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  • 1.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Kronlid, David
    Uppsala universitet.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Östman, Leif
    Uppsala universitet.
    Pragmatiska studier av meningsskapande2008Inngår i: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 17, nr 3, s. 11-24Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the article is to present a pragmatic approach for studies of meaning-making used in the articles of this issue. The approach, which is developed within the SMEDgroup (Studies of Meaning-making in Educational Discourses), mainly builds on the writings of John Dewey, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Michel Foucault. A common ambition for the researchers in SMED is to enable studies and discussions on questions concerning how meanings are made in people’s actions. Another ambition is to carry out these studies beyond assumptions of dualism, essentialism, causality and determinism. In this perspective learning and socialization are viewed in a communicative perspective. We argue in the article that our approach makes it possible, and important, to study meaning-making in action in different kinds of educational practices.

     

  • 2.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Kronlid, David
    Uppsala universitet.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Östman, Leif
    Uppsala universitet.
    Tema: Didaktiska undersökningar2008Inngår i: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 17, nr 3, s. 5-10Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    En presentation av det didaktiska angreppssättet som ligger till grund för temat Didaktiska undersökningar i Utbildning och demokrati nr 3, 2008.

  • 3.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Meckbach, Jane
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    How Wii Teach Physical Education and Health2016Inngår i: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 6, nr 4, s. 1-16Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

     The use of educational computer games in physical education (PE) has become more popular in recent years and has attracted research interest. The aim of the article is to investigate how physical activities and images of the human body are offered by the game. The results show how the “teacher” constituted in the games is one who instructs and encourages the players to exercise and think about their bodies, but not a “teacher” who can help students to investigate, argue, or discuss images of health and the human body. We argue that the use of a wide range and variety of ways of teaching would make the teaching richer and offer a deeper understanding about the body and health.

  • 4.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Is There (Any)Body in Science Education?2015Inngår i: Interchange, ISSN 0826-4805, E-ISSN 1573-1790, Vol. 46, nr 4, s. 439-453Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we develop and use a comparative approach for studies of the role of the body in meaning making processes in science education (SE). In debates about learning, the discussion often centres on how to explore the relation between body and mind. For example, many studies either focus on changes of bodily behaviour or on changes of people’s conceptions and ideas. In a pragmatic perspective on learning it is not possible to envision an ontological distinction between body and mind. By comparing video recordings of physical education lessons, we have studied the role of the body in meaning making processes in SE. The results show that the body is used and constituted in different ways in the analysed situations and how the participants use artefacts in order to do things in a way that would not otherwise be possible. Furthermore, we argue that the comparative approach developed in the article, together with the results of the study, can be used by teachers in their discussions about teaching in relation to different educational objectives and content.

  • 5. Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro universitet, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Östman, Leif
    Pragmatic investigation: studies of meaning-making in educational practices2008Konferansepaper (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this paper is to present and discuss a pragmatic approach for studies of meaning-making in different educational practices. The approach – built on a framework developed within the SMED-group (Studies of Meaning-making in Educational Discourses) at the universities of Uppsala and Örebro – is illustrated in a number of empirical studies. The main point of departure in the studies is taken in pragmatic curriculum theory and sociocultural perspectives on learning, and is inspired mainly by John Dewey, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Michel Foucault. A special focus is directed to communication practices and content selection within Physical education, Environmental education and Science education. A common ambition is to offer a language that enables studies and discussions on questions concerning how meanings are made in people’s actions. Another ambition is to make these investigations beyond assumptions of dualisms, essentialism, causality and determinism. In this perspective learning and socialisation is viewed in communicative perspective. Therefore, many of the studies are built on video recorded classroom conversations, but also on analysis of various kinds of written texts. We argue in the paper that this approach makes it possible to study meaning-making – learning and socialisation – in different kinds of educational practices.

  • 6.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    How Wii teach Physical Education and Health2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The potential use of exergames in Physical Education and Health is surrounded by a growing discussion among practitioners, policy makers and researchers focusing on different expectations about the games. In this discussion there is, however, a need to further include issues about the learning content offered by these games, how the content is expected to be taught and about the potential consequences the use of games may have for learning and socialisation. This study focus on how meanings about health and the human body are offered by the game: What kind of teaching is delegated to the artifact when used in Physical Education and Health?

    Focus of inquiry

    The aim of this article is to investigate how images of health and the human body and are taught by using exergames.

    Analytical framework and Research methods

    The empirical study builds on the use of an analytical tool called “Epistemological move analysis”. Studies of teaching and learning have shown how teachers use different kinds of actions (for example instructive, confirming, re-orienting, generative, re-constructive and evaluative moves) in order to try to direct the meaning making in educational settings. In this study, these categories are used, developed and specified in the context of teaching in Physical Education and Health. The empirical material used consists of video recordings from sessions where the games Wii Fit Plus and EA Sports Active were played.

    Research findings

    The results of the analyses show how the games offer different kinds of epistemological moves: Instructive moves about the fit body and how to play the game, re-orienting moves used in order to help the players to modify their action towards a more relevant and effective way, generative moves used to help the players to think about how to play the game and confirming move about the players’ gaming. In sum, the “teacher” constituted in the game is a teachers who instructs, confirms and encourages the players to move and exercise their bodies. But it is not a teacher who, in contrast to teaching in other contexts, is able to help the learners to make investigations or to participate in argumentation and discussion about for example images of health and the human body. Teaching in these games is constituted as a behavioral modification focused on an idea about a pre-defined and ideal body not expected to be discussed in education.

  • 7.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Meckbach, Jane
    GIH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    What do Wii teach in PE?2012Inngår i: ECER 2012, The Need for Educational Research to Champion Freedom, Education and Development for All, 2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In society, video- and computer games are often pointed out as risk factors in relation to physical inactivity, sedentary behaviour as well as increasing levels of obesity. At the same time, computers are an important source of knowledge where IT-competence and IT-experience provide pronounced advantages in society. 

    In the middle of this paradox a new type of videogames is introduced, where body movement and physical activity constitute the central element. These games, so called exergames or active video games, are games where physical movement is involved in the game through the use of for example balance-boards, step-up boards and dance-pads. Exergames are now more and more put forward in several countries as interesting tools to use in physical education in order to stimulate young people to be physically active.

    In a recent review and synthesis of research on video games and health, Papastergiou (2009) strongly argues that videogames can offer ”potential benefits as educational tools for Health Education and Physical Education, and that those games may improve young people’s knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours in relation to health and physical exercise” (Papastergiou, 2009, p 603). However, Vander Schee and Boyles (2010) argue that exergames rather should be seen as a body pedagogy producing certain narrow meanings about health, and that the uncritical implementation of exergames in school is a problematic way to place commercial products in school. Consequently, there are differences in views regarding exergames in educational settings that are worth paying attention to in research about people’s learning about the body, physical activity and health.

