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  • 1.
    Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    The management of radioactive waste: a description of ten countries2002Report (Other academic)
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  • 2.
    Asayama, Shinichiro
    et al.
    National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan.
    De Pryck, Kari
    Institute for Environmental Sciences (ISE), University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Beck, Silke
    Department of Science, Technology and Society, School of Social Sciences and Technology, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany.
    Cointe, Béatrice
    Centre for the Sociology of Innovation (CSI), Mines Paris, PSL University, i3 CNRS (UMR 9217), Paris, France.
    Edwards, Paul N.
    Center for International Security and Cooperation, Stanford University, Stanford CA, USA.
    Guillemot, Hélène
    Centre Alexandre Koyré, CNRS, Aubervilliers, France.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Environmental Sociology Section.
    Hartz, Friederike
    Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Hughes, Hannah
    International Politics Department, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, UK.
    Lahn, Bård
    TIK Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Leclerc, Olivier
    Centre de Théorie et Analyse du Droit (UMR 7074 CTAD), CNRS, Université Paris Nanterre, Ecole Normale Supérieure – PSL, Nanterre, France.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Livingston, Jasmine E.
    Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
    Lorenzoni, Irene
    School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK.
    MacDonald, Joanna Petrasek
    Joanna Petrasek MacDonald Consulting, Ottawa Ontario, Canada.
    Mahony, Martin
    School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK.
    Miguel, Jean Carlos Hochsprung
    Institute of Geosciences, Department of Science and Technology Policy, State University of Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Monteiro, Marko
    Institute of Geosciences, Department of Science and Technology Policy, State University of Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.
    O’Reilly, Jessica
    Department of International Studies, Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington IN, USA.
    Pearce, Warren
    iHuman, Department of Sociological Studies, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Petersen, Arthur
    Department of Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy, University College London, London, UK.
    Siebenhüner, Bernd
    Ecological Economics Group, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany.
    Skodvin, Tora
    Department of Political Science, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Standring, Adam
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Centre for Urban Research on Austerity, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.
    Sundqvist, Göran
    Department of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Taddei, Renzo
    Institute of Oceanic Sciences, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    van Bavel, Bianca
    School of Geography, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; Priestley Centre for Climate Futures, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    Vardy, Mark
    Criminology Department, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.
    Yamineva, Yulia
    Centre for Climate Change, Energy and Environmental Law, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Hulme, Mike
    Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Three institutional pathways to envision the future of the IPCC2023In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 877-880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The IPCC has been successful at building its scientific authority, but it will require institutional reform for staying relevant to new and changing political contexts. Exploring a range of alternative future pathways for the IPCC can help guide crucial decisions about redefining its purpose.

  • 3.
    Beck, Silke
    et al.
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Esguerra, Alejandra
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Borie, Maud
    University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
    Chilvers, Jason
    University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
    Görg, Christoph
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Heubach, Katja
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Marquard, Elisabeth
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Nesshöver, Carsten
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Hulme, Mike
    King's College, London, United Kingdom.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Miller, Clark
    Arizona State University,Tempe, USA.
    Nadim, Tahani
    Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, Germany.
    Settele, Josef
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Turnhout, Esther
    Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Vasileiadou, Eleftheria
    Eindhoven Univesity of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Towards a reflexive turn in the governance of global environmental expertise: The cases of the IPCC and the IPBES2014In: GAIA, ISSN 0940-5550, E-ISSN 2625-5413, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 80-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role and design of global expert organizations such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) or the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) needs rethinking. Acknowledging that a one-size-fits-all model does not exist, we suggest a reflexive turn that implies treating the governance of expertise as a matter of political contestation.

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    Towards a reflexive turn
  • 4.
    Beland Lindahl, Karin
    et al.
    Unit of Political Science, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Sténs, Anna
    Dept. of Historyical, Philosophical and Religious studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Dept. of Political Science, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Johansson, Johanna
    Dept. of Political Science, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ranius, Thomas
    Dept. of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Roberge, Jean-Michel
    Dept. of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå, Sweden.
    The Swedish forestry model: More of everything?2017In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 77, p. 44-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “The Swedish forestry model” refers to the forest regime that evolved following the 1993 revision of the Swedish Forestry Act. It is key to Swedish forest politics and used to capture the essence of a sustainable way of managing forests. However, the ideas, institutions and practices comprising the model have not been comprehensively analyzed previously. Addressing this knowledge gap,we use frame analysis and a Pathways approach to investigate the underlying governance model, focusing on the way policy problems are addressed, goals, implementation procedures, outcomes and the resulting pathways to sustainability.Wesuggest that the institutionally embedded response to pressing sustainability challenges and increasing demands is expansion, inclusion and integration: more of everything. The more-of-everything pathway is influenced by ideas of ecological modernization and the optimistic view that existing resources can be increased. Our findings suggest that in effect it prioritizes the economic dimension of sustainability. While broadening out policy formulation it closes down the range of alternative outputs, a shortcoming that hampers its capacity to respond to current sustainability challenges. Consequently, there is a need for a broad public debate regarding not only the role of forests in future society, but also the operationalization of sustainable development.

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    fulltext
  • 5.
    Benyamine, Michelle
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Sandén, Per
    Forest nitrogen fertilisationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Benyamine, Michelle
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Sandén, Per
    Why forest nitrogen fertilization is debatedManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Berg, Monika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Deliberative democracy meets democratised science: a deliberative systems approach to global environmental governance2018In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main achievements of the debates on deliberative democracy and democratised science are investigated in order to analyse the reasons, meanings and prospects for a democratisation of global environmental policy. A deliberative systems approach, which emphasises the need to explore how processes in societal spheres interact to shape the deliberative qualities of the system as a whole, is adopted. Although science plays a key role in this, its potential to enhance deliberative capacity has hardly been addressed in deliberative theories. The democratisation of science has potential to contribute to the democratisation of global environmental policy, in that it also shapes the potential of deliberative arrangements in the policy sphere. Deliberative arrangements within the policy sphere may stimulate the democratisation of science to different degrees.

