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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    HILD, School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Westerberg, Christina
    Department of Special Education, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Centre for Audiological Research, The University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Everyday life situations of school-aged children with severe disabilities: what are the goals for the future? an exploratory study2014In: Journal of Intellectual Disability - Diagnosis and Treatment, E-ISSN 2292-2598, no 2, p. 21-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated present and future everyday life situations (ELS) in home, school, work, and leisureenvironments for a group of school-aged children with severe disabilities, including complex disorders and a combinationof disabilities.

    The purpose was to explore universal ELS; clarify how the children can be supported in their developmentof autonomy; and to gather information on potential overall goals for interventions. To make data comparable, allreported ELS were linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Child and Youth version(ICF-CY) and listed along with information on the setting. Both today, and in the future, recreational activities andparticipation in school or work were of highest importance, but few reported ELS involved directly interacting with otherchildren. More ELS were predicted to occur outside the home and with a higher degree of autonomy. Therefore,interventions would be focused on the overall goal that children with severe disabilities take initiatives to becomeindependent and to form relationships with others.

  • 2.
    Danermark, Berth D.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Deafblindness, ontological security, and social recognition2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no s2, p. s119-s123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trust, ontological security, and social recognition are discussed in relation to self-identity among people with acquired deafblindness. To date the phenomenon has not been elaborated in the context of deafblindness. When a person with deafblindness interacts with the social and material environment, the reliability, constancy, and predictability of his or her relations is crucial for maintaining or achieving ontological security or a general and fairly persistent feeling of well-being. When these relations fundamentally change, the impact on ontological security will be very negative. The construction of social recognition through the interaction between the self and others is embodied across three dimensions: at the individual level, at the legal systems level, and at the normative or value level. The relationship between trust and ontological security on the one hand and social recognition on the other hand is discussed. It is argued that these basic processes affecting personality development have to be identified and acknowledged in the interactions people with deafblindness experience. Some implications for the rehabilitation of people with acquired deafblindness are presented and illustrated.

  • 3.
    Durisala, Naresh
    et al.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Republic of Singapore.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont TX, USA; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Audiology India, Mysore KA, India.
    Granberg, Sarah
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological Research Center, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR),Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological Research Center, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Determination and classification of the problems experienced by adults with single-sided deafness using ICF classification: an exploratory study using 26 participants2017In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 748-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     1. Previous studies have shown the application of ICF in classifying hearing problems using open ended questionnaire.

    2. The present study leveraged on that concept and used ICF in classifying hearing related problems and their effects on life style in adults with single-sided deafness.

    3. We have used "problem and life effects" questionnaire to which patients were asked to list the problems and effects of hearing loss on their lives.

    4. Apart from hearing and emotional related problems, use of an open ended questionnaire allowed tapping onto some of the non-auditory problems that these individuals may experience. 5.ICF classification provided basic information on the complex character of single sided deafness and can serve as a key element for rehabilitation.

  • 4.
    Ehn, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linneaus HEAD centre, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linneaus HEAD centre, Örebro, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linneaus HEAD centre, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linneaus HEAD centre, Örebro, Sweden.
    The relationship between work and health in persons with Usher syndrome type 22016In: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, ISSN 0145-482X, E-ISSN 1559-1476, Vol. 110, no 4, p. 233-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Persons with deafblindness may have additional physical and psychological health problems. In this study we have focused on health from a work-life perspective in persons with Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2), a disorder with sensorineural hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between work and disability pension and physical and psychological health in persons with USH2.

    Methods: Participants were recruited from the Swedish Usher database. Eighty-four persons (aged 18 to 65 years) received a health-related questionnaire and 67 (36 women and 31 men) agreed to participate. The participants formed two groups (working group, n = 34; disability pension group, n = 33). A Swedish Health on Equal Terms questionnaire comprising questions on psychological and physical health, living conditions, work activity, and social relationships was used. A chi-square test of significance was used with a significance level of p < 0.05.

    Results: The two groups did not differ in terms of age, gender, degree of hearing loss, visual acuity, or visual field loss. The working group had statistically significant better health compared to the disability pension group in areas such as being overweight, handling problems, concentration, feeling unhappy, depressive symptoms, and feelings of worthlessness. Suicidal thoughts and attempts were significantly more common in the disability pension group.

    Discussion: Persons with USH2 generally reported very poor physical and psychological health, with significant differences between persons who were working and those who were not. This study highlights the need for early rehabilitation, vocational training, and opportunities to access the labor market. Implications for practitioners: It is important that persons with USH2 receive vocational support from an early age and that professionals in the field of rehabilitation always include work activity as a key element of interventions.

  • 5.
    Erdtman, Emil
    et al.
    Swedish Disability Federation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tideman, Magnus
    Centre of Research on Health, Welfare and Sport, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fleetwood, Christina
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Research initiation based on idea-circles: from research object to co-actor2012In: Disability & Society, ISSN 0968-7599, E-ISSN 1360-0508, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 879-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article details an evaluation of a research project based on participatory research methods organized by the Swedish Disability Federation from 2008 to 2011. In Sweden there has been a lack of productive dialogue with the traditional academic world and the question was raised whether proposals for future research would be different if disabled people formulated them. Nine idea-circles with disabled participants and invited researchers from fields of interest close to the participants produced ideas, developed out of the life experience of being a disabled person. These ideas were developed into 72 research drafts that often reflected key advocacy areas, rather than operationalized research issues. The adjustment from the familiar discourse of political struggle to discussion of research was a complicated process for many. When asked to prioritize among areas for research, the representatives from the disability movement chose areas that are not stressed in mainstream disability research in Sweden.

  • 6.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Graduate School, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Skagerstrand, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Graduate School, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss: researcher perspective, Part II: Linking outcome measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 77-87Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To link outcome measures used in audiological research to the ICF classification and thereby describe audiological research from the ICF perspective.

    Design: Through a peer-reviewed or a joint linking procedure, link outcome measures to the ICF classification system using standardized ICF linking rules. Additional linking rules were developed in combination with the established rules to overcome difficulties when connecting audiological data to ICF. Absolute and relative frequencies of ICF categories were reported.

    Study sample: The identified outcome measures from the previous study (Part I) constituted the empirical material. Results: In total, 285 ICF categories were identified. The most prevalent categories were related to listening, hearing functions, auditory perceptions, emotions and the physical environment, such as noise and hearing aids. Categories related to communication showed lower relative frequencies, as did categories related to the social and attitudinal environment.

    Conclusions: Based on the linked outcome measures, communication as a research topic is subordinated to other research topics. The same conclusion can be drawn for research targeting the social and attitudinal environment of adults with HL. Difficulties in the linking procedure were highlighted and discussed, and suggestions for future revisions of the ICF from the audiological perspective were described.

  • 7.
    Middleton, Anna
    et al.
    School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Neary, Wanda
    Warrington Community Service, Warrington, UK.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Facts and figures about deafness, NF2 and deafblindness2010In: Working with Deaf People: A handbook for Healthcare Professionals / [ed] Middleton, Anna, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press , 2010, p. 1-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Deafblindness: a challenge for assessment - is the ICF a useful tool?2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, no Supplement 1, p. S140-S142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Impact on participation and service for persons with deafblindness2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Persons with deafblindness experience difficulties in daily life and they experience service to sometimes barrier. The overall aim of this thesis is therefore to discover, evaluate and explain: 1. mechanisms that might have impact on participation restrictions for people who have visual and hearing impairment i.e. deafblindness and 2. mechanisms that might barrier service to these people. Service is used as an umbrella term for health care, education and certain service for persons with disabilities. Materials from multiple sources have been used: literature (Study I No 96 papers). Interviews (Study I and V) with 32 and 3 adults with deafblindness respectively. Questionnaires (Study II and III): answered by 33 and 34 adults and youth with deafblindness. Patient records (Study IV and V): records from 9 and 3 adult females with USH I respectively. Materials mostly retrospectively cover the period from 2005 and about 40–50 years. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) were consequently used as a framework to describe as well as a tool to analyze mechanisms. Further, the Ecological approach, Disability as a laminated system and Life course approach were used in order to evaluate and explain mechanisms. The conclusions that can be drawn from an ecological, laminated and life course approach are: Participation restrictions for people with deafblindness are far-reaching and are embedded in a complex process of interaction between the person with deafblindness and the environment. Services entail systematical barriers. In order to improve service it is extremely important to understand the role of participation restrictions in deafblindness. Primary activity limitation is to not see and hear enough for comprehension. Hence, not taking part in the visible and audible world is primary participation restriction. Performing activities without basic information includes risk. One important aspect of deafblindness is exposure. Persons with deafblindness require rehabilitation in a life perspective. In order to increase people’s participation and protection requirement of individually adapted support and assistive devices is necessary. ICF and the UN convention support service alterations.

