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  • 1.
    Ericson, Helena
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Resistance training is linked to heightened positive motivational state and lower negative affect among healthy women aged 65–702018In: Journal of Women & Aging, ISSN 0895-2841, E-ISSN 1540-7322, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 366-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resistance training (RT) improves overall health, but the psychological effects of RT in healthy old adults have not been tested. The aim of this study was to investigate a sample of 65–70-year-old healthy and physically active women to assess their sense of coherence, health-related quality of life, hope, and affect, before and after taking part in a 24-week RT intervention (N = 14), compared to controls (N = 18). Findings showed a significant increase in hope (p = 0.013) and a significant decrease in negative affect (p = 0.002). Starting RT after age 65 does not appear to negatively impact on women’s psychological health but seems to be associated with important psychological health benefits.

  • 2.
    Hosford-Donovan, Adrian
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Observational and mechanistic links between C-reactive protein and blood pressure in elderly women2016In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 89, p. 52-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is hypothesized that chronic systemic inflammation contributes to the age-related decline in cardiovascular function. The aim of the present study was to combine an assessment of the relationship between the serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in 108 elderly women (65 and 70 years) with an in-vitro exploration of the effects of CRP on the proliferative and angiogenic potential of endothelial cells exposed to serum in elderly women. Based on the median CRP level in our population, LowCRP (CRP<1.3mg/L) and HighCRP (>1.3mg/L) groups were identified. Body mass index, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were significantly higher in the HighCRP group than in the LowCRP group (p<0.05). The influence of CRP on SBP and DBP remained significant after adjustments for BMI and use of antihypertensive medication (p<0.05). When adjusting for waist circumference the observed influence of CRP on SPB was attenuated (p=0.062). We next evaluated the ability to form capillary tubes (angiogenesis assay) and the proliferation rate of endothelial cells exposed to the sera of elderly women. Increased serum CRP levels were associated with an increased doubling time of endothelial cells (R(2)=0.39; p<0.05) and decreased capillary tube length (R(2)=0.30; p<0.05), indicating a reduction in the proliferation rate of endothelial cells and angiogenic potential. In conclusion, chronic inflammation influences blood pressure in elderly women and compromises endothelial cell function, thus contributing to the age-related decline in vascular health.

  • 3.
    Marklund, Peter
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Mattsson, C. Mikael
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ponsot, Elodie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Lindvall, Björn
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindvall, Lisbeth
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ekblom, Björn
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Extensive inflammatory cell infiltration in human skeletal muscle in response to an ultraendurance exercise bout in experienced athletes2013In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 114, no 1, p. 66-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of a 24-h ultraendurance exercise bout on systemic and local muscle inflammatory reactions was investigated in nine experienced athletes. Blood and muscle biopsies were collected before (Pre), immediately after the exercise bout (Post), and after 28 h of recovery (Post28). Circulating blood levels of leukocytes, creatine kinase (CK), C-reactive protein (CRP), and selected inflammatory cytokines were assessed together with the evaluation of the occurrence of inflammatory cells (CD3(+), CD8(+), CD68(+)) and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC class I) in skeletal muscle. An extensive inflammatory cell infiltration occurred in all athletes, and the number of CD3(+), CD8(+), and CD68(+) cells were two- to threefold higher at Post28 compared with Pre (P < 0.05). The inflammatory cell infiltration was associated with a significant increase in the expression of MHC class I in muscle fibers. There was a significant increase in blood leukocyte count, IL-6, IL-8, CRP, and CK at Post. At Post28, total leukocytes, IL-6, and CK had declined, whereas IL-8 and CRP continued to increase. Increases in IL-1β and TNF-α were not significant. There were no significant associations between the magnitude of the systemic and local muscle inflammatory reactions. Signs of muscle degenerative and regenerative events were observed in all athletes with various degrees of severity and were not affected by the 24-h ultraendurance exercise bout. In conclusion, a low-intensity but very prolonged single-endurance exercise bout can generate a strong inflammatory cell infiltration in skeletal muscle of well-trained experienced ultraendurance athletes, and the amplitude of the local reaction is not proportional to the systemic inflammatory response.

