oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 81
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Ambrosio, Fabrisia
    et al.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Lexell, Jan
    Fitzgerald, G. Kelley
    Boninger, Michael L.
    Huard, Johnny
    The effect of muscle loading on skeletal muscle regenerative potential: an update of current research findings relating to aging and neuromuscular pathology2009In: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, ISSN 0894-9115, E-ISSN 1537-7385, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 145-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skeletal muscle is a dynamic tissue with a remarkable ability to continuously respond to environmental stimuli. Among its adaptive responses is the widely investigated ability of skeletal muscle to regenerate after loading or injury or both. Although significant basic science efforts have been dedicated to better understand the underlying mechanism controlling skeletal muscle regeneration, there has been relatively little impact in the clinical approaches used to treat skeletal muscle injuries and wasting. The purpose of this review article is to provide an overview of the basic biology of satellite cell function in response to muscle loading and to relate these findings in the context of aging and neuromuscular pathology for the rehabilitation medicine specialist.

  • 2. Ambrosio, Fabrisia
    et al.
    Tarabishy, Ayman
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Brown, Elke H. P.
    Sowa, Gwendolyn
    Biological basis of exercise-based treatments for musculoskeletal conditions2011In: PM&R, ISSN 1934-1482, E-ISSN 1934-1563, Vol. 3, no 6 Suppl 1, p. S59-S63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exercise-based therapies are the cornerstone of rehabilitation programs. While the benefits of exercise on systemic and tissue function are generally accepted, mechanisms underlying these benefits are sometimes poorly understood. An improved understanding of the effects of mechanical loading on molecular and cellular processes has the potential to lead to more disease-specific and efficacious exercise-based therapies. The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature examining the role of mechanical signaling on muscle and cartilage biology.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Helena
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Karlsen, Anette
    Inst Basic Med Sci, Fac Med, Dept Nutr, Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Blomhoff, Rune
    Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Oslo, Norway.
    Raastad, Truls
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway .
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Active recovery training does not affect the antioxidant response to soccer games in elite female players2010In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 104, no 10, p. 1492-1499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in plasma endogenous and dietary antioxidants and oxidative stress markers were studied following two 90 min elite female soccer games separated by 72 h of either active or passive recovery. The active recovery group (n 8) trained for 1 h at 22 and 46 h after the first game (low-intensity cycling and resistance training), while the passive group rested (n 8). Blood samples were taken before the games; immediately after the games; 21, 45 and 69 h after the first game; and immediately after the second game. The oxidative stress markers and antioxidants were not affected by active recovery. The oxidative stress marker GSSG increased by the same extent after both the games, while the lipid peroxidation marker diacron-reactive oxygen metabolite remained unchanged. The endogenous antioxidants total glutathione and uric acid and ferric reducing/antioxidant power increased immediately after both the games with the same amplitude, while increases in cysteine, cysteine-glycine and total thiols reached significant levels only after the second game. The changes in dietary antioxidants after the first game were either rapid and persistent (tocopherols and ascorbic acid (AA) increased; polyphenols decreased) or delayed (carotenoids). This resulted in high pre-second game levels of tocopherols, AA and carotenoids. Polyphenols returned to baseline at 69 h, and were not affected by the second game. In conclusion, the soccer-associated dietary antioxidant defence, but not the endogenous antioxidant defence, is persistent. Similar acute oxidative stress and endogenous antioxidant responses and dissimilar dietary antioxidant reactions occur during two repeated female soccer games. Finally, the complex antioxidant response to soccer is not affected by active recovery training.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Helena M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Bøhn, S. K.
    Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Raastad, T.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Paulsen, G.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Blomhoff, R.
    Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Differences in the inflammatory plasma cytokine response following two elite female soccer games separated by a 72-h recovery2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 740-747Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated changes in a large battery of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in elite female soccer players following two 90-min games separated by a 72-h active or passive recovery. Blood samples were taken from 10 players before, within 15-20 min, 21, 45 and 69 h after the first game and within 15-20 min after the second game. The leukocyte count was analyzed, together with several plasma pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, using a multiplex bead array system. After the first and second game, the total leukocytes and neutrophils increased significantly. Likewise, increases (P<0.05) in pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (INF-gamma), IL-17], chemokines [monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-8 and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG)], anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-7, IL-10, IL-13, INF-alpha) and the mixed cytokine IL-6 were observed. Leukocyte and cytokine levels were normalized within 21 h. Active recovery (low-intensity exercises) did not affect the cytokine responses. A dampened cytokine response was observed after the second game as only IL-12, IL-6, MCP-1, IL-8 and MIG increased (P<0.05). In conclusion, a robust pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine response occurs after the first but not the second soccer game. The implications of the dampened cytokine response in female players after the second game are unknown.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Helena M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Karlsen, A.
    Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Blomhoff, R.
    Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Raastad, T.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Plasma antioxidant responses and oxidative stress following a soccer game in elite female players2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 600-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We aimed to investigate markers of oxidative stress and levels of endogenous and dietary antioxidants in 16 elite female soccer players in response to a 90-min game (average intensity 82+/-3% HRpeak). Blood samples were taken before, immediately and 21 h after the game. Plasma-oxidized glutathione, the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH:GSSG) and lipid peroxidation measured by d-ROMs were used as markers of oxidative stress. Plasma endogenous [uric acid, total glutathione (TGSH)] and dietary antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, total carotenoids and polyphenols) were analyzed using liquid chromatography and the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Exercise induced an acute increase (P<0.05) in GSSG, uric acid, TGSH, alpha-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid. In parallel, the GSH:GSSG ratio and polyphenols decreased (P<0.05). GSSG, GSH:GSSG ratio, uric acid, TGSH, and ascorbic acid returned to baseline at 21 h, while polyphenols and alpha-tocopherol remained altered. Total carotenoids increased above baseline only at 21 h (P<0.05). Lipid peroxidation, measured by d-ROMs, remained unchanged throughout the study. Thus, intermittent exercise in well-trained female athletes induces a transient increase in GSSG and a decrease in the GSH:GSSG ratio, which is effectively balanced by the recruitment of both endogenous and dietary antioxidants, resulting in the absence of lipid peroxidation measured by d-ROMs.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Helena M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Karlsen, Anette
    Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo.
    Blomhoff, Rune
    Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo.
    Raastad, Truls
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Active recovery training does not affect the antioxidant response to soccer games in elite female playersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in plasma endogenous and dietary antioxidants and oxidative stress markers were studied following two 90-min elite female soccer games separated by 72 h of either active or passive recovery. The active recovery group (n=8) trained for one hour at 22 and 46 h after the first game (low-intensity cycling and resistance training)while the passive group rested(n=8). Blood samples were taken before, immediately after, 21, 45 and 69 h after the first and immediately after the second game. The oxidative stress markers and antioxidants were not affected by active recovery. The oxidative stress marker oxidized glutathione increased by the same extent after both games, while the lipid peroxidation marker diacrons reactive-oxygen metabolites remained unchanged. The endogenous antioxidants total glutathione, uric acid and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay increased immediately after both games with the same amplitude, while increases in cysteine, cysteine-glycine and total thiols reached significant levels only after the second game. The changes in dietary antioxidants after the first game were either rapid and persistent (tocopherols, ascorbic acid increased; polyphenols decreased) or delayed (carotenoids). This resulted in high pre-second game levels of tocopherols, ascorbic acid and carotenoids. Polyphenols returned to baseline at 69 h and were not affected by the second game. In conclusion, the soccer-associated dietary but not endogenous antioxidant defence is persistent. Similar acute oxidative stress and endogenous antioxidant responses and dissimilar dietary antioxidant reactions occur during two repeated female soccer games. Finally, the complex antioxidant response to soccer is not affected by active recovery training.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Helena M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Raastad, Truls
    Nilsson, Johnny
    Paulsen, Göran
    Garthe, Ina
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Neuromuscular fatigue and recovery in elite female soccer: effects of active recovery2008In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 372-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate the time course of recovery from neuromuscular fatigue and some biochemical changes between two female soccer matches separated by an active or passive recovery regime. METHODS: Countermovement jump (CMJ), sprint performance, maximal isokinetic knee flexion and extension, creatine kinase (CK), urea, uric acid, and perceived muscle soreness were measured in 17 elite female soccer players before, immediately after, 5, 21, 45, 51, and 69 h after a first match, and immediately after a second match. Eight players performed active recovery (submaximal cycling at 60% of HRpeak and low-intensity resistance training at < 50% 1RM) 22 and 46 h after the first match. RESULTS: In response to the first match, a significant decrease in sprint performance (-3.0 +/- 0.5%), CMJ (-4.4 +/- 0.8%), peak torque in knee extension (-7.1 +/- 1.9%) and flexion (-9.4 +/- 1.8%), and an increase in CK (+ 152 +/- 28%), urea (15 +/- 2), uric acid (+ 11 +/- 2%), and muscle soreness occurred. Sprint ability was first to return to baseline (5 h) followed by urea and uric acid (21 h), isokinetic knee extension (27 h) and flexion (51 h), CK, and muscle soreness (69 h), whereas CMJ was still reduced at the beginning of the second match. There were no significant differences in the recovery pattern between the active and passive recovery groups. The magnitude of the neuromuscular and biochemical changes after the second match was similar to that observed after the first match. CONCLUSION: The present study reveals differences in the recovery pattern of the various neuromuscular and biochemical parameters in response to a female soccer match. The active recovery had no effects on the recovery pattern of the four neuromuscular and three biochemical parameters.

