shoe services, understanding of neuropathy as a risk factor, locus of control regarding ulcer healing, belief in the shoes' efficacy to prevent and heal ulcers, worries about ulcer healing and new ulcerations, self-efficacy, depression, shoe use/adherence, paying a fee for therapeutic shoes, and social support.

    Conclusions: Men had worse foot complications. Women had worse general health, lower internal locus of control regarding ulcer prevention, and more negative attitudes toward therapeutic shoes. Clinicians should pay more attention to their female patients' concerns. Future research and development should focus on improving the weight and appearance of therapeutic shoes, particularly for women. Research is also needed on how to facilitate the adaption and reevaluation process where patients change from viewing shoes purely as items of clothing to also viewing them as medical interventions.

  • 26.
    Jarl, Gustav
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes: a systematic review and reflections2016Ingår i: Patient Preference and Adherence, E-ISSN 1177-889X, Vol. 10, s. 1521-1528Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Therapeutic shoes are prescribed to prevent diabetic foot ulcers, but adherence to wearing the shoes is often poor.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to review the literature on factors that are associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes and construct a model of adherence to aid future research and development in the field.

    Methods: We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO for quantitative studies on factors associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes.

    Results: Six studies were included in the review. The studies focused mainly on patient-, therapy-, and condition-related adherence factors. There is some evidence (three to five studies) that sex, diabetes duration, and ulcer history are not associated with adherence. The evidence for or against the other factors was weak (only one or two studies) or conflicting.

    Conclusion: There is no conclusive evidence for using any factor to predict adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes, but there is some evidence against using certain factors for predicting adherence. Future studies should include a broader range of factors, including health system and social/economic factors, and they should investigate perceived costs and benefits of wearing therapeutic shoes in comparison with other shoes or no shoes. A seesaw model is presented illustrating the complex phenomenon of adherence. Further research is needed to identify factors associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes, to enable the development of interventions to improve adherence and thereby reduce ulceration rates among people with diabetic foot complications.

  • 27.
    Jarl, Gustav
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Centre, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    An alternative perspective on assistive technology: the Person-Environment-Tool (PET) model2020Ingår i: Assistive technology, ISSN 1040-0435, E-ISSN 1949-3614, Vol. 32, nr 1, s. 47-53Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The medical and social models of disability are based on a dichotomy that categorizes people as able-bodied or disabled. In contrast, the biopsychosocial model, which forms the basis for the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), suggests a universalistic perspective on human functioning, encompassing all human beings. In this article we argue that the artificial separation of function-enhancing technology into assistive technology (AT) and mainstream technology might be one of the barriers to a universalistic view of human functioning. Thus, an alternative view of AT is needed. The aim of this article was to construct a conceptual model to demonstrate how all human activities and participation depend on factors related to the person, environment, and tools, emphasizing a universalistic perspective on human functioning. In the Person-Environment-Tool (PET) model, a person's activity and participation are described as a function of factors related to the person, environment, and tool, drawing on various ICF components. Importantly, the PET model makes no distinction between people of different ability levels, between environmental modifications intended for people of different ability levels, or between different function-enhancing technologies (AT and mainstream technology). A fictive patient case is used to illustrate how the universalistic view of the PET model lead to a different approach in rehabilitation. The PET model supports a universalistic view of technology use, environmental adaptations, and variations in human functioning.

  • 28.
    Jarl, Gustav
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Beyond dichotomous thinking: a process perspective on diabetic foot disease2017Ingår i: Diabetic Foot & Ankle, ISSN 2000-625X, Vol. 8, nr 1, artikel-id 1380477Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diabetic foot (DF) disease causes severe suffering around the world, and appropriate self-care activities are needed to prevent and treat this condition. However, all too often, self-care activities are less than optimal and clinicians find themselves unable to influence them in a positive direction. Clinicians' and researchers' mental models of the DF tend to be dichotomous: either the patient has or does not have an active ulcer or other DF disease. This mode of thinking hides the long-term perspective of DF disease, where patients' previous experiences and expectations for the future influence their current behavior. Thus, there is a need for a different perspective on DF disease to better understand patients' perspectives and thereby improve self-care, leading to more effective prevention and treatment.

