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  • 1.
    Amdany, Robert
    et al.
    Molecular Sciences Institute, School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Chimuka, Luke
    Molecular Sciences Institute, School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Cukrowska, Ewa
    Molecular Sciences Institute, School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kohoutek, Jiri
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Tölgyessy, Peter
    Water Research Institute, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Vrana, Branislav
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Assessment of bioavailable fraction of POPS in surface water bodies in Johannesburg City, South Africa, using passive samplers: an initial assessment2014In: Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, ISSN 0167-6369, E-ISSN 1573-2959, Vol. 186, no 9, p. 5639-5653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) passive samplers were used to determine freely dissolved concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in selected water bodies situated in and around Johannesburg City, South Africa. The devices were deployed for 14 days at each sampling site in spring and summer of 2011. Time weighted average (TWA) concentrations of the water-borne contaminants were calculated from the amounts of analytes accumulated in the passive samplers. In the area of interest, concentrations of analytes in water ranged from 33.5 to 126.8 ng l(-1) for PAHs, from 20.9 to 120.9 pg l(-1) for PCBs and from 0.2 to 36.9 ng l(-1) for OCPs. Chlorinated pesticides were mainly composed of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) (0.15-36.9 ng l(-1)) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloromethane (DDT) with its metabolites (0.03-0.55 ng l(-1)). By applying diagnostic ratios of certain PAHs, identification of possible sources of the contaminants in the various sampling sites was performed. These ratios were generally inclined towards pyrogenic sources of pollution by PAHs in all study sites except in the Centurion River (CR), Centurion Lake (CL) and Airport River (AUP) that indicated petrogenic origins. This study highlights further need to map up the temporal and spatial variations of these POPs using passive samplers.

  • 2.
    Amdany, Robert
    et al.
    School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand (WITS), Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Chimuka, Luke
    School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand (WITS), Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Cukrowska, Ewa
    School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand (WITS), Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kohoutek, Jiri
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Vrana, Branislav
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Investigating the temporal trends in PAH, PCB and OCP concentrations in Hartbeespoort Dam, South Africa, using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)2014In: Water S.A., ISSN 0378-4738, E-ISSN 1816-7950, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 425-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The seasonal variability of persistent organic pollutants in Hartbeespoort Dam, South Africa, was investigated using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as passive samplers. Freely dissolved waterborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were sampled to investigate seasonal changes in their concentrations. Exposure of the passive samplers was done for 14 days at the same sampling site in each of the four seasons of the year, in 2011. The SPMD-derived analyte amounts enabled the calculation of time-weighted averages of free dissolved waterborne levels of the contaminants. Concentrations ranged from 30.0 ng.l(-1) to 51.5 ng.l(-1) for PAHs, 38 pg l(-1) to 150 pg.l(-1) for PCBs, 9.2 to 10.4 ng.l(-1) for HCHs and 0.3 to 0.8 ng.l(-1) for DDTs, respectively. It was also noted that the winter season generally exhibited higher contaminant concentrations for most compounds studied, which likely reflects the seasonality of their atmospheric deposition. An attempt was also made to identify possible sources of PAH contaminants in the dam by examining PAH ratios. These diagnostic ratios were inclined towards pyrogenic sources of pollution, except for the winter season where both pyrogenic and petrogenic sources likely contribute to the contamination pattern.

  • 3.
    Angelov, Christo
    et al.
    Basic Environmental Observatory Moussala, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Nikolova, Nina
    Basic Environmental Observatory Moussala, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Kalapov, Ivo
    Basic Environmental Observatory Moussala, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Arsov, Todor
    Basic Environmental Observatory Moussala, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Tchorbadjieff, Assen
    Basic Environmental Observatory Moussala, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Boyadjieva, Aneta
    Basic Environmental Observatory Moussala, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Tsakovski, Stefan
    Analytical Chemistry, Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Pribylová, Petra
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Boruvková, Jana
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Klánová, Jana
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    High-mountain monitoring of persistent organic pollutants at the basic environmental observatory moussala2014In: Comptes Rendus de l'Academie Bulgare des Sciences / Proceedings of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, ISSN 1310-1331, E-ISSN 2367-5535, Vol. 67, no 8, p. 1129-1136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present the performance of the equipment for passive air sampling installed at Basic Environmental Observatory (BEO) Moussala, together with the first results obtained during the campaigns conducted in the period March 2009 March 2011 within the framework of the network for POP monitoring (MONET EU Project).

    The advantage of sampling at BEO Moussala is that the observatory is located at a high altitude (Moussala Peak, 2925 m above sea level), away from industrial polluters and large transportation fluxes. This unique location allows one to gather data from a large region subjected to the influence of transboundary Mediterranean and continental air masses. This would further open possibilities for studying the pollutants' levels and their correlation with the local climatic factors, the latter being well known in this region.

  • 4.
    Benisek, Martin
    et al.
    Faculty of Science, RECETOX, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Faculty of Science, RECETOX, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Mariani, Giulio
    Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Unit H.01-Water Resources Unit, European Commission DG Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra, Italy.
    Suurkuusk, Gert
    Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Unit H.01-Water Resources Unit, European Commission DG Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra, Italy.
    Gawlik, Bernd M.
    Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Unit H.01-Water Resources Unit, European Commission DG Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra, Italy.
    Locoro, Giovanni
    Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Unit H.01-Water Resources Unit, European Commission DG Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra, Italy.
    Giesy, John P.
    Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon SK, Canada; Department of Biology & Chemistry and State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China; School of Biological Sciences, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China; State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China.
    Bláha, Ludek
    Faculty of Science, RECETOX, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in composts and digestates from European countries as determined by the in vitro bioassay and chemical analysis2015In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 122, p. 168-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aerobic composting and anaerobic digestion plays an important role in reduction of organic waste by transforming the waste into humus, which is an excellent soil conditioner. However, applications of chemical-contaminated composts on soils may have unwanted consequences such as accumulation of persistent compounds and their transfer into food chains. The present study investigated burden of composts and digestates collected in 16 European countries (88 samples) by the compounds causing dioxin-like effects as determined by use of an in vitro transactivation assay to quantify total concentrations of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-(AhR) mediated potency. Measured concentrations of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibeno-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) equivalents (TEQ(bio)) were compared to concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and selected chlorinated compounds, including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs), co-planar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), indicator PCB congeners and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). Median concentrations of TEQ(bio), (dioxin-like compounds) determined by the in vitro assay in crude extracts of various types of composts ranged from 0.05 to 1.2 with a maximum 8.22 mu g (TEQ(bio)) kg(-1) dry mass. Potencies were mostly associated with less persistent compounds such as PAHs because treatment with sulfuric acid removed bioactivity from most samples. The pan-European investigation of contamination by organic contaminants showed generally good quality of the composts, the majority of which were in compliance with conservative limits applied in some countries. Results demonstrate performance and added value of rapid, inexpensive, effect-based monitoring, and points out the need to derive corresponding effect-based trigger values for the risk assessment of complex contaminated matrices such as composts.