  • 8.
    Bankole, Landry-Cyrille
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. University of Lyon, Saint- Etienne, France; University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, Saint- Etienne, France.
    Feasson, Leonard
    University of Lyon, Saint- Etienne, France; University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, Saint- Etienne, France.
    Ponsot, Elodie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Fibre type-specific satellite cell content in two models of muscle disease2013In: Histopathology, ISSN 0309-0167, E-ISSN 1365-2559, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 826-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Muscle satellite cells (SCs) are responsible for the regenerative events following muscle fibre injury. This study aimed to improve our understanding of SC behaviour in two models of muscle disorder with different pathological mechanisms and onset of disease.

    Methods and results: Pax7(+)SC content was assessed in types I and II fibres of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD; n=9; age 132years), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM; n=9; age 52 +/- 12years) and in controls (n=5; age 26 +/- 5years). Pax7(+)SCs number in type I and II fibres was higher (P<0.05) in DMD and in PM/DM compared to controls. Type I fibres were associated with a higher number of Pax7(+)SCs compared to type II fibres only in DMD; Pax7(+)SCs number in type I fibres was about threefold higher in DMD compared to PM/DM (P<0.05). In DMD, Pax7(+)SC content in small regenerating fibres (0.09 +/- 0.09 SCs/fibre) was similar to that in fibres from healthy skeletal muscle. The proportion of activated SCs (Ki-67(+)SCs) was fivefold lower in DMD (0.4 +/- 0.4%) compared to PM/DM (2.8 +/- 2%). Pax7(+) cells located outside the basal lamina were observed in DMD muscles only.

    Conclusion: The capacity to generate new SCs is increased even in severely impaired muscles and a fibre type-specific enhancement of SC occurs in type I muscle fibres in DMD.

  • 9.
    Bankole, Landry-Cyrille
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Laboratoire Interuniversitaire de Biologie de la Motricité, UJM-Saint-Etienne, Université de Lyon, Saint-Etienne, France; Unité de Myologie, Centre Hospitalier, Universitaire de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France; Centre Référent Maladies Neuromusculaires Rares Rhône-Alpes, Saint-Etienne, France.
    Millet, Guillaume Y.
    Laboratoire Interuniversitaire de Biologie de la Motricité, UJM-Saint-Etienne, Université de Lyon, Saint-Etienne, France; Human Performance Laboratory, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada; INSERM U1042, Grenoble, France.
    Temesi, John
    Laboratoire Interuniversitaire de Biologie de la Motricité, UJM-Saint-Etienne, Université de Lyon, Saint-Etienne, France; Human Performance Laboratory, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada.
    Bachasson, Damien
    INSERM U1042, Grenoble, France; Laboratoire HP2, Grenoble Alpes University, Grenoble, France.
    Ravelojaona, Marion
    Laboratoire Interuniversitaire de Biologie de la Motricité, UJM-Saint-Etienne, Université de Lyon, Saint-Etienne, France; Unité de Myologie, Centre Hospitalier, Universitaire de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France; Centre Référent Maladies Neuromusculaires Rares Rhône-Alpes, Saint-Etienne, France.
    Wuyam, Bernard
    INSERM U1042, Grenoble, France; Laboratoire HP2, Grenoble Alpes University, Grenoble, France; Centre Référent Maladies Neuromusculaires Rares Rhône-Alpes, Saint-Etienne, France.
    Verges, Samuel
    INSERM U1042, Grenoble, France; Laboratoire HP2, Grenoble Alpes University, Grenoble, France.
    Ponsot, Elodie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Antoine, Jean-Christophe
    Centre Référent Maladies Neuromusculaires Rares Rhône-Alpes, Saint-Etienne, France.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Feasson, Leonard
    Laboratoire Interuniversitaire de Biologie de la Motricité, UJM-Saint-Etienne, Université de Lyon, Saint-Etienne, France; Unité de Myologie, Centre Hospitalier, Universitaire de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France; Centre Référent Maladies Neuromusculaires Rares Rhône-Alpes, Saint-Etienne, France.
    Safety and efficacy of a 6-month home-based exercise program in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy A randomized controlled trial2016In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 95, no 31, article id e4497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous randomized controlled trials investigating exercise training programs in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) patients are scarce and of short duration only. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of a 6-month home-ased exercise training program on fitness, muscle, and motor function in FSHD patients.

    Methods: Sixteen FSHD patients were randomly assigned to training (TG) and control (CG) groups (both n=8) in a home-based exercise intervention. Training consisted of cycling 3 times weekly for 35minutes (combination of strength, high-intensity interval, and low-intensity aerobic) at home for 24 weeks. Patients in CG also performed an identical training program (CTG) after 24 weeks. The primary outcome was change in peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) measured every 6 weeks. The principal secondary outcomes were maximal quadriceps strength (MVC) and local quadriceps endurance every 12 weeks. Other outcome measures included maximal aerobic power (MAP) and experienced fatigue every 6 weeks, 6-minute walking distance every 12 weeks, and muscle characteristics from vastus lateralis biopsies taken pre- and postintervention.

    Results: The compliance rate was 91% in TG. Significant improvements with training were observed in the VO2 peak (+19%, P= 0.002) and MAP by week 6 and further to week 24. Muscle endurance, MVC, and 6-minute walking distance increased and experienced fatigue decreased. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area and citrate synthase activity increased by 34% (P=0.008) and 46% (P=0.003), respectively. Dystrophic pathophysiologic patterns were not exacerbated. Similar improvements were experienced by TG and CTG.

    Conclusions: A combined strength and interval cycling exercise-training program compatible with patients' daily professional and social activities leads to significant functional benefits without compromising muscle tissue.

  • 10. Charifi, N.
    et al.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Féasson, L.
    Costes, F.
    Geyssant, A.
    Denis, C.
    Enhancement of microvessel tortuosity in the vastus lateralis muscle of old men in response to endurance training2004In: Journal of Physiology, ISSN 0022-3751, E-ISSN 1469-7793, Vol. 554, no Pt 2, p. 559-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Muscle microvascularization is usually quantified in transverse sections, in absolute terms (capillaries around fibres, CAF, or capillary-to-fibre ratio, C/F) or as CAF related to fibre area (CAF/area, CAFA). The capillary-to-fibre perimeter exchange ratio (CFPE) has been introduced in order to assess the role of the capillary-to-fibre interface in resistance to O(2) diffusion. The ratio between the length of capillaries in contact with fibres and fibre perimeter (LC/PF) has also been used as an index for capillary tortuosity. The possibility of change in capillary tortuosity with endurance training was not considered in previous studies. Consequently, this study investigated the effect of 14 weeks of endurance training on muscle microvascularization, including microvessel tortuosity, in 11 elderly men (8th decade). Microvessels were analysed using the CD31 antibody. Together with the significant increase in peak oxygen exchange and citrate synthase activity, there was a significant increase in C/F. While CFPE and CAFA remained unchanged, an important finding was the clear increase in LC/PF (56%; P < 0.001) for a same sarcomere length. We also found a strong correlation between oxidative enzyme activity and LC/PF both before and after training. These results indicate that endurance training induces significant remodelling in the microvessel network in elderly men and that an increase in the degree of microvessel tortuosity would be an important mechanism of adaptation to endurance training.