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    Deliberative democracy meets democratised
  • 8.
    Berg, Monika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Pathways to deliberative capacity: the role of the IPCC2018In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 148, no 1-2, p. 11-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the arguments for expanding deliberation in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and scrutinizes their implications for the deliberative capacity of global environmental governance (GEG). An analysis of the IPCC is presented that builds on a systematic literature review and thus a broad set of scientific debates concerning the IPCC. Based on this analysis, two different paths are outlined, one moderate and one radical; these paths ascribe different democratizing functions to the IPCC and rely on different epistemologies. The moderate path emphasizes decision capacity, whereas the radical path strives to create deliberative space and to identify the value inherent in different claims. It is argued that the IPCC cannot accommodate the aspirations of these different pathways in a single assessment. Parallel assessments must be developed in complementary subject areas with different science-policy relations.

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    Pathways to deliberative capacity: the role of the IPCC
  • 9.
    Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Foreign, domestic, and cultural factors in climate change reporting: Swedish media's coverage of wildfires in three continents2019In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 381-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines domestic media’s coverage of foreign wildfires from a climate change perspective. It explores Swedish newspapers’ coverage of wildfires in Australia, the Mediterranean region and the USA during a three-year period (February 2013–March 2016), focusing on how and to what extent climate change is viewed as an underlying cause. A central result is that climate change is mentioned far more often in the case of Australian wildfires than of fires in the other two regions. Another finding is that the climate change issue became more prominent after a severe domestic wildfire in 2014. These observations are also examined qualitatively through a combined frame and discourse study where the importance of foreign news values, the use of foreign sources, cultural proximity/distance, and domestication procedures are analyzed. In conclusion, foreign, domestic, and cultural factors in climate change reporting in relation to extreme events are further discussed.

  • 10.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Andersson, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Berg, Monika
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Löfmarck, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ojala, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Olsson, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Singleton, Benedict E
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svenberg, Sebastian
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Conditions for Transformative Learning for Sustainable Development: A Theoretical Review and Approach2018In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 4479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continued unsustainability and surpassed planetary boundaries require not only scientific and technological advances, but deep and enduring social and cultural changes. The purpose of this article is to contribute a theoretical approach to understand conditions and constraints for societal change towards sustainable development. In order to break with unsustainable norms, habits, practices, and structures, there is a need for learning for transformation, not only adaption. Based on a critical literature review within the field of learning for sustainable development, our approach is a development of the concept of transformative learning, by integrating three additional dimensions—Institutional Structures, Social Practices, and Conflict Perspectives. This approach acknowledges conflicts on macro, meso, and micro levels, as well as structural and cultural constraints. It contends that transformative learning is processual, interactional, long-term, and cumbersome. It takes place within existing institutions and social practices, while also transcending them. The article adopts an interdisciplinary social science perspective that acknowledges the importance of transformative learning in order for communities, organizations, and individuals to be able to deal with global sustainability problems, acknowledging the societal and personal conflicts involved in such transformation.

  • 11.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    A reflexive look at reflexivity in environmental sociology2017In: Environmental Sociology, ISSN 2325-1042, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 6-16, article id Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reflexivity is a central concept in environmental sociology, as in environmental social science in general. The concept is often connected to topics such as modernity, governance, expertise, and consumption. Reflexivity is presented as a means for taking constructive steps towards sustainability as it recognizes complexity, uncertainty, dilemmas, and ambivalence. Critical discussion of the conceptual meaning and usage of reflexivity is therefore needed. Is it a useful theoretical concept for understanding various sustainability issues? Is ‘more reflexivity’ relevant and useful advice that environmental sociologists can give in communicating with other disciplines, policymakers, and practitioners? This article explores the conceptual meaning of reflexivity and assesses its relevance for environmental sociology. In particular, it reviews its usages in three research fields; expertise, governance, and citizen-consumers. The paper furthermore discusses the spatial and temporal boundaries of reflexivity. It concludes by discussing how the concept can be a useful analytical concept in environmental sociology, at the same time as it warns against an exaggerated and unreflexive use of the concept.

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    fulltext
  • 12.
    Carleheden, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Roman, Christine
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Inledning2006In: Social interaktion: förutsättningar och former / [ed] Mikael Carleheden, Rolf Lindskog, Christine Roman, Malmö: Liber, 2006, 1, p. 11-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Carleheden, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Lidskog, RolfÖrebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.Roman, ChristineÖrebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Social interaktion: förutsättningar och former2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 14. Díaz Reviriego, Isabel
    et al.
    Beck, Silke
    Darbi, Marianne
    Hauck, Jennifer
    Hudson, Christian
    Janz, Christophe
    Klenk, Nicole
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Marquard, Elisabeth
    Montana, Jasper
    Obermeister, Noam
    Raab, Kristina
    Schoolenberg, Mactheld
    Settele, Josef
    Turnhout, Esther
    Neßhöver, Carsten
    Five years of IPBES : Reflecting the achievements and challenges and identifying needs for its review towards a 2nd work programme.  2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On 17 to 19th October 2017, twenty-four academics and practitioners with diverse inter- and transdisciplinary experiences gathered for a workshop to collectively reflect on IPBES’ work and performance. The workshop was held at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) in Leipzig. The workshop and this report represent an effort to proactively contribute to IPBES’ ongoing (external) review process. The external review process opens up a window of opportunity towards re-thinking the very purpose of IPBES and identifying new pathways to live up to its initial ambitions, such as to move beyond assessments. The workshop identified a spectrum of potential opportunities, provided visions for the future work of IPBES, and collected insights into how to cope with them. While the workshop focussed on identifying future challenges and possible solutions, all participants underlined the great achievements that IPBES has already accomplished. This report provides a synthesis of the workshop discussions. The main recommendations for the external review were:

     - The external review should seize the opportunity to establish itself in a responsive and future-oriented way so that it not only assesses past performance but also facilitates learning and identifies new pathways for IPBES. It is important that the focus of the review is not just on the extent to which IPBES has fulfilled its ambitions but also on the efficiency with which it has done this, and on the potential unintended effects of decisions.