    Objective: To present a novel framework, the process perspective on the DF, which can explain inadequate self-care behaviors not easily understood with a dichotomous perspective, and how they can be changed.

    Results: Three fictive clinical examples are used to illustrate how the process perspective on the DF can be used to understand how patients' previous experiences and expectations for the future influence their current behavior. In particular, this process perspective is used to understand how patients' beliefs and behaviors are sometimes self-reinforcing, resulting in stable behavior patterns, here referred to as 'DF cycles'. These cycles are quite common in clinical practice but are difficult to analyze using a dichotomous perspective on DF disease. The process perspective on the DF is used to analyze specific 'vicious' DF cycles of inadequate patient behavior and to find ways to transform them into 'virtuous' DF cycles, resulting in effective prevention and treatment.

    Conclusions: The process perspective on the DF seems suitable for understanding inadequate patient behaviors not easily understood with a dichotomous perspective on DF disease, opening up new avenues for clinical practice and research to help patients live a life with long remission phases, few relapses, and a high quality of life.

  • 29.
    Jarl, Gustav
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Understanding patients: a process perspective on diabetic foot disease2019Ingår i: 8th International symposium on diabetic foot: Abstract book, 2019, s. 133-133, artikel-id P42.03Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Diabetic foot self-care activities are often less than optimal and clinicians may find themselves unable to influence them in a positive direction. The aim was to present a novel framework, the process perspective on the diabetic foot, which can explain inadequate self-care behaviors and how they can be improved.

    Methods: A literature analysis was conducted.

    Results: The central principle of the process perspective is that diabetic foot disease is not a dichotomy (treatment and prevention) but a process over time, including alternating phases of active and latent diabetic foot disease (Fig. 1a). Thus, the patient is standing in the midst of a process, with a history of experiences and expectations for the future, all relevant to the patient’s current self-care behavior. A fictive patient case illustrates how the process perspective can be used to understand patients’ situation and how beliefs and behaviors are sometimes self-reinforcing, resulting in stable behavior patterns (‘diabetic foot cycles’), which are difficult to understand from a dichotomous perspective. The process perspective can be used to analyze ‘vicious’ diabetic foot cycles (Fig. 1b) of inadequate patient behavior and to find ways to transform them into ‘virtuous’ diabetic foot cycles (Fig. 1c), resulting in effective prevention and treatment.

    Conclusions: The process perspective on the diabetic foot seems suitable for understanding inadequate patient behaviors not easily understood with a dichotomous perspective, opening up new avenues for clinical practice and research to help patients live a life with long remission phases, few relapses, and a high quality of life.

  • 30.
    Jarl, Gustav
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, the SahlgrenskaAcademy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ulf
    University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Alnemo, John
    Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Predictors of adherence to wearing therapeutic footwear among people with diabetes2020Ingår i: Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, ISSN 1757-1146, Vol. 13, nr 1, artikel-id 45Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: People at increased risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers often wear therapeutic footwear less frequently than is desirable. The aims were to identify patient groups prone to nonadherence to wearing therapeutic footwear and modifiable factors associated with adherence.

    Materials and methods: A questionnaire was mailed to 1230 people with diabetes who had been fitted with therapeutic footwear. Independent variables were categorized into five domains. For each domain, variables that were associated with adherence in a univariate regression analysis were entered into a multiple regression analysis.

    Results: A total of 429 (34.9%) questionnaires were analyzed. Multiple regression analyses showed significant associations (p < 0.05) between higher adherence and paid employment, current foot ulcer, previous foot ulcer, satisfaction with follow-up, self-efficacy, understanding of lost/reduced sensation as a risk factor for foot ulcerations, visible storage of therapeutic footwear at home, storage of conventional footwear out of sight, consistent choices about which footwear type to wear, and a belief that therapeutic footwear promotes ulcer healing. The five multivariate models explained 2-28% of the variance in adherence, with the strategies for footwear use domain explaining the most.

    Conclusions: Patients without paid employment or without foot ulcer experience are more prone to nonadherence. To improve adherence, clinicians should advise patients to store therapeutic footwear in a visible place at home and put conventional footwear away and encourage patients' self-efficacy and habitual use of therapeutic footwear. Future studies should investigate this topic further and explore ways to promote changes in habits. A study limitation was that all variables were self-reported.

  • 31.
    Jarl, Gustav
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, the Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ulf
    University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Alnemo, John
    Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Predictors of therapeutic footwear adherence among people with diabetes2020Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 32. Juslin, Patrik N.
    et al.
    Liljeström, Simon
    Västfjäll, Daniel
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    How does music evoke emotions?: Exploring the underlying mechanisms2010Ingår i: Handbook of music and emotion: theory, research, and applications / [ed] Patrik N. Juslin, John Sloboda, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010, s. 605-642Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 33.
    Lin, Esther Ching-Lan
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Hsiao, Fei-Hsiu
    National Taiwan University College of Medicine School of Nursing, Taipei, Taiwan; National Taiwan University Hospital Nursing Department, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Health Science, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjövik, Norway.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Chao, Hui-Lin
    Department, Cathay General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Lee, Shih-Kai
    Department of Nursing, Tsaotun Psychiatric Center, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tsaotun Township, Nantou County 542, Taiwan.
    Hung, Tsui-Mei
    Nursing Department, Songde Branch, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan.
    Lu, Mei-Jou
    Kaohsiung Municipal Kai-Syuan Psychiatric Hospital, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan.
    Lu, Huei-Lan
    Jianan Psychiatric Center, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tainan City, Taiwan.
    Laio, Su-Jung
    Yuli Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taiwan; Department of Nursing, Tzu Chi University of Science and Technology, Taiwan.
    Chang, Kai-Yen
    Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan.
    Pan, An-Nie
    Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Factors influencing patient-perceived quality of care in psychiatric hospitals in Taiwan2021Ingår i: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, ISSN 0883-9417, E-ISSN 1532-8228, Vol. 35, nr 1, s. 9-16Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient-perceived quality of inpatient/outpatient psychiatric care remains under-researched. A cross-sectional survey with purposive sampling comprising 567 inpatients and 549 outpatients was conducted among eight psychiatric care facilities in Taiwan to examine the factors influencing patient-perceived care quality. Inpatients and outpatients perceived moderate quality of care, where "Encounter" was reported as the highest dimension. Inpatients perceived "Secure environment" as the lowest; outpatients rated "Discharge/Referring" as the lowest. Hospital region and customer loyalty were significantly associated with patient-perceived care quality. Other significant factors were also identified: inpatient employment, perceived mental health and treatment effects, understanding diagnosis, previous treatment, and visited by appointment.

  • 34.
    Lindner, Helen Y
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Lilienthal, Achim
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Karlsson, Gunilla
    Adult rehabilitation centre, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Centre.
    Eye gaze technology to gain access to cognitive processes in individuals with profound intellectual and physical disabilities (PIPD)2018Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Individuals with profound intellectual and physical disabilities (PIPD) often cannot speak for themselves and do things for themselves. Their level of cognitive abilities is unclear. Eye gaze technology has the potential to gain access to cognitive processes and eventually enable communication among these individuals.

    Method: Six individuals with PIPD were given multiple sessions of eye gaze training (9-36 sessions) between February 17 to October 18. They used a screen eye-tracker (Tobii pc eye-mini) to control the objects/icons on the screen. An eye-gaze training program with different levels of activities was used to teach cause and effect, give appropriate response, explore the whole screen, target specific objects, choosing objects AND turn taking.

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    Eye gaze technology to gain access to cognitive processes in individuals with profound intellectual and physical disabilities (PIPD)
  • 35.
    Lo Coco, Alida
    et al.
    Università degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Ingoglia, Sonia
    Università degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Region Örebro län.
    The assessment of susceptibility to emotional contagion: a contribution to the Italian adaptation of the emotional contagion scale2014Ingår i: Journal of nonverbal behavior, ISSN 0191-5886, E-ISSN 1573-3653, Vol. 38, nr 1, s. 67-87Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Emotional Contagion Scale (ECS; Doherty in J Nonverbal Behav 21(2):131-154, 1997) is a self-report instrument assessing susceptibility to emotional contagion. The study was aimed at examining its dimensionality, reliability, and validity in the Italian context. It was completed by 541 young adults (45 % men) in Study 1 and 649 young adults (40 % men) in Study 2. The results of a series of confirmatory factor analyses showed that a bi-factor model, with one general factor and four specific factors was supported. The general and specific factors were differentially related to self-other differentiation, empathy, emotional fragility, masculinity, and femininity. Notwithstanding, the results posited some questions about the ECS reliability and convergent validity. Implications for scoring of the ECS and the need to revise it are discussed.