  • 11.
    Edholm, Peter
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Strandberg, Emelie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    A healthy diet rich in N-3 PUFAS enhances the effects of resistance training in elderly women2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Edholm, Peter
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Strandberg, Emelie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    A healthy diet rich in N-3 PUFAS enhances the effects of resistance training in elderly women2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Edholm, Peter
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Strandberg, Emelie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Lower limb explosive strength capacity in elderly women: effects of resistance training and healthy diet2017In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 123, no 1, p. 190-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of 24 wk of resistance training combined with a healthy diet on lower limb explosive strength capacity were investigated in a population of healthy elderly women. Participants (n = 63; 67.5 ± 0.4 yr) were randomized into three groups; resistance training (RT), resistance training and healthy diet (RT-HD), and control (CON). Progressive resistance training was performed at a load of 75-85% one-repetition maximum. A major adjustment in the healthy dietary approach was an n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio below 2. Lower limb maximal strength, explosive force capacity during dynamic and isometric movements, whole body lean mass, and physical function were assessed. Whole body lean mass significantly increased by 1.5 ± 0.5% in RT-HD only. Isometric strength performance during knee extension as well as the performance in the five sit-to-stand and single-leg-stance tests increased similarly in RT and RT-HD. Improvements in dynamic peak power and time to reach peak power (i.e shorter time) during knee extension occurred in both RT (+15.7 ± 2.6 and -11.0 ± 3.8%, respectively) and RT-HD (+24.6 ± 2.6 and -20.3 ± 2.7%, respectively); however, changes were significantly larger in RT-HD. Similarly, changes in peak force and rate of force development during squat jump were higher in RT-HD (+58.5 ± 8.4 and +185.4 ± 32.9%, respectively) compared with RT (+35.7 ± 6.9 and +105.4 ± 22.4%, respectively). In conclusion, a healthy diet rich in n-3 PUFA can optimize the effects of resistance training on dynamic explosive strength capacity during isolated lower limb movements and multijoint exercises in healthy elderly women.

    NEW & NOTEWORTHY Age-related decline in lower limb explosive strength leads to impaired ability to perform daily living tasks. The present randomized controlled trial demonstrates that a healthy diet rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) enhances resistance training-induced gains in dynamic explosive strength capacity during isolated lower limb movements and multijoint exercises in healthy elderly women. This supports the use of strategies combining resistance training and dietary changes to mitigate the decline in explosive strength capacity in older adults.

  • 14.
    Eliason, Gabriella
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Abdel-Halim, S.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Arvidsson, B.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Piehl-Aulin, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Physical performance and muscular characteristics in different stages of COPD2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 865-870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study has examined exercise capacity and muscle morphology in patients with different severities of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Twenty-three patients and 12 healthy matched controls were recruited. Based on the severity of airflow obstruction, patients were divided into two subgroups. Exercise capacity was determined using a 6-min walk test. Muscle fiber composition, fiber area and number of satellite cells/muscle fiber were determined in muscle biopsies using immunohistochemistry. A progressive decline in exercise capacity was noted with ascending disease severity. Furthermore, a correlation between reduction in exercise capacity and changes in muscle fiber composition was observed in COPD. The group with severe and very severe COPD had a lower proportion of type I and a higher proportion of type IIa fibers compared with the other groups. In severe and very severe COPD, a reduction in fiber area of type IIa fibers was also seen. The number of satellite cells/muscle fiber did not differ between the groups. In conclusion, a decline in exercise capacity occurs already in mild and moderate COPD, indicating that the 6-min walk test is a reliable indicator of disease severity. Furthermore, changes in skeletal muscle morphology are associated with disease severity while muscle regenerative capacity is not altered.

  • 15.
    Eliason, Gabriella
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Abdel-Halim, Samy M.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Piehl-Aulin, Karin
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Rheumatology, Danderyds hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Alterations in the muscle-to-capillary interface in patients with different degrees of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease2010In: Respiratory research (Online), ISSN 1465-9921, E-ISSN 1465-993X, Vol. 11, article id 97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is hypothesized that decreased capillarization of limb skeletal muscle is implicated in the decreased exercise tolerance in COPD patients. We have recently demonstrated decreased number of capillaries per muscle fibre (CAF) but no changes in CAF in relation to fibre area (CAFA), which is based on the diffusion distance between the capillary and muscle fibre. The aim of the current study is to investigate the muscle-to-capillary interface which is an important factor involved in oxygen supply to the muscle that has previously been suggested to be a more sensitive marker for changes in the capillary bed compared to CAF and CAFA.

    Methods: 23 COPD patients and 12 age-matched healthy subjects participated in the study. Muscle-to-capillary interface was assessed in muscle biopsies from the tibialis anterior muscle using the following parameters:

    1) The capillary-to-fibre ratio (C:Fi) which is defined as the sum of the fractional contributions of all capillary contacts around the fibre

    2) The ratio between C:Fi and the fibre perimeter (CFPE-index)

    3) The ratio between length of capillary and fibre perimeter (LC/PF) which is also referred to as the index of tortuosity.

    Exercise capacity was determined using the 6-min walking test.

    Results: A positive correlation was found between CFPE-index and ascending disease severity with CFPE-index for type I fibres being significantly lower in patients with moderate and severe COPD. Furthermore, a positive correlation was observed between exercise capacity and CFPE-index for both type I and type IIa fibres.

    Conclusion: It can be concluded that the muscle-to-capillary interface is disturbed in the tibialis anterior muscle in patients with COPD and that interface is strongly correlated to increased disease severity and to decreased exercise capacity in this patient group.

     

  • 16. Eriksson, Anders
    et al.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Malm, Christer
    Thornell, Lars-Eric
    Skeletal muscle morphology in power-lifters with and without anabolic steroids2005In: Histochemistry and Cell Biology, ISSN 0948-6143, E-ISSN 1432-119X, Vol. 124, no 2, p. 167-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The morphological appearance of the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle from high-level power-lifters on long-term anabolic steroid supplementation (PAS) and power-lifters never taking anabolic steroids (P) was compared. The effects of long- and short-term supplementation were compared. Enzyme-immunohistochemical investigations were performed to assess muscle fiber type composition, fiber area, number of myonuclei per fiber, internal myonuclei, myonuclear domains and proportion of satellite cells. The PAS group had larger type I, IIA, IIAB and IIC fiber areas (p<0.05). The number of myonuclei/fiber and the proportion of central nuclei were significantly higher in the PAS group (p<0.05). Similar results were seen in the trapezius muscle (T) but additionally, in T the proportion of fibers expressing developmental myosin isoforms was higher in the PAS group compared to the P group. Further, in VL, the PAS group had significantly larger nuclear domains in fibers containing > or = 5 myonuclei. The results of AS on VL morphology in this study were similar to previously reported short-term effects of AS on VL. The initial effects from AS appear to be maintained for several years.

  • 17.
    Feasson, L.
    et al.
    Lab Physiol Exercice, Univ St Etienne,St Etienne EA 4338, France; Unite Myol, Serv Physiol Clin & Exercice, Hop Bellevue, CHU St Etienne, St Etienne 2, France.
    Verney, J.
    Lab Physiol Exercice, Univ St Etienne, St Etienne, France; Unite Myol, Serv Physiol Clin & Exercice, Hop Bellevue, CHU St Etienne, St Etienne 2, France.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Gautheron, V.
    Lab Physiol Exercice, Univ St Etienne, St Etienne, France; Serv Med Phys & Readaptat, CHU St Etienne, St Etienne, France.
    Calmels, P.
    Lab Physiol Exercice, Univ St Etienne, St Etienne, France; Serv Med Phys & Readaptat, CHU St Etienne, St Etienne, France.
    Millet, G. Y.
    Lab Physiol Exercice, Univ St Etienne, St Etienne, France.
    Exercise therapy and myopathies2010In: Revue neurologique (Paris), ISSN 0035-3787, E-ISSN 2213-0004, Vol. 166, no 3, p. 269-278Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the first consensus papers published early in the 2000s, a growing number of recent publications has shown that adapted physical activity is not only safe in the context of myopathy but also potentially effective as a therapeutic tool. After a short recall of the different exercise modalities, the mechanical strain they induce and the expected muscular benefits, the present paper reviews the different studies related to exercise therapy in myopathic patients and provides a critical analysis of the topic. Myopathies are rare diseases with many different etiologies and a large number of training modalities which could be useful for the different muscular challenges have been proposed. We have chosen to focus on several specific training modalities and to discuss the results from the most recent papers. The purpose of this review is to, firstly, update physical training guidelines for patients with myopathy and, secondly, highlight some common pitfalls associated with this strategy. This is particularly important for medical and allied professionals involved in prescribing and managing exercise therapy protocols. (C) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Folkesson, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kruse, Robert
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Clinical Research Laboratory.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    HSP27 is not mandatory for the hypertrophy of human skeletal muscle cellsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Folkesson, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Mackey, A. L.
    Institute of Sports Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Holm, L.
    Institute of Sports Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kjaer, M.
    Institute of Sports Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Paulsen, G.
    Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sports Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Raastad, T.
    Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sports Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Henriksson, J.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Immunohistochemical changes in the expression of HSP27 in exercised human vastus lateralis muscle2008In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 194, no 3, p. 215-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The role of HSP27 in the adaptive process of skeletal muscle to exercise, especially in humans, is not well understood. The objective of this study was to investigate immunohistochemical changes in HSP27 expression in human vastus lateralis muscle following resistance and endurance exercises.