     - For IPBES to achieve its initial ambitions, strengthening the (mainly global-scale) scientific knowledge base behind assessments is necessary but not yet sufficient. To meet its broader set of goals, it is required to pay critical attention to all aspects of policy support, knowledge generation and capacity-building, including the meaningful participation of Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities and the incorporation of local and indigenous knowledge. This will require building synergies between knowledge systems, promoting the engagement of the social sciences and humanities, and addressing current challenges in the nomination and selection procedures for the identification of experts.

     - The external review also opens up space to identify a full range of alternative options and choices that are available when reforming IPBES. The review should engage in real-world dialogues and liaise closely with partners from research, policy and practice as well as with national platforms and local actors.

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    Five years of IPBES – reflecting the achievements and challenges and identifying needs for its review towards a 2nd work programme
  • 15.
    Eklöf, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Earth Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Managing Swedish forestry's impact on mercury in fish: Defining the impact and mitigation measures2016In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 45, p. S163-S174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inputs of anthropogenic mercury (Hg) to the environment have led to accumulation of Hg in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, contributing to fish Hg concentrations well above the European Union standards in large parts of Fennoscandia. Forestry operations have been reported to increase the concentrations and loads of Hg to surface waters by mobilizing Hg from the soil. This summary of available forestry effect studies reveals considerable variation in treatment effects on total Hg (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) at different sites, varying from no effect up to manifold concentration increases, especially for the bioavailable MeHg fraction. Since Hg biomagnification depends on trophic structures, forestry impacts on nutrient flows will also influence the Hg in fish. From this, we conclude that recommendations for best management practices in Swedish forestry operations are appropriate from the perspective of mercury contamination. However, the complexity of defining effective policies needs to be recognized.

  • 16.
    Ekström, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Handlingspositioner, medier och klimatförändring: om ansvarsutkrävandets villkor2007In: Social interaktion: förutsättningar och former / [ed] Mikael Carleheden, Rolf Lidskog, Christine Roman, Malmö: Liber , 2007, p. 266-290Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Elander, Ingemar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The Rio Declaration and subsequent global initiatives2000In: Consuming cities: the urban environment in the global economy after the Rio Declaration / [ed] Nicholas Low, Brendan Gleeson, Ingemar Elander, Rolf Lidskog, London: Routledge , 2000, 1, p. 30-53Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Engdahl, Emma
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Risk, communication and trust: towards an emotional understanding of trust2014In: Public Understanding of Science, ISSN 0963-6625, E-ISSN 1361-6609, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 703-717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The experience of public distrust towards science-based risk assessments and regulatory proposals have resulted in proposals for context-sensitive risk communication, transparency in decision processes, public inclusion in regulatory work and new contracts between science and citizens. This is the point of departure for this study; however, rather than focusing on strategies to achieve public trust, this study focuses on the very meaning of trust, that is, its prerequisites and character. By drawing on recent discussions in science and technology studies and social psychology, a perspective is elaborated upon that concerns the relational and emotional characteristics of trust. It is argued that trust is a modality of action motivated by the ego’s emotional apprehension of a certain form of double-confidence, that is, the ego’s confidence in the outer world or the future actions of the alter ego and the ego’s confidence in its own understanding and judgment of the outer world or the alter ego. This means that trust does not develop through information and the uptake of knowledge but through active involvement and sense-making.

  • 19.
    Esguerra, Alejandro
    et al.
    University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Beck, Silke
    Department of Environmental Politics, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany; Governing Council of the Science and Democracy Network, Harvard University, Boston, United States .
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Stakeholder engagement in the making: IPBES Legitimization Politics2017In: Global Environmental Politics, ISSN 1526-3800, E-ISSN 1536-0091, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 59-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing number of expert organizations aim to provide knowledge for global environmental policy-making. Recently, there have also been explicit calls for stakeholder engagement at the global level to make scientific knowledge relevant and usable on the ground. The newly established Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) is one of the first international expert organizations to have systematically developed a strategy for stakeholder engagement in its own right. In this article, we analyze the emergence of this strategy. Employing the concept “politics of legitimation,” we examine how and for what reasons stakeholder engagement was introduced, justified, and finally endorsed, as well as its effects. The article explores the process of institutionalizing stakeholder engagement, as well as reconstructing the contestation of the operative norms (membership, tasks, and accountability) regulating the rules for this engagement. We conclude by discussing the broader importance of the findings for IPBES, as well as for international expert organizations in general.

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    Stakeholder engagement in the making: IPBES legitimization politics
  • 20. Gouldson, Andrew
    et al.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Wester-Herber, Misse
    The battle for hearts and minds?: Evolutions in corporate approaches to environmental risk communication2007In: Environment and Planning. C, Government and Policy, ISSN 0263-774X, E-ISSN 1472-3425, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 56-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been a great deal of discussion on the potential for a shift away from modernistic or technocratic approaches to decisionmaking on risk towards more open, inclusive, and deliberative approaches. The authors consider (a) the reasons why some companies have taken the first step in this transition by exploring the potential of more open and communicative approaches to environmental risk management, and (b) the effects that opening up can have, particularly on perceived levels of trust between corporations and stakeholders on matters relating to environmental risk. For the companies surveyed, the nature of their activities, the significance of formative events, and the failure of more traditional forms of risk communication to reduce conflict and to build trust amongst stakeholders have impelled them to experiment with new approaches to risk communication. It is found that, in the short term, such experiments are seen by managers to have had mixed effects: in contexts where trust had already been lost, open engagement can lead to an initial deterioration in relations between companies and stakeholders. However, it is also argued that in the longer term trust can be built through such open engagements. It is suggested, therefore, that opening up and engaging on matters relating to environmental risk may lead to a ‘j-curve effect’, with an initial deterioration in levels of trust being followed by a gradual improvement in levels of credibility and shared understanding over time.