    List of papers
    1. The impact of combined vision and hearing impairment and of deafblindness
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of combined vision and hearing impairment and of deafblindness
    2005 (English)In: The impact of genetic hearing impairment / [ed] Dafydd Stephens, Lesley Jones, London: Whurr , 2005, p. 165-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Whurr, 2005
    National Category
    Social Work
    Research subject
    Medical Disability Research
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2956 (URN)1-86156-437-6 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2008-04-04 Created: 2008-04-04 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    2. Deafblindness: a challenge for assessment - is the ICF a useful tool?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deafblindness: a challenge for assessment - is the ICF a useful tool?
    2003 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, no Supplement 1, p. S140-S142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Social Work
    Research subject
    Medical Disability Research
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2957 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-04-04 Created: 2008-04-04 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Social recognition, participation, and the dynamic between the environment and personal factors of students with deafblindness
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social recognition, participation, and the dynamic between the environment and personal factors of students with deafblindness
    2007 (English)In: American Annals of the Deaf, ISSN 0002-726X, E-ISSN 1543-0375, Vol. 152, no 1, p. 42-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The study describes environmental and personal factors that, from the student perspective, impede participation in education in secondary upper schools by students with postlingual deafblindness. The discussion is framed by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. The researchers use the theory of social recognition as a theoretical tool in understanding the dynamics between personal factors and environment in the context of secondary upper-school education. Thirty-four students with deafblindness responded to a questionnaire; the survey's findings indicate experiences of barriers in the natural and social environments that restrict participation. Experience of considerateness—such as concern for the special requirements of students with deafblindness—and experience of the lack of considerateness are the most important factors. Negative roles adapted by some students for themselves may be interpreted as resulting from a lack of recognition, in the form of denigration or insults.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Washington: Conference of Executives of American Schools for the Deaf, 2007
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social Work
    Research subject
    Social Medicine; Disability Research
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2958 (URN)10.1353/aad.2007.0012 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-04-04 Created: 2008-04-04 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Long-term ophthalmic health care in Usher syndrome type I from an ICF perspective
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term ophthalmic health care in Usher syndrome type I from an ICF perspective
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 15, p. 1283-1292Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

     