  • 36.
    Lobenius Palmér, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sjöqvist, Birgitta
    University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Accelerometer-Assessed Physical Activity and Sedentary Time in Youth With Disabilities2018Ingår i: Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, ISSN 0736-5829, E-ISSN 1543-2777, Vol. 35, nr 1, s. 1-19Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared accelerometer-assessed habitual physical activity (PA), sedentary time, and meeting PA recommendations among 102 youth with disabilities (7-20 years) in four subgroups-physical/visual impairments, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders, and hearing impairment-and 800 youth with typical development (8-16 years). Low proportions of youth with disabilities met PA recommendations, and they generally were less physically active and more sedentary than youth with typical development. The hearing impairment and autism spectrum disorder groups were the most and least physically active, respectively. Older age and to some extent female sex were related to less PA and more sedentary time. Considering the suboptimal levels of PA in youth with disabilities, effective interventions directed at factors associated with PA among them are needed.

  • 37.
    Lobenius Palmér, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Sjöqvist Nätterlund, Birgitta
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Hurtig Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    How physically active are youth with disabilities compared to youth without disabilities?2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 38.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    A Swedish adaptation of the Emotional Contagion Scale: factor structure and psychometric properties2006Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, Vol. 47, s. 263-272Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Emotional Contagion Scale (ECS) is a self-report scale used to measure individual differences in susceptibility to converge towards the emotions expressed by others. The original American ECS (Doherty, 1997), translated into Swedish, was completed by 665 undergraduate students in two independent samples (N= 233 and N= 432, respectively). To investigate the factor structure of the ECS, confirmatory factor analyses of alternative models derived from previous research in emotion and emotional contagion were conducted. The results showed that the proposed one-dimensional structure of the ECS was not tenable. Instead a multi-facet model based on a differential emotions model and a hierarchal valence/differential emotions model was supported. Cross-validation on the second independent sample demonstrated and confirmed the multi-faceted property of the ECS and the equality of the factor structure across samples and genders. With regard to homogeneity and test-retest reliability, the Swedish version showed acceptable results and was in concordance with the original version.

  • 39.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Comparing quality of forensic psychiatric care in Denmark and Sweden2017Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Most industrialized countries measure, report, and improve the quality of medical care. Despite this, there is limited internationally comparable data available on quality of forensic psychiatric care. Collaboration between countries to produce internationally comparable data permits benchmarking and allows policymakers and clinicians to identify specific areas where individual countries could improve.

    Aim: The aim of the study is to compare the quality of forensic in-patient psychiatric care perceived by patients and staff in Denmark and Sweden.

    Method: A total of 1037 individuals in forensic psychiatry, 268 patients and 769 staff, in Denmark and Sweden completed the Quality of In-patient Forensic Care (QPC-FIP) and the Quality of In-patient Forensic Care (QPC-FIPS) instruments. The QPC-FIP and QPC-FIPS measures quality of care using 34 items across seven dimensions: Encounter, Participation, Discharge, Support, Secluded environment, Secure environment, and a Forensic-specific dimension. Confirmatory factor analyses show that the factor structure of the Danish versions of QPC-FIP and QPC-FIPS are equivalent with the original Swedish versions.

    Results: Staff in Denmark and Sweden generally perceived the quality of care higher than the patients except in Encounter and Secluded environment. In Encounter there were no differences in ratings between the Danish and Swedish participants. In Secluded environment the Danish patients rated the quality higher than the staff whereas in Sweden the staff rated the quality higher than the patients. There were few differences in perceived quality among patients. Danish patient’s rated Support and Secure environment higher than Swedish patients. Among staff, Danish staff rated the quality of care higher in all dimensions except in Secluded environment which was rated higher by the Swedish staff.

