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  • 1.
    Jonsson, Marcus
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Physiotherapy and physical activity in patients undergoing cardiac or lung cancer surgery2019Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Cardiac surgery is performed to improve prognosis, relieve symptoms and increase functional capacity in patients with cardiac disease. Postoperative pulmonary complications are common after cardiac surgery and a reduced lung function can persist a long time after surgery. A positive association between level of physical activity and lung function has been proposed in both healthy individuals and people with different disabilities. It is not clear if there is an association between level of physical activity and recovery of lung function after cardiac surgery. Lung cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed forms of cancer worldwide, and a leading cause of cancer deaths. Surgical resection is the primary approach for curative treatment. Despite the fact that physical activity has many positive effects on health, patients undergoing lung cancer surgery often report a low level of physical activity. Measuring physical activity is not easy, self-reported physical activity remains the most clinically applicable type of measurement, and a simple and valid questionnaire for screening patients would be valuable. Patients undergoing lung cancer surgery are often routinely treated by physiotherapists, but this kind of treatment has not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the effect of physiotherapy and physical activity in patients undergoing cardiac or lung cancer surgery. This thesis include one cohort study of physical activity and recovery of lung function in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, one validation study of two self-reported physical activity instruments in patients undergoing lung cancer surgery, and two randomized controlled trials investigating the effect of physiotherapy for patients undergoing lung cancer surgery. In study I, patients who remained active or increased their level of physical activity had better recovery of lung function, compared to patients who remained sedentary or reported a lower level of physical activity postoperatively. In study II, two self-reported physical activity instruments were validated against accelerometer data in patients three and twelve months after lung cancer surgery. Both instruments were found able to identify patients not meeting recommendations on physical activity. In study III, patients treated by physiotherapists were significantly more active during the first three days after lung cancer surgery, compared to an untreated control group. In study IV, no between-group differences three months after surgery were found between patients receiving in-hospital physiotherapy compared to an untreated control group. However, the patients in the treatment group reported an increase of physical activity three months after surgery compared to preoperatively, while the patients in the control group did not.

    Delarbeten
    1. Self-reported physical activity and lung function two months after cardiac surgery: a prospective cohort study
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Self-reported physical activity and lung function two months after cardiac surgery: a prospective cohort study
    2014 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery, ISSN 1749-8090, E-ISSN 1749-8090, Vol. 9, artikel-id 59Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical activity has well-established positive health-related effects. Sedentary behaviour has been associated with postoperative complications and mortality after cardiac surgery. Patients undergoing cardiac surgery often suffer from impaired lung function postoperatively. The association between physical activity and lung function in cardiac surgery patients has not previously been reported.

    Methods: Patients undergoing cardiac surgery were followed up two months postoperatively. Physical activity was assessed on a four-category scale (sedentary, moderate activity, moderate regular exercise, and regular activity and exercise), modified from the Swedish National Institute of Public Health's national survey. Formal lung function testing was performed preoperatively and two months postoperatively.

    Results: The sample included 283 patients (82% male). Two months after surgery, the level of physical activity had increased (p < 0.001) in the whole sample. Patients who remained active or increased their level of physical activity had significantly better recovery of lung function than patients who remained sedentary or had decreased their level of activity postoperatively in terms of vital capacity (94 +/- 11% of preoperative value vs. 91 (+/-) 9%; p = 0.03), inspiratory capacity (94 +/- 14% vs. 88 +/- 19%; p = 0.008), and total lung capacity (96 +/- 11% vs. 90 +/- 11%; p = 0.01).

    Conclusions: An increased level of physical activity, compared to preoperative level, was reported as early as two months after surgery. Our data shows that there could be a significant association between physical activity and recovery of lung function after cardiac surgery. The relationship between objectively measured physical activity and postoperative pulmonary recovery needs to be further examined to verify these results.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    London: BioMed Central, 2014
    Nyckelord
    Cardiac surgery, Lung function, Physical activity
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Kardiologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-35213 (URN)10.1186/1749-8090-9-59 (DOI)000335462200001 ()24678691 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84901980219 (Scopus ID)
    Forskningsfinansiär
    Hjärt-LungfondenVetenskapsrådet
    Anmärkning

    Funding Agencies:

    Research Committee of Orebro County Council

    Swedish Heart and Lung Patients National Association

    Uppsala University

    Uppsala-Orebro Regional Research Council, Sweden

    Tillgänglig från: 2014-06-03 Skapad: 2014-06-02 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-04-10Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. Validation of two self-reported physical activity instruments for patients who have undergone lung cancer surgery
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Validation of two self-reported physical activity instruments for patients who have undergone lung cancer surgery
    (Engelska)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Kirurgi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73595 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2019-04-10 Skapad: 2019-04-10 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-04-10Bibliografiskt granskad
    3. In-hospital physiotherapy improves physical activity level after lung cancer surgery: a randomized controlled trial
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>In-hospital physiotherapy improves physical activity level after lung cancer surgery: a randomized controlled trial
    Visa övriga...
    2019 (Engelska)Ingår i: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 105, nr 4, s. 434-441Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Patients undergoing lung cancer surgery are routinely offered physiotherapy. Despite its routine use, effects on postoperative physical recovery have yet not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether physiotherapy could improve postoperative in-hospital physical activity level and physical capacity.

    DESIGN: Single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    SETTING: Thoracic surgery department at a University Hospital.

    PARTICIPANTS: Patients undergoing elective thoracic surgery (n=94) for confirmed or suspected lung cancer were assessed during hospital stay.

    INTERVENTION: Daily physiotherapy, consisting of mobilization, ambulation, shoulder exercises and breathing exercises. The control group received no physiotherapy treatment.

    OUTCOMES: In-hospital physical activity assessed with the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer, six-minute walk test, spirometry and dyspnea scores.

    RESULTS: The treatment group reached significantly more accelerometer counts (2010 (1508) vs 1629 (1146), mean difference 495 [95% CI 44 to 1109]), and steps per hour (49 (47) vs 37 (34), mean difference 14 [95% CI 3 to 30]), compared to the control group, during the first three postoperative days. No significant differences in six-minute walk test (percent of preoperative 71% vs 79%, P=0.13), spirometry (FEV1 percent of preoperative 69% vs 69%, P=0.83) or dyspnoea (M-MRC 2 vs 2, P=0.74) between the groups were found.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients receiving in-hospital physiotherapy showed increased level of physical activity during the first days after lung cancer surgery, compared to an untreated control group. However, no effects on the six-minute walk test or spirometric values were found. The clinical importance of an increased physical activity level during the early postoperative period needs to be further evaluated.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01961700.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Elsevier, 2019
    Nyckelord
    Lung cancer, Physical activity, Physical therapy, Randomized clinical trial
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Kirurgi Cancer och onkologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73624 (URN)10.1016/j.physio.2018.11.001 (DOI)000496916200005 ()30871894 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062599637 (Scopus ID)
    Forskningsfinansiär
    Cancerfonden, CAN 2015/721
    Anmärkning

    Funding Agencies:

    Research Committee of Örebro County Council  OLL363321 OLL-686781

    Swedish Heart and Lung Patients National Association  E o86/13

    Tillgänglig från: 2019-04-10 Skapad: 2019-04-10 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-12-03Bibliografiskt granskad
    4. In-hospital physiotherapy and physical recovery three months after lung cancer surgery: a randomized controlled trial
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>In-hospital physiotherapy and physical recovery three months after lung cancer surgery: a randomized controlled trial
    Visa övriga...
    (Engelska)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Cancer och onkologi Kirurgi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73625 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2019-04-10 Skapad: 2019-04-10 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-04-10Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 2.
    Jonsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Vidlund, Mårten
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    In-Hospital Physiotherapy and Physical Recovery 3 Months After Lung Cancer Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial2019Ingår i: Integrative Cancer Therapies, ISSN 1534-7354, E-ISSN 1552-695X, Vol. 18, artikel-id UNSP 1534735419876346Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lung cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths. Surgery is the primary approach for curative treatment. Postoperative complications are common, and physiotherapy is often routinely provided for their prevention and treatment, even though the evidence is limited. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of in-hospital physiotherapy on postoperative physical capacity, physical activity, and lung function among patients undergoing lung cancer surgery.

    Methods: A total of 107 patients undergoing elective thoracic surgery were included in a single-blinded randomized controlled trial, and randomized to a study group, receiving in-hospital physiotherapy treatment, or a control group, not receiving in-hospital physiotherapy treatment. The patients were assessed preoperatively and 3 months after surgery. The in-hospital physiotherapy treatment consisted of early mobilization, ambulation, breathing exercises, and thoracic range of motion exercises. Physical capacity was assessed with the 6-minute walk test. Level of physical activity was objectively assessed with an accelerometer and subjectively assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire Modified for the Elderly.

    Results: Physical capacity for the whole sample was significantly decreased 3 months postoperatively compared with preoperative values (P = .047). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding physical capacity, physical activity, spirometric values, or dyspnea. However, patients in the study group increased their level of self-reported physical activity from preoperatively to 3 months postoperatively, while the patients in the control group did not.

    Conclusions: No difference in physical capacity, physical activity, or lung function was found 3 months postoperatively in lung cancer surgery patients receiving in-hospital physiotherapy compared with control patients.

  • 3.
    Jonsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Physiotherapy.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Cardiovascular Theme, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Department of Medical Diagnostics.
    Vidlund, Mårten
    Department of Vascular and Cardiothoracic surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Physiotherapy.
    In-hospital physiotherapy and physical recovery three months after lung cancer surgery: a randomized controlled trialManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 4.
    Jonsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Physiotherapy.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Department of Medical Diagnostics.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Cardiovascular Division, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vidlund, Mårten
    Department of Vascular and Cardiothoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Physiotherapy.
    In-hospital physiotherapy improves physical activity level after lung cancer surgery: a randomized controlled trial2019Ingår i: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 105, nr 4, s. 434-441Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Patients undergoing lung cancer surgery are routinely offered physiotherapy. Despite its routine use, effects on postoperative physical recovery have yet not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether physiotherapy could improve postoperative in-hospital physical activity level and physical capacity.

    DESIGN: Single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    SETTING: Thoracic surgery department at a University Hospital.

    PARTICIPANTS: Patients undergoing elective thoracic surgery (n=94) for confirmed or suspected lung cancer were assessed during hospital stay.

    INTERVENTION: Daily physiotherapy, consisting of mobilization, ambulation, shoulder exercises and breathing exercises. The control group received no physiotherapy treatment.

    OUTCOMES: In-hospital physical activity assessed with the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer, six-minute walk test, spirometry and dyspnea scores.

    RESULTS: The treatment group reached significantly more accelerometer counts (2010 (1508) vs 1629 (1146), mean difference 495 [95% CI 44 to 1109]), and steps per hour (49 (47) vs 37 (34), mean difference 14 [95% CI 3 to 30]), compared to the control group, during the first three postoperative days. No significant differences in six-minute walk test (percent of preoperative 71% vs 79%, P=0.13), spirometry (FEV1 percent of preoperative 69% vs 69%, P=0.83) or dyspnoea (M-MRC 2 vs 2, P=0.74) between the groups were found.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients receiving in-hospital physiotherapy showed increased level of physical activity during the first days after lung cancer surgery, compared to an untreated control group. However, no effects on the six-minute walk test or spirometric values were found. The clinical importance of an increased physical activity level during the early postoperative period needs to be further evaluated.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01961700.

  • 5.
    Jonsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Physiotherapy.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Department of Medical Diagnostics.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Cardiovascular Division, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vidlund, Mårten
    Department of Vascular and Cardiothoracic surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Physiotherapy/CAMTÖ.
    Physical activity level during the first three days after lung cancer surgery improves with physiotherapy: a randomized controlled trial2018Ingår i: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52, nr Suppl. 62, artikel-id OA5189Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Physical inactivity is common after lung cancer surgery. Patients undergoing lung cancer surgery are routinely offered physiotherapy. Despite its routine use, any effect on postoperative physical activity has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether physiotherapy could improve physical activity during the first days after surgery.

    Methods: A total of 94 patients undergoing elective surgery for confirmed or suspected lung cancer were consecutevily included and randomized to treatment group (n=50) or control group (n=44). The treatment group received daily physiotherapy, consisting of mobilization and ambulation, shoulder exercises and breathing exercises. The control group received no physiotherapy. Physical activity was assessed with the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer.

    Results: The patients in the treatment group reached significantly more counts (1692 vs 1197, p=0.029) and steps per hour (39 vs 25, p=0.013), during the first three days, compared to the control group.

    Conclusions: Physical activity during the first three days is increased by physiotherapy treament. The long term effect of in-hospital physiotherapy needs to be further evaluated.

  • 6.
    Jonsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Cardiothoracic surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Urell, Charlotte
    Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Emtner, Margareta
    Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Department of Physiotherapy, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Cardiothoracic surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Self-reported physical activity and lung function two months after cardiac surgery: a prospective cohort study2014Ingår i: Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery, ISSN 1749-8090, E-ISSN 1749-8090, Vol. 9, artikel-id 59Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical activity has well-established positive health-related effects. Sedentary behaviour has been associated with postoperative complications and mortality after cardiac surgery. Patients undergoing cardiac surgery often suffer from impaired lung function postoperatively. The association between physical activity and lung function in cardiac surgery patients has not previously been reported.

    Methods: Patients undergoing cardiac surgery were followed up two months postoperatively. Physical activity was assessed on a four-category scale (sedentary, moderate activity, moderate regular exercise, and regular activity and exercise), modified from the Swedish National Institute of Public Health's national survey. Formal lung function testing was performed preoperatively and two months postoperatively.

    Results: The sample included 283 patients (82% male). Two months after surgery, the level of physical activity had increased (p < 0.001) in the whole sample. Patients who remained active or increased their level of physical activity had significantly better recovery of lung function than patients who remained sedentary or had decreased their level of activity postoperatively in terms of vital capacity (94 +/- 11% of preoperative value vs. 91 (+/-) 9%; p = 0.03), inspiratory capacity (94 +/- 14% vs. 88 +/- 19%; p = 0.008), and total lung capacity (96 +/- 11% vs. 90 +/- 11%; p = 0.01).

    Conclusions: An increased level of physical activity, compared to preoperative level, was reported as early as two months after surgery. Our data shows that there could be a significant association between physical activity and recovery of lung function after cardiac surgery. The relationship between objectively measured physical activity and postoperative pulmonary recovery needs to be further examined to verify these results.

  • 7.
    Jonsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Physiotherapy.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Physiotherapy.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Cardiovascular Theme, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Department of Medical Diagnostics.
    Validation of two self-reported physical activity instruments for patients who have undergone lung cancer surgeryManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 8.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Jonsson, Marcus
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Emtner, Margareta
    Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pulmonary function and health-related quality of life 1-year follow up after cardiac surgery2016Ingår i: Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery, ISSN 1749-8090, E-ISSN 1749-8090, Vol. 11, nr 1, artikel-id 99Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pulmonary function is severely reduced in the early period after cardiac surgery, and impairments have been described up to 4-6 months after surgery. Evaluation of pulmonary function in a longer perspective is lacking. In this prospective study pulmonary function and health-related quality of life were investigated 1 year after cardiac surgery.

    Methods: Pulmonary function measurements, health-related quality of life (SF-36), dyspnoea, subjective breathing and coughing ability and pain were evaluated before and 1 year after surgery in 150 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, valve surgery or combined surgery.

    Results: One year after surgery the forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s were significantly decreased (by 4-5 %) compared to preoperative values (p < 0.05). Saturation of peripheral oxygen was unchanged 1 year postoperatively compared to baseline. A significantly improved health-related quality of life was found 1 year after surgery, with improvements in all eight aspects of SF-36 (p < 0.001). Sternotomy-related pain was low 1 year postoperatively at rest (median 0 [min-max; 0-7]), while taking a deep breath (0 [0-4]) and while coughing (0 [0-8]). A more pronounced decrease in pulmonary function was associated with dyspnoea limitations and impaired subjective breathing and coughing ability.

    Conclusions: One year after cardiac surgery static and dynamic lung function measurements were slightly decreased, while health-related quality of life was improved in comparison to preoperative values. Measured levels of pain were low and saturation of peripheral oxygen was same as preoperatively.

  • 9.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Department of Physiotherapy, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro, Sweden .
    Urell, Charlotte
    Physiotherapy, Department of Neuroscience, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Jonsson, Marcus
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Department of Physiotherapy, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden .
    Hedenström, Hans
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Emtner, Margareta
    Physiotherapy, Department of Neuroscience, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Deep breathing exercises performed 2 months following cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial2014Ingår i: Journal of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation and prevention, ISSN 1932-7501, Vol. 34, nr 1, s. 34-42Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Postoperative breathing exercises are recommended to cardiac surgery patients. Instructions concerning how long patients should continue exercises after discharge vary, and the significance of treatment needs to be determined. Our aim was to assess the effects of home-based deep breathing exercises performed with a positive expiratory pressure device for 2 months following cardiac surgery.

    METHODS: The study design was a prospective, single-blinded, parallel-group, randomized trial. Patients performing breathing exercises 2 months after cardiac surgery (n = 159) were compared with a control group (n = 154) performing no breathing exercises after discharge. The intervention consisted of 30 slow deep breaths performed with a positive expiratory pressure device (10-15 cm H2O), 5 times a day, during the first 2 months after surgery. The outcomes were lung function measurements, oxygen saturation, thoracic excursion mobility, subjective perception of breathing and pain, patient-perceived quality of recovery (40-Item Quality of Recovery score), health-related quality of life (36-Item Short Form Health Survey), and self-reported respiratory tract infection/pneumonia and antibiotic treatment.

    RESULTS: Two months postoperatively, the patients had significantly reduced lung function, with a mean decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 second to 93 ± 12% (P< .001) of preoperative values. Oxygenation had returned to preoperative values, and 5 of 8 aspects in the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey were improved compared with preoperative values (P< .01). There were no significant differences between the groups in any of the measured outcomes.

    CONCLUSION: No significant differences in lung function, subjective perceptions, or quality of life were found between patients performing home-based deep breathing exercises and control patients 2 months after cardiac surgery.

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