  • 5.
    Blanc, Mélanie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kärrman, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kukučka, Petr
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Scherbak, Nikolai
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Keiter, Steffen
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Mixture-specific gene expression in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos exposed to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) and 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126)2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 590-591, p. 249-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) are persistent organic pollutants of high concern because of their environmental persistence, bioaccumulation and toxic properties. Besides, the amphiphilic properties of fluorinated compounds such as PFOS and perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) suggest a role in increasing cell membrane permeability and solubilizing chemicals. The present study aimed at investigating whether PFOS and PFHxA are capable of modifying the activation of PCB126 toxicity-related pathways. For this purpose, zebrafish embryos were exposed in semi-static conditions to 7.5 μg/L of PCB126 alone, in the presence of 25 mg/L of PFOS, 15.7 mg/L of PFHxA or in the presence of both PFOS and PFHxA. Quantitative PCR was performed on embryos aged from 24 h post fertilization (hpf) to 96 hpf to investigate expression changes of genes involved in metabolism of xenobiotics (ahr2, cyp1a), oxidative stress (gpx1a, tp53), lipids metabolism (acaa2, osbpl1a), and epigenetic mechanisms (dnmt1, dnmt3ba). Cyp1a and ahr2 expression were significantly induced by the presence of PCB126. However, after 72 and 78 h of exposure, induction of cyp1a expression was significantly lower when embryos were co-exposed to PCB126 + PFOS + PFHxA when compared to PCB126-exposed embryos. Significant upregulation of gpx1a occurred after exposure to PCB126 + PFHxA and to PCB126 + PFOS + PFHxA at 30 and 48 hpf. Besides, embryos appeared more sensitive to PCB126 + PFOS + PFHxA at 78 hpf: acaa2 and osbpl1a were significantly downregulated; dnmt1 was significantly upregulated. While presented as environmentally safe, PFHxA demonstrated that it could affect gene expression patterns in zebrafish embryos when combined to PFOS and PCB126, suggesting that such mixture may increase PCB126 toxicity. This is of particular relevance since PFHxA is persistent and still being ejected into the environment. Moreover, it provides additional information as to the importance to integrate mixture effects of chemicals in risk assessment and biomonitoring frameworks.

  • 6.
    Bohlin, P.
    et al.
    Resarch Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Audy, O.
    Resarch Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Skrdliková, L.
    Resarch Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Kukucka, Petr
    Resarch Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Pribylová, P.
    Resarch Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Prokes, R.
    Resarch Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Vojta, S.
    Resarch Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Klánová, J.
    Resarch Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Outdoor passive air monitoring of semi volatile organic compounds (SVOCs): a critical evaluation of performance and limitations of polyurethane foam (PUF) disks2014In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 433-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most commonly used passive air sampler (PAS) (i.e. polyurethane foam (PUF) disk) is cheap, versatile, and capable of accumulating compounds present both in gas and particle phases. Its performance for particle associated compounds is however disputable. In this study, twelve sets of triplicate PUF-PAS were deployed outdoors for exposure periods of 1-12 weeks together with continuously operated active samplers, to characterize sampling efficiency and derive sampling rates (R-S) for compounds belonging to 7 SVOC classes (including particle associated compounds). PUF-PAS efficiently and consistently sampled polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and eight novel brominated flame retardant (nBFR) compounds. Low accuracy and lack of sensitivity was observed for most polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans PCDD/Fs and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) (under the conditions of this study), with the exception of some congeners which may be used as qualitative markers for their respective classes. Application of compound specific R-S was found crucial for all compounds except PCBs. Sampling efficiency of the particle associated compounds was often low.

  • 7.
    Bohlin, Pernilla
    et al.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Audy, Ondrej
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Skrdliková, Lenka
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Vojta, Simon
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Pribylová, Petra
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Prokes, Roman
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Cupr, Pavel
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Klánová, Jana
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Evaluation and guidelines for using polyurethane foam (PUF) passive air samplers in double-dome chambers to assess semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in non-industrial indoor environments2014In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 2617-2626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Indoor air pollution has been recognized as an important risk factor for human health, especially in areas where people tend to spend most of their time indoors. Many semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) have primarily indoor sources and are present in orders of magnitude higher concentrations indoors than outdoors. Despite this, awareness of SVOCs in indoor air and assessment of the link between indoor concentrations and human health have tagged behind those of outdoor air. This is partially related to challenges associated with indoor sampling of SVOCs. Passive air samplers (PASs), which are widely accepted in established outdoor air monitoring networks, have been used to fill the knowledge gaps on indoor SVOCs distribution. However, their applicability for indoor environments and the assessment of human health risks lack sufficient experimental data. To address this issue, we performed an indoor calibration study of polyurethane foam (PUF) PAS deployed in a double-dome chamber, covering both legacy and new SVOC classes. PUF-PAS and a continuous low-volume active air sampler (AAS) were co-deployed for a calibration period of twelve weeks. Based on the results from this evaluation, PUF-PAS in a double-bowl chamber is recommended for indoor sampling and health risk assessment of gas phase SVOCs, including novel brominated flame retardants (nBFR) providing sufficient exposure time is applied. Data for particle associated SVOCs suffered from significant uncertainties caused by low level of detection and low precision in this study. A more open chamber design for indoor studies may allow for higher sampling rates (R-s) and better performance for the particle associated SVOCs.