  • 4.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Physical activity and not sedentary time per se influences on clustered metabolic risk in elderly community-dwelling women2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e0175496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Whether amount of time spent in sedentary activities influences on clustered metabolic risk in elderly, and to what extent such an influence is independent of physical activity behavior, remain unclear. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine cross-sectional associations of objectively assessed physical activity and sedentary behavior on metabolic risk outcomes in a sample of elderly community-dwelling women.

    Methods: Metabolic risk outcomes including waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, fasting levels of plasma glucose, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were assessed in 120 community-dwelling older women (65-70 yrs). Accelerometers were used to retrieve daily sedentary time, breaks in sedentary time, daily time in light (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and total amount of accelerometer counts. Multivariate regression models were used to examine influence of physical activity and sedentary behavior on metabolic risk outcomes including a clustered metabolic risk score.

    Results: When based on isotemporal substitution modeling, replacement of a 10-min time block of MVPA with a corresponding time block of either LPA or sedentary activities was associated with an increase in clustered metabolic risk score (beta = 0.06 to 0.08, p < 0.05), and an increase in waist circumference (beta = 1.78 to 2.19 p < 0.01). All associations indicated between sedentary time and metabolic risk outcomes were lost once variation in total accelerometer counts was adjusted for.

    Conclusions: Detrimental influence of a sedentary lifestyle on metabolic health is likely explained by variations in amounts of physical activity rather than amount of sedentary time per se. Given our findings, increased amounts of physical activity with an emphasis on increased time in MVPA should be recommended in order to promote a favorable metabolic health profile in older women.

  • 5.
    Oskarsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ulfberg, Jan
    Capio Health Center , Örebro, Sweden.
    Reduced daytime intramuscular blood flow in patients with restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease2014In: Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, ISSN 1323-1316, E-ISSN 1440-1819, Vol. 68, no 8, p. 640-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine possible signs of impairment of the microcirculation in the lower extremities of female patients suffering from primary restless legs syndrome (RLS)/Willis-Ekbom disease.

    Methods: This study was performed in eight female patients, mean age 48 years (range 21-65), diagnosed with primary RLS but otherwise healthy. Eight healthy female control subjects, mean age 47 years (range 27-64), were also included in the study. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to determine intramuscular blood flow by placing an optical single fiber in the tibialis anterior muscle belly. The studies were performed between 08.00 and 10.00 hours and 20.00 and 22.00 hours. Blood flow was expressed in perfusion units.

    Results: The median intramuscular blood flow in the RLS patients' tibialis anterior muscles, recorded from both legs, was significantly higher in the morning, at 17.9 perfusion units, than in the evening, at 12.1 perfusion units (P = 0.004). Corresponding values for the healthy controls were 13.1 perfusion units and 12.0 perfusion units, a non-significant difference. The relative fold changes of microcirculation in the RLS group compared to healthy age-matched controls were 0.7 +/- 0.3 and 1.1 +/- 0.6, respectively (P = 0.04).

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that in female patients with primary RLS, the microcirculation in the tibialis anterior muscle is higher in the morning compared with in the evening.

  • 6.
    Strandberg, Emelie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Edholm, Peter
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ponsot, Elodie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hellmén, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Engfeldt, Peter
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Riserus, Ulf
    Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Clin NuDept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Clin Nutr & Metab, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Influence of combined resistance training and healthy diet on muscle mass in healthy elderly women: a randomized controlled trial2015In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 119, no 8, p. 918-925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The delivery of efficient nonpharmacological treatment to prevent the loss of muscle mass in older adults is a major challenge, and information on the combined effects of training and diet is particularly important. Here we aimed to evaluate the effects of 24 wk of resistance training combined with a healthy dietary approach (n-6/n-3 ratio < 2) in a population of healthy and physically active older women (65-70 years). The three-armed randomized controlled trial included a resistance training + healthy diet group (RT-HD), a resistance training group (RT), and controls (CON). All subjects included in the study were physically active and had low levels of serum inflammatory markers. In accordance with the dietary goals, the n-6/n-3 ratio dietary intake significantly decreased only in RT-HD by 42%. An increase in 1 repetition maximum in leg extension occurred in RT (+20.4%) and RT-HD (+20.8%), but not in CON. Interestingly, leg lean mass significantly increased only in RT-HD (+1.8%). While there were no changes in serum C-reactive protein and IL-6 levels, a significant decrease in serum level of the pro-inflammatory precursor arachidonic acid (-5.3 +/- 9.4%) together with an increase in serum n-3 docosahexaenoic acid (+8.3%) occurred only in RT-HD. Altogether, this study demonstrates that the effects of resistance training on muscle mass in healthy older adults can be optimized by the adoption of a healthy diet.