    Methods: Two different exercise protocols were used: (1) one-leg ergometer cycling (EC, n = 6) consisting of two 30-min bouts at 40% and 75% of peak oxygen uptake, respectively, and (2) leg extension resistance exercise (RE, n = 9) including 10 sets of eight repetitions at a load corresponding to 70% of one maximal repetition (1RM). Immunohistochemistry using specific monoclonal antibodies was used to determine the location of HSP27 protein in muscle biopsies from human vastus lateralis.

    Results: Our results show that RE, but not EC, induced a significant appearance of scattered accumulations of HSP27 protein in muscle fibres from five of nine subjects. The number of fibres with accumulation of HSP27 in RE ranged from 0% to 32% with a mean of 6.3% of the total number of fibres.

    Conclusion: We conclude that this rapid HSP27 protein relocation after RE is an important player in the cellular remodelling of human muscle fibres in response to exercise involving high-force contractions, but not in response to endurance exercises.

  • 20.
    Folkesson, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Mackey, Abigail L.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery M, Faculty of Health Sciences, Institute of Sports Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; Centre for Healthy Ageing, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Langberg, Henning
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery M, Faculty of Health Sciences, Institute of Sports Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; Centre for Healthy Ageing, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Oskarsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Piehl-Aulin, Karin
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyds Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Jan
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    The expression of heat shock protein in human skeletal muscle: effects of muscle fibre phenotype and trainingbackground2013In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 209, no 1, p. 26-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Exercise-induced adaptations of skeletal muscle are related to training mode and can be muscle fibre type specific. This study aimed to investigate heat shock protein expression in type I and type II muscle fibres in resting skeletal muscle of subjects with different training backgrounds.

    Methods

    Three groups of subjects were included: healthy active not engaged in any training programme (ACT, n = 12), resistance trained (RES, n = 6) and endurance trained (END, n = 8). Biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis, and immunohistochemistry was performed using monoclonal antibodies against myosin heavy chain I and IIA, αB-crystallin, HSP27, HSP60 and HSP70.

    Results

    In ACT and RES, but not in END, a fibre type–specific expression with higher staining intensity in type I than type II fibres was seen for αB-crystallin. The opposite (II > I) was found for HSP27 in subjects from ACT (6 of 12 subjects) and RES (3 of 6), whereas all subjects from END displayed uniform staining. HSP60 showed no fibre-specific expression. HSP70 displayed a fibre-specific expression pattern (I > II) in ACT (4 of 12), but not in END or RES.

    Conclusion

    This study shows that the level of expression of the different HSPs in human skeletal muscle is influenced by muscle fibre phenotype. The fibre type–specific expression of HSP70 is influenced by resistance and endurance training, whereas those of αB-crystallin and HSP27 is influenced only by endurance training, suggesting the existence of a training-modality-specific action on the adaptive processes including heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle.

  • 21.
    Hanssen, K. E.
    et al.
    Østfold University College, Halden, Norway; Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Kvamme, N. H.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Nilsen, T. S.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Rønnestad, B.
    Lillehammer University College, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Ambjørnsen, I. K.
    Østfold University College, Fredrikstad, Norway.
    Norheim, F.
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hallèn, J.
    Lillehammer University College, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Drevon, C. A.
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Raastad, T.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    The effect of strength training volume on satellite cells, myogenic regulatory factors, and growth factors2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 728-739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of training volume on activation of satellite cells. Healthy untrained men were randomly assigned into two groups. The 3L-1UB group (n = 10) performed three-set leg exercises and single-set upper body exercises, and the 1L-3UB group (n = 11) performed single-set leg exercises and three-set upper body exercises. Both groups performed three sessions (80-90 min) per week for 11 weeks. Biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis and m. trapezius. The number of satellite cells, satellite cells positive for myogenin and MyoD, and the number of myonuclei were counted. Homogenized muscle was analyzed for myogenin and MyoD, and extracted ribonucleic acid (RNA) was monitored for selected growth factor transcripts. Knee extensor strength increased more in the 3L-1UB group than in the 1L-3UB group (48 ± 4% vs 29 ± 4%), whereas the strength gain in shoulder press was similar in both training groups. The number of satellite cells in m. vastus lateralis increased more in the 3L-1UB group than in the 1L-3UB group. The number of myonuclei increased similarly in both groups. The messenger RNA expression of growth factors peaked after 2 weeks of training. In conclusion, increasing training volume enhanced satellite cell numbers in the leg muscle, but not in the upper body muscle.

  • 22.
    Harridge, S. D. R.
    et al.
    Centre of Human and Aerospace Physiological Sciences, King’s College London, London, UK.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    The lingering effects of testosterone abuse: it seems muscles have long memories2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 869-870Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Hosford-Donovan, Adrian
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Observational and mechanistic links between C-reactive protein and blood pressure in elderly women2016In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 89, p. 52-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is hypothesized that chronic systemic inflammation contributes to the age-related decline in cardiovascular function. The aim of the present study was to combine an assessment of the relationship between the serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in 108 elderly women (65 and 70 years) with an in-vitro exploration of the effects of CRP on the proliferative and angiogenic potential of endothelial cells exposed to serum in elderly women. Based on the median CRP level in our population, LowCRP (CRP<1.3mg/L) and HighCRP (>1.3mg/L) groups were identified. Body mass index, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were significantly higher in the HighCRP group than in the LowCRP group (p<0.05). The influence of CRP on SBP and DBP remained significant after adjustments for BMI and use of antihypertensive medication (p<0.05). When adjusting for waist circumference the observed influence of CRP on SPB was attenuated (p=0.062). We next evaluated the ability to form capillary tubes (angiogenesis assay) and the proliferation rate of endothelial cells exposed to the sera of elderly women. Increased serum CRP levels were associated with an increased doubling time of endothelial cells (R(2)=0.39; p<0.05) and decreased capillary tube length (R(2)=0.30; p<0.05), indicating a reduction in the proliferation rate of endothelial cells and angiogenic potential. In conclusion, chronic inflammation influences blood pressure in elderly women and compromises endothelial cell function, thus contributing to the age-related decline in vascular health.

  • 24.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the action of testosterone on human skeletal muscle: a basis for illegal performance enhancement2008In: British Journal of Pharmacology, ISSN 0007-1188, E-ISSN 1476-5381, Vol. 154, no 3, p. 522-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The popularity of testosterone among drug users is due to its powerful effects on muscle strength and mass. Important mechanisms behind the myotrophic effects of testosterone were uncovered both in athletes using steroids for several years and in short-term controlled studies. Both long-term and short-term steroid usage accentuates the degree of fibre hypertrophy in human skeletal muscle by enhancing protein synthesis. A mechanism by which testosterone facilitates the hypertrophy of muscle fibres is the activation of satellite cells and the promotion of myonuclear accretion when existing myonuclei become unable to sustain further enhancement of protein synthesis. Interestingly, long-term steroid usage also enhances the frequency of fibres with centrally located myonuclei, which implies the occurrence of a high regenerative activity. Under the action of testosterone, some daughter cells generated by satellite cell proliferation may escape differentiation and return to quiescence, which help to replenish the satellite cell reserve pool. However, whether long-term steroid usage induces adverse effects of satellite cells remains unknown. Testosterone might also favour the commitment of pluripotent precursor cells into myotubes and inhibit adipogenic differentiation. The effects of testosterone on skeletal muscle are thought to be mediated via androgen receptors expressed in myonuclei and satellite cells. Some evidence also suggests the existence of an androgen-receptor-independent pathway. Clearly, testosterone abuse is associated with an intense recruitment of multiple myogenic pathways. This provides an unfair advantage over non-drug users. The long-term consequences on the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle are unknown.