  • 21. Gouldson, Andrew
    et al.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Wester-Herber, Misse
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    The battle for hearts and minds?: Evolutions in organizational approaches to environmental risk communication2004Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Larsson, Stig
    Dealing with uncertainty: a case study of controlling insect populations in natural ecosystems2008In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 13, no 7, p. 641-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the political process for handling an outbreak of an insect causing human allergic reactions. In the southern part of the Swedish island Gotland in the Baltic Sea, an outbreak of the northern pine processionary moth, Thaumetopoea pinivora,

    has occurred. With regard to the human nuisance and long-term effects on the tourist industry, demands have been raised for intervention to reduce and control the insect population. At the same time, there have been warnings against treating the insect

    population because there are knowledge gaps concerning the wider ecological consequences, including effects on biodiversity. This paper analyses the political process and its problemsolving

    efforts. Of particular interest is how it dealt with the issue of uncertainty. It was found that the uncertainty associated with the issue hindered the development of a shared understanding of the problem and a possible solution. There seems to be a growing need in society to develop the institutional capacity to handle complex issues that cross different sectors, regulatory frameworks and policy targets.

  • 23. Grennfelt, Peringe
    et al.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Lindau, Lars
    Maas, Rob
    Raes, Frank
    Sundqvist, Göran
    Arnell, Jenny
    Towards robust European air pollution policies: constrains and prospects for a wider dialogue between scientists, experts, decision-makers and citizens : a workshop report2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The international regulation of transboundary air pollution in Europe is often considered a success story. The success is usually explained by a close relationship between scientists and policy makers. When looking into other international environmental areas (e.g. climate change, marine pollution), there have generally been larger obstacles in the science-policy relationships. Social scientists have for many years studied the international policy development processes for air pollution and pointed to certain factors of importance in for its success. There have however seldom been opportunities for social scientists, policy makers and scientists to discuss together the interrelations between science and policy in the area.

    In order to further evaluate the science policy interactions and discuss possibilities for social scientists to play a role in the further development of air pollution strategies a workshop was organised in Gothenburg, Sweden 5-7 October 2005. The workshop was organised by the Swedish ASTA programme and the EU Network of Excellence ACCENT in collaboration with the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution and the EU CAFE initiative. Approximately 35 participants from 12 countries representing Europe, North America and Japan attended at the workshop. This report compiles the outcome of the workshop. The report is also available at http://asta.ivl.se/

  • 24.
    Gustafsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Var är vi hemma?: Bostadens och det offentliga livets förändrade betydelse2007In: I&M. Invandrare & minoriteter, ISSN 1404-6857, Vol. 34, no 4-5, p. 15-18Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Människor är både olika och söker umgänge på olika sätt. Skillnader i kultur och behov kräver variation i stadsplaneringen och olika stadsformer. Detta för att främja det spontana, offentliga liv, som behövs för att motverka xenofobin.

  • 25.
    Gustafsson, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Acknowledging risk, trusting expertise, and coping with uncertainty: citizens’ deliberation on spraying an insect population2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In southern Gotland in the Baltic Sea, a moth outbreak has caused human nuisance & possible long-term effects on the tourist industry, prompting demands for intervention to reduce the insect population. At the same time, there have been warnings concerning the broader ecological consequences of spraying, not least for biodiversity. Through an interview study using a sample of local residents, their deliberations on the spraying are analyzed. In particular, the analysis focuses on the lay understanding of the situation & how this relates to a scientific understanding of it, its causes, & possible remedies. The study focuses on the narratives residents created to make sense of the situation and guide action, on the risks they associated with different action options, & on how these narratives relate to the expert view of the problem. The analysis shows that trust & distrust should not be seen as dichotomous, but must be more differentiated. Simultaneously, as the residents criticize specific knowledge claims & specific experts, their trust in science can strengthen. Furthermore, the analysis shows that citizen knowledge does not merely passively reflect science. Instead, citizens create meaning and construct knowledge by organizing personal experience and articulated knowledge claims into coherent narratives.

  • 26.
    Gustafsson, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Acknowledging risk, trusting expertise, and coping with uncertainty: citizens' deliberations on spraying an insect population2012In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 587-601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The basis for this article is the growing interest in understanding how the public evaluates risk issues. The empirical case consists of an interview study of residents in an area that has experienced an outbreak of moths that has become a nuisance to humans. The study focuses on the narratives created by the residents to make sense of the situation, the risks they associated with regulatory options, and how these narratives relate to expert opinions of the problem. The analysis shows that the residents criticize specific experts and knowledge claims. This is done, however, without questioning science as such; there is still a belief among the residents that science is an institution that generally produces valid knowledge. The analysis also shows that citizen knowledge does not merely passively reflect science. Instead, citizens create meaning and construct knowledge by organizing personal experiences and knowledge claims into coherent narratives.