    Staff was generally more positive to the quality of care provided whereas the patients were less positive to the care they received. Staff and patients were however quite similar in their perceptions of the low quality of participation. Interestingly, the staff rated the quality of Secure environment lower than the patients, regardless of country.

    Conclusions: Although Denmark and Sweden are similar countries, there were large discrepancies between patients and staff perception of perceived quality of care. The present study thus reveals the importance of assessing both patients and staff perception of quality of care and it demonstrates the potential of using QPC for international benchmarking in forensic psychiatry.

  • 40.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Facial EMG reactions to facial expressions: a case of facial emotional contagion?1995Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 36, nr 2, s. 130-141Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore whether subjects exposed to stimuli of facial expressions respond with facial electromyographic (EMG) reactions consistent with the hypothesis that facial expressions are contagious. This study further examines whether males and females differ in facial EMG intensity. Two experiments demonstrated that subjects responded with facial EMG activity over the corrugator supercilii, the zygomatic major, the lateral frontalis, the depressor supercilii, and the levator labii muscle regions to stimuli of sad, angry, fearful, surprised, disgusted and happy faces, that, to large extent, were consistent with the hypothesis that facial expressions are contagious. Aspects of gender differences reported in earlier studies were found, indicating a tendency for females to respond with more pronounced facial EMG intensity.

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    fulltext
  • 41.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Factors predicting social dysfunction in people with autism: a multiple mediation model approach2014Ingår i: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 27, nr 4, s. 326-326Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 42.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hyper-responsiveness to touch mediates social dysfunction in adults with autism spectrum disorders2015Ingår i: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 9, s. 13-20Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated whether hyper-responsiveness to touch serves as a mediating variable that predicts social dysfunction in adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Data were obtained from all adults with administratively defined intellectual disability in a region in Sweden (n = 915, where 143 had ASD). A multiple mediation modeling analysis revealed a well-fitted model (Satorra-Bentler scaled chi-square = 10.91, df = 7, p = 0.14, CFI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.025), demonstrating that social dysfunction among adults with ASD was completely mediated by hyper-responsiveness to touch followed by impairment of speech and aggressive/destructive behavior. The results demonstrated that in adulthood, the tactile sensory system is foundational for social functioning in people with ASD, with diagnosis and intervention implications.

  • 43.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län.
    Prevalence and risk markers of behavior problems among adults with intellectual disabilities: a total population study in Örebro County, Sweden2013Ingår i: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 34, nr 4, s. 1346-1356Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of behavior problems among people with administratively defined intellectual disability (ID) and identify possible risk markers for behavior problems using the Behavior Problems Inventory (BPI). Sixty-two percent of the ID population (n = 915) had a behavior problem (self-injurious, stereotyped, or aggressive/destructive behavior) and 18.7% had a behavior problem identified as challenging behavior, resulting in a prevalence of 80.3 per 100,000 in the base population. The most pronounced risk markers for behavior problems were severity of ID, autism, night sleep disturbances, sensory hypersensitivity, communication dysfunction, social deficits, psychiatry involvement, and psychotropic medication. About 50% of people with behavior problems were on psychotropic drugs. Protective markers were Down's syndrome and, to some extent, cerebral palsy. The results were largely consistent with those reported in previous studies. Findings not previously reported were that prevalence of aggressive/destructive behavior peaked among those ≥70 years. Highlighting groups within a population at particular risk has implications for management and treatment of individuals with behavior problems.