  • 25.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Fysisk träning och telomerer2008In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, no 2, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Hormonal and growth factor-related mechanisms involved in the adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise2005In: The endocrine system in sports and exercise: Olympic encyclopaedia of sports medicine / [ed] William J. Kraemer, Alan D. Rogol, Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Publishing , 2005, p. 306-318Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    In response to Point: Counterpoint: "Satellite cell addition is/is not obligatory for skeletal muscle hypertrophy"2007In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 103, no 3, p. 1105-1105Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this letter, the point: counterpoint issue (1, 5) is addressed solely by referring to studies in humans. The analysis of histological sections from skeletal muscle of power lifters with many years of practice leaves no doubt about the role of satellite cells as myonuclei donors in the hypertrophied muscle fibre. The larger the cross-sectional area of fibres, the higher the number of myonuclei per cross-section (2, 4). Importantly, the strong relationship between the cross-sectional area of fibres and the number of myonuclei (r = 0,86; p < 0.0001) is obtained with a range of areas between 2500 µm2 and 14000 µm2 (4). Existing myonuclei are able to sustain an initial hypertrophy of the muscle fibre as long as the transcriptional activity of existing myonuclei does not reach its maximum (2, 3, 5). Satellite cells become myonuclei donors when fibre size reaches the ceiling size (2, 3, 5). Additionally, we should not forget that satellite cells are also donors of myonuclei to newly generated myotubes (2, 4). The intensity of exercise and the initial fibre area of the subjects included in a training program are important factors governing whether daughter cells generated by satellite cell activation and proliferation provide new myonuclei to existing myofibres or to newly generated myotubes. Finally, in parallel with these events, some of the daughter cells can escape differentiation and facilitate renewal of the satellite cell pool. Efforts should be made to better understand key elements guiding the fate of satellite cells.

  • 28.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    The influence of physical exercise on adult stem cells2011In: Genetic and molecular aspects of sports performance / [ed] Claude Bouchard , Eric Hoffman, Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011, 1, p. 343-349Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Vägen mot effektivare styrketräning för nybörjare: en eller flera serier?2006In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, no 3, p. 16-19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Charifi, Nadia
    Denis, Christian
    Lexell, Jan
    Satellite cells and myonuclei in young and elderly women and men2004In: Muscle and Nerve, ISSN 0148-639X, E-ISSN 1097-4598, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 120-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this study was to assess the effects of aging on the satellite cell population. Muscle biopsies were taken from the tibialis anterior muscle of healthy, moderately active young (age range, 20-32 years; n = 31) and elderly (age range, 70-83 years; n = 27) women and men with comparable physical activity pattern. Satellite cells and myonuclei were visualized using a monoclonal antibody against neural cell adhesion molecule and counterstained with Mayer's hematoxylin. An average of 211 (range, 192-241) muscle fibers were examined for each individual. Compared with the young women and men, the elderly subjects had a significantly lower (P < 0.011) number of satellite cells per muscle fiber but a significantly higher (P < 0.004) number of myonuclei per muscle fiber. The number of satellite cells relative to the total number of nuclei [satellite cells/(myonuclei + satellite cells)] was significantly lower in the elderly than in the young women and men. These results imply that a reduction in the satellite cell population occurs as a result of increasing age in healthy men and women.

  • 31.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Charifi, Nadia
    Denis, Christian
    Lexell, Jan
    Andersen, Jesper L.
    Schjerling, Peter
    Olsen, Steen
    Kjaer, Michael
    The behaviour of satellite cells in response to exercise: what have we learned from human studies?2005In: Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology, ISSN 0031-6768, E-ISSN 1432-2013, Vol. 451, no 2, p. 319-327Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the complex role played by satellite cells in the adaptive response to exercise in human skeletal muscle has just begun. The development of reliable markers for the identification of satellite cell status (quiescence/activation/proliferation) is an important step towards the understanding of satellite cell behaviour in exercised human muscles. It is hypothesised currently that exercise in humans can induce (1) the activation of satellite cells without proliferation, (2) proliferation and withdrawal from differentiation, (3) proliferation and differentiation to provide myonuclei and (4) proliferation and differentiation to generate new muscle fibres or to repair segmental fibre injuries. In humans, the satellite cell pool can increase as early as 4 days following a single bout of exercise and is maintained at higher level following several weeks of training. Cessation of training is associated with a gradual reduction of the previously enhanced satellite cell pool. In the elderly, training counteracts the normal decline in satellite cell number seen with ageing. When the transcriptional activity of existing myonuclei reaches its maximum, daughter cells generated by satellite cell proliferation are involved in protein synthesis by enhancing the number of nuclear domains. Clearly, delineating the events and the mechanisms behind the activation of satellite cells both under physiological and pathological conditions in human skeletal muscles remains an important challenge.

  • 32.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Charifi, Nadia
    Henriksson, Jan
    The number of satellite cells in slow and fast fibres from human vastus lateralis muscle2006In: Histochemistry and Cell Biology, ISSN 0948-6143, E-ISSN 1432-119X, Vol. 126, no 1, p. 83-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this investigation was to study the distribution of satellite cells in slow (type I fibres) and fast (type II fibres) fibres from human vastus lateralis muscle. This muscle is characterised by a mixed fibre type composition and is considered as the site of choice for biopsies in research work and for clinical diagnosis. Biopsy samples were obtained from five healthy young volunteers and a total of 1,747 type I fibres and 1,760 type II fibres were assessed. Satellite cells and fibre type composition were studied on serial muscle cross-sections stained with specific monoclonal antibodies. From a total of 218 satellite cells, 116 satellite cells were found in contact with type I fibres (53.6+/-8% of the satellite cells associated to type I fibres) and 102 satellite cells in contact with type II fibres (46.4+/-8% of the satellite cells associated to type II fibres). There was no significant difference (P=0.4) between the percentages of satellite cells in contact with type I and with type II fibres. Additionally, there was no relationship between the mean number of satellite cells per fibre and the mean cross-sectional area of muscle fibres. In conclusion, our results show that there is no fibre type-specific distribution of satellite cells in a human skeletal muscle with mixed fibre type composition.

  • 33.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Johansson, Fredrik
    Johansson, Rikard
    Sjöström, Mikael
    Henriksson, Jan
    Effects of one bout of endurance exercise on the expression of myogenin in human quadriceps muscle2004In: Histochemistry and Cell Biology, ISSN 0948-6143, E-ISSN 1432-119X, Vol. 121, no 4, p. 329-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate the cellular localisation of MyoD and myogenin in human skeletal muscle fibres as well as the possible alterations in the expression of MyoD and myogenin in response to a single bout of endurance exercise at 40% and 75% of maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2) max). Twenty-five biopsies (5 per subject) from the vastus lateralis muscle were obtained before exercise, from the exercising leg at 40% and 75% of VO(2) max and from the resting leg following these exercise bouts. The tyramide signal amplification-direct and the Vectastain ABC methods using specific monoclonal antibodies were used to determine the exact location of myogenin and MyoD, to identify muscle satellite cells and to determine myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition. At rest, myonuclei did not express MyoD or myogenin. Following a single bout of exercise at 40% and 75% of VO(2) max, an accumulation of myogenin in myonuclei and not in satellite cells was observed in biopsies from the exercised leg but not in biopsies before exercise and from the resting leg. The number of myogenin-positive myonuclei varied among individuals indicating differences in the response to a single exercise bout. In conclusion, this immunohistochemical study showed that a rapid rearrangement of myogenin expression occurs in exercised human skeletal muscles in response to a single bout of exercise.