    The aim of this paper is to investigate how images of the human body are expected to be learned when using exergames.

    The use of artifacts – physical objects made by humans – is a central part of human life. In fact, there are many activities that would not be possible to perform without the use of them. In schools, students learn to use paper and pencils, computers, vaulting-horses, footballs and so on. How and why artifacts are supposed to be used in educational settings is however not given beforehand (Cuban 1986). The use of artifacts mediates certain meanings about the view of learning and the goals and choices of content in education (Almqvist 2005, Quennerstedt et al in press).  

    In this paper, we will use discourse analytical strategies in order to analyse how meanings about the body are expected to be learned when playing exergames. The discourse analytical strategies involve an interest in how processes of discourse constitute how we experience or relate to ourselves as well as our environment (Laclau & Mouffe 1985). Discourses constitute what is possible to say or do as partial and temporal fixations (Foucault 1980). These fixations are imbued with power, values and ideologies. As Evans and colleagues argue: “/…/ health beliefs, perceptions and definitions of illness are constructed, represented and reproduced through language that is culturally specific, ideologically laden and never value free” (Evans et al 2008 p 46).

     

    Method

    To investigate what these games offer we have explored the manuals, the content, the animations of the games as well as the instructions and comments offered during game play. The empirical material consists of exergames most commonly used in schools: Wii fit and Wii sports (sports active). In the discourse analysis we have explored what is taken for granted in the empirical material in relation to other possible ways to argue. In this way we can explore what is included and excluded in the games and what is possible to think and act in relation to statements concerning the body.

     

    Expected Outcomes

    The analysis shows how the logic of the game, its animations, instructions and feedback to the player, constitutes the ideal body as a physically active, well-balanced, slim and strong body. The use of the game, the balance board and the hand control, makes it possible to measure and register how the player follows this logic. The analysis also shows how the way the player is supposed to learn about the body is strongly influenced by behaviorism. In the paper we argue that this way of learning about the body is narrow and limited and that it is important to critically discuss the effects of the use of these games in schools.

     

    References

    Almqvist, Jonas (2005). Learning and artefacts. On the use of information technology in educational settings. Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis. Cuban, Larry (1986). Teachers and machines. The classroom use of technology since 1920. New York: Teachers College Press. Evans, John, Rich Emma & Davies Bryan (2008). Education, disordered eating and obesity discourse: Fat fabrications. London: Routledge Foucault, Michel (1980). Power/knowledge. Selected interviews & other writings 1972-1977. New York: Pantheon Books. Laclau, Ernesto & Mouffe, Chantal (1985). Hegemony and socialist strategy. Towards a radical democratic politics. London: Verso. Papastergiou, Marina (2009). Exploring the potential of computer and video games for health and physical education: A literature review. Computers & Education, 53(3), 603-622. Quennerstedt, Mikael, Almqvist, Jonas & Öhman, Marie (in press). Keep your eye on the ball. Investigating artifacts in physical education. Interchange. Vander Schee, Carolyn J. & Boyles, Deron (2010): ‘Exergaming,’ corporate interests and the crisis discourse of childhood obesity. Sport, Education and Society, 15(2), 169-185.

  • 8.
    Armour, Kathleen
    et al.
    School of Sport, Exercise & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Chambers, Fiona
    Sports Studies and Physical Education, School of Education, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
    Makopoulou, Kyriaki
    School of Sport, Exercise & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    What is ‘effective’ CPD for contemporary physical education teachers?: A Deweyan framework2017Inngår i: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 22, nr 7, s. 799-811Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    It is widely argued that continuing professional development (CPD) for physical education (PE) teachers is important, yet questions remain about ‘effective’ CPD. We consider these questions afresh from a Deweyan perspective. An overview of the CPD/PE-CPD literature reveals conflicting positions on teachers as learners. Considering the nature of contemporary PE, and the learning needs of teachers, we argue that a different model of PE-CPD is required to reflect the dynamic nature of contemporary practice. We propose John Dewey's classic concept of ‘education as growth’ to underpin a new conceptual framework for the design, delivery and evaluation of PE-CPD. We argue that ‘effective’ PE-CPD will not be found in formal policies, structures and processes, however, well-intentioned, unless it (i) focuses on the dazzling complexity of the learning process, (ii) prioritises context and contemporary challenges; (iii) bridges research/theory–practice in innovative ways; and (iv) nurtures the career-long growth of PE teachers.

  • 9.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Annerstedt, Claes
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Examining groupwork in health and physical education: emerging findings from a Vygotskian analysis2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduktion: Group work underpins curricular models such as Teaching Games for Understanding, Sport Education  and Cooperative Learning. Within such models, HPE teachers typically assume ‘facilitator’ roles, dividing their time and attention between groups. In doing so, teachers gain only a partial view of their students’ learning. Very simply, they do not see what is happening when they are not immediately present. It is difficult to frame this as a problem – it appears to be part of the reality of teaching. At the same time, the argument made in this paper is that an understanding of student interactions where the teacher is absent has significant potential for informing pedagogic practice.

    Syfte & teoretisk ram: The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that influence learning when two or more learners are co-constructing meaning in the absence of a teacher.

    The paper draws on the work of Lev Vygotsky as well as more recent activity theory. Learning is understood as a social enterprise where the relationship between what an individual can do independently and what s/he can do in collaboration with others is crucial. Vygotsky’s notion of a Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) provides a specific tool for thinking through this relationship. Key tenets include:

    - performance of novel tasks is often achieved in collaboration with other people before it is achieved individually.

    - potential for learning is bounded (Vygotsky, 1978, p. 208-209). At a given point in time it is not possible for an individual to learn simply anything. As learning occurs and individual performance increases, so does collaborative learning potential.

    - learning takes place within the context of dialectical activity. In this respect, all learning is social.

    - although individuals take on ‘novice’ and ‘expert’ positions during learning activity, these positions are flexible.

    - for learning to take place, novices and experts should influence the group’s activity. 

    Metod: Empirical material was produced with eight different HPE classes in years 6-9 (lower and upper secondary schools) in Sweden. Schools were selected in a way that maximized variation.

    Observations consisted of three or four video-recorded lessons with each of the eight classes. Two cameras were used: one stationary and the other mobile. Mobile filming focused on different groups working within the classes. Between two and five students were generally in the frame at any one time and filming was done with the intention of capturing sequences where a group of students worked with a specific problem/task. Here, Emerson’s (2004) notion of key incidents was utilized. Due to the proximity of the camera to students, audio material could be obtained and detailed transcripts of speech exchanges were produced.