  • 7.
    Wåhlin Larsson, Britta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Skeletal muscle in Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS)2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) are two sleep disorders that affect daily life with symptoms such as sleepiness and fatigue. It was therefore hypothesised that the skeletal muscle could be affected as symptoms from skeletal muscle are common. The overall aim of the thesis was to investigate aerobic capacity and structure of skeletal muscle in patients with OSAS and RLS and an age matched control group to provide information regarding the underlying mechanisms. The specific aims were to investigate muscle fibre composition, capillary network, capillary proliferation and sings of local inflammation in musculus tibialis anterior of RLS and OSAS.OSAS and RLS patients had a significantly lower predicted VO2 max expressed in ml/min/kg compared with the control group and in the OSAS group apnoes-hyponea index (AHI) was inversely correlated to maximal oxygen uptake Fibre type composition and muscle fibre cross sectional area in the tibialis anterior muscle was equal in all groups with a predominant proportion of slow type I fibres and a smaller fibre area in slow type I fibres compared to fast type II fibres. The distribution of fast fibres (I/IIA, IIA) did not differ except for the group IIX and IIA/IIX where OSAS and RLS had a significantly higher percentage. OSAS patients had a significantly higher number of capillaries per fibre (CAF) for slow type I fibres and CAF per fibre area (CAFA) for fast type II fibres. CFPE- index (capillary to fibre perimeter exchange) and LC/PF-index (length of capillary/perimeter of fibre) were higher in both patient groups. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and proliferating endothelial cells were analysed by double-immunofluorescence staining and were presented to a greater extent in the patient groups compared with the healthy controls. Based on normal amounts of T-cells and macrophages in the histological picture it was also demonstrated that local inflammation was not present in the tibialis anterior muscle of RLS and OSAS whish was also supported by the absence of expression of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC class I) on the surface of the tibialis anterior muscle fibres.In conclusion, the low predicted VO2 max together with higher percentage of type IIX and IIA/IIX muscle fibres indicates a low central capacity in the patient groups. The increased capillary network and the absence of inflammation indicate the occurrence of local hypoxia in tibialis anterior muscle in patients OSAS and RLS.

    List of papers
    1. Skeletal muscle morphology in patients with restless legs syndrome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Skeletal muscle morphology in patients with restless legs syndrome
    2007 (English)In: European Neurology, ISSN 0014-3022, E-ISSN 1421-9913, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 133-137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of the study was to assess the cellular and structural properties of skeletal muscle in restless legs syndrome (RLS).

    METHOD: Twenty patients and 16 controls were included. Aerobic performance was assessed using a submaximal test. On muscle biopsies taken from the tibialis anterior, fiber distribution and fiber area were analyzed together with parameters surveying the microvascularization, especially the tortuosity, which is expressed as a percent of muscle fiber perimeter in contact with the wall of the microvessel, length of capillary/perimeter of fiber (LC/PF) index.

    RESULTS: The RLS group had significantly lower predicted maximal oxygen uptake (p = 0.01) and significantly higher LC/PF index (p = 0.01) compared to the controls.

    CONCLUSION: The higher capillary tortuosity in RLS patients indicates the occurrence of significant remodeling in capillary geometry in RLS.