  • 34.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Motion mot inflammation: fysisk aktivitet viktigt för äldres hälsa2018In: Idrottsforskning, ISSN 2002-3944, article id 9 janArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bergens, Oscar
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Chronic Systemic Inflammation, Physical Activity and Skeletal Muscle in Elderly2017In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 234-234Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: It t is hypothesized that chronic systemic inflammation is influenced by physical activity level and is involved in the age-related decline in muscle function. The impact of physical activity behaviours on the level of C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in elderly women is investigated. The impact of chronic systemic inflammation on muscle mass and the cellular and molecular mechanisms behind the putative inflammation-mediated action on human muscle cells are explored.

    METHODS: Total amount of sedentary time, 30-minute periods of sedentary time and breaks in sedentary behaviour and time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were assessed using accelerometry in a cohort of 89 elderly women. Serum HsCRP and TNF-α are were measured. The proliferative and metabolic capacity of human muscle cells obtained from vastus lateralis and exposed to CRP are assessed.

    RESULTS: No variables of sedentary behaviour were significantly associated with the level of CRP or TNF-α. In contrast, time spent in MVPA was inversely associated with the level of CRP, independently of sedentary behaviour and waist circumference, but not TNF-α. Serum CRP levels were inversely associated to skeletal muscle mass. Elevated serum CRP levels were associated to reduced proliferative rate of human muscle cells and changes in the regulation of the size muscle cells.

    CONCLUSIONS: Elevation in the inflammatory status in elderly is influenced by the amount of time spent in MVPA and exerts detrimental effects on skeletal muscle mass.

  • 36.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ponsot, Elodie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    The biology of satellite cells and telomeres in human skeletal muscle: effects of aging and physical activity2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 39-48Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The decline in the neuromuscular function affects the physical performance and is a threat for independent living in later life. The age-related decrease in muscle satellite cells observed by the age of 70 can be specific to type II fibers in some muscles. Several studies have shown that different forms of exercise induce the expansion of satellite cell pool in human skeletal muscle of young and elderly. Exercise is a powerful non-pharmacological tool inducing the renewal of the satellite cell pool in skeletal muscles. Skeletal muscle is not a stable tissue as satellite cells are constantly recruited during normal daily activities. Satellite cells and the length of telomeres are important in the context of muscle regeneration. It is likely that the regulation of telomeres in vitro cannot fully mimic the behavior of telomeres in human tissues. New insights suggest that telomeres in skeletal muscle are dynamic structures under the influence of their environment. When satellite cells are heavily recruited for regenerative events as in the skeletal muscle of athletes, telomere length has been found to be either dramatically shortened or maintained and even longer than in non-trained individuals. This suggests the existence of mechanisms allowing the control of telomere length in vivo.

  • 37.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ponsot, Elodie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Piehl-Aulin, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Mackey, Abigail
    Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kjaer, Michael
    Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Oskarsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Holm, Lars
    The effects of regular strength training on telomere length in human skeletal muscle2008In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 82-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The length of DNA telomeres is an important parameter of the proliferative potential of tissues. A recent study has reported abnormally short telomeres in skeletal muscle of athletes with exercise-associated fatigue. This important report raises the question of whether long-term practice of sports might have deleterious effects on muscle telomeres. Therefore, we aimed to compare telomere length of a group of power lifters (PL; N = 7) who trained for 8 +/- 3 yr against that of a group of healthy, active subjects (C; N = 7) with no history of strength training. METHODS: Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis, and the mean and minimum telomeric restriction fragments (TRF) (telomere length) were determined, using the Southern blot protocol previously used for the analysis of skeletal muscle. RESULTS: There was no abnormal shortening of telomeres in PL. On the contrary, the mean (P = 0.07) and the minimum (P = 0.09) TRF lengths in PL tended to be higher than in C. In PL, the minimum TRF length was inversely correlated to the individual records in squat (r = -0.86; P = 0.01) and deadlift (r = -0.88; P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: These results show for the first time that long-term training is not associated with an abnormal shortening of skeletal muscle telomere length. Although the minimum telomere length in PL remains within normal physiological ranges, a heavier load put on the muscles means a shorter minimum TRF length in skeletal muscle.

  • 38.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Schjerling, Peter
    Andersen, Lars L.
    Charifi, Nadia
    Madsen, Jørgen L.
    Christensen, Lasse R.
    Andersen, Jesper L.
    The effects of heavy resistance training and detraining on satellite cells in human skeletal muscles2004In: Journal of Physiology, ISSN 0022-3751, E-ISSN 1469-7793, Vol. 558, no Pt 3, p. 1005-1012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the modulation of satellite cell content and myonuclear number following 30 and 90 days of resistance training and 3, 10, 30, 60 and 90 days of detraining. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis of 15 young men (mean age: 24 years; range: 20-32 years). Satellite cells and myonuclei were studied on muscle cross-sections stained with a monoclonal antibody against CD56 and counterstained with Mayer's haematoxylin. Cell cycle markers CyclinD1 and p21 mRNA levels were determined by Northern blotting. Satellite cell content increased by 19% (P= 0.02) at 30 days and by 31% (P= 0.0003) at 90 days of training. Compared to pre-training values, the number of satellite cells remained significantly elevated at 3, 10 and 60 days but not at 90 days of detraining. The two cell cycle markers CyclinD1 and p21 mRNA significantly increased at 30 days of training. At 90 days of training, p21 was still elevated whereas CyclinD1 returned to pre-training values. In the detraining period, p21 and CyclinD1 levels were similar to the pre-training values. There were no significant alterations in the number of myonuclei following the training and the detraining periods. The fibre area controlled by each myonucleus gradually increased throughout the training period and returned to pre-training values during detraining. In conclusion, these results demonstrate the high plasticity of satellite cells in response to training and detraining stimuli and clearly show that moderate changes in the size of skeletal muscle fibres can be achieved without the addition of new myonuclei.

  • 39.
    Koutsis, G
    et al.
    Laboratoire de Physiologie, Faculté de Médecine Pitié-salpétière, France.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Laboratoire de Physiologie, Faculté de Médecine Pitié-salpétière, France.
    Vandewalle, H
    Laboratoire de Physiologie, Faculté de Médecine Pitié-salpétière, France.
    Lechat, P
    Laboratoire de Pharmacologie, Faculté de Médecine Pitié-salpétière, 91 bld de l'Hôpital, Paris, France.
    Hadjiisky, P
    Centre de recherche sur les maladies cardiovasculaires, Faculté de Médecine Pitié-salpétière, 91 bld de l'Hôpital, France.
    Monod, H
    Laboratoire de Physiologie, Faculté de Médecine Pitié-salpétière, 91 de l'Hôpital, Paris, France.
    Effects of an endurance training programme on the passive and noradrenaline-activated compliances of rat aorta1995In: European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, ISSN 0301-5548, E-ISSN 1432-1025, Vol. 71, no 2-3, p. 173-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of a 12-week endurance training programme (treadmill) upon the passive and the noradrenaline-activated properties of the aorta were studied in 15 trained and 24 sedentary rats. Aortic compliance was studied by measuring the length-tension curves of rings of the descending aorta without (passive properties) and with noradrenaline (noradrenaline activated) in a bubbling Krebs bath kept at a temperature of 37 degrees. The training effect on aortic volume compliance was studied by transforming the tension-length curves into a cross-sectional area-pressure curve according to Laplace's law. The noradrenaline responsiveness was studied by the dose-effect curve. The mechanical data were correlated with the results of a histomorphometric study which measured the aortic wall thickness and the percentages and amounts of elastic, connective and muscle components. Passive aortic compliance and volume compliance were higher in endurance-trained rats whose tunica media presented a lower percentage of collagen and a larger amount of elastic tissue. The dose-effect curve showed that the maximal aortic response to noradrenaline was stronger in trained rats but that the half maximal effective dose was not different. As a consequence, the length-tension curves of the noradrenaline fully activated aorta were similar in trained and sedentary rats except at the highest tensions where collagen is the main factor determining aortic stiffness. The increased noradrenaline response in trained rats was probably the result of the hypertrophy of the smooth muscle cells as maximal active strain (Newtons per square metre) was similar in trained and sedentary rats.