    Resultat: Data suggest that: (1) teachers often define the outcome of groupwork situations with relative precision but pay less attention to process (i.e. how learners will reach the outcome); (2) many groupwork situations do not result in the creation of ZPD’s and hence do not result in learning in a Vygotskian sense; (3) the creation of ZPD’s in HPE are achieved through corporeal and through linguistic strategies - this makes HPE ZPD’s unique from many educational settings.

    Diskussion: The emerging results suggest that HPE teachers should pay more attention to how they define and implement groupwork. They should reflect on how they present groupwork tasks to learners and think about the relationship between group process and learning outcome. Teachers should also consider how ‘expertise gradients’ can be exploited and help learners to occupy novice and expert positions in ways that maximize learning. Finally, the results suggest that facilitation of groupwork should account for learners’ physical and linguistic capacities.  

  • 10.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Power and group work in physical education: A Foucauldian perspective2017Inngår i: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 23, nr 3, s. 339-353Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Group work is used in physical education (PE) to encourage student-directed, collaborative learning. Aligned with this aim, group work is expected to shift some power from teacher to students and enable students to make decisions and co-construct meaning on their own. There are, however, very few investigations focusing on power in group work situations in PE, with most research focusing on learning and content. Assumptions about the nature of power and its mechanisms have been largely implicit. The purpose of this paper was consequently to explore power relations in PE group work. To do this, we have drawn primarily on observational data of three groups working together to choreograph a dance performance in a Swedish PE lesson. A small amount of pre- and post-lesson interview material is used as a complementary data source. Michel Foucault’s notion of power as action-on-action is used to identify different types of power relations in this group work. Four specific kinds of relations are presented concerning: (1) the students’ task; (2) other cultures; (3) gender; and (4) interactions with one another. These relations suggest that power relations are not simply created locally between group members, nor are power relations only a function of the members’ proficiency in the task. In these respects, the results encourage a reconsideration of learning in group work and open up new avenues for further research. The paper is concluded with practical considerations that relate to common assumptions about student power, teacher authority and the potential benefit of ambiguous tasks in group work.

  • 11.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Annerstedt, Claes
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Embodied interaction in physical education: examining group work from a multimodal perspective2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 12.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Annerstedt, Claes
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Facilitating group work in physical education: working with post-Vygotskian ideas2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 13.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Annerstedt, Claes
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Inter-student interactions and student learning in health and physical education: a post-Vygotskian analysis2015Inngår i: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 20, nr 4, s. 409-426Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Group work is often used in Physical Education (and Health – HPE). In this paper, we propose that despite: (1) its widespread use; (2) advances surrounding HPE models that utilize group strategies; and (3) a significant amount of literature dealing with group work in other school subjects, we do not have a particularly good theoretical understanding of group learning in HPE.

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose one way of conceptualizing individual learning in peer interaction based on three tenets of post-Vygotskian theory that relate to the zone of proximal development (ZPD); namely that in learning situations: (i) group members engage in shared communication; (ii) expert–novice relationships can develop and change during group activities and (iii) constructing knowledge can be thought of as reaching agreement.

    Participants and setting: Empirical material was generated with eight different HPE classes in lower and upper secondary schools in Sweden. Schools were selected in a way that maximized variation and were distributed across four geographic locations with varying sizes and types of communities.

    Data collection: Observational material was produced at each of the sites with the use of two cameras: one stationary and the other mobile. Stationary filming maintained a wideangled focus and captured the entire class. Mobile filming focused on different groups working within the classes. During mobile filming, between two and five students were generally in the frame and filming was directed at sequences in which a group of students worked together on a specific task.

    Data analysis: Analysis of the data focused on two kinds of incidents. The first

    comprised a sequence in which two or more students were interacting to complete a

    task which they could not immediately do and were engaged in collective

    signification by talking about or doing the activity in mutually compatible ways.

    These conditions were sufficient in our view to signal the creation of a ZPD. The

    second kind of incident fulfilled the first criteria but not the second – i.e. the students

    were interacting but not in mutually compatible ways.

    Findings: A post-Vygotskian interpretation of three group work sequences draws

    attention to: (i) the flexible and fluid nature of ‘expertness’ as it exists within groups;

    (ii) the unpredictable nature of member interactions and (iii) the challenging role that

    teachers occupy while trying to facilitate group work.

    Conclusion: Such an interpretation contributes to a growing understanding of group

    work and helps HPE practitioners to make the most of a teaching strategy which is

    already used widely in schools.

  • 14.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Annerstedt, Claes
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Inter-student interactions and student learning in Health and Physical Education: A post-Vygotskian analysis2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    If group work has not always been a central element of Physical Education (and Health - HPE), then it has certainly become one in recent times (Ward & Lee, 2005). In this paper we propose that despite: (1) the widespread use of group work in HPE; and (2) significant theoretical advances surrounding HPE models that utilize group strategies (Dyson, Griffin, & Hastie, 2004), we do not have a particularly good theoretical understanding of how learning in groups takes place in the practice of HPE. In order to fill what we see as a significant lacuna, the aim of this paper is to propose one way of conceptualizing individual learning in peer interaction based on three tenets of post-Vygotskian theory; namely that in learning situations: (i) group members create collective consciousnesses; (ii) expert-novice relationships develop and change; and (iii) knowledge can be thought of as reaching agreement (Roth & Radford, 2010). These tenets are considered with respect to three empirical instances that are represented with transcript material from observations conducted in Swedish HPE lessons. A post-Vygotskian interpretation encourages us to consider: (i) how student engagement with tasks relates to learning; (ii) how group members become “other-oriented” along with the reasons why they might not orient themselves towards others, and (iii) how “non-experts” guide interactions even as “expertness” shifts between members. Such an interpretation has the potential to contribute to a growing understanding of group work and help HPE practitioners make the most of a teaching strategy which is already used widely in schools.

     

    References

    Dyson, B., Griffin, L., & Hastie, P. (2004). Sport Education, Tactical Games, and Cooperative Learning: Theoretical and pedagogical considerations. Quest, 56, 226-240.

    Roth, W., & Radford, L. (2010). Re/thinking the zone of proximal development (symmetrically). Mind, Culture and Activity, 17, 299-307.  

    Ward, P. & Lee, M. (2005). Peer-Assisted Learning in Physical Education: A Review of Theory and Research. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 24, 205-225.