  • 27.
    Gustafsson, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Boundary work, hybrid practices and portable representations: an analysis of global and national co-productions of Red Lists2013In: Nature and Culture, ISSN 1558-6073, E-ISSN 1558-5468, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 30-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For many countries, the IUCN Red List of threatened species is a central instrument in their work to counteract loss of biodiversity. This article analyzes the development of the Red List categories and criteria, how these categories and criteria are used in the construction of global, national, and regional red lists, and how the red lists are employed in policy work. A central finding of the article is that this mix of actors implies many different forms of boundary work. This article also finds that the Red List functions as a portable representation, that is, a context-independent instrument to represent nature. A third finding is that the Red List functions as a link between experts and policy makers. Thus, the Red List is best understood as a boundary object and hybrid practice where the credibility of scientific assessment and a specific policy is mutually strengthened

  • 28.
    Gustafsson, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Boundary work, hybrid practices, and portablel representations: an analysis of global and national co-production of Red Lists.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Gustafsson, Karin M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Berg, Monika
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Löfmarck, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Intersectional boundary work in socializing new experts: The case of IPBES2019In: Ecosystems and People, ISSN 2639-5908, E-ISSN 2639-5916, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 181-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expert organizations are often described as facilitators of the interactions between science and policy. In managing this boundary, they must also manage other boundaries, such as those between different knowledge systems and between different categories of actors. However, how this intersectional boundary work is performed, and what it implies, is still unexplored territory. Focusing on the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), this study contributes knowledge on the intersectionality of boundary work and how it influences the production of global policy-relevant knowledge. This is done by examining how IPBES socializes junior experts to become senior experts. This socialization process makes a number of norms and ideals visible and enables an analysis of how the know- how of boundary work is passed forward from one generation of experts to the next. The study analyzes three boundaries: between senior and junior experts, between science and policy, and between scientific knowledge and indigenous and local knowledge. The findings show how intersectional boundary work is crucial in the creation of expert organizations and policy-relevant knowledge. In the case of IPBES, this study shows how the institutionalization of the organization unintentionally has created restrictions for the boundary work between different knowledge systems.

  • 30.
    Gustafsson, Karin M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Environmental Sociology Section.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Environmental Sociology Section.
    Boundary organizations and environmental governance: Performance, institutional design, and conceptual development2018In: Climate Risk Management, E-ISSN 2212-0963, Vol. 19, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept boundary organization has been introduced to identify and explain a specific way of organizing the interface between science and policy. Although the original meaning of the concept has been criticized, the term has come to be frequently used in studies of knowledge transfer and science-policy relations. This usage constitutes the reason for this paper, which investigates how the concept of boundary organization has come to be used and defined and explores its contribution to the discussion of the organization of the science-policy interplay. The analysis finds that despite its spread and usage, the concept boundary organization does not refer to any specific form of organization and does not per se give any guidance about how to organize science-policy interplay. Instead, boundary organization is mainly used as an empirical label when studying the governance of expertise and the management of science-policy interfaces. This finding is also true for studies of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which describe that organization as a boundary organization without saying anything about what that label means in terms of institutional design and practical implications. However, to label an organization as a boundary organization nevertheless works performatively; it shapes an organization’s identity, may provide legitimacy, and can also stabilize the interactions between it and other organizations. Therefore, boundary organization is an important concept, but primarily as a way to facilitate interaction. Thus, the focus of research should be on analyzing how the concept is used and what its implications are for the organization studied.

  • 31.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. CESSS-Center for Environmental and Sustainability Social Science.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Environmental Sociology Section.
    Expertise for policy-relevant knowledge: IPBES’s epistemic infrastructure and guidance to make environmental assessment2023In: Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences, ISSN 1943-815X, E-ISSN 1943-8168, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 2187844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizations conducting global environmental assessments (GEAs) face the challenge of not only producing trustworthy and policy-relevant knowledge but also recruiting and training experts to conduct these GEAs. These experts must acquire the skills and competencies needed to produce knowledge assessments. By adopting an institutional approach, this paper explores IPBES’s epistemic infrastructure that aims to communicate and form the expertise that is needed to conduct its assessments. The empirical material consists of IPBES’s educational material, which teaches new experts how to perform the assessment. The analysis finds three crucial tasks that experts introduced in the assessments are expected to learn and perform. The paper concludes by discussing the broader importance of the findings that organizations that conduct GEAs are not passive intermediaries of knowledge but instead, through their epistemic infrastructure, generate ways to understand and navigate the world, both for those who create and those who receive the assessment report.

  • 32.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Environmental Sociology Section.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Environmental Sociology Section.
    Organizing international experts: IPBES’s efforts to gain epistemic authority2018In: Environmental Sociology, ISSN 2325-1042, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 445-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What role do organizational preconditions play in the constitution of expertise? This is the guiding question for this paper, which studies how expertise is shaped in the Intergovernmental Science–Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). By organizing the world’s experts on biodiversity, IPBES sets out to produce policy-relevant knowledge. However, in contrast to many other international expert bodies such as the IPCC, IPBES assesses not only scientific knowledge, but also other forms of knowledge, including indigenous and local knowledge. In light of IPBES’s ambition to become an epistemic authority by synthesizing heterogeneous knowledge forms, it is of great interest to investigate how this expertise is constructed. What does ‘expertise’ mean for IPBES, and how are experts selected? Based on documents studies, this study explores the organizational structure through which IPBES assesses and selects experts. The analysis finds that the construction of expertise involves scientific as well as political dimensions. In the conclusions, problems are raised that are related to the outcome of this process and may threaten the epistemic authority of IPBES.