  • 40.
    Kvorning, T
    et al.
    Team Danmark, The House of Sport, Brøndby, Denmark; Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Schjerling, P
    Institute of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; Center for Healthy Aging, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersen, M
    Department of Endocrinology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Brixen, K
    Department of Endocrinology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Suetta, C
    Division of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Department of Diagnostics, Glostrup University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Madsen, K
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Exercise, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The activity of satellite cells and myonuclei following 8 weeks of strength training in young men with suppressed testosterone levels2015In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 213, no 3, p. 676-687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate how suppression of endogenous testosterone during an 8-week strength training period influences the activity of satellite cells and myonuclei.

    METHODS: Twenty-two moderately trained young men participated in this randomized, placebo-controlled, and double-blinded intervention study. The participants were randomized to treatment with a GnRH analogue, goserelin (n = 12), which suppresses testosterone or placebo (n = 10) for 12 weeks. The strength training period of 8 weeks started after 4 weeks of treatment and included exercises for all major muscles. Biopsies were obtained from the mid-portion of the vastus lateralis muscle.

    RESULTS: Testosterone resting level in goserelin was 10-20 times lower compared with placebo, and the training-induced increase in the level of testosterone was abolished in goserelin. Training increased satellite cells number in type II fibres by 20% in placebo and by 52% in goserelin (P < 0.01), whereas the myonuclear number significantly increased by 12% in type II fibres in placebo and remained unchanged in goserelin (P < 0.05). No changes in satellite cells and myonuclei were seen in type I fibres in either group. Data from the microarray analysis indicated that low testosterone affects the bone morphogenetic proteins signalling, which might regulate proliferation vs. differentiation of satellite cells.

    CONCLUSION: Eight weeks of strength training enhances the myonuclear number in type II fibres, and this is largely blocked by the suppression of testosterone. The data indicate that low testosterone levels could reduce the differentiation of satellite cells to myonuclei via the bone morphogenetic proteins signalling pathway, resulting in reduced increases in lean leg mass.

  • 41. Larsson, Barbro
    et al.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Lindvall, Björn
    Gerdle, Björn
    Surface electromyography and peak torque of repetitive maximum isokinetic plantar flexions in relation to aspects of muscle morphology2006In: Journal of Electromyography & Kinesiology, ISSN 1050-6411, E-ISSN 1873-5711, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 281-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the relationships between surface electromyography (EMG [Mean frequency of the power spectrum (MNF)]) and peak torque variables obtained during 100 maximum concentric plantar flexions with the right limb at 60 degrees s(-1) and different muscle morphological variables. Surface EMG was recorded from the right gastrocnemius lateralis and muscle biopsies were taken from the same site as the EMG electrodes were positioned. Muscle fibre area and fibre type composition were determined on serial muscle cross sections using both histochemistry (myofibrillar adenosine triphosphatase) and immunohistochemistry (monoclonal antibodies against specific myosin heavy chain isoforms). Forty-three female and nine male students participated in the study. Gastrocnemius lateralis contained predominantly type I fibres (50%) and type IIA fibres (40%) in both sexes and large individual differences were found. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for the intercorrelation analyses, and projection to latent structures (PLS) was used for the multivariate regression analysis. MNF correlated positively with different fibre areas and with the proportion of type I fibres. Fibre areas and sex were the most important factors in the regression of maximum peak torque. High proportion of type I fibres and sex were the most important regressors of peak torque endurance normalised for lean body mass. More studies are needed to understand the complex interrelationships between intrinsic muscle properties and the frequency content of the surface EMG before theoretical models can be formulated that incorporate both fibre areas and fibre type proportions.

  • 42. Larsson, Britt
    et al.
    Björk, Jonas
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Lindman, Rolf
    Gerdle, Björn
    Blood supply and oxidative metabolism in muscle biopsies of female cleaners with and without myalgia2004In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 440-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Pathomechanisms of work-related myalgia are poorly understood. Myalgia is thought to be caused by excitation of nociceptors present in the muscular tissue but not in the muscle fiber itself. Muscle contraction in combination with hypoxia is known to excite nociceptors. Morphologic analysis can contribute to the knowledge of the excitation of nociceptors. This study thoroughly examines the morphology of the trapezius muscle's capillary supply and signs of disturbed oxidative metabolism to understand their role in work-related myalgia. METHODS: Surgical trapezius muscle biopsies were obtained from 25 female cleaners with long-standing work-related myalgia, 25 female cleaners without trapezius myalgia, and 21 healthy teachers. Enzyme and immunohistochemical stainings were performed to highlight fibers with aberrant intermyofibrillar patterns, indicating a disturbed oxidative metabolism (also known as moth-eaten fibers) and a disturbed capillary supply of different fibers. RESULTS: A significantly lower number of capillaries per fiber area in cleaners suffering from myalgia compared with cleaners without trapezius myalgia was found. Moth-eaten fibers were found in the 3 groups, but these fibers were significantly more prevalent in the groups of cleaners than in the healthy teacher group. CONCLUSION: This work indicates that the capillary supply of trapezius is affected in work-related trapezius myalgia. More studies are needed to understand possible mechanisms that would explain the occurrence of moth-eaten fibers.

  • 43. Leprêtre, Pierre Marie
    et al.
    Ponsot, Elodie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Särnblad, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Cardiorespiratory responses to incremental exercise in Type 1 diabetic patients: a comparison between patients with poor and good glycaemia control2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44. Mackey, A. L.
    et al.
    Esmarck, B.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Koskinen, S. O. A.
    Kongsgaard, M.
    Sylvestersen, A.
    Hansen, J. J.
    Larsen, G.
    Kjaer, M.
    Enhanced satellite cell proliferation with resistance training in elderly men and women2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 34-42Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In addition to the well-documented loss of muscle mass and strength associated with aging, there is evidence for the attenuating effects of aging on the number of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the response of satellite cells in elderly men and women to 12 weeks of resistance training. Biopsies were collected from the m. vastus lateralis of 13 healthy elderly men and 16 healthy elderly women (mean age 76+/-SD 3 years) before and after the training period. Satellite cells were visualized by immunohistochemical staining of muscle cross-sections with a monoclonal antibody against neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and counterstaining with Mayer's hematoxylin. Compared with the pre-training values, there was a significant increase (P<0.05) in the number of NCAM-positively stained cells per fiber post-training in males (from 0.11+/-0.03 to 0.15+/-0.06; mean+/-SD) and females (from 0.11+/-0.04 to 0.13+/-0.05). These results suggest that 12 weeks of resistance training is effective in enhancing the satellite cell pool in skeletal muscle in the elderly.

  • 45. Mackey, A. L.
    et al.
    Holm, L.
    Reitelseder, S.
    Pedersen, T. G.
    Doessing, S.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Kjaer, M.
    Myogenic response of human skeletal muscle to 12 weeks of resistance training at light loading intensity2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 773-782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is strong evidence for enhanced numbers of satellite cells with heavy resistance training. The satellite cell response to very light muscle loading is, however, unknown. We, therefore, designed a 12-week training protocol where volunteers trained one leg with a high load (H) and the other leg with a light load (L). Twelve young healthy men [mean age 25 ± 3 standard deviation (SD) years] volunteered for the study. Muscle biopsies were collected from the m. vastus lateralis of both legs before and after the training period and satellite cells were visualized by CD56 immunohistochemistry. A significant main effect of time was observed (P<0.001) for the number of CD56+ cells per fiber (L: from 0.11 ± 0.02 to 0.13 ± 0.03; H: from 0.12 ± 0.03 to 0.15 ± 0.05, mean ± SD). The finding that 12 weeks of training skeletal muscle even with very light loads can induce an increase in the number of satellite cells reveals a new aspect of myogenic precursor cell activation and suggests that satellite cells may play a role in skeletal muscle adaptation over a broad physiological range.

  • 46. Mackey, A. L.
    et al.
    Kjaer, M.
    Charifi, N.
    Henriksson, J.
    Bojsen-Moller, J.
    Holm, L.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Assessment of satellite cell number and activity status in human skeletal muscle biopsies2009In: Muscle and Nerve, ISSN 0148-639X, E-ISSN 1097-4598, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 455-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of our study was to validate the assessment of myonuclear and satellite cell number in biopsies from human skeletal muscle. We found that 25 type I and 25 type II fibers are sufficient to estimate the mean number of myonuclei per fiber. In contrast, the assessment of satellite cells improved when more fibers were included. Second, we report that small differences in counting satellite cells using CD56 and Pax7 antibodies can be attributed to the different staining profiles. Third, we provide support for the use of Ki67 in evaluating the proportion of active satellite cells. We observed very few (up to 1.3%) active satellite cells in healthy adult skeletal muscle at rest, but they increased significantly (up to 7-fold) following muscle activity. This study provides valuable tools to assess the behavior of satellite cells, both in pathological conditions and in response to physiological stimuli.