  • 8.
    Brudzinska-Kosior, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection University, Wrocław, Poland.
    Kosior, Grzegorz
    Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection University, Wrocław, Poland.
    Klánová, Jana
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Vanková, Lenka
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Chropenová, Maria
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Samecka-Cymerman, Aleksandra
    Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection University, Wrocław, Poland.
    Kolon, Krzysztof
    Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection University, Wrocław, Poland.
    Mróz, Lucyna
    Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection University, Wrocław, Poland.
    Kempers, Alexander J.
    Department of Environmental Science, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in herbaceous Centaurium erythraea affected by various sources of environmental pollution2015In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 50, no 13, p. 1369-1375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are persistent xenobiotics with harmful effects on humans and wildlife. Their levels in the environment and accumulation in biota must be carefully controlled especially in species harvested from wild populations and commonly used as medicines. Our objective has been to determine PBDE concentrations (BDEs 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183 and 209) in Centaurium erythraea collected at sites with various levels of environmental pollution. PBDE congener profiles in C. erythraea were dominated by BDE209, which accounted for 47-89% of the total PBDE burden in the plants. Principal Component and Classification Analysis, which classifies the concentration of PBDEs in C. erythraea, allowed us to distinguish the pattern of these compounds characteristic for the origin of pollution: BDEs 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100 for lignite and general chemical industry and the vicinity of an expressway and BDEs 183 and 209 for a thermal power plant and ferrochrome smelting industry. Careful selection of sites with C. erythraea for medicinal purposes is necessary as this herb can accumulate PBDEs while growing at polluted sites.

  • 9.
    Degrendele, C.
    et al.
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; Multiphase Chemistry Department, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany.
    Okonski, K.
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Melymuk, L.
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Landlová, L.
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kukucka, Petr
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Audy, O.
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kohoutek, J.
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Cupr, P.
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Klánová, J.
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Pesticides in the atmosphere: a comparison of gas-particle partitioning and particle size distribution of legacy and current-use pesticides2016In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 1531-1544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents a comparison of seasonal variation, gas-particle partitioning, and particle-phase size distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) in air. Two years (2012/2013) of weekly air samples were collected at a background site in the Czech Republic using a high-volume air sampler. To study the particle-phase size distribution, air samples were also collected at an urban and rural site in the area of Brno, Czech Republic, using a cascade impactor separating atmospheric particulates according to six size fractions. Major differences were found in the atmospheric distribution of OCPs and CUPs. The atmospheric concentrations of CUPs were driven by agricultural activities while secondary sources such as volatilization from surfaces governed the atmospheric concentrations of OCPs. Moreover, clear differences were observed in gas-particle partitioning; CUP partitioning was influenced by adsorption onto mineral surfaces while OCPs were mainly partitioning to aerosols through absorption. A predictive method for estimating the gas-particle partitioning has been derived and is proposed for polar and non-polar pesticides. Finally, while OCPs and the majority of CUPs were largely found on fine particles, four CUPs (carbendazim, isoproturon, prochloraz, and terbuthylazine) had higher concentrations on coarse particles (> 3.0 mu m), which may be related to the pesticide application technique. This finding is particularly important and should be further investigated given that large particles result in lower risks from inhalation (re-gardless the toxicity of the pesticide) and lower potential for long-range atmospheric transport.

  • 10.
    Degrendele, Céline
    et al.
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Okonski, Krzysztof
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Melymuk, Lisa
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Landlová, Linda
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kukucka, Petr
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Cupr, Pavel
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Klánová, Jana
    RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Size specific distribution of the atmospheric particulate PCDD/Fs, dl-PCBs and PAHs on a seasonal scale: Implications for cancer risks from inhalation2014In: Atmospheric Environment, ISSN 1352-2310, E-ISSN 1873-2844, Vol. 98, p. 410-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents the seasonal size distribution of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) in the atmosphere. Particles were sampled from October 2009 to October 2010 on a seasonal basis using a cascade impactor collecting six size fractions at a rural and urban site in the Brno area, Czech Republic. Higher concentrations of PAHs, PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs were observed in cold seasons at both sites, attributed to the seasonality of the gas-particle partitioning, the increase of emissions and the lower boundary mixing layer in winter. All of the compounds showed a strong accumulation in the fine fraction, with, on average, 71% of Sigma PAHs, 73% of Sigma PCDD/Fs and 60% of Sigma dl-PCBs associated with particles <0.95 mu m. The human risk assessment via inhalation was addressed and followed the same pattern as for concentrations, with 41 and 7 times higher risk in winter compared to summer at the rural and urban sites, respectively. More than 70% of cancer risks of PAHs, PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs was associated with particles <0.95 mu m. Moreover, an overestimation of the cancer risk via inhalation of up to 50% occurred when the size distribution of related compounds was not considered.

  • 11.
    Geng, Dawei
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. RECETOX Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Eriksson, Ulrika
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ekblad, Alf
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grahn, Hans
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Roos, Anna
    Department for Environmental Research and Monitoring, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Temporal Trends of Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorine Pesticides and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Osprey Eggs in Sweden over the Years 1966 – 2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Geng, Dawei
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kukucka, Petr
    MTM Research Centre, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Hagberg, Jessika
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Roos, Anna
    Department for Environmental Research and Monitoring , Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden .
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Comparison on atmospheric pressure gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) and high resolution mass spectrometry for the analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)2014In: Organohalogen Compounds, ISSN 1026-4892, Vol. 76, p. 1593-1596Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Geng, Dawei
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. RECETOX Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Analysis of brominated flame retardants and their derivatives by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization using gas chromatography coupled to tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry2017In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 162, p. 618-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A validated method using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for coupling gas chromatography (GC-APCI) to tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the determination of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) is presented. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), their methoxylated derivatives (MeO-PBDEs) and other emerging BFRs were included in this study. The method showed good linearity and repeatability. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the relative response factors (RRFs) of all compounds was less than 16%. Repeatability for BFRs was tested on one or two concentration levels of calibration standardswith RSDs for RRFs below 16%. The lowest calibration standards (0.075 –0.1 pg/μL for emerging BFRs, BDE 209 and MeO-PBDEs mixtures, 0.625 –6.25 pg/μL for Br1-9 PBDEs mixtures) were used as instrument detection limits (IDL). The method was applied on biotic samples, including fish, osprey, and seal. In general, BDE209 and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) were detected in 50% of the seal samples. A 100% detection rate was achieved for 6-MeO-BDE47 in all the samples (72 –580 pg/g ww in osprey samples, 24 000 –96 000 pg/g ww in seal samples and 78–99 pg/g ww in fish samples). AllBr3-6PBDEs (BDE28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154) were detected in all the samples (ranging from 12 to 20 000 pg/g ww), while BDE183 was detected in 60% of the osprey eggs, 20% of the seal samples and below MDL in all fish samples. The results presented indicate the capability of the GC-APCI-MS/MS system for the detection and quantification of BFRs.