    National Category
    Sport and Fitness Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Research subject
    Sports Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-4035 (URN)10.1159/000104712 (DOI)000249536800002 ()17622717 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2007-09-20 Created: 2007-09-20 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Skeletal muscle morphology and aerobic capacity in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Skeletal muscle morphology and aerobic capacity in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome
    2008 (English)In: Respiration, ISSN 0025-7931, E-ISSN 1423-0356, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite the fact that patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) often have symptoms at the level of skeletal muscle such as fatigue, the question of whether the structural, cellular and functional properties of limb skeletal muscles are affected has not been fully examined. Objective: The aim was to examine physiological and muscular parameters in patients with OSAS and to assess the relationship between these parameters and the clinical symptoms. Method: Eighteen patients with OSAS and 16 controls participated. Aerobic capacity was assessed using a submaximal test. Fibre type distribution and fibre area were analyzed on muscle biopsies taken from the tibialis anterior. The microvascularization was assessed using the following parameters: (1) the number of capillaries per fibre (CAF), (2) CAF per fibre area (CAFA), (3) capillary to fibre perimeter exchange (CFPE) index, which represents the interface between muscle fibre and capillaries, and (4) length of capillary/perimeter of the fibre (LC/PF) index or capillary tortuosity, which represents the percent of muscle fibre perimeter in contact with the wall of the microvessel. Results: The OSAS group had significantly lower predicted relative maximal oxygen uptake (p = 0.0047) which was inversely correlated to the apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI; r = –0.6, p = 0.017). There was a significantly higher CFPE index for slow type I fibres (p = 0.007) and fast type II fibres (p = 0.0126) and a significantly higher LC/PF index for type I fibres (p = 0.0003) and type II fibres (p = 0.0285) in OSAS patients compared to controls. Conclusion: OSAS patients have a higher muscle microvascularization and a lower aerobic capacity than controls. Furthermore the aerobic capacity was inversely correlated to AHI.

    Keywords
    Adult, Aerobiosis, Biopsy, Needle, Capillaries/pathology, Female, Humans, Leg, Male, Microcirculation, Middle Aged, Muscle Fibers/pathology, Muscle; Skeletal/blood supply/*pathology, Oxygen Consumption, Sleep Apnea; Obstructive/pathology/*physiopathology
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Sport and Fitness Sciences
    Research subject
    Sports Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-4753 (URN)10.1159/000126492 (DOI)000258319100004 ()18408358 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-11-24 Created: 2008-11-24 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    3. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in skeletal muscle of patients with sleep disorders
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in skeletal muscle of patients with sleep disorders
    2009 (English)In: Muscle and Nerve, ISSN 0148-639X, E-ISSN 1097-4598, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 556-561Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    An increased capillary network has been observed in the skeletal muscle in patients with Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). These changes could be due to upregulation of growth factors responsible for angiogenesis.

    The aim of the study was to examine the occurrence and localization of VEGF and capillary proliferation in skeletal muscle of RLS (n=12), OSAS (n=12) and controls (n=11).

    Double-immunofluorescence staining for capillaries (CD31) and VEGF, and proliferating cells (Ki-67), was carried out on biopsies taken from the tibialis anterior. The percentage of capillaries expressing VEGF (CD31,VEGF+)  was significantly higher in OSAS and RLS compared to controls. The percentage of proliferating capillaries (CD31,Ki-67+)  was significantly higher in OSAS compared with controls.

    In conclusion our study shows the occurrence of proliferation of endothelial cells in skeletal muscle in RLS and OSAS, supporting an upregulation of VEGF located in capillaries probably due to local hypoxia.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, 2009
    Keywords
    VEGF, immunofluorescence, capillary, RLS, OSAS
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Sport and Fitness Sciences
    Research subject
    Sports Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6213 (URN)10.1002/mus.21357 (DOI)000270794900006 ()
    Available from: 2009-04-08 Created: 2009-04-08 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Markers of local inflammation and oxidative enzymes in musculus tibialis anterior in Restless Legs Syndrome and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Markers of local inflammation and oxidative enzymes in musculus tibialis anterior in Restless Legs Syndrome and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (Other academic)
    National Category
    Physiology Sport and Fitness Sciences
    Research subject
    Sports Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6215 (URN)
    Projects
    RLS, OSAS, inflammation
    Available from: 2009-04-08 Created: 2009-04-08 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 8.
    Wåhlin Larsson, Britta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ulfberg, Jan
    Avesta Hospital, Avesta, Sweden.
    Piehl Aulin, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Skeletal muscle morphology and aerobic capacity in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome2008In: Respiration, ISSN 0025-7931, E-ISSN 1423-0356, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite the fact that patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) often have symptoms at the level of skeletal muscle such as fatigue, the question of whether the structural, cellular and functional properties of limb skeletal muscles are affected has not been fully examined. Objective: The aim was to examine physiological and muscular parameters in patients with OSAS and to assess the relationship between these parameters and the clinical symptoms. Method: Eighteen patients with OSAS and 16 controls participated. Aerobic capacity was assessed using a submaximal test. Fibre type distribution and fibre area were analyzed on muscle biopsies taken from the tibialis anterior. The microvascularization was assessed using the following parameters: (1) the number of capillaries per fibre (CAF), (2) CAF per fibre area (CAFA), (3) capillary to fibre perimeter exchange (CFPE) index, which represents the interface between muscle fibre and capillaries, and (4) length of capillary/perimeter of the fibre (LC/PF) index or capillary tortuosity, which represents the percent of muscle fibre perimeter in contact with the wall of the microvessel. Results: The OSAS group had significantly lower predicted relative maximal oxygen uptake (p = 0.0047) which was inversely correlated to the apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI; r = –0.6, p = 0.017). There was a significantly higher CFPE index for slow type I fibres (p = 0.007) and fast type II fibres (p = 0.0126) and a significantly higher LC/PF index for type I fibres (p = 0.0003) and type II fibres (p = 0.0285) in OSAS patients compared to controls. Conclusion: OSAS patients have a higher muscle microvascularization and a lower aerobic capacity than controls. Furthermore the aerobic capacity was inversely correlated to AHI.

  • 9.
    Wåhlin Larsson, Britta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine. Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ulfberg, Jan
    Avesta Hospital, Avesta, Sweden.
    Piehl Aulin, Karin
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Skeletal muscle morphology in patients with restless legs syndrome2007In: European Neurology, ISSN 0014-3022, E-ISSN 1421-9913, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 133-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of the study was to assess the cellular and structural properties of skeletal muscle in restless legs syndrome (RLS).

    METHOD: Twenty patients and 16 controls were included. Aerobic performance was assessed using a submaximal test. On muscle biopsies taken from the tibialis anterior, fiber distribution and fiber area were analyzed together with parameters surveying the microvascularization, especially the tortuosity, which is expressed as a percent of muscle fiber perimeter in contact with the wall of the microvessel, length of capillary/perimeter of fiber (LC/PF) index.

    RESULTS: The RLS group had significantly lower predicted maximal oxygen uptake (p = 0.01) and significantly higher LC/PF index (p = 0.01) compared to the controls.

    CONCLUSION: The higher capillary tortuosity in RLS patients indicates the occurrence of significant remodeling in capillary geometry in RLS.

  • 10.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Carnac, Gilles
    Univ Montpellier INSERM U1046, Montpellier, France.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    The influence of systemic inflammation on skeletal muscle in physically active elderly women2014In: Age (Omaha), ISSN 0161-9152, E-ISSN 1574-4647, ISSN 0161-9152, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 9718-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biological mechanisms responsible for the decline in skeletal muscle mass during aging remain unknown. It is hypothesized that elevations in the level of the acute phase C-reactive protein (CRP) negatively affect skeletal muscle mass in elderly. We examined the relationship between serum CRP and muscle mass in a population of active elderly women (65-70 years; n =23). Though all subjects were physically active, serum CRP levels were negatively associated to the amount of time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (R (2) = 0.20, P = 0.032) and to skeletal muscle mass (R (2)  = 0.28, P = 0.009). We further aimed to determine the potential mechanisms behind the action of systemic inflammation on skeletal muscle by exposing myoblasts isolated from vastus lateralis to the different sera from each elderly woman. The doubling time (DT) of myoblasts increased when cells were exposed to sera with high CRP levels (R (2) = 0.27, P = 0.011), indicating that CRP contributes to the impairment of the proliferative rate of myoblasts in elderly. In order to further confirm our findings, we incubated human myoblasts in exogenous CRP. Exposition to exogenous CRP induced an increase in myoblast DT by 1.21-fold (P = 0.007) and a reduction in the expression of the proliferation marker ki-67 confirming the negative influence of CRP on myoblast proliferative rate. Collectively, these findings highlight the contribution of the systemic inflammatory status in the age-related decline in skeletal muscle function.