    PURPOSE: The aim was to explore ophthalmic health care in female patients with Usher Syndrome type I (USH I) over 20 years and to evaluate the relationship between the ophthalmic health care and the health state of the patients from a health perspective. METHODS: A retrospective study of records from ophthalmology departments (OD) and low vision clinics (LVC) from 1985 to 2004. Assessment of the reports was performed based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Findings were analysed by manifest content analysis with ICF as a framework and using four themes: health care system, procedure examinations, patient's functioning and disability and procedure actions. RESULTS: The records of nine female patients (aged 25-39 years, 1985) with USH I were selected from the national database of USH. A great number of notes were collected (OD 344 and LVC 566). Procedure examinations were exclusively oriented towards body structure and function. All patients showed aggravated visual impairment over and above the hearing and vestibular impairment. Procedure actions were oriented towards environmental factors. No correlation was found between procedures performed and patient's experience of disability. CONCLUSIONS: The high degree of resource allocation was not correlated to the patients' impairment. The study indicates that the ophthalmic health care was characterised by inefficiency. This conclusion is very serious because patients very likely face severe disability and emotional difficulties. ICF is ought to be incorporated in ophthalmic health care strategy to improve the health care.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2009
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2959 (URN)10.1080/09638280802519669 (DOI)000268212200008 ()19280439 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-70350437864 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2008-04-04 Created: 2008-04-04 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    5. Participation in people with deafblindness: an ICF and the life course perspective
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participation in people with deafblindness: an ICF and the life course perspective
    (English)Manuscript (Other academic)
    National Category
    Social Work
    Research subject
    Medical Disability Research
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2960 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-04-04 Created: 2008-04-04 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
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  • 10.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    International classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF): the model and the classification2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    International classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF): the model and the classification2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Specialist issues relevant to working with clients with deafblindness2010In: Working with deaf people: A handbook for healthcare professionals / [ed] Middleton, Anna, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press , 2010, p. 141-167Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    The impact of combined vision and hearing impairment and of deafblindness2005In: The impact of genetic hearing impairment / [ed] Dafydd Stephens, Lesley Jones, London: Whurr , 2005, p. 165-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Möller, Kerstin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Social recognition, participation, and the dynamic between the environment and personal factors of students with deafblindness2007In: American Annals of the Deaf, ISSN 0002-726X, E-ISSN 1543-0375, Vol. 152, no 1, p. 42-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study describes environmental and personal factors that, from the student perspective, impede participation in education in secondary upper schools by students with postlingual deafblindness. The discussion is framed by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. The researchers use the theory of social recognition as a theoretical tool in understanding the dynamics between personal factors and environment in the context of secondary upper-school education. Thirty-four students with deafblindness responded to a questionnaire; the survey's findings indicate experiences of barriers in the natural and social environments that restrict participation. Experience of considerateness—such as concern for the special requirements of students with deafblindness—and experience of the lack of considerateness are the most important factors. Negative roles adapted by some students for themselves may be interpreted as resulting from a lack of recognition, in the form of denigration or insults.

  • 15.
    Möller, Kerstin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Eriksson, Kristina
    Sadeghi, André M.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Long-term ophthalmic health care in Usher syndrome type I from an ICF perspective2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 15, p. 1283-1292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    PURPOSE: The aim was to explore ophthalmic health care in female patients with Usher Syndrome type I (USH I) over 20 years and to evaluate the relationship between the ophthalmic health care and the health state of the patients from a health perspective. METHODS: A retrospective study of records from ophthalmology departments (OD) and low vision clinics (LVC) from 1985 to 2004. Assessment of the reports was performed based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Findings were analysed by manifest content analysis with ICF as a framework and using four themes: health care system, procedure examinations, patient's functioning and disability and procedure actions. RESULTS: The records of nine female patients (aged 25-39 years, 1985) with USH I were selected from the national database of USH. A great number of notes were collected (OD 344 and LVC 566). Procedure examinations were exclusively oriented towards body structure and function. All patients showed aggravated visual impairment over and above the hearing and vestibular impairment. Procedure actions were oriented towards environmental factors. No correlation was found between procedures performed and patient's experience of disability. CONCLUSIONS: The high degree of resource allocation was not correlated to the patients' impairment. The study indicates that the ophthalmic health care was characterised by inefficiency. This conclusion is very serious because patients very likely face severe disability and emotional difficulties. ICF is ought to be incorporated in ophthalmic health care strategy to improve the health care.

  • 16.
    Möller, Kerstin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    ICF Brief Core Set for Adults with Hearing Loss in Audiological Rehabilitation Part I2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Möller, Kerstin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    ICF Brief Core Set for Adults with Hearing Loss in Audiological Rehabilitation Part II2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Rönnåsen, Berit
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital; Department of Behavioural Science and Learning, Linköping University.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Department of Behavioural Science and Learning, Linköping University.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital.
    Aspects of Learning from the Perspective of People With Alström SyndromeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Rönnåsen, Berit
    et al.
    Specialpedagogiska skolmyndigheten, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Science and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Department of Behavioural Science and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Aspects of learning in deafblindness: opportunities and limitations for persons with Alström syndrome2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Rönnåsen, Berit
    et al.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Department of Behavioural Science and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Anderzén Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Aspects of learning from the perspective of people with Alström syndrome2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 644-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to explore aspects of learning, from a lifelong perspective, in individuals with Alstro ̈m syndrome (AS). AS is an autosomal recessive disorder causing early blindness, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, cardiomyopathy, endocrine disorders, metabolic dysfunction, and abbreviated lifespan.

    Method: Eleven individuals with AS participated. The study had a qualitative explorative design, giving voice to the participants’ perspectives on their situation. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews, which were subjected to conventional (inductive) qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The analysis revealed in the participants a quest for independence and an image of themselves as capable people willing to learn, but in constant need of support to continue learning throughout their lives to be as independent as possible.

    Conclusion: Based on the levels of functioning, i.e. personal resources, revealed in the interviews, supervisors, caregivers, and teachers are encouraged to allow people with AS to be their own advocates, as they know best how, what, and with whom they learn, and what type of sensory material – tactile, auditory, visual, or a combination – is most helpful. Implications for RehabilitationIndividuals with AS strive for independence, and to be independent they need to continue to learn throughout their lives.Individuals with AS know best how they learn, and should be asked what modalities are the most effective for them.The tactile modality for learning will continue throughout life and should be emphasized early in the individual's education and rehabilitation.

  • 21.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Widén, Stephen
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Doctoral theses within the Swedish Institute for Disability Research 2000-2012: A review of content and interdisciplinarity2017In: International Journal of Health Sciences, ISSN 2372-5060, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR) was founded in 2000. The SIDR graduate programmedis a leading research programmedin disability science. The scientific method at SIDR is based on an interdisciplinary approach.The aim of this study is to describe content of doctoral theses presented within SIDR, and to analyzethe occurrence of interdisciplinarywithin the theses published between 2000 and 2012. Forty-one theses were included in the study. First, the manifest data was categorized in a matrix, and second, the latent content was analyzedwithin a scheme. The scheme included seven criteria within interdisciplinary theory, namely: Is the phenomenon multi-dimensional? Does the aim reflect an interdisciplinary approach? Are the studies non-reductionist? Have multiple methods been used? Is the knowledge integrated? Are the results discussed as a whole?Do they explicitly show an interdisciplinaryknowledge?Findings show a variety of disability groups studied within SIDR, but the main disabilities are hearing impairment or deafness, and cognitive and communication difficulties. Different theoretical perspectives are used within the theses. To different extents, an interdisciplinary approach is used as an overall meta-theory.

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    Doctoral theses within the Swedish Institute for Disability Research, 2000-2012: A Review of Content and Interdisciplinarity
  • 22.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Widén, Stephen
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Doctoral theses within the Swedish Institute for Disability Research, 2000-2012: a survey study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Wahlqvist, Moa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Health among Persons with Usher syndrome type 3, Implications of DeafblindnessIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Wahlqvist, Moa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Implications of Deafblindness: The Physical and Mental Health and Social Trust of Persons with Usher Syndrome Type 32016In: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, ISSN 0145-482X, E-ISSN 1559-1476, Vol. 110, no 4, p. 245-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to describe health and social trust in persons with Usher syndrome type 3 (USH3) in relation to hearing and visual impairment.

    Methods: Participants were recruited from the Swedish Usher database. Twenty-one persons with USH3 received two questionnaires, which covered a wide range of domains related to health and social trust. Fifteen individuals, 4 men and 11 women aged 19-71 years, responded. Each outcome measure within every domain reported by the individual was structured into a matrix, which included auditory and visual findings.

    Results: Severe problems with health and social trust were apparent for persons with USH3. Differences in the number of reported problems were suggested. Three persons had cochlear implants, and they reported far fewer problems with physical health, mental health, and social trust than the others.

    Discussion: Three major patterns emerged. The first was that the group was heterogeneous with regard to the problems reported in the biopsychosocial dimensions; that is, general health, physical health, and mental health, as well as social trust. The second was that none of the biopsychosocial dimensions could be disregarded when describing health among persons with USH3. The third major pattern was that a cochlear implant might benefit the health of persons with USH3.

    Implications for practitioners: The results suggested poor physical and mental health and severe social trust problems for people with USH3. Interdisciplinary strategies are required to facilitate the rehabilitation of persons with USH3 throughout their lifespan.

  • 25.
    Wahlqvist, Moa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Physical and psychological health in persons with deafblindness that is due to Usher Syndrome Type II2013In: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, ISSN 0145-482X, E-ISSN 1559-1476, Vol. 107, no 3, p. 207-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The objectives of the study reported here were to describe the physical and psychological health of persons with Usher syndrome Type II (USH2) and to explore any differences in terms of gender.