  • 14.
    Geng, Dawei
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. RECETOX Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Analysis of Novel and Legacy Brominated Flame Retardants Including Their Derivates by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Using Gas Chromatography Coupled to Triple Quadrupole Mass SpectrometryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Geng, Dawei
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Roos, A.
    Temporal Trends of Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorine Pesticides and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Osprey Eggs in Sweden over the Years 1966 – 20132016In: Organohalogen Compounds, ISSN 1026-4892, Vol. 78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Kosior, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection, Wrocław University, Wrocław, Poland.
    Klánová, Jana
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Vankova, Lenka
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Chropenová, Maria
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Brudzinska-Kosior, Anna
    Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection, Wrocław University, Wrocław, Poland.
    Samecka-Cymerman, Aleksandra
    Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection, Wrocław University, Wrocław, Poland.
    Kolon, Krzysztof
    Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection, Wrocław University, Wrocław, Poland.
    Kempers, Alexander J.
    Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Department of Environmental Science, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Pleurozium schreberi as an ecological indicator of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in a heavily industrialized urban area2015In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034, Vol. 48, p. 492-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are toxic contaminants with a persistent character and adverse effects on humans and wildlife. Therefore, the deposition of these chemicals in vegetation must be carefully controlled. Our objective was to determine PBDE concentrations (BDEs 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183 and 209) in Pleurozium schreberi collected in a heavily industrialized urban agglomeration. High PBDE concentrations in the moss confirm the presence of active sources of atmospheric pollution in an area tested. The distribution of these xenobiotics was related to the vegetation cover being lower in sites surrounded by forests which indicates that PBDEs may have a tendency to be trapped from the air by tree leaves and needles. Congener profiles in P. schreberi were dominated by BDE 209 which was for 79% (in case of the coke smelter) to 95% (in case of the chemical plant) part of the total PBDE burden in this moss. The principal component and classification analysis classifying the concentration of PBDEs in P. schreberi allowed us to distinguish the pattern of these compounds characteristic for the origin of pollution. P. schreberi may be used as a bioindicator for PBDEs in areas contaminated with these chemicals.

  • 17.
    Kukucka, Petr
    et al.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Brno, Czech Republ ic.
    Audy, Ondrej
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Brno, Czech Republ ic.
    Kohoutek, Jiri
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Brno, Czech Republ ic.
    Holt, Eva
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Brno, Czech Republ ic.
    Kalábová, Tereza
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Brno, Czech Republ ic.
    Holoubek, Ivan
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Brno, Czech Republ ic.
    Klánová, Jana
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Brno, Czech Republ ic.
    Source identification, spatio-temporal distribution and ecological risk of persistent organic pollutants in sediments from the upper Danube catchment2015In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 138, p. 777-783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Riverine sediments, collected on a monthly basis during a period of one year, from five sites in a mixed land use region of the Czech Republic were analysed for chlorinated and brominated persistent organic pollutants (POPs). The region is located in the upper catchment of the Danube River. The POPs concentrations were as follows: 11-930 pg g(-1) polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs), 170-980 pg g(-1) dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs), 34-13,700 pg g(-1) polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs), 5.7-29,200 pg g(-1) polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) and 0.21-351 ng g(-1) hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs). Concentrations expressed as toxic equivalents (TEQs), for PCDD/F + dl-PCB + PCN (TEQ(PCDD/F+dla-PCB+PCN)) ranged from 0.37 to 19 pg g(-1). The results revealed a clear spatial separation between sites based on concentration and congener profile. There were also some obvious temporal patterns of selected POPs, which were related to river flow (seasonality) and organic carbon (TOC) of the sediment. Potential sources of POPs include local municipalities (flame retardants), some diffuse sources (PCNs and PCDDs/Fs) and potential point sources (PBDEs). Risk assessment based on risk quotients (RQ) revealed limited to medium ecological risk from PBDEs. TEQ(PCDD/F+dl-PCB+PCN) were low relative to other European rivers, hence the risk to aquatic organisms was considered to be low. PCNs contributed significantly to overall TEQ in several cases.

  • 18.
    Kukucka, Petr
    et al.
    Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology RECETOX, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Klánová, Jana
    Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology RECETOX, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Sánka, Milan
    Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology RECETOX, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Holoubek, Ivan
    Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology RECETOX, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Soil burdens of persistent organic pollutants - Their levels, fate and risk: Part II. Are there any trends in PCDD/F levels in mountain soils?2009In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 157, no 12, p. 3255-3263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Good quality data apt for an assessment of temporal trends of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDDs/Fs) in soils are difficult to obtain since there is a general lack of information on their residues in soils. Variability of soil profiles, non-homogeneity of samples, and often also inconsistency of applied sampling procedures further complicate this problem. To assess spatial and temporal trends of contamination, three soil sampling campaigns have been performed over the period of 12 years at the mountain forest sites in the Czech Republic. Relation between the air, needle and soil contaminations was addressed in addition to time-related variability of soil. It has been confirmed that soil is a good matrix for evaluation of spatial distribution of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) but difficult for establishment of temporal trends. A slow rate of the soil-forming processes and their site-specificity was generally the major source of uncertainties.