  • 15.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Annerstedt, Claes
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Learning through group work in physical education: a symbolic interactionist approach2015Inngår i: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 20, nr 5, s. 604-623Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In line with contemporary constructivist pedagogies, students are frequently expected to learn through interaction in physical education (PE). There is a relatively sophisticated body of literature focusing on learning in groups, peer teaching, and cooperative learning. Current research has not, however, focused on how the body is implicated in interactional learning. This is surprising given that much learning in PE is expected to take place in the physical domain. The aim of this paper is to contribute to current theorizing by examining social interactions in PE practice. By drawing on symbolic interactionist theory, we put forward a framework for considering how inter-student interactions occur in a multimodal sense. Key ideas relate to (1) the sequential organization of interactions; (2) the ways in which semiotic resources in different fields are used to elaborate each other; (3) the importance of interpretation as a driver of interaction; (4) the creation of local environments in which participants attend to and work together within a shared world of perception; and (5) the influence of material environments on social interaction. The specific concepts employed are epistemic ecology, epistemic position, and learning trajectory. The paper includes observational data from an investigation of learning in Swedish PE to demonstrate the explanatory power and limitations of the theoretical tenets presented. The paper is concluded with practical implications of understanding group work in a multimodal manner.

  • 16.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wallhead, Tristan
    Division of Kinesiology and Health, University of Wyoming, Wyoming, USA.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Student learning through interaction in physical education2017Inngår i: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 23, nr 3, s. 273-278Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 17. Bengtsson, Tomas
    et al.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Sköldmark, Magnus
    Medveten matchledare: en studie av fotbollsdomarkompetensen ur tre aspekter1994Rapport (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 18.
    Brolin, Magnus
    et al.
    aSchool of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro Univerity, Örebro, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    bSchool of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Casey, Ashley
    cSchool of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
    A salutogenic strengths-based approach in practice: an illustration from a school in Sweden2018Inngår i: Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education, ISSN 2574-2981, Vol. 9, nr 3, s. 237-252Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite an extensive debate and an openness of teachers to a strength-based approach to health and physical education, it is not always clear what a salutogenic strengths-based approach might look like in practice, at least not in the day-to-day work in schools. The purpose of this article is to present a salutogenic strengths-based school initiative in Sweden and to identify health discourses in the school's practice. An insider perspective is used to explore health in the school through Brookfield's four lenses for exploring one's own teaching practice. Two health discourses are identified: (1) an individual health discourse rooted in the fostering of personal development, and (2) a value-based health discourse build up around social relations and the fostering of democratic values. The individual health discourse can be understood as based in a pathogenic norm, and in the investigated school practice the individual health discourse dominated the school health initiative despite the salutogenic intentions.

  • 19.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Routes and roots to knowing in Shaun White’s snowboarding road trip: A mycorrhizaic approach to multisensory emplaced learning in exergames2019Inngår i: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 10, s. 251-278Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores learning during game-play of a snowboarding video game intrigued by questions raised in the wake of the increasing mediatisation and digitisation of learning. Correspondingly, we answer to calls for more suitable metaphors for learning to cater for the entangled learning processes that changes related to the increase of digital media may infer. Using a short term sensory ethnography approach, we elaborate on the idea of multisensory emplaced learning and propose an organic metaphor – mycorrhiza – to both methodology and learning. Mycorrhiza refers to a symbiotic relationship between fungi and roots of plants in its environment where fungi are the visible effects of the mycorrhiza. The metaphor provides a way to start to unpack sensory, visual and embodied aspects of learning in the complexities of the digital age. By elaborating on the mycorrhizaic concepts fungus, soil, growth, mycelia and symbiosis we show three interrelated ways of moving through this game: (i) a social and cultural route, (ii) a competitive route, and (iii) an experiential route. With help of the metaphor we discern the symbiotic relations between what appeared in our empirical material as visual and other human and non-human aspects of emplacement.

  • 20.
    Casey, Ashley
    et al.
    Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    MacPhail, Ann
    University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Models-Based Practices: Problematizing the M and the P in MBP2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/purpose: While some argue that Models-Based Practice (MBP) has a number of laudable and desirable ambitions and outcomes (Kirk, 2013), others contend that those advocating for MBP must be mindful of wider debates in the field about the overall purpose of physical education and Sport Pedagogy (PESP) (Dillon et al. 2016). The purpose of this presentation is to begin to articulate the types of questions PESP might consider now and in the future as regards the M and P in MBP.

    The main points: The overarching intention of MBP is the achievement of specific, relevant, and challenging learning objectives that apportion more time for learners to be engaged with learning, and which ultimately strives toward par- ticular outcomes relative to each model. Interestingly, however, the preferred perspective researchers have pursued in MBP-related research is that of the teacher and to a lesser degree the coach (Casey, 2014). Whilst there are those who have focused on the learner (Hastie,1998), the aim of this presentation is to present a num- ber of questions about MBP; questions about the what, how, why, who, when and where of teaching, learning and context.

    Addressing the themes: We address the sub-themes by considering the ways in which our understanding of MPB might be better fo- cused to pedagogically engage learners in transformative learning and teaching. Further, by asking questions of practice we are better able explore innovative perspectives on PESP.

    Conclusions/implications: This paper concludes by problematizing the M and the P in MBP and the notion that practice, when related to models, become singular. We argue, given the diversity that exists in schools, states and countries as well as the diversity between young people, that the idea of a practice should be expanded into practices and, in doing so, acknowledge the multifarious ways in which learning might become manifest.

  • 21.
    Casey, Ashley
    et al.
    School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Cooperative learning in physical education encountering Dewey’s educational theory2020Inngår i: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Cooperative learning can be considered as an umbrella term for a number of classroom practices. In this paper we consider the educative nature of cooperative learning in physical education, and we have challenged ourselves to examine how cooperative learning can enhance the education of young people. We do this by revisiting cooperative learning’s Deweyan foundations and hold that such a move would be a constructive way forward for cooperative learning in physical education. We argue that there is a risk, in not going back to its educational roots, that cooperative learning might just become another way to teach, for example, games or sports, and that it currently puts too much emphasis on destination rather than journey. We suggest that using Dewey’s idea of education and experience would add: a situational element, a directional element, a temporal element, a communal element and an educative element. In this way, the use of cooperative learning in physical education can move away from exclusively developing students’ skills, towards an open-ended process of becoming where a diversity of students transform and are being transformed by one another.

  • 22.
    Casey, Ashley
    et al.
    Loughborough University, Loughboroug, United Kingdom; University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    "I just remember rugby": re-membering physical education as more than a sport2015Inngår i: Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, ISSN 0270-1367, E-ISSN 2168-3824, Vol. 86, nr 1, s. 40-50Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to investigate how boys communicate previous experiences of cultural norms in physical education (PE) practice. This was done by analyzing what boys (from a school in the United Kingdom) remember about PE 2 years after they last participated. Making use of autobiographical memory theory and John Dewey’s notions of reactualization of experience and collateral learning, we discuss the results of the study in terms of re-membering. '

    Method: The participants in this study were 20 boys from a secondary school in the United Kingdom. At the time of the study, 11 of the boys were aged 16 to 17 years old and 9 were aged 17 to 18 years old. These boys were interviewed using a semistructured approach to explore their autobiographical memories of PE.