    Methods: The participants were recruited from the Swedish Usher database. In the first step, 122 persons received the questionnaire by mail, and 96 (aged 18–84, with a mean age of 55, 53% of whom were female) agreed to participate. The Health on Equal Terms questionnaire was used, which covered such items as health, living conditions, and social relationships. Results for the participants with USH2 were compared to those of a reference group of 5,738 persons who were drawn from a random sample of the Swedish population retrieved from the Swedish Public Health Institute. The odds ratio (adjusted for gender and age), and its 95% confidence interval were calculated.

    Results: The participants with USH2 reported that their physical and psychological health was significantly poorer than that of the Swedish reference group. They revealed major problems involving headache, fatigue, depression, suicidal thoughts, and suicide attempts. For the male participants, the psychological differences were even more marked than those of the male reference group.

    Discussion: The identification of factors associated with physical and psychological health and well-being is important for the design of future rehabilitation strategies for people with USH2. Special focus must be placed on the psychological well-being of men with USH2.

    Implications for practitioners: The management of rehabilitation services for persons with USH2 calls for interdisciplinary teamwork to provide adequate resources to cope with the physical and psychological health issues demonstrated in this study.

  • 26.
    Wahlqvist, Moa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Similarities and Differences in Health, Social trust and Financial situation in people with Usher syndrome, a bio- psychosocial perspectiveManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Wahlqvist, Moa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Health and Social Trust in Persons with Usher syndrome type 1In: The British Journal of Visual Impairment, ISSN 0264-6196, E-ISSN 1744-5809Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Wahlqvist, Moa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Physical and psychological health, social trust and financial situation for persons with Usher syndrome type 12016In: The British Journal of Visual Impairment, ISSN 0264-6196, E-ISSN 1744-5809, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 15-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article describes physical health, psychological health, social trust, and financial situation in persons with deafblindness due to Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) in comparison with a crosssection of the Swedish population. Persons with USH1 were recruited through the Swedish Usher database. Totally, 87 adults received the Health on Equal Terms (HET) questionnaire. The HET was adjusted, thus the questions were translated into Swedish sign language, and a large font size, better contrast, and a structure compatible with the Braille script reader were also provided. The questionnaire comprises a wide range of domains related to health and wellbeing. In all, 60 persons responded (60% women, mean age: 49 years, range: 21–79 years). The persons with USH1 were compared to a cross section of the Swedish population that included 5738 individuals (56% women, mean age: 49 years, range: 16–84 years). Significant differences in physical health, psychological health, social trust, and financial situation as well as the odds ratio adjusted for sex and age, and its 95% confidence interval are reported. The psychological health, social trust, and financial situation of persons with USH1 were significantly poorer compared to the reference group although this was not the case for physical health. Persons with USH1 only expressed significantly more problems with headache compared to the cross section of the Swedish population. The respondents revealed major problems with fatigue, loss of confidence, and suicide thoughts and attempts. Major social trust and financial problems were reported in terms of refraining going out alone, not receiving help, having no one with whom to share thoughts, and confide in and being unable to obtain 15.000 SEK (approximately US$1.724 or €1.544) in the case of an unforeseen situation. To identify factors associated with physical health, psychological health, social trust, and financial situation is important in the design of future rehabilitation strategies for persons with USH1. The high level of psychological distress and lack of social trust reported could be related to ontological insecurity, as well as lack of recognition from others. Special attention must be devoted to suicide behavior.

  • 29.
    Wahlqvist, Moa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Physical and Psychological Health, Social Trust and Financial Situation for persons with Usher syndrome type 12015In: The British Journal of Visual Impairment, ISSN 0264-6196, E-ISSN 1744-5809Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30. Wallenius, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Berglund, Britta
    Karolinska institutet.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ur ett sällsynt perspektiv2006In: Inre och yttre världar: funktionshinder i psykologisk belysning / [ed] Erland Hjelmquist, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2006, p. 63-78Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31. Wallenius, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Berglund, Britta
    Karolinska institutet.
    Everyday impact of having a rare diagnosis: a questionnaire study2009In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, no 3, p. 13-17Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 31 of 31
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