  • 19.
    Kukucka, Petr
    et al.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Lammel, Gerhard
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Brno, Czech Republic; Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany.
    Dvorska, Alice
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Klanova, Jana
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Möller, Andrea
    Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Maritime Research, Bremerhaven, Germany; [Present address] Aerotec Engineering GmbH, Hamburg, Germany.
    Fries, Elke
    Institute of Environmental Systems Research, University of Osnabrueck, Osnabrueck, Germany.
    Contamination of Antarctic snow by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons dominated by combustion sources in the polar region2010In: Environmental Chemistry, ISSN 1448-2517, E-ISSN 1449-8979, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 504-513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firn samples attributed to the period between 2002 and 2005 were collected from a snow pit on the Ekstrom Shelf Ice in the Weddell Sea (70 degrees 43.8'S, 8 degrees 25.1'W). Low-volume meltwater samples (5 mL) were extracted by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The recovery of the analytical method for the 4-6 ring PAHs was low. PAH concentrations in snow were found within the range of 26-197 ng L(-1). The most prevailing substances were determined to be naphthalene, 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene and phenanthrene, with naphthalene accounting for an overall mean of 82% of total PAH. Potential emission sources of PAHs in snow were studied using back-trajectory statistics and available emission data of combustion sources in and around Antarctica. The distance to the sources (ships and research stations) in this region was found to control the snow PAH concentrations. There was no indication for intercontinental transport or marine sources.

  • 20.
    Lammel, Gerhard
    et al.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; Multiphase Chemistry Department, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany.
    Audy, Ondrej
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Besis, Athanasios
    Department of Chemistry, Environmental Pollution Control Laboratory, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Efstathiou, Christos
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Eleftheriadis, Kostas
    Institute of Nuclear Technology and Radiation Protection, NCSR Demokritos Institute, Athens, Greece.
    Kohoutek, Jiri
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Mulder, Marie D.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Pribylová, Petra
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Prokes, Roman
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Rusina, Tatsiana P.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Samara, Constantini
    Department of Chemistry, Environmental Pollution Control Laboratory, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Sofuoglu, Aysun
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Izmir Institute of Technology, Urla, Turkey.
    Sofuoglu, Sait C.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Izmir Institute of Technology, Urla, Turkey.
    Tasdemir, Yucel
    Environmental Engineering Department, Uludağ University, Nilüfer, Turkey.
    Vassilatou, Vassiliki
    Institute of Nuclear Technology and Radiation Protection, NCSR Demokritos Institute, Athens, Greece.
    Voutsa, Dimitra
    Department of Chemistry, Environmental Pollution Control Laboratory, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Vrana, Branislav
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Air and seawater pollution and air-sea gas exchange of persistent toxic substances in the Aegean Sea: spatial trends of PAHs, PCBs, OCPs and PBDEs2015In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 22, no 15, p. 11301-11313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Near-ground air (26 substances) and surface seawater (55 substances) concentrations of persistent toxic substances (PTS) were determined in July 2012 in a coordinated and coherent way around the Aegean Sea based on passive air (10 sites in 5 areas) and water (4 sites in 2 areas) sampling. The direction of air-sea exchange was determined for 18 PTS. Identical samplers were deployed at all sites and were analysed at one laboratory. hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) as well as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its degradation products are evenly distributed in the air of the whole region. Air concentrations of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and o,p'-DDT and seawater concentrations of p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDD were elevated in Thermaikos Gulf, northwestern Aegean Sea. The polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener pattern in air is identical throughout the region, while polybrominated diphenylether (PBDE)patterns are obviously dissimilar between Greece and Turkey. Various pollutants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs, DDE, and penta- and hexachlorobenzene are found close to phase equilibrium or net-volatilisational (upward flux), similarly at a remote site (on Crete) and in the more polluted Thermaikos Gulf. The results suggest that effective passive air sampling volumes may not be representative across sites when PAHs significantly partitioning to the particulate phase are included.

  • 21.
    Lammel, Gerhard
    et al.
    Multiphase Chemistry Department, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany; Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Spitzy, Alejandro
    Centre for Earth System Research and Sustainability, Institute for Geology, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Audy, Ondřej
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Beckmann, Sabine
    Centre for Earth System Research and Sustainability, Institute for Geology, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Codling, Garry P.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kretzschmann, Lisett
    Centre for Earth System Research and Sustainability, Institute for Geology, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany; Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH), Hamburg, Germany.
    Kukučka, Petr
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Stemmler, Irene
    Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany.
    Organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls along an east-to-west gradient in subtropical North Atlantic surface water2017In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 11045-11052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the fact that most persistent toxic substances have hardly been primarily emitted for several decades, their concentrations are only slowly decreasing in the global oceans. Surface seawater samples were collected along a 38°-24° N/28°-67° W transect in the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. While the concentration levels of hexachlorobenzene (2.1-6.1 pg L(-1)), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT, up to 2.1 pg L(-1)) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB, 10.8-24.9 pg L(-1)) were in the same range as observed earlier in the North Atlantic, hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH, 90-627 pg L(-1)) was found elevated, partly also relative to previous measurements in the same sea region. Hereby, the ratio α-HCH/γ-HCH was very low, 0.09-0.13. Chlordane and endosulfan were found in the range <3.0-11.1 and <5.8-8.8 pg L(-1) respectively. DDT metabolites, endrin and related pesticides were found below quantification limits. Spatial pollution patterns in surface seawaters seem to be determined by atmospheric and oceanic transport patterns, rather than by mixing and air-sea equilibrium. The comparison with global multicompartment chemistry-transport model predictions of surface seawater levels indicate underestimated degradation of PCBs and overestimated emissions of endosulfan.

  • 22.
    Liu, Liang-Ying
    et al.
    School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington IN, United States.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Venier, Marta
    School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington IN, United States.
    Salamova, Amina
    School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington IN, United States.
    Klanova, Jana
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Hites, Ronald A.
    School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington IN, United States.
    Differences in spatiotemporal variations of atmospheric PAH levels between North America and Europe: Data from two air monitoring projects2014In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 64, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atmospheric concentrations of high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured at five sites for almost two decades near the North American Great Lakes, as part of the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network (IADN), and at three remote sites around Europe, as part of the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP). The primary objectives were to reveal the spatial distributions, long-term temporal trends, and seasonal variations of atmospheric PAH concentrations and to investigate potential differences between these two regions. Atmospheric PAH concentrations at the urban sites in Chicago and Cleveland near Great Lakes were about 20 times (depending on PAH congener and sampling site) greater than those at the rural sites except for Kosetice in the Czech Republic. Atmospheric PAH concentrations at Kosetice, also a rural site, were about one-third of those at Chicago and Cleveland, but 10 times higher than those at other rural sites (Sturgeon Point, Sleeping Bear Dunes, Eagle Harbor, Aspvreten, and Spitsbergen). Significant long-term decreasing trends of all these PAH atmospheric concentrations were observed at Chicago and Cleveland. For the other sites, either less significant or no long-term decreasing trends were observed. Clear seasonality was observed at Sturgeon Point, Sleeping Bear Dunes, Kosetice, and Spitsbergen, with the highest PAH concentrations observed in mid-January.