  • 44.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Psychometric properties and factor structure of the Behavior Problems Inventory (BPI-01) in a Swedish community population of adults with intellectual disability2011Ingår i: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 32, nr 6, s. 2295-2303Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Behavior Problems Inventory (BPI-01) in a community population. The Swedish version of the BPI-01 was administered by interviewing care staff of all adults (n = 915) with administratively defined intellectual disabilities (IDs) living in Orebro County, Sweden. sixty-two percent of the participants had at least one behavior problem. Altogether, 30.9% showed self-injurious behavior, 41.3% stereotyped behavior, and 34.8% aggressive/destructive behavior. All but the self-injurious behavior scale reached acceptable levels of internal consistency. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the unidimensionality of the subscales as well as the proposed three factor structure of the original BPI-01. The present study demonstrates that the three subscales are highly similar constructs across different language and cultural settings, and that the BPI-01 is applicable in research on populations with varying mental functioning, diagnoses, ages, and living arrangements. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 45.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för beteende-, social- och rättsvetenskap. Örebro Univ Hosp, Rehabil Res Ctr, Örebro, Sweden.
    The relationship between the Biosocial Model of Personality and susceptibility to emotional contagion: a structural equation modeling approach2008Ingår i: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 45, nr 1, s. 89-95Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Using structural equation modeling, the present study investigated the influences of personality, measured by the Temperament and Character Inventory, on susceptibility to emotional contagion, measured by the Emotional Contagion Scale (ECS), in a sample of 423 Swedish university students. Consistent with predictions of the Riosocial Model of Personality and the theory of emotional contagion, reward dependence influenced all basic emotion facets (anger, fear, sadness, happiness, and love) measured by the ECS, and harm avoidance influenced susceptibility to anger and fear, while the temperament dimensions of novelty seeking and persistence had no influence on susceptibility to emotional contagion. Among the character dimensions, self-directedness influenced susceptibility to positive emotions (happiness and love), while cooperativeness and self-transcendence had negative influences on susceptibility to anger and love (cooperativeness) and sadness (self-transcendence). The relation between susceptibility to emotional contagion and the behavior maintenance system proposed by the Biosocial Model of Personality is discussed. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 46.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Centre for Rehabilitation Research.
    Ahlström, G.
    Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Wilde-Larsson, B.
    Department of Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Hedmark University College, Hedmark, Norway.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Psychiatric Research Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    The patient's view of quality in psychiatric outpatient care2012Ingår i: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 19, nr 7, s. 629-637Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Accessible summary: This paper describes Swedish outpatients' perception of the quality of psychiatric care they received. A large number of patients (1340) from 15 outpatient clinics participated in the study. A newly developed and tested questionnaire, the Quality in Psychiatric Care Out-Patient, was used. The patients' highest ratings were for Encounter (staffpatient interaction), the lowest were for Discharge. Most notably, quality of care was rated higher by women, older people, those with a partner, those with a lower educational level and those who were gainfully employed. In relation to the visit to the clinic, higher quality of care was associated with shorter waiting time, better information and meeting with fewer professions. Older people and those gainfully employed reported better mental health. The longer the waiting time and the greater the number of professions met, the poorer mental health was reported. The conclusion was that although a majority of the patients rated the quality of outpatient care as high, aspects of it remain unsatisfactory. The Quality in Psychiatric Care Out-Patient offers an easy way to assess patients' perception of the quality of care they receive as an outpatient and has a useful role to play in quality-assurance evaluations. Abstract The influence of demographic characteristics on patients' ratings of the quality of psychiatric outpatient care has been given little attention in research. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the quality of psychiatric care among outpatients and investigate demographic and clinical factors associated with the way in which this quality is perceived. A sample of 1340 outpatients from 15 general adult psychiatric clinics in Sweden completed the Quality in Psychiatric Care Out-Patient (QPCOP), with a response rate of 71%. The patients' highest ratings were for Encounter; the lowest were for Discharge. Most notably, quality of care was rated higher by women, older people, those with a partner, those with a lower educational level and those who were gainfully employed. In regard to visits to the clinic, higher quality of care was associated with shorter waiting time, better information and fewer professions encounters. Older people and those gainfully employed reported better mental health. Thus the QPCOP was associated with both demographic and clinical factors. In particular, wanting to come back to the clinic was the single strongest predictor of quality.

  • 47.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Psychometric evaluation of the Ways of Coping Questionnaire as applied to clinical and nonclinical groups2006Ingår i: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 60, nr 5, s. 485-93Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe coping and evaluate the psychometric properties and the factor structure of the Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCQ) applied to clinical and nonclinical groups.

    Method: The responses of 510 subjects (chronically disabled patients, their next of kin, and students) who completed the Swedish version of the WCQ were the basis for confirmatory factor analyses of the original eight-factor model as well as of the model consistency across samples.