  • 11.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ulfberg, Jan
    Sleep Disorder Center, Avesta .
    Lindvall, Björn
    Muscle Center, Departments of Neurology and Clinical Pathology, Örebro University Hospital.
    Piehl-Aulin, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Markers of local inflammation and oxidative enzymes in musculus tibialis anterior in Restless Legs Syndrome and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea SyndromeManuscript (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Ulfberg, Jan
    Avesta Hospital, Avesta, Sweden.
    Piehl-Aulin, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in skeletal muscle of patients with sleep disorders2009In: Muscle and Nerve, ISSN 0148-639X, E-ISSN 1097-4598, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 556-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increased capillary network has been observed in the skeletal muscle in patients with Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). These changes could be due to upregulation of growth factors responsible for angiogenesis.

    The aim of the study was to examine the occurrence and localization of VEGF and capillary proliferation in skeletal muscle of RLS (n=12), OSAS (n=12) and controls (n=11).

    Double-immunofluorescence staining for capillaries (CD31) and VEGF, and proliferating cells (Ki-67), was carried out on biopsies taken from the tibialis anterior. The percentage of capillaries expressing VEGF (CD31,VEGF+)  was significantly higher in OSAS and RLS compared to controls. The percentage of proliferating capillaries (CD31,Ki-67+)  was significantly higher in OSAS compared with controls.

    In conclusion our study shows the occurrence of proliferation of endothelial cells in skeletal muscle in RLS and OSAS, supporting an upregulation of VEGF located in capillaries probably due to local hypoxia.

  • 13.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Wilkinson, Daniel J.
    MRC-ARUK Centre of Excellence for Musculoskeletal Ageing Research, Division of Medical Sciences and Graduate Entry Medicine, University of Nottingham, Royal Derby Hospital Centre, Derby, United Kingdom.
    Strandberg, Emelie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Hosford-Donovan, Adrian
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Atherton, Philip J.
    MRC-ARUK Centre of Excellence for Musculoskeletal Ageing Research, Division of Medical Sciences and Graduate Entry Medicine, University of Nottingham, Royal Derby Hospital Centre, Derby, United Kingdom.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Mechanistic Links Underlying the Impact of C-Reactive Protein on Muscle Mass in Elderly2017In: Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry, ISSN 1015-8987, E-ISSN 1421-9778, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 267-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Mechanisms underlying the relationship between systemic inflammation and age-related decline in muscle mass are poorly defined. The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between the systemic inflammatory marker CRP and muscle mass in elderly and to identify mechanisms by which CRP mediates its effects on skeletal muscle, in-vitro.

    METHODS: Muscle mass and serum CRP level were determined in a cohort of 118 older women (67±1.7 years). Human muscle cells were differentiated into myotubes and were exposed to CRP. The size of myotubes was determined after immunofluorescent staining using troponin. Muscle protein synthesis was assessed using stable isotope tracers and key signalling pathways controlling protein synthesis were determined using western-blotting.

    RESULTS: We observed an inverse relationship between circulating CRP level and muscle mass (β= -0.646 (95% CI: -0.888, -0.405) p<0.05) and demonstrated a reduction (p < 0.05) in the size of human myotubes exposed to CRP for 72 h. We next showed that this morphological change was accompanied by a CRP-mediated reduction (p < 0.05) in muscle protein fractional synthetic rate of human myotubes exposed to CRP for 24 h. We also identified a CRP-mediated increased phosphorylation (p<0.05) of regulators of cellular energy stress including AMPK and downstream targets, raptor and ACC-β, together with decreased phosphorylation of Akt and rpS6, which are important factors controlling protein synthesis.

    CONCLUSION: This work established for the first time mechanistic links by which chronic elevation of CRP can contribute to age-related decline in muscle function.

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