  • 23.
    Lohmann, Rainer
    et al.
    Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, Rhode Island, United States.
    Klanova, Jana
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Yonis, Shifra
    Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, Rhode Island, United States.
    Bollinger, Kevyn
    Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, Rhode Island, United States.
    Concentrations, fluxes, and residence time of PBDEs across the tropical Atlantic Ocean2013In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 47, no 24, p. 13967-13975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the fate of polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) across the Oceans. Air and water were sampled using both active and passive polyethylene samplers on an east-west transect across the tropical Atlantic Ocean in 2009 and analyzed for PBDEs. Typical particle-bound concentrations of PBDEs in the surface water were low, at <1 pg L-1. Truly dissolved concentrations from passive samplers were similar to 40.5 pg L-1 for BDE 47 and around 0.1 pg L-1 for BDEs 28, 99, and 100 (results from active samples were compromised). In the atmosphere, particle-bound BDE 209 dominated overall concentrations (median 1.2 pg m(-3)), followed by BDE 99 (0.13 pg m(-3)). Gas-phase concentrations based on passive samplers were 1-8 pg m(-3) for BDE 47 and <= 4 pg m(-3) for BDE 99. Net air-water exchange gradients strongly favored gas-phase deposition of PBDEs into the water. Net gas-phase deposition fluxes ranged from tens of pg m(-2) day(-1) for BDEs 28 and 85 to around 1 ng m(-2) day(-1) for BDE 47, 99, and 209. Settling fluxes of particle-bound PBDEs in the atmosphere and surface water were around 50 pg m(-2) day(-1) for BDE 47 and <10 pg m(-2) day(-1) for the other congeners.

  • 24.
    Lohmann, Rainer
    et al.
    Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, Rhode Island, United States; Geowissenschaften, Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
    Klanova, Jana
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Yonis, Shifra
    Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, Rhode Island, United States.
    Bollinger, Kevyn
    Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, Rhode Island, United States.
    PCBs and OCPs on a East-to-West Transect: The Importance of Major Currents and Net Volatilization for PCBs in the Atlantic Ocean2012In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 46, no 19, p. 10471-10479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Air-water exchange gradients of selected polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners across a large section of the tropical Atlantic suggested net volatilization of PCBs to the atmosphere. Only for the higher chlorinated PCB 153 and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were gradients near equilibrium detected. The use of passive samplers also enabled the detection of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its transformation products across the tropical Atlantic, indicating net deposition. There were clear differences between the southern and northern hemisphere apparent in terms of atmospheric concentrations: Once the ship moved from the southern into the northern hemisphere air, concentrations of HCB and other organochlorine pesticides increased several-fold. For large swaths of the tropical Atlantic Ocean, neither PCB nor organochlorine pesticide dissolved concentrations varied much longitudinally, probably due to efficient mixing by ocean currents. In selected samples, dissolved concentrations reflected the influence of river plumes and major ocean currents far away from the continents. Dissolved concentrations of PCBs 28, 52, 101, 118, and HCB increased in the Amazon plume and the Gulf Stream. While the Amazon plume flushed only a few kg of PCBs and HCB, the Gulf Stream is potentially delivering tons of PCBs into the North Atlantic annually.

  • 25.
    Macikova, P.
    et al.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kalabova, T.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Klanova, J.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Giesy, J. P.
    Department of Biomedical Veterinary Sciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon SK, Canada; Zoology Department and Centre for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI, USA; Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; Zoology Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Environmental Science Program, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China.
    Hilscherova, K.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Longer-term and short-term variability in pollution of fluvial sediments by dioxin-like and endocrine disruptive compounds2014In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 5007-5022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in pollutant loads in relatively dynamic river sediments, which contain very complex mixtures of compounds, can play a crucial role in the fate and effects of pollutants in fluvial ecosystems. The contamination of sediments by bioactive substances can be sensitively assessed by in vitro bioassays. This is the first study that characterizes detailed short- and long-term changes in concentrations of contaminants with several modes of action in river sediments. One-year long monthly study described seasonal and spatial variability of contamination of sediments in a representative industrialized area by dioxin-like and endocrine disruptive chemicals. There were significant seasonal changes in both antiandrogenic and androgenic as well as dioxin-like potential of river sediments, while there were no general seasonal trends in estrogenicity. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent potency (dioxin-like potency) expressed as biological TCDD-equivalents (BIOTEQ) was in the range of 0.5-17.7 ng/g, dry mass (dm). The greatest BIOTEQ levels in sediments were observed during winter, particularly at locations downstream of the industrial area. Estrogenicity expressed as estradiol equivalents (EEQ) was in the range of 0.02-3.8 ng/g, dm. Antiandrogenicity was detected in all samples, while androgenic potency in the range of 0.7-16.8 ng/g, dm dihydrotestosterone equivalents (DHT-EQ) was found in only 30 % of samples, most often during autumn, when antiandrogenicity was the least. PAHs were predominant contaminants among analyzed pollutants, responsible, on average, for 13-21 % of BIOTEQ. Longer-term changes in concentrations of BIOTEQ corresponded to seasonal fluctuations, whereas for EEQ, the inter-annual changes at some locations were greater than seasonal variability during 1 year. The inter- as well as intra-annual variability in concentrations of both BIOTEQ and EEQ at individual sites was greater in spring than in autumn which was related to hydrological conditions in the river. This study stresses the importance of river hydrology and its seasonal variations in the design of effective sampling campaigns, as well as in the interpretation of any monitoring results.

  • 26.
    Mulder, M. D.
    et al.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Heil, A.
    Helmholtz Research Centre Jülich, Institute for Energy & Climate Research, Jülich, Germany.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Klánová, J.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kuta, J.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Prokes, R.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Sprovieri, F.
    CNR, Institute for Atmospheric Pollution Research, Rende, Italy.
    Lammel, G.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany.
    Air-sea exchange and gas particle partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Mediterranean (vol 14, pg 8905, 2014)2014In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 14, no 23, p. 12965-12965Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Mulder, M. D.
    et al.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Heil, A.
    Helmholtz Research Centre Jülich, Institute for Energy {&} Climate Research, Jülich, Germany.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Klánová, J.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kuta, J.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Prokes, R.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Sprovieri, F.
    Institute for Atmospheric Pollution Research, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Rende, Italy.
    Lammel, G.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany.
    Air-sea exchange and gas-particle partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Mediterranean2014In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 14, no 17, p. 8905-8915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentration in air of the central and eastern Mediterranean in summer 2010 was 1.45 (0.30-3.25) ng m(-3) (sum of 25 PAHs), with 8 (1-17) % in the particulate phase, almost exclusively associated with particles <0.25 mu m. The total deposition flux of particulate PAHs was 0.3-0.5 mu g m(-2) yr(-1). The diffusive air-sea exchange fluxes of fluoranthene and pyrene were mostly found net-depositional or close to phase equilibrium, while retene was net-volatilisational in a large sea region. Regional fire activity records in combination with box model simulations suggest that seasonal depositional input of retene from biomass burning into the surface waters during summer is followed by an annual reversal of air-sea exchange, while interannual variability is dominated by the variability of the fire season. One-third of primary retene sources to the sea region in the period 2005-2010 returned to the atmosphere as secondary emissions from surface seawaters. It is concluded that future negative emission trends or interannual variability of regional sources may trigger the sea to become a secondary PAH source through reversal of diffusive air-sea exchange.

    Capsule: In late summer the seawater surface in the Mediterranean has turned into a temporary secondary source of PAH, obviously related to biomass burning in the region.

  • 28.
    Mulder, Marie D.
    et al.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Heil, Angelika
    Atmospheric Chemistry Dept., Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kuta, Jan
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Pribylova, Petra
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Prokes, Roman
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Lammel, Gerhard
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; Multiphase Chemistry Dept., Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany.
    Long-range atmospheric transport of PAHs, PCBs and PBDEs to the central and eastern Mediterranean and changes of PCB and PBDE congener patterns in summer 20102015In: Atmospheric Environment, ISSN 1352-2310, E-ISSN 1873-2844, Vol. 111, p. 51-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The central and eastern Mediterranean is a receptor area for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) emitted in western, central and eastern Europe, particularly during summer. Atmospheric concentrations of PCBs, DDXs, PBDEs, penta- and hexachlorobenzene were measured during a ship-borne survey in the summer of 2010. The concentration of PCBs (sum of 7 congeners) was 3.61 (2.08-7.72) pg m(-3), of which 6.7% was associated with the particulate phase. The mean concentration of DDT isoi-ners and their metabolites, DDE and DDD, was 2.60 (0.46-7.60) pg m(-3) (particulate mass fraction theta = 0.097), of penta- and hexachlorobenzene 0.22 (<039-2.80) pg m(-3) and 6.29 (2.48-24.16) pg m(-3), respectively, and of PBDEs (sum of 8 congeners) 7.31 (2.80-19.89) pg m(-3). The air masses studied had been transported mostly across central Europe, some crossing western Europe. The observed changes of PCB congener patterns along transport routes are in agreement with the perception that the reaction with the OH radical is dominating PCB atmospheric lifetime, and indicate an overestimation of the second order gas-phase reaction rate coefficient of PCB:153 with OH by structure-activity relationship.

  • 29.
    Mulder, Marie D.
    et al.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Heil, Angelika
    Atmospheric Chemistry Dept., Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kuta, Jan
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Pribylová, Petra
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Prokes, Roman
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Lammel, Gerhard
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; Multiphase Chemistry Dept., Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany.
    Reprint of: Long-range atmospheric transport of PAHs, PCBs and PBDEs to the central and eastern Mediterranean and changes of PCB and PBDE congener patterns in summer 2010 (Reprinted from Atmospheric Environment, vol 111, pg 51-59)2015In: Atmospheric Environment, ISSN 1352-2310, E-ISSN 1873-2844, Vol. 121, p. 66-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The central and eastern Mediterranean is a receptor area for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) emitted in western, central and eastern Europe, particularly during summer. Atmospheric concentrations of PCBs, DDXs, PBDEs, penta- and hexachlorobenzene were measured during a ship-borne survey in the summer of 2010. The concentration of PCBs (sum of 7 congeners) was 3.61 (2.08-7.72) pg m(-3), of which 6.7% was associated with the particulate phase. The mean concentration of DDT isomers and their metabolites, DDE and DDD, was 2.60 (0.46-7.60) pg m(-3) (particulate mass fraction theta = 0.097), of penta- and hexachlorobenzene 0.22 (<0.39-2.80) pg m(-3) and 6.29(2.48-24.16) pg m(-3), respectively, and of PBDEs (sum of 8 congeners) 7.31 (2.80-19.89) pg m(-3). The air masses studied had been transported mostly across central Europe, some crossing western Europe. The observed changes of PCB congener patterns along transport routes are in agreement with the perception that the reaction with the OH radical is dominating PCB atmospheric lifetime, and indicate an overestimation of the second order gas-phase reaction rate coefficient of PCB153 with OH by structure-activity relationship.

  • 30.
    Okonski, Krzysztof
    et al.
    Faculty of Science, RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Degrendele, Céline
    Faculty of Science, RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Melymuk, Lisa
    Faculty of Science, RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Landlová, Linda
    Faculty of Science, RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Faculty of Science, RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Vojta, Simon
    Faculty of Science, RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kohoutek, Jiri
    Faculty of Science, RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Cupr, Pavel
    Faculty of Science, RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Klánová, Jana
    Faculty of Science, RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Particle size distribution of halogenated flame retardants and implications for atmospheric deposition and transport2014In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 48, no 24, p. 14426-14434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and a group of novel flame retardants (NFRs) on atmospheric aerosols. Two high volume cascade impactors were used to collect particulate fractions of ambient air over a one year period at urban and rural sites. The majority of FRs were found on the finest aerosols (<0.95 mu m). Concentrations of HBCD were higher than those of SPBDEs. Moreover, we noted seasonality and spatial differences in particle size distributions, yet a large portion of the observed differences were due to differences in particulate matter (PM) itself. When normalized by PM, the size distributions of the FRs exhibited much greater heterogeneity. Differences existed between the FR distributions by molecular weight, with the higher molecular weight FRs (e.g., BDE-209, Dechlorane Plus) distributed more uniformly across all particulate size fractions. The seasonal, spatial, and compound-specific differences are of crucial importance when estimating dry and wet deposition of FRs as smaller aerosols have longer atmospheric residence times. Estimated wet and dry deposition of four representative FRs (BDE-47, BDE-209, HBCD, and Dechlorane Plus) using size-segregated aerosol data resulted in lower deposition estimates than when bulk aerosol data were used. This has implications for estimates of long-range atmospheric transport and atmospheric residence times, as it suggests that without size-specific distributions, these parameters could be underestimated for FRs.

  • 31.
    Pozo, Karla
    et al.
    Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Concepción, Chile; Research Center for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Center for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Vanková, Lenka
    Research Center for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Pribylová, Petra
    Research Center for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Klánová, Jana
    Research Center for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Rudolph, Anny
    Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Concepción, Chile.
    Banguera, Yulieth
    Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Concepción, Chile.
    Monsalves, Javier
    Gobernación Marítima de Talcahuano, Concepción, Chile.
    Contreras, Sergio
    Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Concepción, Chile.
    Barra, Ricardo
    Facultad de Ciencias Ambientales/Centro Eula-Chile, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción, Chile.
    Ahumada, Ramon
    Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Concepción, Chile.
    Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) in Concepcion Bay, central Chile after the 2010 Tsunami2015In: Marine Pollution Bulletin, ISSN 0025-326X, E-ISSN 1879-3363, Vol. 95, no 1, p. 480-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PBDEs (10 congeners) were analyzed using GC-MS in superficial sediments and organisms of the Concepcion Bay after the 2010 Tsunami. From all congeners analyzed PBDE-47, -99, -100 and -209 were the most frequently detected. Concentrations (ng g(-1) d.w.) in sediments for Sigma PBDE-47, -99, -100 were low (0.02-0.09). However, PBDE-209 showed significantly higher values similar to 20 ng g-, d.w. This result were similar to 10 times lower than those reported in a previous study of the 2010 Tsunami. The high result might be influenced by the massive urban debris dragged by the 2010 Tsunami. In organisms, concentrations of PBDE-47, -99, -100 (similar to 0.4 ng g(-1) d.w.) were higher than those found in sediments (similar to 0.04 ng g(-1) d.w.). Differences in PBDE pattern were also observed between different levels of the trophic food chain (primary and secondary consumers). This is the first attempt to assess the current status of Concepcitin Bay after the 2010 Tsunami.

  • 32.
    Roots, Ott
    et al.
    Estonian Environmental Research Institute, Estonian Environmental Research Centre, Tallinn, Estonia .
    Lukki, Tiit
    Tallinn University, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Pribylova, Petra
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Boruvkova, Jana
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Audy, Ondrej
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Kalina, Jiri
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Klanova, Jana
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Holoubek, Ivan
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Sweetman, Andrew
    Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom .
    Schleicher, Ole
    FORCE Technology, Brøndby, Denmark.
    Measurements of persistent organic pollutants in Estonian ambient air (1990-2013)2015In: Proceedings of the Estonian Academy of Sciences, ISSN 1736-6046, E-ISSN 1736-7530, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 184-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Central and Eastern Europe is a region that is expected to need more data on the concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the ambient air in the future. Passive air sampling is a cheap screening method for comparison of contamination on various sites or for verification of information obtained by active samplers. Passive air samplers are sensitive enough to mirror even small-scale differences, which makes them capable of monitoring spatial, seasonal, and temporal variations. Different passive air samplers were employed between 1990 and 2013 from time to time in six Estonian air monitoring stations. The concentrations of PCB and its congeners, HCB, PeCB, HCH, and DDT (the same for PBDE, PCN, PCDD/F) in Estonian ambient air were very low, but they allow tracking transboundary air pollution. The main aim of this article is analysis of changes in the ambient air pollution in Estonia during a long period of time (1990-2013). Also, selection of Lahemaa background station for monitoring POPs in the European area is addressed.

  • 33.
    Čechová, Eliška
    et al.
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University Kamenice, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Seifertová, Marta
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University Kamenice, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kukučka, Petr
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University Kamenice, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Vojta, Šimon
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University Kamenice, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Quaak, Ilona
    Department of Health and Life Sciences, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    de Cock, Marijke
    Department of Health and Life Sciences, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    van de Bor, Margot
    Department of Health and Life Sciences, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Kočan, Anton
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University Kamenice, Brno, Czech Republic.
    An effective clean-up technique for GC/EI-HRMS determination of developmental neurotoxicants in human breast milk2017In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 409, no 5, p. 1311-1322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing number of children suffering from developmental disorders has raised questions regarding their association with the presence of environmental contaminants in mothers and children. We therefore developed a new method for the determination of 78 proven and potential developmental neurotoxicants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, legacy pesticides, pyrethroids, and old and new halogenated flame retardants in breast milk. The essential part of sample preparation was dialysis as a non-destructive clean-up step which was newly used at 10 °C and showed more efficient lipid removal (up to 96%) than the conventional methods such as gel permeation chromatography or freezing-lipid filtration and thus ensured low limits of detection (LOD) by reducing the sample volume prior to injection. Next advantages were significant solvent reduction and no risk of sample cross-contamination. Gas chromatography coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) was subsequently used for the separation and compound quantification. The method was validated using breast milk samples fortified with the analyzed compounds. Recoveries for most of the compounds ranged from 63 to 121% with a relative standard deviation of 2-25%, and LODs ranged between 0.001 and 0.87 ng g(-1) lipid weight. The method was applied to breast milk samples from a Dutch birth cohort where 35 out of the 78 compounds were quantified in more than 60% of the samples. For novel flame retardants, the method provides unique results regarding their occurrence in human matrices in Europe. Overall, the analysis of a complex mixture of developmental neurotoxicants could be useful for the assessment of the influence of the studied compounds to child health and development. Graphical abstract Flow diagram of the method and levels of the developmental neurotoxicants in Dutch human milk samples.

1 - 33 of 33
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