    Results: The coping patterns that emerged in the case of the patients were very similar to those of the next of kin. The exceptions were greater use of Distancing by patients and of Positive Reappraisal by next of kin. The results showed support for the original eight-factor model, but deviation from the equality of factor structures among the subsamples indicated a limited use of the WCQ in between-sample comparisons.

    Conclusion: Modifications to the eight-factor model adequately described the subsamples, supporting the use of the WCQ in within-sample settings. This was particularly evident from the evaluation of alternative factor structures based on previously described models derived from clinical samples.

  • 48. Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Andersson, Gunilla
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för beteende-, social- och rättsvetenskap.
    Viding, Jane
    Effects of vibroacoustic music on challenging behaviors in individuals with autism and developmental disabilities2009Ingår i: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 3, nr 2, s. 390-400Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Vibroacoustic music has been proposed to be an effective treatment for individuals with developmental disorders and challenging behaviors. The present study experimentally tested the effects of vibroacoustic music on self-injurious, stereotypical, and aggressive destructive behaviors in 20 individuals with autism spectrum disorders and developmental disabilities. The participants were randomized into two groups in a randomized controlled trial evaluation. The first group received 10–20 min sessions with vibroacoustic music treatment for 5 weeks. Then the second group received the same treatment during the next 5 weeks. Behavior was assessed using the Behavior Problems Inventory in all participants before the treatment, after the first group had completed their treatment, and again after the second group had completed their treatment. In order to evaluate each session, the accompanying assistants assessed behavior on different scales after each session. In addition, the sessions were videotaped and analyzed minute by minute for challenging behaviors. The results revealed that vibroacoustic music reduced self-injurious, stereotypic, and aggressive destructive behaviors in the participants. In addition, the results indicated that the effect of vibroacoustic music was to some extent dependent on the participants’ diagnosis. Implications for vibroacoustic music theory and practice are discussed.

  • 49.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Carlsson, Fredrik
    Hilmersson, Per
    Juslin, Patrik N.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Psychol, SE-75142 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Emotional responses to music: experience, expression, and physiology2009Ingår i: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 37, nr 1, s. 61-90Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A crucial issue in research on music and emotion is whether music evokes genuine emotional responses in listeners (the emotivist position) or whether listeners merely perceive emotions expressed by the music (the cognitivist position). To investigate this issue, we measured self-reported emotion, facial muscle activity, and autonomic activity in 32 participants while they listened to popular music composed with either a happy or a sad emotional expression. Results revealed a coherent manifestation in the experiential, expressive, and physiological components of the emotional response system, which supports the emotivist position. Happy music generated more zygomatic facial muscle activity, greater skin conductance, lower finger temperature, more happiness and less sadness than sad music. The finding that the emotion induced in the listener was the same as the emotion expressed in the music is consistent with the notion that music may induce emotions through a process of emotional contagion.

  • 50.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Frank, André
    University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Duberg, Anna
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. University Health Care Research Center.
    Effects of the Structured Water Dance Intervention (SWAN) on muscular hypertonia in adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities2022Ingår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, nr 1, artikel-id 8746Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Structured Water Dance Intervention (SWAN) on muscular hypertonia in individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disability (PIMD). Muscular hypertonia has a multitude of negative consequences for people with PIMD because it can lead to contractures, pain, mobility impairment, pressure ulcers that limits functional behavior as well as gross and fine motor function. Thirty-six individuals with PIMD in four Swedish regions were randomized to two groups in a multicenter, crossover design. Two withdrew participation, thus 34 individuals completed the intervention. The intervention was administered for 40 min once a week during a 12-week period. Outcomes related to muscular hypertonia were examined using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), and based on accompanying assistants' assessments. Hypertonia decreased from baseline to the end of the intervention period, as demonstrated by a decrease in MAS score. Hypertonia also decreased during the sessions, as shown by the assistants' ratings. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that SWAN holds potential to reduce muscular hypertonia in people with PIMD and points out the importance of customized physical treatment alternatives. The study provides useful information for the design of future non-invasive, non-pharmacological interventions to reduce muscular hypertonia in PIMD.

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