  • 33.
    Hulme, Mike
    et al.
    Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    White, James M.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Standring, Adam
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Social scientific knowledge in times of crisis: What climate change can learn from coronavirus (and vice versa)2020In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, ISSN 1757-7780, E-ISSN 1757-7799, Vol. 11, no 4, article id e656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crisis, by its very nature, requires decisive intervention. However, important questions can be obscured by the very immediacy of the crisis condition.  What is the nature of the crisis? How it is defined (and by whom)?  And, subsequently, what forms of knowledge are deemed legitimate and authoritative for informing interventions?  As we see in the current pandemic, there is a desire for immediate answers and solutions during periods of uncertainty. Policymakers and publics grasp for techno-scientific solutions, as though the technical nature of the crisis is self-evident. What is often obscured by this impulse is the contingent, conjunctural and ultimately social nature of these crises.  The danger here is that by focussing on immediate technical goals, unanticipated secondary effects are produced.  These either exacerbate the existing crisis or else produce subsequent further crises.  Equally, these technical goals can conceal the varied, and often unjust, distribution of risk exposure and resources and capacities for mitigation present within and between societies.  These socio-political factors all have important functions in determining the effectiveness of interventions. As with climate change, the unfolding response to the COVID-19 pandemic underscores the importance of broadening the knowledge base beyond technical considerations.  Only by including social scientific knowledge is it possible to understand the social nature of the crises we face.  Only then is it possible to develop effective, just and legitimate responses.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Social scientific knowledge in times of crisis: What climate change can learn from coronavirus (and vice versa)
  • 34.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Do Conceptual Innovations Facilitate Transformative Change? The Case of Biodiversity Governance2021In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 8, article id 612211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores to what extent and in what ways conceptual innovations matter for biodiversity governance. A three-step analysis is employed, starting with identifying theoretical insights on how concepts matter for transformative change. These insights provide a lens for examining the academic debate on the Ecosystem Services concept and for identifying critical conceptual challenges related to transformative change. Finally, how the concept is used and valued in policy practice is explored through an empirical study of policy practitioners in Sweden. Based on this investigation we conclude that the ES concept holds important but restricted properties for transformative change. The ES concept provides new meanings in the form of economic valuation of nature, but these remain highly contested and difficult to practice; ES function as a boundary object, but poorly integrates social analysis and, in practice engages professionals, rather than resulting in more inclusive public participation; and ES function performatively by reflecting a technocratic ideal and raising awareness rather than targeting fundamental political challenges. Finally, the paper returns to the general questions of how conceptual innovations can generate transformative change and argues that in the continued work of conceptually developing the Nature’s Contribution to People, researchers and practitioners need to pay close attention to interpretive frames, political dimensions, and institutional structures, necessitating a strong role for social analysis in this process of conceptual innovation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Do Conceptual Innovations Facilitate Transformative Change?
  • 35.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Environmental Sociology Section.
    Policy Contestation over the Ecosystem Services Approach in Sweden2018In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 393-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecosystem services (ES) is an important approach to biodiversity protection in political rhetoric and policy practice, but it is also highly contested. This paper analyzes the introduction of ES in Swedish environmental policy and how it is contested by key stakeholders, and discusses its implications for biodiversity governance. The results show that although ES is widely accepted on an abstract and conceptual level, critical features and functions are highly contested. These primarily concern the valuation of nature, and the appropriateness of different policy instruments and institutional structures. The paper concludes that while the controversy surrounding ES fills an important role by reinvigorating debate and stimulating reflections on biodiversity loss, it also illustrates how ES is used to further particular values and beliefs and to challenge traditional biodiversity-protecting strategies. Understanding these policy controversies is central to addressing the challenges of transforming the promises of ES into practical policies. 

  • 36.
    Höijer, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Thornberg, Lars
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    News media and food scares: the case of contaminated salmon2006In: Environmental Sciences, ISSN 1569-3430, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 273-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2004, Science published a study on organic contaminants in farmed salmon. The study had a clear normative message and worked strategically and successfully to gain worldwide media attention. In this article, we investigate global media coverage of the study. The varying types of attention and different framings of selected national broadsheets in 14 countries are analysed. (Framing is where a complex and often uncertain reality is simplified in order to support a specific understanding of the issue and/or push an agenda.) The results show that even if the scientists and the sponsor of the study had a clear ambition to publicize and disseminate their results and normative proposals to the wider society, the newspapers did not act as a passive medium for distributing the original message. Instead, diverging understandings and framings were developed. By way of conclusion, it is stated that ambitious strategies for attracting media attention may be successful in terms of media coverage; this does not, however, mean that the message is passively transmitted. The national context and the logic of media cause issues to be framed in specific ways with the aim of telling stories and catching the attention of the reader.

  • 37.
    Höijer, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Facing dilemmas: sense-making and decision-making in late modernity2006In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 350-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today the certainties of modernity are dissolving and there is little guidance on how to act. In late modernity, individuals and organisations are forced to take standpoints and make choices on the basis of uncertain knowledge and diverse views. It is argued that we therefore often are confronted with dilemmas. In this article, the concept of dilemma is presented as a way to understand and analyse processes of sense-making and decision-making by contemporary institutions and people. With reference to various current meanings, the concept of dilemma is elaborated and a definition is proposed that encompasses both the cognitive-emotional and the socio-cultural side of dilemma. Emphasising this duality, a research approach is suggested for empirically analysing the multidimensional dilemmas people and institutions are confronted with in late modernity. By way of conclusion, it is stated that the challenge is to not only acknowledge dilemmas, but to use them as means for opening up spaces where stakeholders can deliberate upon desirable futures.

  • 38.
    Jetzkowitz, Jens
    et al.
    Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Methods of empirical social research and statistics, Helmut Schmidt University, Hamburg, Germany.
    van Koppen, C. S. A. Kris
    Environmental Policy, Department of Social Sciences, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ott, Konrad
    Department of Philosophy, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Voget-Kleschin, Lieske
    Department of Philosophy, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Wong, Cathrine Mei Ling
    Maison des Sciences Humaines, Porte des Sciences, Institute of Geography and Spatial Planning, Université du Luxembourg, Esch-Belval, Luxembourg.
    The significance of meaning: Why IPBES needs the social sciences and humanities2018In: Innovation. The European Journal of Social Science Research, ISSN 1351-1610, E-ISSN 1469-8412, Vol. 31, no S1, p. 38-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term “biodiversity” is often used to describe phenomena of nature, which can be studied without a reference to the socially constructed, evaluative, or indeed normative contexts. In our paper, we challenge this conception by focusing particularly on methodological aspects of biodiversity research. We thereby engage with the idea of interdisciplinary biodiversity research as a scientific approach directed at the recognition and management of contemporary society in its ecological embedding. By doing this, we explore how research on and assessments of biodiversity can be enhanced if meaning, aspiration, desires, and related aspects of agency are methodically taken into account. In six sections, we substantiate our claim that the discourse on biodiversity (including the IPBES (Intergovernmental science-policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services) debate) is incomplete without contributions from the social sciences and humanities. In the introduction, a brief overview of biodiversity’s conceptual history is provided showing that “biodiversity” is a lexical invention intended to create a strong political momentum. However, that does not impede its usability as a research concept. Section 2 examines the origins of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) by way of sociological discourse analysis. Subsequently, it proposes a matrix as a means to structure the ambiguities and tensions inherent in the CBD. The matrix reemphasizes our main thesis regarding the need to bring social and ethical expertise to the biodiversity discourse. In Section 3, we offer a brief sketch of the different methods of the natural and social sciences as well as ethics. This lays the groundwork for our Section 4, which explains and illustrates what social sciences and ethics can contribute to biodiversity research. Section 5 turns from research to politics and argues that biodiversity governance necessitates deliberative discourses in which participation of lay people plays an important role. Section 6 provides our conclusions.

  • 39.
    Johansson, Björn
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Det känslosamma våldet?: Sociologiska aspekter på förnuft, känsla och våld1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Johansson, Björn
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Det meningsfyllda våldet: staden, våldet och det rituella handlandet1997Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Johansson, J.
    et al.
    School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Constructing and justifying risk and accountability after extreme events: public administration and stakeholders’ responses to a wildfire disaster2020In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 353-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impacts of extreme weather events, causing severe storms and wildfires, cascade across administrative borders within a country, challenging the steering capacity of governance networks at different political scales. This paper examines how accountability and risk were constructed and negotiated in the aftermath of Sweden’s largest wildfire. It draws on results from an interview study with executives of organizations and landowners involved, and an analysis of government reports about the wildfire’s cause and consequences. Although the fire was human-caused, public administrative bodies paid considerable attention to the local emergency services and their poor handling of the wildfire, caused by lack of knowledge of forest fire behavior. The study confirms many of the challenges associated with governance networks. It finds that issues about who to hold accountable, in what forum and for what issue are not fully addressed, being overwhelmed by demands for better knowledge of forest fire prevention and improved coordination and collaboration. To conclude, the paper calls for a better-informed public administration, forest sector and interrelated networks that take responsibility for their actions or lack thereof.

  • 42.
    Klapwijk, M. J.
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Boberg, J.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Mycology and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bergh, J.
    Linnaeus University, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology, Växsjö, Sweden.
    Bishop, K.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources and Assessment, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Björkman, C.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ellison, D.
    Ellison Consulting, Baar, Switzerland; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Resource Management, Umeå, Sweden.
    Felton, A.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lundmark, T.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Umeå, Sweden.
    Keskitalo, E. C. H.
    Umeå University, Department of Geography and Economic History, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sonesson, J.
    Skogforsk, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordin, A.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nordström, E. -M
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Resource Management, Umeå, Sweden.
    Stenlid, J.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Mycology and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mårald, E.
    Umeå University, Department of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies, Umeå, Sweden.
    Capturing complexity: Forests, decision-making and climate change mitigation action2018In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 52, p. 238-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Managed forests can play an important role in climate change mitigation due to their capacity to sequester carbon. However, it has proven difficult to harness their full potential for climate change mitigation. Managed forests are often referred to as socio-ecological systems as the human dimension is an integral part of the system. When attempting to change systems that are influenced by factors such as collective knowledge, social organization, understanding of the situation and values represented in society, initial intentions often shift due to the complexity of political, social and scientific interactions. Currently, the scientific literature is dispersed over the different factors related to the socio-ecological system. To examine the level of dispersion and to obtain a holistic view, we review climate change mitigation in the context of Swedish forest research. We introduce a heuristic framework to understand decision-making connected to climate change mitigation. We apply our framework to two themes which span different dimensions in the socio-ecological system: carbon accounting and bioenergy. A key finding in the literature was the perception that current uncertainties regarding the reliability of different methods of carbon accounting inhibits international agreement on the use of forests for climate change mitigation. This feeds into a strategic obstacle affecting the willingness of individual countries to implement forest-related carbon emission reduction policies. Decisions on the utilization of forests for bioenergy are impeded by a lack of knowledge regarding the resultant biophysical and social consequences. This interacts negatively with the development of institutional incentives regarding the production of bioenergy using forest products. Normative disagreement about acceptable forest use further affects these scientific discussions and therefore is an over-arching influence on decision-making. With our framework, we capture this complexity and make obstacles to decision-making more transparent to enable their more effective resolution. We have identified the main research areas concerned with the use of managed forest in climate change mitigation and the obstacles that are connected to decision making.

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    Capturing complexity: Forests, decision-making and climate change mitigation action
  • 43.
    Leonard, Llewellyn
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of South Africa (UNISA), Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Conditions and Constrains for Reflexive Governance of Industrial Risks: The Case of the South Durban Industrial Basin, South Africa2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 10, p. 1-19, article id 5679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within sustainability development paradigms, state governance is considered important in interventions to address risks produced by the industrial society. However, there is largely a lack of understanding, especially in the Global South, about the nature and workings of the governance institutions necessary to tackle risks effectively. Reflexive governance, as a new mode of governance, has been developed as a way to be more inclusive and more reflexive and respond to complex risks. Conversely, there is limited scholarly work that has examined the theoretical and empirical foundations of this governance approach, especially how it may unfold in the Global South. This paper explores the conditions and constrains for reflexive governance in a particular case: that of the South Durban Industrial Basin. South Durban is one of the most polluted regions in southern Africa and has been the most active industrial site of contention between local residents and industry and government during apartheid and into the new democracy. Empirical analysis found a number of constrains involved in enabling reflexive governance. It also found that a close alliance between government and industry to promote economic development has overshadowed social and environmental protection. Reflexive governance practitioners need to be cognisant of its applicability across diverse geographic settings and beyond western notions of reflexive governance.

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    Conditions and Constrains for Reflexive Governance of Industrial Risks: The Case of the South Durban Industrial Basin, South Africa
  • 44.
    Leonard, Llewellyn
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Science, University of South Africa, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Industrial scientific expertise and civil society engagement: Reflexive scientisation in the South Durban Industrial Basin, South Africa2021In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 1127-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the significance of scientific expertise is often proposed and empirically illustrated in academic literature, it is still unclear how environmental expertise becomes authoritative, and how its legitimacy can be challenged. In order to understand the interplay between scientific expertise and civil society engagement, this paper examines how industrial scientific expertise has worked with surrounding communities and civil society to inform scientific decisions, and for the co-creation of scientific knowledge formations. A particular case is analysed, that of the South Durban Industrial Basin in KwaZulu-Natal. This area comprises a mixed use of residential areas juxtaposed with heavy industries. Scientific expertise, especially within the industrial sectors, is therefore important in the prevention, alleviation and management of risks to residents, society and the environment. The study finds that there is poor engagement between scientific expertise with communities and civil society, not least when it comes to environmental issues. A reason for this is poor governance, enforcement and leadership with an overriding objective of industrial expansion for economic development by both government and industry. Another reason is that, with a few exceptions, the communities have mainly been concerned about socio-economic issues. This has resulted in a double bind, where scientific expertise and government have not shared environmental information with civil society at the same as the civil society, has not on the whole requested it.

  • 45.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Daniel Sjödin, "Tryggare kan ingen vara [Children of the heavenly father]: Migration, religion och integration i en segregerad omgivning [Migration, religion and integration in a segregated environment]", Lund Dissertation in sociology 982011In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, E-ISSN 2002-066X, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 73-75Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Den farliga staden: Om rädslan för det okända och möjligheten att skapa trygghet segregering2014In: Från skuggsidan: folk och förbrytelser ur Stockholms historia / [ed] Lennartsson, Rebecka, Stockholm: Stockholmia förlag, 2014, p. 11-20Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Medierna rapporterar dagligen om våldsbrott och människors otrygghet att vistas i stadsrummet. Frågan om skapandet av trygga och säkra städer fått en allt högre prioritet bland såväl offentliga som privata aktörer. Det ställs krav på ordning och säkerhet, till exempel genom fler poliser och ordningsvakter, starkare social kontroll och kameraövervakning av tunnlar och allmänna platser. Säkerhetstänkandet har spridit sig i samhället, detta trots att brottsstatistiken inte visar på någon ökad brottslighet. Istället pekar många forskare på att vi håller på att utveckla en rädslokultur i samhället, där staden starkt förknippas med brott, våld och otrygghet, våld. En rädslokultur som hotar stadens integrerande funktioner. Bland annat är olika typer av segregation och utanförskap ett stort hot mot stadens kvaliteter: det som kortsiktigt kan skapa individuell trygghet kan långsiktigt leda till kollektiv otrygghet.

    Denna situation utgör utgångspunkt för denna text som diskuterar hur en stad samtidigt kan vara öppen och trygg, innehålla såväl fredliga som konfliktfyllda möten samt omfatta kulturell mångfald och gemensamma normer. Med hjälp av urbansociologiska anknytningar visar jag på hur staden historiskt sett kännetecknas av mångfald, hur konflikter och kontroverser har hanterats fredligt och hur en social ordning gradvis utvecklats där vi lärt oss samspela med människor som inte delar våra intressen och livsstil. Det största hotet mot staden är kanske inte en tilltagande brottslighet, utan vår rädsla för det okända och de avgränsade liv många av oss lever där vi endast möte de som är lika mig själv?

  • 47.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Eco-standards, product labelling and green consumerism2010In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 190-191Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Extreme events, regulatory style and regional environmental governance2013In: Comparing Regional Environmental Governance in East Asia and Europe (EE-REG): Proceedings / [ed] Jörg Balsiger, Aysun Uyar, Kyoto, Japan, 2013, p. 53-61Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Extreme events are increasingly prominent in society. Both experienced environmental catastrophes, such as hurricanes, droughts and flooding and anticipated ones (such as the consequences of climate change) are reported in the media, discussed in public arenas and negotiated about in political discussions. The focus is both on how to mitigate the events that occur and how to minimize the consequences of those events that it is assumed will occur (by developing adaptation capacity and coping strategies).

    A changing climate has widespread consequences, for example extreme weather. An important task is to decrease exposure and vulnerability, and increase the resilience of systems in order to minimize the adverse effects of climate-related extreme events. Even if many extreme events cannot be avoided or mitigated, regulation can make systems more robust.

    This presentation focuses on extreme events and their regulation. Three questions are in focus: What is an extreme event? To what extent are they preventable or at least manageable? And, what role do regions play in regulating extreme events?

  • 49.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Främlingars mötesplats2007In: I&M. Invandrare & minoriteter, ISSN 1404-6857, no 2, p. 5-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I staden möts människor med olika kulturer, normer, livsstilar. I samspelet med främlingar på gator och torg lär man sig hantera kulturell olikhet. Dessa möten kan leda till konflikter, men även till översyn av den egna personliga identiteten.

  • 50.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Governing moth and man: political strategies to manage demands for spraying2010In: Études rurales, ISSN 0014-2182, no 185, p. 149-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the political process for handling the outbreak of an insect causing human allergic reactions. Given the human nuisance and possible long-term damage to the tourist industry, the affected populace demanded spraying to reduce and control the insect population. However, there were warnings against such a treatment because of gaps in knowledge of its wider ecological consequences, not least its effects on biodiversity.Key actors were interviewed to investigate their understanding of the problem and how they tried to make it governable. The point of departure is that regulation not only governs specific objects, but is also deeply involved in their construction. The empirical analysis investigates involved actors’ conceptualizations of the problem and the proposed remedy. Despite local residents’ demands for spraying, public agencies took no substantial action to control the insect population, but instead deliberately acted to manage the local population’s claim-making. Thus, what took place was a process of governing not just moths, but men too.

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