    Results: The overarching “logic” of memories of PE was sport. Almost all of the boys’ articulated memories were of doing sports, albeit in various capacities. Beyond the main theme, the article positions the boys’ recollections against established cultural norms of PE as a social practice and explores three subthemes: (a) just doing the game in a traditional curriculum though a multiactivity sport discourse; (b) learning the games in a technical sport discourse; and (c) learning beyond the game around an educational sport discourse.

    Conclusions: These boys reactualized memories of learning within an educational discourse, which suggests that what they learned goes beyond the simple consequence of participating.

  • 23.
    Casey, Ashley
    et al.
    Loughborough university, Loughborough, UK.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Missing in (trans)action: Cooperative learning in physical education and the unacknowledged contribution of John Dewey2019Inngår i: BERA conference in Manchester 10-12 sept 2019, 2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Pedagogical models are increasingly part of the vocabulary and practice in physical education. They emerged from decades of innovation that seeks to end the dominance of direct instruction and multi-model curricula. They continue to evolve and that serves as a catalyst for our argument that Cooperative Learning lost a keystone of its development when it was brought into physical education.

    Digging into the genesis of Cooperative Learning shows that it owes much of its early intellectual development to the work of John Dewey and Kurt Lewin (Schmuck, 1985). Indeed Cooperative Learning was ‘born’ out of both the epistemology of pragmatic philosophy (Dewey) and the positivist epistemology of developmental psychology (Lewin). However, over time, the legacy of Dewey’s work around cooperation has been marginalised, at best, in the body of work around Cooperative Learning in general education and is conspicuous by its near total absence in the physical education literature. Revisiting the 27 papers used by Casey and Goodyear (2015) in their review of literature shows that Dewey’s name does not appear in a single reference list. This paper seeks to redress the balance and argues that in applying a Deweyan lens of experience to Cooperative Learning we return to Lewin and Dewey shared interest and “pioneering spirit…to improve social interaction and cooperation in schools” (Schmuck, 1985, p. 2).

    One of Dewey’s main contributions is his notion of education as growth. For Dewey education is the “reconstruction or reorganization of experience which adds to the meaning of experience” (1916: 76), and in these constructions the person experiencing, the experiencer, as well as what is experienced has a potential for change (Dewey & Bentley, 1949). Such change, however, is not fixed or completed. Instead it is a process of becoming which then promotes further experiences (Dewey, 1938a). Education then does not have an end beyond itself. It is about the conditions of education, and experiences are educative if they promote growth of still even more, richer experiences.

    Cooperative learning as a pedagogical model should then be about “…the enterprise of supplying the conditions which insure growth” (Dewey, 1916: 61). This is not in terms of cooperating as a passive adaption into a set of predetermined contexts like for example competitive sports, but cooperating to ensure improved quality of future experiences. It should provide experiences that: “arouses curiosity, strengthens initiative, and sets up desires and purposes that are sufficiently intense to carry a person over the dead places” (Dewey, 1938b: 38).

    Using Dewey we can also take critique directed towards cooperative learning seriously, for example, the inability to take power relations of the educational situation into account e.g. sexism, racism or homophobia. Here we turn to Shannon Sullivan’s (2001) use of Dewey’s notion of transaction to address this relative blindness and move beyond dualist notions of experience. Sullivan contends that:

    Many times, the reconstruction of organism and environment through their ongoing transactional activity serves only to deepen the grooves of the transactions that came before. Because organism and environment are continually being remade through their transactional relationship, however, significant change is possible. (Sullivan, 2001, 36)

    This, according to Sullivan, involves acknowledging continuity as well as difference in experience and in doing so cooperative learning has to be modelled to handle all students experiences since it is in the transaction between the students and the environment the model becomes the model it is.

    In conclusion, by taking back Dewey’s ideas around experience and education into cooperative learning in physical education we could focus more on both the process of cooperating and the process of learning taking into account the diversity of students experiences in the complex transaction between content, teaching and learning.

  • 24.
    Ericson, Helena
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Skoog, Therése
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Health resources, ageing and physical activity: a study of physically active women aged 69–75 years2018Inngår i: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 10, nr 2, s. 206-222Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Most studies on issues relating to ageing, physical activity and health are based on an understanding of what causes illness, rather than what promotes health. The health benefits of physical activity relate to questions about how to avoid physical inactivity and overcoming barriers to participating in physical activity, rather than why older people continue to be physically active. The aim of this study was to explore health resources in relation to physical activity, especially resistance training, that physically active women between the ages of 69–75 years characterise as important for the maintenance of health. In order to investigate these health resources, the study drew on salutogenic theory and the concept of sense of coherence. The analysed data came from interviews with 14 physically active Swedish women aged 69–75 years who had previously taken part in a resistance training intervention, but who also had continued to engage in physical activity and resistance training when the intervention ended. We identified seven health resources, social relations and care, positive energy, self-worth, capability in and about physical activity, the habit of exercising, identity as an exercising person and womanhood related to physical activity, in this case resistance training, that physically active women aged between 69 and 75 years characterised as important for maintaining their health. In conclusion, physical activity carried out in a stable group of peers provided a meaningful, comprehensible and manageable way for these older women to engage in the on-going process of maintaining health.