  • 47. Mackey, Abigail L.
    et al.
    Kjaer, Michael
    Dandanell, Sune
    Mikkelsen, Kristian H.
    Holm, Lars
    Døssing, Simon
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Koskinen, Satu O.
    Jensen, Charlotte H.
    Schrøder, Henrik D.
    Langberg, Henning
    The influence of anti-inflammatory medication on exercise-induced myogenic precursor cell responses in humans2007In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 425-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is widespread among athletes when faced with muscle soreness or injury, but the effects of NSAIDs on satellite cell activity in humans are unknown. To investigate this, 14 healthy male endurance athletes (mean peak oxygen consumption 62 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) volunteered for the study, which involved running 36 km. They were divided into two groups and received either 100 mg indomethacin per day or placebo. Muscle biopsies collected before the run and on days 1, 3, and 8 afterward were analyzed for satellite cells by immunohistochemistry with the aid of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and fetal antigen-1 (FA1) antibodies. Muscle biopsies were also collected from untrained individuals for comparison. Compared with preexercise levels, a 27% increase in the number of NCAM+ cells was observed on day 8 postexercise in the placebo group (P < 0.05), while levels remained similar at all time points in the NSAID group. No change was seen in the proportion of FA1+ cells, although lower levels were found in the muscle of endurance-trained athletes compared with untrained individuals (P < 0.05). These results suggest that ingestion of anti-inflammatory drugs attenuates the exercise-induced increase in satellite cell number, supporting the role of the cyclooxygenase pathway in satellite cell activity.

  • 48.
    Mackey, Abigail L.
    et al.
    Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery M, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Biomedical Sciences, Center for Healthy Aging, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Rasmussen, Lotte K.
    Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery M, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Schjerling, Peter
    Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery M, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Helmark, Ida C.
    Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery M, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ponsot, Elodie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Aagaard, Per
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Muscle Research Cluster, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Durigan, João Luiz Q.
    Physical Therapy Division, University of Brasília, Brasília, Brazil.
    Kjaer, Michael
    Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery M, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Biomedical Sciences, Center for Healthy Aging, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Activation of satellite cells and the regeneration of human skeletal muscle are expedited by ingestion of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication2016In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 2266-2281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With this study we investigated the role of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in human skeletal muscle regeneration. Young men ingested NSAID [1200 mg/d ibuprofen (IBU)] or placebo (PLA) daily for 2 wk before and 4 wk after an electrical stimulation-induced injury to the leg extensor muscles of one leg. Muscle biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis muscles before and after stimulation (2.5 h and 2, 7, and 30 d) and were assessed for satellite cells and regeneration by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR, and we also measured telomere length. After injury, and compared with PLA, IBU was found to augment the proportion of ActiveNotch1(+) satellite cells at 2 d [IBU, 29 ± 3% vs. PLA, 19 ± 2% (means ± sem)], satellite cell content at 7 d [IBU, 0.16 ± 0.01 vs. PLA, 0.12 ± 0.01 (Pax7(+) cells/fiber)], and to expedite muscle repair at 30 d. The PLA group displayed a greater proportion of embryonic myosin(+) fibers and a residual ∼2-fold increase in mRNA levels of matrix proteins (all P < 0.05). Endomysial collagen was also elevated with PLA at 30 d. Minimum telomere length shortening was not observed. In conclusion, ingestion of NSAID has a potentiating effect on Notch activation of satellite cells and muscle remodeling during large-scale regeneration of injured human skeletal muscle.-Mackey, A. L., Rasmussen, L. K., Kadi, F., Schjerling, P., Helmark, I. C., Ponsot, E., Aagaard, P., Durigan, J. L. Q., Kjaer, M. Activation of satellite cells and the regeneration of human skeletal muscle are expedited by ingestion of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication.

  • 49.
    Marklund, Peter
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Mattsson, C. Mikael
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ponsot, Elodie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Lindvall, Björn
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindvall, Lisbeth
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ekblom, Björn
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Extensive inflammatory cell infiltration in human skeletal muscle in response to an ultraendurance exercise bout in experienced athletes2013In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 114, no 1, p. 66-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of a 24-h ultraendurance exercise bout on systemic and local muscle inflammatory reactions was investigated in nine experienced athletes. Blood and muscle biopsies were collected before (Pre), immediately after the exercise bout (Post), and after 28 h of recovery (Post28). Circulating blood levels of leukocytes, creatine kinase (CK), C-reactive protein (CRP), and selected inflammatory cytokines were assessed together with the evaluation of the occurrence of inflammatory cells (CD3(+), CD8(+), CD68(+)) and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC class I) in skeletal muscle. An extensive inflammatory cell infiltration occurred in all athletes, and the number of CD3(+), CD8(+), and CD68(+) cells were two- to threefold higher at Post28 compared with Pre (P < 0.05). The inflammatory cell infiltration was associated with a significant increase in the expression of MHC class I in muscle fibers. There was a significant increase in blood leukocyte count, IL-6, IL-8, CRP, and CK at Post. At Post28, total leukocytes, IL-6, and CK had declined, whereas IL-8 and CRP continued to increase. Increases in IL-1β and TNF-α were not significant. There were no significant associations between the magnitude of the systemic and local muscle inflammatory reactions. Signs of muscle degenerative and regenerative events were observed in all athletes with various degrees of severity and were not affected by the 24-h ultraendurance exercise bout. In conclusion, a low-intensity but very prolonged single-endurance exercise bout can generate a strong inflammatory cell infiltration in skeletal muscle of well-trained experienced ultraendurance athletes, and the amplitude of the local reaction is not proportional to the systemic inflammatory response.

  • 50.
    Montiel Rojas, Diego
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Ponsot, Elodie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Brummer, Robert Jan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Fairweather-Tait, Susan
    Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
    Jennings, Amy
    Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
    de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.
    Department of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Berendsen, Agnes
    Department of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Pietruszka, Barbara
    Department of Human Nutrition, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.
    Madej, Dawid
    Department of Human Nutrition, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.
    Caumon, Elodie
    Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine d’Auvergne, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Meunier, Nathalie
    Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine d’Auvergne, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Malpuech-Brugere, Corinne
    Unité de Nutrition Humaine, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine d’Auvergne, Université Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Guidarelli, Giulia
    Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Santoro, Aurelia
    Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; Interdepartmental Center “L. Galvani” (CIG), University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Franceschi, Claudio
    Bellaria Hospital, Institute of Neurological Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Short Telomere Length Is Related to Limitations in Physical Function in Elderly European Adults2018In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 9, article id 1110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aims to explore the potential influence of leucocyte telomere length (LTL) on both a single indicator and a composite construct of physical functioning in a large European population of elderly men and women across diverse geographical locations. A total of 1,221 adults (65-79 years) were recruited from five European countries within the framework of NU-AGE study. The physical functioning construct was based on the 36-item Short Form Health Survey. Handgrip strength was used as a single indicator of muscle function and LTL was assessed using quantitative real-time PCR. Women had significantly longer (p < 0.05) LTL than men. Participants in Poland had significantly shorter LTL than in the other study centers, whereas participants in the Netherlands had significantly longer LTL than most of the other centers (p < 0.01). An analysis of LTL as a continuous outcome against physical functioning by using linear models revealed inconsistent findings. In contrast, based on an analysis of contrasting telomere lengths (first vs. fifth quintile of LTL), a significant odds ratio (OR) of 1.7 (95% CI: 1.1 -2.6; p < 0.05) of having functional limitation was observed in those belonging to the first LTL quintile compared to the fifth. Interestingly, having the shortest LTL was still related to a higher likelihood of having physical limitation when compared to all remaining quintiles (OR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1 -2.1; p < 0.05), even after adjustment by study center, age, sex, and overweight status. Collectively, our findings suggest that short LTL is an independent risk factor that accounts for functional decline in elderly European populations. The influence of LTL on functional limitation seems driven by the detrimental effect of having short telomeres rather than reflecting a linear dose-response relationship.

12 1 - 50 of 81
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf