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  • 1.
    Ericson, Helena
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Skoog, Therése
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Health resources, ageing and physical activity: a study of physically active women aged 69–75 years2018In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 206-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most studies on issues relating to ageing, physical activity and health are based on an understanding of what causes illness, rather than what promotes health. The health benefits of physical activity relate to questions about how to avoid physical inactivity and overcoming barriers to participating in physical activity, rather than why older people continue to be physically active. The aim of this study was to explore health resources in relation to physical activity, especially resistance training, that physically active women between the ages of 69–75 years characterise as important for the maintenance of health. In order to investigate these health resources, the study drew on salutogenic theory and the concept of sense of coherence. The analysed data came from interviews with 14 physically active Swedish women aged 69–75 years who had previously taken part in a resistance training intervention, but who also had continued to engage in physical activity and resistance training when the intervention ended. We identified seven health resources, social relations and care, positive energy, self-worth, capability in and about physical activity, the habit of exercising, identity as an exercising person and womanhood related to physical activity, in this case resistance training, that physically active women aged between 69 and 75 years characterised as important for maintaining their health. In conclusion, physical activity carried out in a stable group of peers provided a meaningful, comprehensible and manageable way for these older women to engage in the on-going process of maintaining health.

  • 2.
    Ericson, Helena
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Resistance training is linked to heightened positive motivational state and lower negative affect among healthy women aged 65–702016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Ericson, Helena
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Resistance training is linked to heightened positive motivational state and lower negative affect among healthy women aged 65–702018In: Journal of Women & Aging, ISSN 0895-2841, E-ISSN 1540-7322, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 366-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resistance training (RT) improves overall health, but the psychological effects of RT in healthy old adults have not been tested. The aim of this study was to investigate a sample of 65–70-year-old healthy and physically active women to assess their sense of coherence, health-related quality of life, hope, and affect, before and after taking part in a 24-week RT intervention (N = 14), compared to controls (N = 18). Findings showed a significant increase in hope (p = 0.013) and a significant decrease in negative affect (p = 0.002). Starting RT after age 65 does not appear to negatively impact on women’s psychological health but seems to be associated with important psychological health benefits.

  • 4.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Kjell
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Johansson, Therese
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Mustell, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sundberg, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Svensson, Lena
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Skolämnet idrott och hälsa: en nationell utvärdering2003In: Tidskrift i gymnastik och idrott, no 4, p. 12-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Kjell
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Johansson, Therese
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Mustell, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Sundberg, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Svensson, Lena
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Skolämnet idrott och hälsa hösten 2002: uppläggning och huvudresultat från en nationell utvärdering2003In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, no 3, p. 30-34Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Johansson, Therese
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Idrott och hälsa – mer för fysiskt aktiva pojkar än fysiskt inaktiva flickor?2003In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 35-38Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Davis, Paul
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne ,UK.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Harberl, Peter
    United States Olympic Committee, Colorado Springs, USA.
    Mindfulness and Its Relationship With Perceived Stress, Affect, and Burnout in Elite Junior Athletes2015In: Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, ISSN 1932-9261, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 263-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between dispositional mindfulness and burnout and whether this relationship is mediated by perceived stress, negative affect, and positive affect in elite junior athletes. Participants were 233 (123 males and 107 females) adolescent athletes, ranging in age from 15-19 years (M = 17.50; SD = 1.08).Bivariate correlations revealed that mindfulness had a significant negative relationship with both perceived stress and burnout. To investigate mediation, we employed nonparametric bootstrapping analyses. These analyses indicated that positive affect fully mediated links between mindfulness and sport devaluation. Further, positive affect and negative affect partially mediated the relationships between mindfulness and physical/emotional exhaustion, as well as between mindfulness and reduced sense of accomplishment. The results point toward mindfulness being negatively related to burnout in athletes and highlight the role of positive affect. Future research should investigate the longitudinal effect of dispositional mindfulness on stress and burnout.

  • 8.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Skoog, Therese
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The mediational role of perceived stress in the relation between optimism and burnout in competitive athletes2012In: Anxiety, Stress, and Coping, ISSN 1061-5806, E-ISSN 1477-2205, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 183-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Burnout has been highlighted as an important issue, not only in occupational settings but also among athletes. Optimists appear to be more resistant to burnout, which might be partly explained by lower levels of stress. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between optimism and burnout symptoms in 217 athletes (139 males and 78 females, aged 16 to 19 years), while also examining stress as a mediator in this relationship. The results showed that optimism had a significant negative relationship with both stress and burnout. Mediation analyses indicated that perceived stress fully mediated the links between optimism and two symptoms of burnout, emotional/physical exhaustion and sport devaluation, and partly mediated the link between optimism and a third symptom, reduced sense of accomplishment. The findings indicate that individual factors, such as optimism, may play an important role in the development of burnout by virtue of their association with stress. Future research should, therefore, investigate the longitudinal effects of optimism on stress and burnout.

  • 9.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad university, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Podlog, Leslie
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City UT, USA.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Hope and athlete burnout: Stress and affect as mediators2013In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 640-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In this study we examined the relationship between trait hope and burnout in elite junior soccer players and whether stress and positive and negative affect mediated this relationship.

    Methods: Participants were 238 Swedish soccer players (166 males, 71 females; one did not indicate gender) aged 15-19 years who completed questionnaires measuring trait hope, perceived stress, positive and negative affect, and athlete burnout (i.e., emotional/physical exhaustion, a reduced sense of accomplishment, and sport devaluation).

    Results: Bivariate correlations were consistent with hope theory contentions indicating significant negative relationships between hope and all three burnout dimensions. The relationship between hope and emotional/physical exhaustion was fully mediated by stress and positive affect. For sport devaluation and reduced sense of accomplishment, stress and positive affect partially mediated the relationship with hope. In contrast, negative affect did not mediate the relationship between hope and any of the burnout dimensions.

    Conclusion: The results support earlier findings that hope is negatively related to athlete burnout. Support was also found for the hypothesis that high hope individuals would experience less stress and therefore less burnout. Promoting hope may be relevant in reducing the likelihood of this detrimental syndrome. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 10.
    Jaf, Darun
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ungas kärleksrelationer2018In: Barn och ungdomsvetenskap / [ed] Emma Sorbring, Thomas Johansson, Stockholm: Liber, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Johansson, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Ritzén, E. Martin
    Very long-term follow-up of girls with early and late menarche2005In: Abnormalities in puberty: scientific and clinical advances / [ed] H. A. Delemarre-van de Waal, Basel: Karger , 2005, p. 126-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Short- and long-term psychosocial effects of precocious or early normal puberty are probably more important for individuals than the moderate losses in final height they experience. Despite this, pediatric endocrinologists have focused much more on final height than psychosocial outcomes. As a surrogate for long-term follow-up studies of girls with precocious puberty, we have reviewed the results of a very long-term study of physical and psychosocial development of girls with normal early puberty. Results revealed that at age 15-16, girls with menarche before age 11 (early) were more norm-breaking, including being delinquents. In addition, they had earlier advanced sexual experiences. By adult age, there were no differences in psychosocial adjustment between the early- and late-developed women. Thus, the effects of early pubertal timing for psychosocial problems seem to be adolescent-limited. At ages 27 and 43, early-developed women had lower academic education. Regarding somatic development, at age 43, women with early menarche were shorter and heavier, had worse physical fitness and dieted more frequently compared to other women. There was no difference in quality of life. In searching for reasons for the antisocial behaviors in adolescence and the lower educational levels among early developers, early heterosexual relations seem to be the most crucial.

  • 12.
    Johansson, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ritzén, Martin
    Karolinska institutet.
    Very long-term follow-up of girls with early and late menarche2005In: Abnormalities in Puberty: Scientific and Clinical Advances / [ed] Delemarre-van de Waal H.A., Basel, Switzerland: S. Karger, 2005, p. 126-136Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Short- and long-term psychosocial effects of precocious or early normal puberty are probably more important for individuals than the moderate losses in final height they experience. Despite this, pediatric endocrinologists have focused much more on final height than psychosocial outcomes. As a surrogate for long-term follow-up studies of girls with precocious puberty, we have reviewed the results of a very long-term study of physical and psychosocial development of girls with normal early puberty. Results revealed that at age 15-16, girls with menarche before age 11 (early) were more norm-breaking, including being delinquents. In addition, they had earlier advanced sexual experiences. By adult age, there were no differences in psychosocial adjustment between the early- and late-developed women. Thus, the effects of early pubertal timing for psychosocial problems seem to be adolescent-limited. At ages 27 and 43, early-developed women had lower academic education. Regarding somatic development, at age 43, women with early menarche were shorter and heavier, had worse physical fitness and dieted more frequently compared to other women. There was no difference in quality of life. In searching for reasons for the antisocial behaviors in adolescence and the lower educational levels among early developers, early heterosexual relations seem to be the most crucial.

  • 13.
    Kerr, Margaret
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Ruiselova, Zdena
    Female pubertal timing and problem behavior: explaining the mechanism at different levels of social contextsManuscript (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Kimber, Birgitta
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Föräldrastöd i Sverige: Föräldrakraft, ett exempel : tema: utsatthet2008In: Socialmedicinsk tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, no 1, p. 83-87Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Kimber, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Sandell, Rolf
    Linköpings university, Linköping, Sweden.
    Teacher change and development during training in social and emotional learning programs in Sweden2013In: The International Journal of Emotional Education, ISSN 2073-7629, E-ISSN 2073-7629, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 17-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents the results from a thematic analysis of the process diaries of teachers involved in teacher training in social and emotional learning (SEL) in Sweden. Twentynine out of the 122 diaries available were analyzed until saturation was reached. The following themes and sub-themes were extracted: development (professional and personal, and classroom climate), and concomitants of development (need for collaboration and unease). The themes and sub-themes are related to theoretical aspects of specialised teacher education and to the debate in Sweden on how to proceed with SEL programs, and more generally with life skills programs. The results suggest that training generates both general teacher improvement and better implementation of SEL programs.

  • 16.
    Larsson, Madelene
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Pettersson, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Initial motives and organizational context enabling female mentors' engagement in formal mentoring: a qualitative study from the mentors' perspective2016In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 71, p. 17-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mentoring aimed at supporting young people and their development shows promising results, but its delivery is threatened by the difficulty of recruiting sufficient numbers of mentors and keeping them engaged over time. The aim of this study was to help overcome this problem by examining female mentors’ motives for engaging in formal voluntary mentoring of young women, and exploring how organizations can facilitate these mentors’ satisfaction in staying engaged over time. Based on qualitative interviews with 12 mentors in a Swedish non-governmental organization, the Girls Zone, we show six categories of mentor motives related to initial motivation for engagement: self-interested reasons, empowering women, being a responsible citizen, sense of compassion, self-awareness, and longing for meaningfulness. In addition, we show five categories related to the organizational work of satisfying mentors: a win-win relationship, a feeling of ambivalence despite clear responsibilities and contributions, customized support and guidance, a caring organizational identity, and a commitment to pursue with feelings of duty and emotional connection. Using Self-Determination Theory as the framework to guide our understanding of the findings, we conclude that mentors’ motivations for engaging as mentors are linked to the fulfillment of basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Practical recommendations are offered in light of the findings.

  • 17.
    Larsson, Madelene
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Skoog, Theresé
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    NGOs as a complement to youth mental health services aimed at young females in Sweden2015In: 8th European Public Health Conference: Health in Europe – from global to local policies, methods and practices, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During adolescence, mental health problems, including anxiety and loneliness, among girls increase drastically. The perceived problems among this group do not match the inclusion criteria for mental health services and barriers to access occur. In Sweden, both the government and the voluntary sector provide services to youth. The Girls Zone (Tjejzonen) is a Swedish NGO, which targets young females. Its goal is to prevent mental health problems and to strengthen girls´ self-esteem, confidence, and trust by offering a female mentoring program. How can a NGO constitute a complement to the mental health services for young girls with mental health problems?                                                                       

    Methods: In a qualitative, ecologically sensitive study young females aged 15 to 26 (n=5), women mentors (n=12) and organization managers (n=3) were interviewed and national supervisory reports on youth health services were included in inductive qualitative content analyses.                                                                                                              

    Results: The analyzes show a variety of differences between the youth mental health services and the Girls Zone. Added value of the NGO is the availability, including support without inclusion criteria and a great potential to act based on young females conditions, needs and preferences including a possibility to establish a relationship with a female mentor without demand and hierarchy.                                                                                    

    Conclusion: NGOs can act as important complements to the youth mental health service. A salutogenic perspective on young female’s mental health based on the Convention of Rights of the Children can empower young girls and reduce barriers for access to youth mental health service for those with severe mental health problems.                                          

    Main messages: NGOs are important actors in the prevention of mental health problems among young females. NGOs can meet the needs and preferences of the target groups and facilitate empowering processes in preventing mental health problems among young females.

  • 18.
    Larsson, Madelene
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Skoog, Theresé
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    The importance of a mentoring program in strengthening female youths and promoting female mental health2013In: Nobel Day Festivities 10th of December 2013, Book of Abstracts, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Young females report overall lower moods, more negative self-concepts and more psychosomatic disorders compared to boys. Tjejzonen (the Girl zone) is a NGO in Sweden targeting female youths to prevent mental health problems and to strengthening girls´ self-esteem, confidence and trust. Dyads of a young girl 12-25 years old, the Little sister (LS), and a ten year older girl, the Big sister (BS) (mentor), meet twice a month to talk about issues important to the LS. A BS’s role is to be someone girls can talk to, be inspired from and be supported by.

    Objective: The study is examining the importance of the mentoring program. What do this mentoring program and the relationship mean to the LSs?

    Methods: As part of a larger study, five LSs who had met their BSs for at least 6 months participated in semi-structured interviews analyzed using inductive qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The LS were strengthened by the relationships. The BS had limited information about the LS before they met and the LS were in control of what information to share with their mentors. The LS had strong positions in the mentoring program. They were taken seriously and treated with respect. The BS did not judge them and were good listeners. The LS also expressed that the relationships contributed to their personal development, increased the self-insights and constructive handling of feelings.

    Conclusions: The mentoring program can contribute to increased empowerment among female youth. This will be further analyzed in the on-going longitudinal study.

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • 19.
    Larsson, Madelene
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Pettersson, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Enabling relationship formation, development, and closure in a one-year female mentoring program at a non-governmental organization: a mixed-method study2016In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mental health problems among young women aged 16-24 have increased significantly in recent decades, and interventions are called for. Mentoring is a well-established preventative/promotive intervention for developing adolescents, but we have yet to fully understand how the relationship between the mentor and the protégé forms, develops, and closes. In this study, we focused on a female mentoring program implemented by a Swedish non-governmental organization, The Girls Zone. First, we examined the psychological and social characteristics of the young women who chose to take part in the program as protégés. Second, we investigated adolescent female protégés’ own experiences of the relationship process based on a relational-cultural theory perspective.

    Methods: The mixed-method study included 52 questionnaires and five semi-structured interviews with young women aged 15–26 who had contacted The Girls Zone between 2010 and 2012 in order to find a mentor. Their experience of the mentoring relationships varied in duration. Data were analysed statistically and with inductive qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The group of protégés was heterogeneous in that some had poor mental health and some had good mental health. On the other hand, the group was homogenous in that all its members had shown pro-active self-care by actively seeking out the program due to experiences of loneliness and a need to meet and talk with a person who could listen to them. The relationships were initially characterized by feelings of nervousness and ambivalence. However, after some time, these developed into authentic, undemanding, non-hierarchical relationships on the protégés’ terms. The closure of relationships aroused feelings of both abandonment and developing strength.

    Conclusions: Mentorships that are in line with perspectives of the relational-cultural theory meet the relationship needs expressed by the female protégés. Mentor training should focus on promoting skills such as active listening and respect for the protégé based on an engaged, empathic, and authentic approach in a non-hierarchical relationship. These insights have the potential to inform interventions in several arenas where young women create authentic relationships with older persons, such as in school, in traditional health care contexts, and in youth recreation centres. 

  • 20.
    Olofsson, Viveca
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Implementing group based parenting programs: A narrative review2016In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 69, p. 67-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Group based preventive parenting programs are efficacious, but seem hard to implement sustainably within regular service. This review aimed to investigate specific challenges related to their implementation. Through a systematic search in several databases, we retrieved 1356 articles for title, abstract, and full-text screening. After screening, we selected 35 articles for quality rating. An established narrative approach allowed us to include 24 studies. We used an ecological approach and a recently suggested implementation construct terminology to report our findings. To date, there are no evaluations of the implementation of group based programs where implementation aspects and effectiveness are compared with other kinds of programs or formats. Hence, important research knowledge is lacking concerning implementation of group based parenting programs. Our finding indicate that certain format specific implementation aspects of group based parenting programs are perceived by practitioners as particularly challenging. For instance, scheduling of group leader workload, provision of additional services (e.g., meals and childcare), and recruitment of participants. Further, practitioners and group leaders influence implementation success and program sustainability as well as parental attitudes and reasons for participation. To highlight the importance of practitioners and parents we suggest adaptations to the ecological model approach. Overall, the theoretical foundation of current implementation research is weak and future implementation research need to be theoretically driven. It is important to fill the existing lack of implementation knowledge because it might be one of the reasons why group based parenting programs have limited impact as preventive interventions on children's mental well-being.

  • 21.
    Olofsson, Viveca
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Implementing Group Based Parenting Programs: A Narrative ReviewManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Podlog, Leslie
    et al.
    Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City UT, USA .
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden .
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Gao, Zan
    School of Kinesiology, The University of Minnesota, Minneapolis MN, USA .
    Westin, Maria
    Stockholm Sports Trauma Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Capio Artro Clinic, Sophiahemmet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Werner, Susanne
    Stockholm Sports Trauma Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Capio Artro Clinic, Sophiahemmet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Swedish Winter Sport Research Centre, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden; Department of School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden .
    Need satisfaction, motivation, and engagement among high-performance youth athletes: a multiple mediation analysis2015In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 415-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether the various types of motivation articulated in self-determination theory (SDT) mediated the relationship between basic need satisfaction (i.e. competence, autonomy, and relatedness) and athlete engagement. Four types of motivation as assessed by the Situational Motivation Scale including intrinsic motivation, identified regulation, external regulation, and amotivation were examined as mediators of the need satisfaction–engagement relationship. Swedish downhill skiers (N = 192; n = 95 males, n = 97 females) aged 15–20 years completed questionnaires assessing the study variables of interest. Mediation analyses revealed that all four motivational regulations were significant partial mediators of the relationship between autonomy support and engagement. Moreover, except for external regulation, all three motivational regulations fully mediated the association between relatedness and engagement. Finally, intrinsic motivation and identified regulation partially mediated the relationship between competence and engagement. Findings support SDT contentions highlighting the importance of self-determined forms of motivation in mediating need satisfaction and engagement. The mediation patterns and directions for future research are discussed.

  • 23.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Adolescent and adult implications of girls’ pubertal timing2012In: Girls at risk: Swedish longitudinal research on adjustment / [ed] Anna-Karin Andershed, New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2012, p. 9-34Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Puberty is a milestone in female development. It is the process through which girls become capable of sexual reproduction and during which major physical changes occur. Puberty is often viewed as one of girls’ troubles. In fact, pubertal development is linked with adjustment in many areas of life, with pubertal timing—when in relation to same-sex, same-age peers a girl experiences puberty—being associated with adjustment difficulties in particular. According to a substantial literature, puberty appears to be troublesome mostly for girls who mature early. Despite being vast, the literature has important limitations, including a lack of comprehensive models placing girls in their contexts and a considerable lack of long-term follow-ups. In this chapter, the role of pubertal timing in adolescent and adult adjustment is studied in a broader developmental context using a cohort of children from a middle-size urban Swedish community who have been followed across 33 years within the Individual Development and Adaptation program. Biological (puberty), psychological (self-perceptions), and environmental (heterosexual relationships) factors are examined simultaneously. The findings suggest that early puberty is associated with adjustment difficulties in several areas, but when pubertal timing is considered in conjunction with psychological and social factors, a more differentiated picture emerge. Certain subgroups of early-developing females might be among those who show the most positive adjustment. From a long-term perspective, pubertal timing continues to in some respects play a role in adulthood. In conclusion, early-developing girls need not be at risk girls. Rather, neglecting to view pubertal timing in its context likely masks that different early-developing girls have different patterns of adjustment in adolescence and, in addition, different developmental paths to adulthood.

  • 24.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Adolescent and adult implications of girls' pubertal timing: what roles do perceived maturity and early sexuality play?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 25. Skoog, Therése
    Läraren sitter på två stolar: när ska hon falla emellan?2012In: Universitetsläraren, ISSN 0282-4973, no 3, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Måste man välja vilket ben man ska stå på?: om metodtriangulering2013In: Barn- och ungdomsforskning: metoder och arbetssätt / [ed] Soly Erlandsson, Lena Sjöberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013, 1, p. 225-243Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    On the developmental significance of female pubertal timing2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Puberty is the process of becoming sexually mature and it has fundamental somatic and psychosocial implications. The focus of this dissertation was the short and long term developmental significance, concerning both soma et psyche, of female pubertal timing. Four studies were designed to accomplish these aims. Six samples of different ages from different countries and from different time points, comprising several thousand females some of which were followed longitudinally, were used. Age at menarche was used as the primary measure of pubertal maturation. The first main aim of this dissertation was to explore the mechanisms that might explain the well-established link between female pubertal timing and problem behavior, and to identify contextual conditions at which associations are stronger or weaker. Existing explanations are unsatisfactory and little is known about conditions that might affect the strength of the associations.

    In Paper I, we tested and confirmed a peer socialization hypothesis as a satisfactory explanation for the link between early puberty and problematic adjustment. In short, this hypothesis posits that early developing girls associate with older peers and boyfriends because they feel more mature than their same age peers, and through these peers and boyfriends the early developed girls are channeled into more socially advanced behaviors, including normbreaking. This should be particularly true in contexts where heterosexual relationships are sanctioned and where there is an abundance of deviant youth. In Paper II, I used a biopsychosocial approach and studied pubertal timing along with self-perceptions of maturity and early romantic relationships. The findings revealed that early puberty had very different implications depending on the psychological and social contexts in which it was embedded. For instance, when early puberty was coupled with feeling mature and having early romantic relationships, it was associated with adjustment problems. When early puberty was coupled with neither, it was not linked to particularly high levels of problem behavior.

    In stark contrast to the vast literature on the role of female pubertal timing in adolescence, the literature on long-term implications is remarkably limited. For this reason, the second main aim of this dissertation was to study the adult implications of female pubertal timing. In Papers III and IV, we examined long term implications of pubertal timing, particularly as it relates to somatic development. The findings suggested that pubertal timing does have future implications for women’s body perception and composition, with early developing females having higher body mass indexes in adulthood, but only under certain circumstances. The findings of this dissertation help further understanding of the soma et psyche implications of female pubertal timing. They indicate that pubertal timing has concurrent and future implications. It seems, however, that timing is not everything. The developmental significance of female pubertal timing appears to be very different under different contextual conditions. Thus, it is only when girls’ psychological and social contexts are considered that fruitful predictions can be made. As such, the findings have important implications for prevention, policy, and practice.

    List of papers
    1. Female pubertal timing and problem behavior: explaining the mechanism at different levels of social contexts
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Female pubertal timing and problem behavior: explaining the mechanism at different levels of social contexts
    (English)Manuscript (Other academic)
    National Category
    Psychology
    Research subject
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2952 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-03-24 Created: 2008-03-24 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    2. Adolescent and adult implications of girls' pubertal timing: what roles do perceived maturity and early sexuality play?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescent and adult implications of girls' pubertal timing: what roles do perceived maturity and early sexuality play?
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Psychology
    Research subject
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15481 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-05-05 Created: 2011-05-05 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    3. Very long-term follow-up of girls with early and late menarche
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Very long-term follow-up of girls with early and late menarche
    2005 (English)In: Abnormalities in puberty: scientific and clinical advances / [ed] H. A. Delemarre-van de Waal, Basel: Karger , 2005, p. 126-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Short- and long-term psychosocial effects of precocious or early normal puberty are probably more important for individuals than the moderate losses in final height they experience. Despite this, pediatric endocrinologists have focused much more on final height than psychosocial outcomes. As a surrogate for long-term follow-up studies of girls with precocious puberty, we have reviewed the results of a very long-term study of physical and psychosocial development of girls with normal early puberty. Results revealed that at age 15-16, girls with menarche before age 11 (early) were more norm-breaking, including being delinquents. In addition, they had earlier advanced sexual experiences. By adult age, there were no differences in psychosocial adjustment between the early- and late-developed women. Thus, the effects of early pubertal timing for psychosocial problems seem to be adolescent-limited. At ages 27 and 43, early-developed women had lower academic education. Regarding somatic development, at age 43, women with early menarche were shorter and heavier, had worse physical fitness and dieted more frequently compared to other women. There was no difference in quality of life. In searching for reasons for the antisocial behaviors in adolescence and the lower educational levels among early developers, early heterosexual relations seem to be the most crucial.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Basel: Karger, 2005
    Series
    Endocrine development, ISSN 1421-7082 ; 8
    National Category
    Psychology
    Research subject
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2954 (URN)978-3-8055-7867-7 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2008-03-24 Created: 2008-03-24 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    4. Does appetite affect the association between female pubertal timing and adult weight status?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does appetite affect the association between female pubertal timing and adult weight status?
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Psychology
    Research subject
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2955 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-03-24 Created: 2008-03-24 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
  • 28.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Physical Appearance and Sexual Activity Mediate the Link between Early Puberty and Sexual Harassment Victimization in Male Adolescents2016In: Sex Roles, ISSN 0360-0025, E-ISSN 1573-2762, Vol. 75, no 7-8, p. 339-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contrary to common belief, research shows that male adolescents are frequent targets of sexual harassment. According to some prior studies, early puberty puts male adolescents at a particular risk for being sexually harassed. In this cross-sectional study, we tested two competing explanations of the link between male pubertal timing and sexual harassment in early adolescence. The explanations were based on evolutionary and feminist theories. The sample included 704 seventh-grade Swedish male adolescents (Mage = 13.37, SD = .59). We found that looking more mature and being sexually active significantly mediated the link between pubertal timing and sexual harassment. The magnitude of the indirect effects did not differ significantly from each other. These findings largely replicate prior research for female adolescents, and they suggest that early pubertal timing is linked to victimizing sexual phenomena in early adolescence through young men’s normative sexually mature appearance and sexual activities. Tolerance and respect for differences should be central components of interventions aimed at reducing sexual harassment among young people of any gender.  

  • 29.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Understanding the Link between Pubertal Timing in Girls and the Development of Depressive Symptoms: The Role of Sexual Harassment2016In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 316-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The link between sexual maturation, or pubertal timing, in girls and adolescent depressive symptoms is well-documented, but the underlying processes remain unclear. We examined whether sexual harassment, which has previously been linked to both pubertal timing and depressive symptoms, mediates this link, using a two-wave longitudinal study including 454 girls in 7th (Mage = 13.42, SD = .53) and 8th grade (Mage = 14.42, SD = .55). Pubertal timing was linked to depressive symptoms in both age groups, and predicted an increase in depressive symptoms among the 7th graders. Sexual harassment significantly mediated the link between pubertal timing and depressive symptoms among the 7th, but not the 8th grade girls. Together, our findings suggest that one way to prevent depressive symptoms among early-maturing girls could be to address sexual harassment in preventive intervention in early adolescence.

  • 30.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bayram-Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Explaining why early-maturing girls are more exposed to sexual harassment in early adolescence2016In: Journal of Early Adolescence, ISSN 0272-4316, E-ISSN 1552-5449, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 490-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we tested two competing explanations of the previously established link between early female puberty and sexual harassment in early adolescence. The sample included 680 seventh-grade Swedish girls (Mage = 13.40, SD = .53). Findings revealed that looking more sexually mature and being sexually active mediated the link between pubertal timing and sexual harassment. The magnitude of the indirect effect through sexually mature appearance was greater than that through engagement in sexual behaviors. Apparently, early-maturing girls are sexually harassed as a result of natural and normative sexual development, which happens earlier than for most of their peers. The findings have clear implications for prevention of sexual harassment in adolescence

  • 31.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    "Jag är en idrottare": fritid, idrott och moral2014In: Att förstå ungdomars identitetsskapande: en inspirations- och metodbok / [ed] Emma Sorbring, Åsa Andersson och Martin Molin, Stockholm: Liber, 2014, 1, p. 146-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Otterman, Gabriel
    Akademiska sjukhuset i Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Review of "Child sexual abuse revisited: a population-based cross-sectional study among swiss adolescents”2014In: The Quartely Update, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 26-27Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Skoog, Per
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ungdomars identitetsutveckling och idrottande2015In: Skolhälsan, ISSN 0284-284X, no 1, p. 12-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Sorbring, Emma
    Centre for Child and Youth Studies, Department for Social and Behavioral Studies, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    Centre for Child and Youth Studies, Department for Social and Behavioral Studies, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Facebook as a means to make new peers among early maturing girls2015In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 48, p. 500-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explored, for the first time, links between female pubertal timing and adolescent Internet use, Facebook use, and the size of peer networks on Facebook in a Swedish early adolescent sample (N = 166). Although pubertal timing was not linked to Internet use or Facebook use, it was linked to being more open about oneself and having more Facebook friends in grade 7. These associations had disappeared one year later. Consonant with previous studies of offline contexts, this study provides preliminary evidence to suggest that Facebook is a means to make new peers among early maturing girls in early adolescence.

  • 35.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Jonas
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Boys' pubertal timing measured on the pubertal development scale is linked to online sexual activities2013In: International Journal of Sexual Health, ISSN 1931-7611, E-ISSN 1931-762X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 281-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    . We explored the link between boys' pubertal timing and offline and online romantic and sexual activities using a sample of 142 Swedish early adolescent boys. Boys reported on two aspects of pubertal timing, a stage-normative (measured by five indicators of physical development related to puberty) and a peer-normative, and on offline and online romantic and sexual activities. Both aspects of pubertal timing was related to being romantically and sexually active offline, but only the stage-normative measure was linked to corresponding activities online. Thus, the implications of stage-normative pubertal timing on sexual activities seem to extend to online contexts.

  • 36.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Att vara eller verka mogen: flickors pubertetsutveckling och sociala anpassning2013In: Att studera människors utveckling: resultat från forskningsprogrammet  IDA 1965-2013 / [ed] A-K Andershed and Henrik Andershed, Stockholm: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013, p. 51-71Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Does appetite affect the association between female pubertal timing and adult weight status?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Flickors pubertetsmognad och social anpassning2013In: Att studera människors utveckling: resultat från forskningsprogrammet IDA 1965-2013 / [ed] A-K. Andershed & H. Andershed, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Why and under which contextual conditions do early maturing girls develop problem behaviors?2014In: Child Development Perspectives, ISSN 1750-8592, E-ISSN 1750-8606, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 158-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have proposed several theoretical models to account for the well-established link between pubertal timing and social adjustment. The early models are general and pay little attention to mechanisms or contextual conditions, while newer models concentrate on interpersonal and contextual conditions. A recent theoretical approach-combining peer-socialization and contextual-amplification models-seeks to specify the theoretical mechanisms involved in the peer-socialization explanation of the link between girls' early maturation and problem behavior, on one hand, and the contextual conditions during which peer socialization are likely to occur, on the other. Findings from our empirical studies on micro-and macrocontextual levels support this integrative approach. Models of how puberty affects behavior should recognize the social embeddedness of adolescents' behaviors, and should therefore be contextual.

  • 40.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The Role of Pubertal Timing in What Adolescent Boys Do Online2009In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     The aim of this study was to investigate associations between pubertal timing and boys' Internet use, particularly their viewing of pornography. We used a sample comprising of 97 boys in grade 8 (M age, 14.22 years) from two schools in a medium-sized Swedish town. This age should be optimal for differentiating early, on-time, and later-maturing boys. Boys responded to self-report questionnaires on their Internet use and pubertal timing. Early, on-time, and late-maturing boys did not differ in terms of most Internet activities. However, early maturers reported downloading and viewing pornography more often than the other boys did (p<.001). The findings build on previous research on the link between pubertal timing and sexual behavior in adolescence. Moreover, they help further understanding of the behavioral implications of boys' pubertal timing.

     

     

     

  • 41.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ruiselova, Zdena
    Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia .
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Female pubertal timing and problem behaviour: the role of culture2013In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 357-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested the peer-socialization/contextual-amplification explanation for the link between early female puberty and problem behaviour. We propose that in cultures with high tolerance for adolescent heterosexual involvement, early puberty should be linked with problem behaviournot in other cultures. We compared girls in two cultures (Slovakia and Sweden) that differ in acceptance of adolescent girls' heterosexual involvement. Findings supported the hypothesis by showing that in Sweden, a culture that facilitates adolescent heterosexual involvement, early-maturing girls reported more problem behaviours than in Slovakia. The mediation link (heterosexual involvement as the mechanism linking early puberty with problem behaviour) was moderated by culture. The findings expand our understanding of the role of macro-cultural contexts in the developmental significance of female puberty.

  • 42.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    Centre for Child and Youth Studies, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Jonas
    Centre for Child and Youth Studies, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    Centre for Child and Youth Studies, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Parental attitudes and young people's online sexual activities2015In: Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning, ISSN 1468-1811, E-ISSN 1472-0825, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 129-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parental attitudes towards young people's sexuality in traditional (i.e. non-online media) settings have been associated with young people's sexual activities. In this study, we explored the association between key parent and youth characteristics and parental attitudes towards young people's online sexual activities. We also examined the association between young people's self-reported online sexual activities and parents' attitudes. Questionnaires were completed by parents and young people in 496 families. Parents' attitudes towards young people's offline and online sexual activities were closely related, although parents are more accepting in an offline setting. Parents' attitudes towards online sexuality are related to their sexual attitudes and their preferences with regard to the Internet. Parents' attitudes differ depending on the sex of the parent and the sex and age of the child. The link between parents' attitudes and young people's online sexual activities appears to be mediated by parental rules.

  • 43.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    Center for Child and Youth Studies, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden .
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    Center for Child and Youth Studies, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden .
    Adolescent girls’ and boys’ well-being in relation to online and offline sexual and romantic activity2014In: Cyberpsychology : Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, ISSN 1802-7962, E-ISSN 1802-7962, Vol. 8, no 1, p. Article 7-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to determine links between adolescent’s well-being and their sexual and romantic activities off- and online. The study includes 245 mid-adolescents (15 years of age; 55 % girls) and 251 late-adolescents (18 years of age; 49 % girls). Of the 496 teenagers, 54 % had experiences of both online and offline sexual and romantic activities, while the remaining (46 %) had only offline experiences.

    Teenagers’ experiences with online sexual/romantic activities were associated with experiences of offline sexual/romantic activities. Multiple regressions showed that age (older) and risk behaviour contributed to higher engagement in offline sexual/romantic activities. In contrast, only higher risk behaviour contributed to higher engagement in online sexual/romantic activities for boys, but for girl several factors, such as age (younger), lower body esteem, higher risk- and problem behaviour contributed to higher engagement in online sexual/romantic activities. We discuss this result from a gender perspective.

  • 44.
    Stattin, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Early pubertal timing and girls' problem behavior: integrating two hypotheses2011In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 1271-1287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Girls' early pubertal timing has been linked in many studies to behavioral problems such as delinquency and substance use. The theoretical explanations for these links have often involved the girls' peer relationships, but contexts have also been considered important in some explanations. By integrating two theoretical models, the peer-socialization and the contextual-amplification hypotheses, we propose a contextual framework for explaining the link between early pubertal timing and external problem behavior in girls. We hypothesize that early developing girls engage in unhealthy, dangerous, and risky behavior under contextual conditions that promote access to older friends and opposite-sex relationships. Under other conditions it is less likely. We tested this integrated hypothesis in two studies conducted in Sweden. The first was a cross-sectional study with information about school and free-time friends in a community sample (N = 284). Early pubertal timing was linked to having older, more normbreaking friends outside of school, but not in school, thus suggesting that the school context interferes early-developing girls' selection of older peers. The second study involved both a longitudinal (N = 434) and a cross-sectional sample of girls (N = 634), where we examined a leisure setting that is known to attract delinquent youth. Results showed that early pubertal timing was most strongly linked to delinquency for girls who spent time in this context and were heavily involved with boys and peers. In sum, results from both studies supported our predictions that certain contexts would amplify the peer-socialization effect. Overall, we conclude that the integrated peer-socialization/contextual-amplification model satisfactorily explains the link between pubertal timing and external problem behavior.

  • 45.
    Stattin, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Pubertal timing2018In: The SAGE Encyclopedia of Lifespan Human Development / [ed] M.H. Bornstein, M.E. Arterberry, K.L. Fingerman, & J.E. Lansford, Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Stattin, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Skoog, Therése
    Pubertal timing and its developmental significance for mental health and adjustment2016In: Encyclopedia of Mental Health / [ed] Howard S. Friedman, Oxford, UK: Academic Press, 2016, 2, p. 386-397Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although puberty is a universal developmental process and the developmental sequence of pubertal changes tends to be similar for boys and girls, there are considerable individual differences in the timing of puberty. In this article, we reviewed well-cited empirical studies concerning pubertal timing and its developmental significance for mental health and social adjustment outcomes in adolescence. We present the major theoretical models about pubertal development and attend to the questions of why, when, and under what circumstances puberty is consequential. We draw conclusions and discuss implications for interventions and future research.

1 - 46 of 46
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