  • 25.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Gustavsson, Kjell
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Johansson, Therese
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Mustell, Jan
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Sundberg, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Svensson, Lena
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Skolämnet idrott och hälsa: en nationell utvärdering2003Inngår i: Tidskrift i gymnastik och idrott, nr 4, s. 12-15Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 26.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Gustavsson, Kjell
    Örebro universitet, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Johansson, Therese
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för beteende-, social- och rättsvetenskap.
    Mustell, Jan
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Sundberg, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Svensson, Lena
    Örebro universitet, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Skolämnet idrott och hälsa hösten 2002: uppläggning och huvudresultat från en nationell utvärdering2003Inngår i: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, nr 3, s. 30-34Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 27.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för idrott och hälsa.
    Gustavsson, Kjell
    Örebro universitet, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för idrott och hälsa.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för idrott och hälsa.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för idrott och hälsa.
    Öijen, Lena
    Örebro universitet, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    A national evaluation of the school subject physical education and health: I. methodological approaches and challenges2003Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 28.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för idrott och hälsa.
    Gustavsson, Kjell
    Örebro universitet, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för idrott och hälsa.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för idrott och hälsa.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för idrott och hälsa.
    Öijen, Lena
    Örebro universitet, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    A national evaluation of the school subject physical education and health: II. on the importance of subject content and focus2003Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 29.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för idrott och hälsa.
    Gustavsson, Kjell
    Örebro universitet, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för idrott och hälsa.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för idrott och hälsa.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för idrott och hälsa.
    Öijen, Lena
    Örebro universitet, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    A national evaluation of the school subject physical education and health: III. ”More for boys than girls?”2003Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 30.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Gustavsson, Kjell
    Örebro universitet, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Öijen, Lena
    Örebro universitet, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Idrott och hälsa – ämnesrapport NU-03.2005Rapport (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 31.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Gustavsson, Kjell
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Öijen, Lena
    Physical education in Sweden2005Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 32.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Johansson, Therese
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för beteende-, social- och rättsvetenskap.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för idrott och hälsa.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för idrott och hälsa.
    Idrott och hälsa – mer för fysiskt aktiva pojkar än fysiskt inaktiva flickor?2003Inngår i: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 12, nr 3, s. 35-38Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 33.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Idrott och hälsa: ett ämne för hälsa i rörelse!?2005Inngår i: Grundskolans ämnen i ljuset av nationella utvärderingen 2003: nuläge och framåtblickar, Stockholm: Skolverket , 2005, s. 177-195Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 34.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Physical education in Sweden2007Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 35. Geidne, Susanna
    et al.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Rekommendationer för implementering av alkoholpolicyer i idrottsföreningar: resultat från en studie med åtta svenska fotbollsföreningar2012Inngår i: Folkhälsostämman 2012: folkhälsa för en hållbar framtid, Östersund: Statens folkhälsoinstitut , 2012, s. 38-38Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 36.
    Geidne, Susanna
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    The implementation process of alcohol policies in eight Swedish football clubs2013Inngår i: Health Education, ISSN 0965-4283, E-ISSN 1758-714X, Vol. 113, nr 3, s. 196-215Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Alcohol stands in an ambiguous relationship to sports, and there is a common belief that participation in sports prevents alcohol consumption. Although this is not always the case, sports clubs can be important settings for health promoting alcohol policy interventions .The purpose of this paper is to explore the process of implementing alcohol policies in eight football clubs in Sweden and, in particular, how the implementation process is conveyed in the clubs’ alcohol policy projects, the similarities and differences between this case study and Durlak and DuPre's implementation model and the recommendations for successful alcohol policy implementation in relation to the result.

    Design/methodology/approach – In total, 15 semi-structured interviews on the subject of sports’ club alcohol policies were conducted with project leaders and board members from eight sports clubs. The interviews were analysed using Durlak and DuPre's model of factors affecting implementation processes.

    Findings – The results show that almost all the factors in Durlak and DuPre's model were comprehensively manifested in the football clubs’ alcohol policy projects, although with slightly different significance and emphases.

    Practical implications – The results are discussed in relation to recommendations for successful alcohol policy implementation in sports clubs. Recommendations are presented in six areas: an explicit message; fit; internal policy dissemination; alcohol policy as a part of overall policy; support; and actors.

    Originality/value – Many sports clubs do an excellent job of implementing alcohol policies successfully and it is imperative to incorporate their “good” practices into research and provide assistance to those whose policies and practice are less developed.

  • 37.
    Geidne, Susanna
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    The youth sports club as a health-promoting setting: an integrative review of research2013Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 41, nr 3, s. 269-283Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aims of this review is to compile and identify key issues in international research about youth sports clubs as health-promoting settings, and then discuss the results of the review in terms of a framework for the youth sports club as a health-promoting setting.

    Methods: The framework guiding this review of research is the health-promoting settings approach introduced by the World Health Organization (WHO). The method used is the integrated review. Inclusion criteria were, first, that the studies concerned sports clubs for     young people, not professional clubs; second, that it be a question of voluntary participation in some sort of ongoing organized athletics outside of the regular school curricula; third, that the studies consider issues about youth sports clubs in terms of health-promoting settings as described by WHO. The final sample for the review consists of 44 publications.

    Results: The review shows that youth sports clubs have plentiful opportunities to be or become health-promoting settings; however this is not something that happens automatically. To do so, the club needs to include an emphasis on certain important elements in its strategies and daily practices. The youth sports club needs to be a supportive and healthy environment with activities designed for and adapted to the specific age-group or stage of development of the youth.

    Conclusions: To become a health-promoting setting, a youth sports club needs to take a comprehensive approach to its activities, aims,  and purposes.

  • 38.
    Gibbs, Beatrice
    et al.
    GIH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Meckbach, Jane
    GIH,Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    TV-spel som läromedel i idrott och hälsa?2012Inngår i: Idrott & hälsa : organ för Svenska idrottslärarföreningen, ISSN 1653-1124, Vol. 2, nr 8, s. 11-14Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    I projektet TV-spel som hälsofostran, som presenterades i nr 6 i Idrott och hälsa 2011, undersöks det lärande avseende kropp, fysisk aktivitet och hälsa som sker i ungdomars spelande av TV-spel som innefattar rörelse, så kallade exergames (Quennerstedt, Almqvist, Meckbach, & Öhman, 2011). I artikeln lyfte vi bland annat fram hur exergames i allt större utsträckning återfinns i flera länder (till exempel England, Kanada, Australien och USA) som intressanta redskap att använda i skolan, bland annat för att i utbildning stimulera barns och ungdomars vilja att vara fysiskt aktiva samt för att tackla överviktsfrågor. I samband med artikeln bifogades även en enkät i tidskriften som vände sig till lärare i idrott och hälsa i både grund- och gymnasieskolan. Enkäterna nådde med andra ord de som prenumererar på tidningen såsom idrottslärarstudenter och lärare i idrott och hälsa samt även de som tar del av tidningen vid samtliga grund- och gymnasieskolor i Sverige. Vi vill här samtidigt tacka alla lärare som tog sig tid att besvara enkäten.

    I denna artikel kommer vi som en uppföljning av våra analyser av enkätstudien att beskriva svenska lärares användning av TV-spel i idrott och hälsa samt de hinder och motiv som kan finnas med att använda spelen i undervisningen.

    Quennerstedt, M., Almqvist, J., Meckbach, J., & Öhman, M. (2011). Tv-spel som hälsofostran: om exergaming och ungdomars lärande om kropp, fysisk aktivitet och hälsa. Idrott och hälsa, 138 (6), pp. 34-35.

    Statistiska centralbyrån. (2012-10-27). Statistiska centralbyrån. From Register över pedagogisk personal: http://www.scb.se/Pages/Product____8480.aspx

     

  • 39.
    Gibbs, Beatrice
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Larsson, Håkan
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Teaching dance in physical education using exergames2017Inngår i: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 23, nr 2, s. 237-256Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the different ways in which a dance exergame can be used to teach dance in upper secondary school physical education. Particular attention is paid to the learning processes that students are involved in when the dance game is used as a teaching resource. A socio-cultural perspective on learning constitutes the analytical framework. The study demonstrates three different uses: instructor, facilitator and inspirer. In relation to these uses the students are involved in the following learning processes: learning by imitating, repeating, communicating, negotiating, instructing, modelling and using metaphors. It is argued that dance exergames can be used pedagogically to teach dance because they focus on the moves and steps and allow the teacher to focus on observing, supporting, assigning tasks and providing feedback.

  • 40.
    Goodyear, Victoria A.
    et al.
    School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Casey, Ashley
    School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK; Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Social media as a tool for generating sustained and in-depth insights into sport and exercise practitioners’ ongoing practices2018Inngår i: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 10, nr 1, s. 1-16Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to suggest and empirically illustrate how social media can be used to generate sustained and in-depth insights into sport and exercise practitioners’ ongoing practices. This is achieved by discussing the potential for social media in research designs and presenting an analysis of 6 physical education teachers’ and a researcher’s tweets during a six-year school-based continuous professional development programme. Through the use of empirical illustrations we suggest that social media promotes interflections i.e. an ongoing deliberation between practitioners and researchers facilitated by social media. The key contribution of this paper is the argument that social media offers researchers the opportunity to capture sustained and in-depth insights into practitioners and their practices and/or to examine longer-term impacts of programmes or interventions. The discussions are relevant to a range of practitioners within sport and exercise pedagogy, with teachers and teaching used as a representative example of this broad field.

  • 41.
    Goodyear, Victoria A.
    et al.
    School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Kerner, Charlotte
    Department of Life Sciences, Brunel University London, London, UK.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Young people’s uses of wearable healthy lifestyle technologies; surveillance, self-surveillance and resistance.2019Inngår i: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 24, nr 3, s. 212-225Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    An international evidence-base demonstrates that healthy lifestyle digital technologies, like exergames, health-related mobile applications (‘apps’) and wearable health devices are being used more and more within educational settings. Despite this, there is a lack of in-depth empirical evidence on young people’s experiences and uses of healthy lifestyle technologies. In this article we focus on young people’s uses of a wearable health device – Fitbit – and the associated health app. Informed by the work of Foucault, the purpose is to investigate the surveillance, self-surveillance and resistance that occur by young people. One hundred 13–14 years olds (53 females, 47 males), from five physical education classes in two UK schools participated. Data were generated through 8 focus group interviews, and the nominal interview group technique was applied. Data were analyzed using key concepts from Foucault’s theoretical framework. The results demonstrated that, the daily 10,000 step and calorie burning targets set by the Fitbit device encouraged the young people to do more physical activity. Increases in physical activity occurred because of the self-surveillant practices promoted by the Fitbit through; (i) the monitoring and recording of steps and calories burned, and (ii) peer comparison (or monitoring). Surveillance and self-surveillance practices, however, were clearly connected to health equating to fitness and being ‘fit’ or not being ‘fat’. These narrow interpretations of health, equally, underpinned resistance. Daily step and calorie burning targets, (i) did not sustain young people’s engagement with the device beyond a few weeks, (ii) promoted negative feelings, and (iii) the device was resisted because it did not record physical activity accurately as part of young people’s daily lives. In turn, the young people resisted the educational value of the Fitbit and demonstrated a sceptical stance toward introducing health devices in school and physical education settings.

  • 42.
    Goodyear, Victoria A.
    et al.
    School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, UK.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    #Gymlad: young boys learning processes and health-related social media2020Inngår i: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 12, nr 1, s. 18-33Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent systematic reviews identify that the factors mediating and/or moderating the relationship between social media and health outcomes are sparse. There have also been few attempts to analyse gender specific uses of social media. This paper investigated young boys health-related learning in relation to social media. Data were generated from class activities and interviews and from a large data set that included 1346 young people. The approach to the empirical data adopted was Practical Epistemology Analysis (PEA). The findings reveal two main purposes of young boys engagement with social media: (i) communicating with friends, and (ii) accessing health-related information. Irony and humour were central learning mechanisms used by young boys to participate within health-related social media, and in a way that enabled them to engage with, uphold, and handle health discourses associated with masculinity – such as being ripped – without fear of ‘literal’ peer ridicule and within a context of acceptable ‘banter’. There was evidence that young people were critical users and generators of social media, who were clearly thinking through what they see, do, and use online. Hence, this paper provides a fresh evidence-based perspective on the potentially positive role of social media as a health-related learning resource. PEA is illustrated as a new methodological approach for investigating learning in the context of social media. The evidence generated can be used to inform future evaluations of social media use, the design of educative support for young people, and guidance and training for key stakeholders.

  • 43.
    Goodyear, Victoria A.
    et al.
    University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Enright, Eimear
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Kirk, David
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Cale, Lorraine
    Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
    Young People and their Engagement with Health-related Social Media: New Perspectives2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This symposium will provide original, empirically robust, and theoretically rich insights into the complex rela- tionship between social media and young people, and will consider the potential impacts on the field of health and physical education (HPE). To date, the main target population for the analysis of risk in digital health has been healthcare professionals and adults (Swist et al., 2015; Rich & Miah, 2017). There are few empirical ac- counts of how young people use or share health information on social media (Hausmann et al. 2017), and how their experiences can be used to frame health interventions (Dunlop et al., 2016). As a consequence, no ro- bust guidance on young people, social media and health is available (Hausmann et al. 2017) and there is little mention in school/childcare guidelines in current UK, European or US policy (Livingstone et al., 2017).

    The session draws on data from over 1500 young people as ‘expert’ (or at least prolific) social media users and offers analysis from multi-disciplinary perspectives. The objectives are to: (i) increase awareness of the opportunities and risk-related impacts of social media on young people’s health and wellbeing; (ii) generate new theoretical insights into young people’s digital health; and (iii) provide new directions for pedagogy and practice in HPE.

    The session is organised into three sections. Section 1: five original composite and digital narrative case studies will be presented. The case studies were constructed using a public pedagogy framework from participatory re- search with over 1500 young people (age 13-19) in ten UK schools. Section 2: three separate disciplinary analyses of the case studies will be presented. Each academic will identify key issues from their disciplinary perspec- tive and implications for HPE. Section 3: The discussant will suggest new directions for effective pedagogy and practice in HPE.

  • 44.
    Hill, Robert
    et al.
    School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Tinning, Richard
    School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    McCuaig, Louise
    School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Physical Activity and Sense of Coherence in Older Australians2016Inngår i: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, ISSN 1063-8652, E-ISSN 1543-267X, Vol. 24, nr Suppl., s. S111-S112Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Aaron Antonovsky’s focus on the sources of health (‘salutogenesis’) and his related concept of ‘sense of coherence’ (SOC) have been studied and used widely in Scandinavia, North America, England, and some other countries, but not in Australia. Few papers on his ideas and their usefulness for studying older adult health have been published. Guided by Antonovsky’s theories, this study investigated the relationships between ‘sense of coherence’ (SOC), physical activity (PA), and health in 36 Australians 65 years of age and older.

    Methods: Participants were Brisbane residents, aged 65 to 93, who were free of severe memory problems and able to walk without the assistance of another person. They completed the SOC-13, an instrument created by Antonovsky, to measure levels of SOC, and participated in semi-structured interviews that were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Interview questions focused on how they had handled life difficulties during the most recent five-year period and then in their earlier lives. Participants also completed a survey asking for basic demographic information, diagnosis or treatment for chronic diseases, and their assessment of their overall health. Qualitative data were augmented by quantitative data from accelerometers that each participant wore for one week while keeping a diary of PA.

    Results: Participants with higher scores on the SOC-13 spoke more often and more enthusiastically about PA. They also engaged in more minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA, averaged more steps per day, and reported fewer chronic disease problems than those with lower SOC scores. Several expectations that had been expressed by Antonovsky seemed to have been borne out by the results of this study.

    Conclusion: Antonovsky’s ideas and SOC-measurement tools can be useful for the study of health in Australians aged 65 years and over. Our finding that higher SOC levels seem to be related to engagement in positive health maintenance practices by older people supports conclusions of earlier studies. Since one such practice is PA, further research into the role of SOC may offer novel opportunities for interventions aimed at improving the health of this population.

  • 45.
    Janemalm, Lucas
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Barker, Dean
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Transformation of complex movements from policy to practice: a discourse analysis of Swedish physical education teachers’ concepts of moving2020Inngår i: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: How teachers enact policy has been of significant interest to educational scholars. In physical education research, scholars have identified several factors affecting the enactment of policy. These factors include but are not limited to: structural support available for teachers, provision of professional development opportunities, the nature of the policy, and the educational philosophies of the teachers. A recurring conclusion drawn in this scholarship is that official documentation and teachers’ work often diverge, sometimes in profound ways.

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how physical education teachers in Sweden describe their enactment of policy regarding the concept complex movement, which features in the latest Swedish curriculum.

    Methods: Interview data were generated with six specialist physical education teachers. Three questions guided the interviews: What is complex movement? What is not complex movement? And, can you give examples from your teaching of complex movement? Data were analyzed using a discourse analytic framework. Meaning was understood as a production of dialectical relationships between individuals and social practices. Two key concepts were utilized: intertextuality, which refers to the condition whereby all communicative events, not merely utterances, draw on earlier communication events, and interdiscursivity, which refers to discursive practices in which discourse types are combined in new and complex ways.

    Results: We identified three discourses regarding the teachers’ enactment of policy: (1) Complex movement as individual difficulty, (2) Complex movement as composite movements, and (3) Complex movement as situational adaptation. Several features were common to all three discourses: they were all related to issues of assessment; they suggested that complex movement is something students should be able to show or perform, and; they left open room for practically any activity done in physical education to be considered complex.

    Discussion: Three issues are addressed in the Discussion. The first concerns the intertextual nature of the teachers’ statements and how the statements relate to policy and research. The second concerns the way that knowledge, and specifically movement knowledge, becomes problematic in the teachers’ statements about complex movement. The third concerns more broadly the language used to describe the relationship between policy and practice.

    Conclusions: We propose that modest levels of overlap between teachers’ discursive resources, policy, and research is unsurprising. In line with earlier research, we suggest that the notion of ‘enactment’ is a more productive way to describe policy-oriented practice than notions such as ‘implementation’ or ‘translation’, which imply a uni-directional, linear execution of policy.

  • 46.
    Janemalm, Lucas
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Barker, Dean
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), Sweden.
    What is complex in complex movement? A discourse analysis of conceptualizations of movement in the Swedish physical education curriculum2019Inngår i: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 25, nr 4, s. 1146-1160Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2011, the Swedish National Agency for Education introduced a new national curriculum. Thecurriculum contained a number of new terms. One in particular proved problematic for physicaleducators – complex movement. The confusion surrounding the term could be seen as somewhatunexpected since movement is and has been a central element of practically all physical education(PE) curricula. The specific aim of this paper is to identify how the discourse regarding complexmovement is assembled, and by doing so, provide insights into the meaning(s) of complexmovement within the context of PE policy in Sweden. Following Englund and Quennerstedt (2008),the study is framed within a Swedish curriculum theory tradition and six policy texts are examinedusing a discourse analytic methodology. The results suggest three different inferences of complexmovement discourse: advanced with a wide meaning; context-dependent and related to sports forolder pupils; and knowledge-dependent where different views about knowledge exist. From theseresults, three discussion points are raised related to: the diversity of possible meanings presentedin policy; the connection between knowledge and understanding; and the probability of differentaudiences reading the texts in different ways. The paper is concluded with a consideration of theconsequences of different inferences concerning complex movement and whether greater consensusis necessary.

  • 47.
    Kerner, Charlotte
    et al.
    Brunel University, London , UK.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Goodyear, Victoria A.
    University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Young people oppose Fitbits in schools2017Inngår i: The Conversation, ISSN 2201-5639Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 48.
    Kirk, David
    et al.
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Hastie, Peter
    Auburn University, Auburn AL, USA.
    Macphail, Ann
    University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
    O'Donovan, Toni
    University of Bedfordshire, Luton, UK.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Writing for publication in Physical education and sport pedagogy: reflections and advice from an editorial team2014Inngår i: Revista Brasileira de Ciências do Esporte, ISSN 0101-3289, E-ISSN 2179-3255, Vol. 36, nr 4, s. 740-745Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to provide an introduction to the process of writing for

    publication in Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, where three issues in particular are

    analyzed. The fi rst one explains how to write an article for an international scientifi c publication,

    drawing the attention that it must be in accordance to the aims and the scope of the journal

    and that instructions regarding structure should be followed, as well as articles must be clear in

    regard to theory, method, results, conclusions, summary and key words. The second issue is a

    step-by-step guide to the review process, which involves the editor´s fi rst decision, the decision

    to return the submission to the author or select two reviewers to revise the article; the feedback

    given by the reviewers to the editor, which decides and communicates the author; and, if the

    author must re-submission the article, the way how it happens. Last issue explains how Physical

    Education and Sport Pedagogy acts in regard to articles written in English as a foreign language.

  • 49.
    Kronlid, David O.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sverige.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Klimatförändrad hälsa: om hälsobegreppets betydelse för klimathälsoundervisning2010Inngår i: Klimatdidaktik: att undervisa för framtiden / [ed] David O. Kronlid, Stockholm: Liber , 2010, s. 58-80Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 50.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, sverige.
    Annerstedt, Claes
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Barker, Dean
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Karlefors, Inger
    Umeå universitet, Umeå, Sverige.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Redelius, Karin
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan GIH, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Physical education: a subject for learning?2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
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