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  • 1.
    Abdul Khaliq, Ali
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Point-to-point safe navigation of a mobile robot using stigmergy and RFID technology2016In: 2016 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2016, p. 1497-1504, article id 7759243Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reliable autonomous navigation is still a challenging problem for robots with simple and inexpensive hardware. A key difficulty is the need to maintain an internal map of the environment and an accurate estimate of the robot’s position in this map. Recently, a stigmergic approach has been proposed in which a navigation map is stored into the environment, on a grid of RFID tags, and robots use it to optimally reach predefined goal points without the need for internal maps. While effective,this approach is limited to a predefined set of goal points. In this paper, we extend this approach to enable robots to travel to any point on the RFID floor, even if it was not previously identified as a goal location, as well as to keep a safe distance from any given critical location. Our approach produces safe, repeatable and quasi-optimal trajectories without the use of internal maps, self localization, or path planning. We report experiments run in a real apartment equipped with an RFID floor, in which a service robot either reaches or avoids a user who wears slippers equipped with an RFID tag reader.

  • 2.
    Alirezaie, Marjan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Context Recognition: Towards Automatic Query Generation2015In: Ambient Intelligence: 12th European Conference, AmI 2015, Athens, Greece, November 11-13, 2015, Proceedings, Springer, 2015, p. 205-218Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present an ontology-based approach in designing knowledge model for context recognition (CR) systems. The main focus in this paper is on the use of an ontology to facilitate the generation of user-based queries to the CR system. By leveraging from the ontology, users need not know about sensor details and the structure of the ontology in expressing queries related to events of interest. To validate the approach and demonstrate the flexibility of the ontology for query generation, the ontology has been integrated in two separate application domains. The first domain considers a health care system implemented for the GiraffPlus project where the query generation process is automated to request information about activities of daily living. The second application uses the same ontology for an air quality monitoring application in the home. Since these two systems are independently developed for different purposes, the ease of applying the ontology upon them can be considered as a credit for its generality.

  • 3.
    Amato, Giuseppe
    et al.
    ISTI-CNR, Pisa, Italy.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Chessa, Stefano
    Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Dragone, Mauro
    University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Gennaro, Caludio
    ISTI-CNR, Pisa, Italy.
    Lopez, Rafa
    Robotnik Automation, Valencia, Spain.
    Maguire, Liam
    University of Ulster, Coleraine, Ireland.
    McGinnity, Martin T.
    University of Ulster, Coleraine, Ireland.
    Micheli, Alessio
    Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Renteria, Arantxa
    Tecnalia, Derio, Spain.
    O’Hare, Gregory M. P.
    University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Robotic UBIquitous COgnitive Network2012In: Ambient Intelligence: Software and Applications / [ed] Paulo Novais, Kasper Hallenborg, Dante I. Tapia, Juan M. Corchado Rodríguez, Springer-Verlag New York, 2012, p. 191-195Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robotic ecologies are networks of heterogeneous robotic devices pervasively embedded in everyday environments, where they cooperate to perform complex tasks. While their potential makes them increasingly popular, one fundamental problem is how to make them self-adaptive, so as to reduce the amount of preparation, pre-programming and human supervision that they require in real world applications. The EU FP7 project RUBICON develops self-sustaining learning solutions yielding cheaper, adaptive and efficient coordination of robotic ecologies. The approach we pursue builds upon a unique combination of methods from cognitive robotics, agent control systems, wireless sensor networks and machine learning. This paper briefly illustrates how these techniques are being extended, integrated, and applied to AAL applications.

  • 4.
    Andreasson, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bouguerra, Abdelbaki
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Cirillo, Marcello
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Dimitrov, Dimitar Nikolaev
    INRIA - Grenoble, Meylan, France.
    Driankov, Dimiter
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saarinen, Jari Pekka
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Aalto University, Espo, Finland .
    Sherikov, Aleksander
    Centre de recherche Grenoble Rhône-Alpes, Grenoble, France .
    Stoyanov, Todor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Autonomous transport vehicles: where we are and what is missing2015In: IEEE robotics & automation magazine, ISSN 1070-9932, E-ISSN 1558-223X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 64-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we address the problem of realizing a complete efficient system for automated management of fleets of autonomous ground vehicles in industrial sites. We elicit from current industrial practice and the scientific state of the art the key challenges related to autonomous transport vehicles in industrial environments and relate them to enabling techniques in perception, task allocation, motion planning, coordination, collision prediction, and control. We propose a modular approach based on least commitment, which integrates all modules through a uniform constraint-based paradigm. We describe an instantiation of this system and present a summary of the results, showing evidence of increased flexibility at the control level to adapt to contingencies.

  • 5. Bahadori, Shahram
    et al.
    Cesta, Amedeo
    Grisetti, Giorgio
    Iocchi, Luca
    Leone, Riccardo G.
    Nardi, Daniele
    Oddi, Angelo
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    Robocare: an integrated robotic system for the domestic care of the elderly2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6. Bahadori, Shahram
    et al.
    Cesta, Amedeo
    Grisetti, Giorgio
    Iocchi, Luca
    Leone, Riccardo G.
    Nardi, Daniele
    Oddi, Angelo
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    RoboCare: pervasive intelligence for the domestic care of the elderly2004In: Intelligenza Artificiale, ISSN 1724-8035, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 16-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Bahadori, Shahram
    et al.
    Cesta, Amedeo
    Iocchi, Luca
    Leone, Riccardo G.
    Nardi, Daniele
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    Scozzafava, L.
    Towards ambient intelligence for the domestic care of the elderly2005In: Ambient intelligence: a novel paradigm / [ed] Gian Luca Foresti, Tim Ellis, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2005, p. 15-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8. Beetz, Michael
    et al.
    Chatila, Raja
    Hertzberg, Joachim
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    AI Reasoning Methods for Robotics2016In: Springer Handbook of Robotics / [ed] Bruno Siciliano, Oussama Khatib, Springer, 2016, 2, p. 329-356Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Artificial intelligence (AI) reasoning technology involving, e.g., inference, planning, and learning, has a track record with a healthy number of successful applications. So can it be used as a toolbox of methods for autonomous mobile robots? Not necessarily, as reasoning on a mobile robot about its dynamic, partially known environment may differ substantially from that in knowledge-based pure software systems, where most of the named successes have been registered. Moreover, recent knowledge about the robot’s environment cannot be given a priori, but needs to be updated from sensor data, involving challenging problems of symbol grounding and knowledge base change. This chapter sketches the main robotics relevant topics of symbol-based AI reasoning. Basic methods of knowledge representation and inference are described in general, covering both logic and probability-based approaches. The chapter first gives a motivation by example, to what extent symbolic reasoning has the potential of helping robots perform in the first place. