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  • 1.
    Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Economics and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Laage-Hellman, Jens
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Frida
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shih, Tommy
    Department of Business Administration, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Exploring the roles of university spin-offs in business networks2016In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 59, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies different university spin-off (USO) roles related to resource interaction among business parties. It does so by mapping how USOs become part of business networks in terms of their roles relative to other parties. The theoretical frame of reference focuses on roles and resource interaction based on an industrial network approach to business markets. The empirical research is based onfive cases of USOs representing a variety in terms of technology, degree of newness, sector, and area of application. As a result of the analysis, three different roles are identified: the USO as resource mediator, resource re-combiner and resource renewer. These roles reflect how USOs adapt resources to, or require changes among, business parties' resources. The paper also discusses the main resource interfaces associated with the three roles and related challenges. The paper contributes to previous research through illustrating USOs' roles relative to business parties from a resource interaction point of view, and by pointing to the establishment of new companies in business networks as a way of implementing innovation. Finally, the paper discusses the managerial implications of the research in terms of the USO's need to understand which role to take and how to develop it.

  • 2. AAboen, Lise
    et al.
    Laage-Hellman, Jens
    Chalmers University of technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Frida
    Chalmers University of technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shih, Tommy
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    University spin-offs and their roles in business networks2014In: IMP Conference, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Adams, Richard
    et al.
    University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, UK.
    Alexander, Allen
    University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, UK.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Innovation management capabilities for start-ups and spin-offs: A literature review2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Adams, Richard
    et al.
    University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, UK.
    Alexander, Allen
    University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, UK.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Innovation management capabilities for start-ups and spin-offs: A literature review2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A firm’s ability to innovate is critical to retaining its competitiveness and even survival: in the long run it is the capability to generate a stream of product and process changes that matters. Consequently to secure their position into the future, firms need to be able to develop, maintain and renew their Innovation Management Capability (IMC). In order to improve their firm’s IMC, managers need to know which ‘levers’ to pull. An extensive and diverse body of literature exists that has sought to identify these important factors, and several attempts at synthesis have been made which imply that organisations successfully able to innovate exhibit a number of generic characteristics. The contingency perspective presents a challenge to these views and raises questions about their universal applicability, whether or not different contexts demand different IMCs and to what extent there is variation in generic factors across different contexts. This paper presents a literature review on innovation management capability in relation to firms that are at the early stages of development, whether they are starting out or spinning-off from other organisations. Start-ups and spin-outs (SUSOs) constitute important motors for industrial change, and their IMCs are therefore important considerations. The aim of this review is to assess the pertinence of the IMC construct for organisations in the early stages of their development and uncover any contextual contingencies. The paper indicates that SUSOs are heavily reliant on their linkages, networks and connectivity. This would seem intuitive as at the outset a firm can benefit from having mentors, partners and networks. In the open innovation paradigm, where connectivity and links are essential, this is reinforced. The paper also indicates that the IMC is described somewhat differently for SUSOs than in the general literature, a finding that emphasises how firm newness impacts IMC.

  • 5.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sweden.
    Dahlin, Peter
    Havila, Virpi
    Holtström, Johan
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Corporate restructuring and customers and suppliers2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Dahlin, Peter
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Havila, Virpi
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Including customers and suppliers in the understanding of mergers and acquisitions2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Dahlin, Peter
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Havila, Virpi
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    The Stake of Customers and Suppliers in Mergers and Acquisitions2016In: SMS 36th Annual Conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For a firm, customers and suppliers are important stakeholders in their business activities, including such strategic activities as mergers and acquisitions. But how has this been depicted in previous research? In this paper we review articles on mergers and acquisitions to find out in what way customers and suppliers are recognized in the research on mergers and acquisitions. The paper is a review of 1,632 articles. The analysis proposes six categories: customers and suppliers in vertical integration; customers as an aggregated market; customers and suppliers as resources; customers (and suppliers) being affected by changed market conditions; the merger or acquisition following from or leading to power imbalances in relationships to customers/suppliers; and customers and suppliers as actors or reactors.

  • 8.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Are Mergers or Acquisitions expected to affect customer and supplier relationships?: An Analysis of Decisions Taken by a Competition Authority2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies concerning corporate mergers and acquisitions are mainly focused on the merging companies. Recently though, there has been an increased interest concerning connected companies, e.g. those firms having customer, supplier or other business relationships with participants in a merger or acquisition. In many countries, there is a legal prerequisite to report intended business concentration to the national competition authority for investigation. This paper investigates decisions made by a competition authority and in addition looks at studies where connected companies are mentioned by the authorities in such decisions. In very few of the investigated decisions, 2.4%, is a third party identified. Our conclusion is that customers and suppliers, if at all effected, are seen as reactive rather than active partners in a concentration. And, the concept supplier or customer relationship is not used.

  • 9.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Connectedness in complementary acquisitions: Effects on customers and suppliers2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School , Jönköping , Sweden.
    Holtström, Johan
    Department of Management and Engineering , Linköping University, Linköping , Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Department of Industrial Management and Logistics , Lund University, Lund , Sweden.
    Do competition authorities consider business relationships?2012In: Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing, ISSN 1051-712X, E-ISSN 1547-0628, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 67-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Companies engage in business relationships for a variety of reasons, including specialization, product development, and building competitive networks. Research has demonstrated that mergers and acquisitions (M&As) may challenge ongoing business relationships. The purpose of this article is to investigate whether and how competition authorities consider business relationships when evaluating M&As.

    Methodology: The article uses the documentation from 450 M&As reported to the Swedish competition authority to capture the way in which an authority evaluates M&As. The Swedish competition authority evaluation corresponds to other national and international evaluation procedures.

    Findings: The findings indicate that the competition authorities neglect an important aspect of business life, namely companies forming business relationships. The competition authorities evaluate M&As on the basis of risk for price increases, and consequently disregard such issues as heterogeneity in demand and offerings, and values built into existing business relationships.

    Originality/Value/Contribution: The article contributes to research on business relationships through exploring how a public authority deals with such relationships. It also contributes to research on mergers and acquisitions through examining how these activities are evaluated by competition authorities. Furthermore, the article contributes to competition research by reflecting on competition law concerning M&A regulations in relation to business relationships.

  • 11. Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Bessant, John
    Heinonen, Tarja
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Trifilova, Anna
    Meeting radical change: SMEs and innovation capabilities2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radically new ideas, or disruptive innovations, would expect to come from inside companies, or possibly in their collaboration with other parties. However, they may also be 'forced' on a company from outside, and then be so without necessarily bringing any solutions on how to deal with the new situation. The energy sector is bound to deal with major changes. For SMEs acting in the sector, their ability to take on, or even invent, new solutions to meet such pressures may be limited. The sector is marked by high investment costs and the sector is also highly regulated in terms of what to produce. In this study we explore how prepared SMEs are to meet radical change in the energy sector. Managers from ten SMEs in Finland completed an Innovation Fitness survey and were interviewed. The study indicates how the SME managers are unprepared for new external requirements and need to better orient themselves before actually being able to tackle arising issues. The paper points to the importance of actively searching the environment for changes. It contributes to the innovation literature through pointing to how innovation may be forced from the outside, and deal with fighting for its survival, rather than be seen as a competitive advantage from inside out.

  • 12.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Carlborg, Per
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hasche, Nina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Kask, Johan
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Linton, Gabriel
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shahin Moghadam, Sarah
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Jussila, Jari J.
    Jyväskylä University, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Mustafee, Navonil
    University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, United Kingdom.
    Shams, Tawfiq
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Clustering the imp thought: searching roots and diversities in imp research2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMP research is often treated as an empirical perspective describing complexities of repeated business-to-business exchanges and their embeddedness. While building on some common understandings and concepts, this paper asks: How homogeneous is the IMP research? This paper uses cluster analysis to capture the roots and various sub-groups of IMP research as means to depict the question of homogeneity (i.e. a core focus in the research) or heterogeneity (i.e. using references from other fields or specific to sub-fields) of the IMP thought. In this scientific work in progress paper we introduce how we design to use bibliographical methods in order to harvest data from an extensive amount of IMP-related articles written from the 1970’s onwards. In this first attempt to reveal IMP we used overall 294 articles yielded to 10,615 co-citation relationships. A threshold of minimum number of citations of a cited reference was set to five (5) to capture such references that have been cited in multiple publications. We introduce visual mapping of defined subject area clusters and as an example we describe shortly clusters. Perhaps not surprisingly our findings suggest that IMP research is not so homogenous, with at least four clear clusters of IMP-research each utilizing different key references.

    Download full text (pdf)
    CLUSTERING THE IMP THOUGHT: SEARCHING ROOTS AND DIVERSITITES IN IMP RESEARCH
  • 13.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Carlborg, Per
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hasche, Nina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Jussila, J.
    Häme University of Applied Sciences, Research Unit for Smart Services, Hämeenlinna, Finland.
    Kask, Johan
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Linton, Gabriel
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Mustafee, N.
    Häme University of Applied Sciences, Research Unit for Smart Services, Hämeenlinna, Finland.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Harvard University, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Cambridge Street, MA, Cambridge, USA.
    Charting the reach and contribution of IMP literature in other disciplines: A bibliometric analysis2020In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 87, p. 47-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acknowledgement of a research tradition by other disciplines shows its contribution to the development of the broader body of scientific knowledge. This paper investigates the contribution of IMP (Industrial Marketing and Purchasing) research to broader research disciplines by analyzing how researchers within and beyond IMP have cited core IMP articles. First, through quantitative bibliometric analysis, the paper identifies the diffusion to other research disciplines. Thereafter, through qualitative analysis, the impact of the IMP perspective is captured to understand how strong these imprints are. The analyses show that IMP research has been noticed among a range of adjacent research disciplines. However, the use of IMP references has generally been rudimentary, and without a deeper understanding of the IMP ontology, meaning that IMP still has some “weak ties” to the other disciplines. Establishing IMP's contribution through enduring imprints would need further engagement with researchers from other research disciplines and publications in top journals. The paper contributes empirically with how the IMP perspective has spread beyond the IMP Group and theoretically by adding insight into how research ideas travel and transform to other disciplines. 

  • 14.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Suominen, Anu
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Jussila, Jari J.
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Innovation enablers attracting Gen Z at future workplace2018In: Proceedings of the 2018 ISPIM Innovation Conference (Stockholm) / [ed] Iain Bitran, Steffen Conn, K.R.E Huizingh, Olga Kokshagina, Marko Torkkeli, Marcus Tynnhammar, LUT , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased focus in popular press has been directed at how individuals born at different times differ in their preferences and ways of acting. Generation Z (Gen Z) refers to individuals born in the 1990s that are often described to be self-centred but also entrepreneurial, potentially based on how the abilities to get at permanent position has changed during the last decades. The purpose of this study is to investigate: What does Gen Z consider important organizational innovation factors at a future workplace? Based on a questionnaire directed at individuals as part of Gen Z, we focus our analysis on innovation enablers, to thereby also see how Gen Z’s expectations fit with needs to continuously and increasingly rapidly renew operations. With this study we contribute to a greater academic understanding of a new and in Sweden relatively unexplored Gen Z. The practical implication of the study is to provide employers with guidelines on how to create successful innovation incubation environments at their workplace.

  • 15.
    Asnafi, Nader
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Shams, Tawfiq
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Aspenberg, David
    DYNAmore Nordic AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    3D Metal Printing from an Industrial Perspective: Product Design, Production and Business Models2018In: Metal Additive Manufacturing Conference 2018 Proceedings: Industrial perspectives in Additive Technologies, Vienna, Austria: ASMET , 2018, p. 304-313Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is focused on automotive stamping tools and dies and the impact of 3D metal printing and metals related 3D printing on design and production of such tools and dies. The purpose has been to find out the current industrial potential of 3D printing, as far lead time, costs, shapes, material usage, metal piece size, surface roughness, hardness, strength, and machinability are concerned. The business transformational impact of 3D printing is also addressed in this paper. The obtained results show that the lead time can be halved, the costs are somewhat higher, and the strength, hardness, surface roughness and machinability of the 3D printed metallic tools and dies are as good as those of the conventionally made. The maximum size of a metal piece that can be 3D printed today by Powder Bed Fusion (PBF) is in the best case 500 mm x 500 mm x 500 mm. 3D printing can also be used to make the pattern used to make the mold box in iron and steel casting. It is also possible to eliminate the casting pattern, since the mold box can be 3D printed directly. All this has started to have a large business impact and it is therefore of great significance to outline and execute an action plan almost immediately.

  • 16.
    Asnafi, Nader
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Shams, Tawfiq
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Aspenberg, David
    DYNAmore Nordic AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    3D Metal Printing from an Industrial Perspective: Product Design, Production, and Business Models2019In: Berg- und Huttenmännische Monatshefte (BHM), ISSN 0005-8912, E-ISSN 1613-7531, Vol. 164, no 3, p. 91-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is focused on automotive stamping tools and dies as well as the impact of 3D metal printing and metals related 3D-printing on design and production of such tools and dies. The purpose has been to find out the current industrial potential of 3D-printing as far as lead time, costs, shapes, material usage, metal piece size, surface roughness, hardness, strength, and machinability are concerned. The business transformational impact of 3D-printing is also addressed in this paper. The obtained results show that the lead time can be halved, the costs are somewhat higher, and the strength, hardness, surface roughness, and machinability of the 3D-printed metallic tools and dies are as good as those of the conventionally made. The maximum size of a metal piece that can be 3D-printed today by Powder Bed Fusion (PBF) is, in the best case, 500 mm × 500 mm × 500 mm. 3D-printing can also be used for the pattern to make the mold box in iron and steel casting. It is also possible to eliminate the casting pattern, since the mold box can be 3D-printed directly. All this has started to have a large business impact, and it is therefore of great significance to outline and execute an action plan almost immediately.

  • 17.
    Babri, Maira
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Carlborg, Per
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Bildningspraktika för ekonomer2020In: Organisation & Samhälle, ISSN 2001-9114, E-ISSN 2002-0287, no 2, p. 70-71Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Havenvid, Malena Ingemansson
    NTNU, Norway.
    Linné, Åse
    Uppsala University, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ration Institute, Sweden.
    Start-ups and networks: Interactive perspectives and a research agenda2019In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 80, p. 58-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article introduces Industrial Marketing Management's special issue on start-ups and networks. To begin with, we stress the relevance of understanding the context wherein entrepreneurship unfolds – a context filled with social, technical and economic connections to which the start-up needs to relate. We also present and confront three network perspectives which bring different insights to the interplay between start-ups and networks: Social Network (SN) theory, the Industrial Marketing & Purchasing (IMP) view, and Actor-Network Theory (ANT). Next, we introduce the 12 papers of this special issue and place them on a continuum covering a start-up's process of network embedding and including the three periods of establishmentconsolidation and stabilization. We conclude with a research agenda suggesting five avenues for further research: (1) tracing start-ups' process of network embedding, (2) mapping the connections between the different networks affecting a start-up, (3) grasping the negative effects of networks on start-ups, (4) making longitudinal case studies on start-ups and networks more comparable via common analytical tools, and (5) investigating how policy influences the complex interplay between start-ups and networks.

  • 19.
    Bessant, John
    et al.
    Centre for Innovation and Service Research, University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, United Kingdom.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Centre for Innovation and Service Research, United Kingdom and Department of Business Administration, University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, UK.
    Trifilova, Anna
    Centre for Innovation and Service Research, University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, United Kingdom; Faculty of Economics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Framing problems in radical innovation2014In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 1284-1292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The challenge of managing radical innovation is partly about dealing with higher levels of uncertainty as organisations seek to extend their exploration into new technological and market spaces. Innovation management routines for dealing with this differ from those around incremental innovation — the well-established exploit/explore dilemma. But it can be argued that there is a second challenge associated with radical innovation under conditions of discontinuity — when new elements in the environment need to be brought into the organisation's frame for search, selection and implementation. Under these conditions existing routines fail and otherwise successful incumbents experience significant difficulties. This paper explores the challenge of such radical innovation through the lens of the ways in which innovation activity is framed and contributes to the theme of this Special Issue through discussing barriers and enabling routines associated with the search, selection, and implementation processes within organisations.

  • 20. Bhuanantanonoh, K.
    et al.
    Gibbons, Paul M.
    Hinthong, S.
    Manolis, D.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sarvanidis, S.
    MRes Curriculum2005In: 1st Bath University Postgraduate Conference, Bath, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Björkman, Hans
    et al.
    WSP Analysis & Strategy, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden; University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
    Angels and demons: The religion of innovation?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Cognitive and materialistic practices in service innovation2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23. Chou, Hsin-Hui
    et al.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shih, Tommy
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Strategizing in networks: a case study on different approaches and their consequences2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24. Chou, Hsin-Hui
    et al.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shih, Tommy Tsung-Ying
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Strategies and network consequences in an interactive context2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25. Cooper, Cary
    et al.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Tarba, Shlomo Yedidia
    Culture in M&As as intra-organizational and inter-organizational value systems2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Dahlin, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Fors, Jeanette
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Press releases, annual reports and newspaper articles: Using alternative data sources for studies on business network dynamics2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research according to the IMP-tradition has a strong foundation in case studies. These case studies are often built on interviews. Whereas interviews may capture the complexity of business relationships and networks, they are associated with weaknesses, especially if the interviews are meant to capture events that occurred in the past. In this paper we challenge the one-sided use of interviews through proposing alternative data sources for studies on business network dynamics. The purpose of this paper is to discuss and exemplify how press releases, newspaper articles and annual reports can be used systematically to study business network dynamics. Examples from three ongoing studies using these sources are presented to illustrate their use. These studies indicate that press releases, annual reports and newspaper articles enable both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of business network dynamics, where the systematic use of data enables the capturing of a network at different times of its development without the risk of rationalisation or loss of memory effects.

  • 27. Dahlin, Peter
    et al.
    Pesämaa, Ossi
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Network embeddedness and the survival of start-ups: A census study of Swedish companies founded in 20072014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Dahlin, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Pesämaa, Ossi
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Network embeddedness as a factor for survival of start-ups2016In: 76th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Dahlin, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sharing economy: For whom?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    et al.
    Institute of Retail Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moradi, Jasmine
    Soundtrack Your Brand, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rudholm, Niklas
    Institute of Retail Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Effects of employees' opportunities to influence in-store music on sales: Evidence from a field experiment2021In: Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, ISSN 0969-6989, E-ISSN 1873-1384, Vol. 59, article id 102417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of in-store music on consumer behavior have attracted much attention in the marketing literature, but surprisingly few studies have investigated in-store music in relation to employees. By conducting a field experiment in eight Filippa K fashion stores in Stockholm, Sweden, we investigate whether it is beneficial for store owners to give employees more opportunities to influence the in-store music. We randomly assigned the stores into a treatment group and a control group, with the employees in the treatment stores having the opportunity to influence the in-store music through an app developed by Soundtrack Your Brand (SYB). The experiment lasted 56 weeks and sales data were also gathered 22 weeks before the experiment, resulting in a total of 4626 observations. Our results show that sales decreased by 6% when the employees had the opportunity to influence the music played in the store, and the effect is driven by a reduction in sales of women's clothing. Interviews with the employees revealed that they had diverse music preferences, frequently changed songs, and preferred to play high-intensity songs. Employees thus seem to make choices regarding the in-store music that reduce sales, implying that store owners might want to limit their opportunities to influence the background music.

  • 31.
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    et al.
    HUI Research, Stockholm, Sweden; Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Moradi, Jasmine
    Rudholm, Niklas
    HUI Research AB, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Economics, Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Effects of employees’ opportunities to influence in-store music on sales: Evidence from a field experiment2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of in-store music on consumer behavior have attracted much attention in the marketing literature, but surprisingly few studies have investigated in-store music in relation to employees. Conducting a large-scale field experiment in eight Filippa K fashion stores in Stockholm, Sweden, we investigate whether it is beneficial for store owners to give employees more opportunities to influence the in-store music. The experiment lasted 56 weeks, and the stores were randomly assigned into a treatment group and a control group, with the employees in the treatment stores having the opportunity to influence the in-store music through an app developed by Soundtrack Your Brand (SYB). The results from the experiment show that sales decreased by, on average, 6% in treatment stores when employees had the opportunity to influence the music played in the store. Interviews revealed that employees frequently changed songs, preferred to play high-intensity songs, and had diverse music preferences that were not congruent with the brand values of the company. Our results thus imply that employees choose music that suits their preferences rather than based on what is optimal for the store, suggesting that store owners might want to limit their opportunities to influence the background music in stores.

  • 32.
    Degbey, W. Y.
    et al.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Nummela, N.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Recapturing Customers in Cross-border Acquisitions of Knowledge-intensive Firms: The Case of a Chinese-Finnish M&A2018In: International Businessin a Transforming World – the Changing Role of States and Firms: Proceedings of the 44th Annual Conference of European International Business Academy / [ed] Barbara Jankowska, Anna Matysek-Jędrych, Katarzyna Mroczek-Dąbrowska, The European International Business Academy , 2018, p. 128-128Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how and through what mechanisms a knowledge-intensive acquired firm influences customer recapturing following a cross-border M&A. This is studied in the setting of a Chinese firm’s acquisition of a Finnish, knowledge-intensive firm in the maritime industry. The paper indicates the following mechanisms for customer recapturing in the post-M&A integration process: investments, human resource management, information about M&A, and interest in the customer. These are linked to the influencing factors of extent of integration, key employees, and communication. The paper contributes to the literature on customer retention in M&A through focusing specifically on the recapturing of customers

  • 33. Fontana, E.
    et al.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Are you nominated? On the indirect control of direct and indirect suppliers2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Fontana, Enrico
    et al.
    Department of Management, Sasin School of Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; Mistra Centre for Sustainable Markets, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; CTF, Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Poblete, León
    Department of Business Studies, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nominated procurement and the indirect control of nominated sub-suppliers: Evidence from the Sri Lankan apparel supply chain2021In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 127, p. 179-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes and discusses nominated procurement as a means through which buyers select sub-suppliers to achieve sustainability compliance upstream in emerging economies' supply chains. Hence, it critically examines the ways buyers articulate nominated procurement and the unfolding supply chain consequences. Based on in-depth interviews and fieldwork in the Sri Lankan apparel supply chain, the findings indicate that buyers accomplish sustainability compliance among their sub-suppliers while prioritizing their own business agenda. In doing so, however, buyers perpetuate "suboptimal compliance" of raw material suppliers and "sandwiching" of direct suppliers as harmful consequences on the supply chain. These consequences link theoretically with commercial, geographical, compliance and extended-compliance pressure. This article contributes to the advancement of the Sustainable Supply Chain Management literature by theorizing about nominated procurement, direct and indirect pressure, and pointing to the supply chain consequences beyond achievements in sustainability compliance.

  • 35.
    Gebert Persson, Sabine
    et al.
    Department of Business Studies, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Mattsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Department of Marketing and Strategy, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Theories within the IMP approach: A study of the internationalization process2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Gebert-Persson, Sabine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lagin, Madelen
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sustainable and then what? The paradox of first-mover advantage2019In: nitmkg2 : Bringing Institutional Theory to Marketing / [ed] Karim Ben-Slimane, ISC Paris Business School, France Damien Chaney, South Champagne Business School, France Ashlee Humphreys, Northwestern University, USA Bernard Leca, ESSEC Business School, France , and Marie Taillard, ESCP Europe, UK, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Gebert-Persson, Sabine
    et al.
    Department of Business Studies, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Department of Marketing and Strategy, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Has research on the internationalization of firms from an IMP perspective resulted in a theory of internationalization?2015In: The IMP Journal, ISSN 2059-1403, E-ISSN 0809-7259, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 208-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Recently, increased interest has been devoted to discuss theory development in relation to business-to-business (B2B) marketing. The purpose of this paper is to explore these thoughts through describing and analyzing research on the internationalization of firms from an Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) perspective. The authors ask: to what extent have these studies resulted in a theory of internationalization?

    Design/methodology/approach: The paper is conceptual and frames research on the internationalization of firms by means of definitions, domains, relations of variables and predictions. It looks into research on internationalization based on an IMP-inspired network perspective to see to what extent research has resulted in theories of internationalization.

    Findings: While there have been substantial efforts on theorizing related to IMP-based internationalization studies, the research has not yet resulted in theory.

    Research limitations/implications: In this paper one phenomenon was selected that has already been addressed in IMP research, namely, the internationalization of firms. Had the authors chosen another phenomenon previously studied in IMP the findings might had turned out differently.

    Originality/value: The paper makes a contribution to understanding how ideas are developed, used and referenced in long-term research development for the specific phenomenon of internationalization. The paper contributes to the debate on theories within B2B research.

  • 38.
    Gebert-Persson, Sabine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Handelshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    The network approach: a theoretical discussion2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Gebert-Persson, Sabine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Handelshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Why is the network approach not a theory? Does it matter?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Christofer, Laurell
    Stockholm School of Economics, Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Christian, Sandström
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden; The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Gigging in the sharing economy2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gigs define temporary works performed by individuals in various settings (Bogenhold, Klinglmair, & Kandutsch, 2017; Healy, Nicholson, & Pekarek, 2017; Horney, 2016; Lehdonvirta, 2018). Coined in the 1920s, its long tradition relates to music and art performers and their acting on stage. It represents some sort of temporality, meaning that the exact same task may not appear again, at least not in the same surrounding. Recent trends in business life have redefined work (cf. Öberg, 2012), have brought forth such concepts as freelance and gig economies to portray individuals as self-employed and the mentioned temporality of task (Gandini, 2016; Janofsky, 2015).

    At the rise of the sharing economy, that is, peer-to-peer based exchanges accomplished by digital platforms (e.g., Belk, 2014), the providing parties’ operations could well be seen as gigs intermediated online, but facilitated offline in temporary exchanges with users. The development of the sharing economy includes an increased plurality in ways to operate though (Mair & Reischauer, 2017), not the least underlined by how the peer-to-peer exchanges have sometimes turned into ways to earn living by the providing parties. This paper sets to investigate this phenomenon by particularly focusing on how various stakeholders – internal and external actors with direct or indirect influence or participation in the exchanges (cf. Freeman, 1984) – comprehend this development. The purpose of the paper is to categorize various stakeholders’ viewpoints and their influence on the understanding of gigs in the sharing economy.

    Empirically, the paper departs from two social-media data sets: one describing Uber, the other one Foodora, as two examples of sharing economy platforms. The data sets comprises more than 30,000 social media posts. The paper analyses how the providing side of these platforms is reported on in social media also taking into account who (type of stakeholder) posts about them. Preliminary findings indicate how the providing side, albeit both studied platforms would be characterized as highly commercialized, demonstrate quite different results related to those work conditions actually at hand. While this being the case, the data reveals a shared pattern of negative connotation across stakeholder groups, with them influencing one another across the social media. The negative descriptions do, as opposed to learnings from traditional stakeholder theory, indicate expressions well beyond stakes and influences by the particular stakeholder group: a user may well engage in talks about legal regulations, for instance, while it would had been expected to mostly engage with services provided, payments, and deliveries.

    The paper contributes to previous research in several ways: Firstly, the sharing economy literature is still mainly focused on the user side of sharing, meaning that this paper fills an empirical hole in its perspective. Secondly, the methodological approach taken allows for a broad, but also integrated capturing of individual stakeholders’ understanding of the phenomenon. Hence, it includes both the definition of various stakeholder groups and how they may influence one another. Thirdly, and as the theoretical contribution, the paper provides understanding for stakeholders, their influence and participation in digital settings, and particularly how influences and viewpoints of stakeholders become separated from their participation.

  • 41.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Möhlmann, Mareike
    Warwick Business School, University of Warwick, UK.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Collaborative economy in social media – Collective action in Sweden2019In: 6th International Workshop on the Sharing Economy, June 27-29, Utrecht University: List of abstracts, 2019, p. 64-64Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper assesses the role of social media to enable collective action, that is, parties’ attempts to change behaviour in such a manner that a common goal is achieved. It studies collective action in the light of the sharing economy and some parties’ attempts to reverse the commercialisation of the sharing economy and (partially) recreate it as a collaborative economy. This paper draws social media data for almost 36 months, from 14 March 2016 to 11 February 2019, generating a dataset of 11,553 social media posts for the sharing economy, from which a subsequent dataset consisting of 533 social media posts with reference to the collaborative economy was derived. Findings point at how the collective actors were caught between conflicting interests and chose to prioritise the marketing of their own services, rather than supporting the collective action movement. Increased transactional behaviours and difficulties to reach through counteracted the collective action idea. Based on these findings, we contribute to previous research by discussing ways in which digital technology facilitates or hinders collective action in the context of digitalisation.

  • 42.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Imitating Airbnb and Uber: On the Interconnectedness of Sharing Economy Platforms and Digital Business Ventures2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Interconnectivity of Sharing Economy Platforms2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sharing economy increasingly gains momentum in several business sectors. This paper sets to investigate the interconnectivity among platforms in the sharing economy through reporting on how new platforms are created with reference to previous ones. The paper points out a seamless, unobtrusive, imitation pattern of spread of the sharing economy business model. It could be seen as information or availability based focusing on reproducing activities in ever new resource settings. Contributions are made to IMP research in the sense of continuing the discussion on how the sharing economy can be understood from the IMP perspective, and it broadens the discussion to include the network level. Imitation as a mechanism of spread raises new insights to understand how current business landscapes transition into a new logic of operations.

  • 44.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Assessing the impact of the sharing economy on the evolution of online commerce2020In: ISPIM Conference Proceedings, Manchester: The International Society for Professional Innovation Management (ISPIM) , 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to assess the impact of the sharing economy on ways in which online commerce is evolving. By utilising Social Media Analytics to systematically track the developments of the sharing economy visà-vis online commerce, we analyse an empirical material of 8,755 user-generated content covering a time period of 24 months. Our findings illustrate that the sharing economy fuels platforms focusing attention to sharing commerce but also platforms engaged in social commerce and more general forms of e-commerce. Furthermore, our findings show the sectors in which sharing commerce, social commerce and general forms of e-commerce have become particularly prevalent. The paper contributes to previous literature by providing a systematic empirical contribution on the impact of the sharing economy on the evolution of online commerce and by conceptually explaining why the sharing economy gives rise to a relatively wide plethora of online commerce initiatives.

  • 45.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sandström, Christian
    Assessing the sustainability impact of the sharing economy2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Sciences and Technology Studies, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    How sustainable is the sharing economy?: On the sustainability connotations of sharing economy platforms2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 206, p. 419-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sharing economy has evolved and spread to various sectors of the economy. Its early idea linked to the creation of more sustainable uses of resources. Since then, the development of the sharing economy has included a professionalization with self-employed suppliers rather than peers, and the question is whether the platforms following this development maintain the focus on sustainability. This paper describes and classifies the sustainability connotation of sharing economy platforms. It analyses 121 platforms derived through social media analytics to figure out whether they describe themselves as sustainable. The findings suggest that the sustainability connotation closely connects to specific sectors such as fashion, on-demand services and logistics. Meanwhile, the dominant role model platforms do not communicate about being sustainable. These findings contribute to previous research through (1) giving a systematic empirical account on the way various sharing economy platforms describe themselves in terms of sustainability, (2) pointing out the differences among the platforms, and (3) indicating the diversity in sustainability connotation among various sectors of the economy.

  • 47.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Tracking the institutional logics of the sharing economy2019In: Handbook of the sharing economy / [ed] R. W. Belk, G. M. Eckhardt & F. Bardhi, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing , 2019, p. 177-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sick, Nathalie
    University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Suseno, Yuliani
    School of Business and Law, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia.
    Institutional Change at the Sharing Economy's Fringes: Evidence from Foodora2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sick, Nathalie
    University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Suseno, Yuliani
    School of Business and Law, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia.
    Social media analytics for knowledge acquisition of market and non-market perceptions in the sharing economy2021In: Journal of Knowledge Management, ISSN 1367-3270, E-ISSN 1758-7484, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 500-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Using the case of Foodora, this paper aims to assess the impact of technological innovation of an emerging actor in the sharing economy through stakeholders' perceptions in the market and non-market domains.

    Design/methodology/approach: Using a methodological approach called social media analytics (SMA) to explore the case of Foodora, 3,250 user-generated contents in social media are systematically gathered, coded and analysed.

    Findings: The findings indicate that, while Foodora appears to be a viable provider in the marketplace, there is mounting public concern about the working conditions of its employees. In the market domain, Foodora manages its status as an online delivery platform and provider well, but at the same time, it struggles with its position in the non-market sphere, suggesting that the firm is vulnerable to regulatory change. These insights highlight the importance of simultaneously exploring and balancing market and non-market perceptions when assessing the impact of disruptive innovation.

    Originality/value: This study offers originality by providing an integrative approach to consider both the market and non-market domains. It is also novel in its use of SMA as a tool for knowledge acquisition and management to evaluate the impact of emerging technologies in the sharing economy.

  • 50.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sick, Nathalie
    Suseno, Yuliano
    Market and Non-market perceptions at fringes of the Sharing Economy: Evidence from Foodora2018Conference paper (Refereed)
12345 1 - 50 of 238
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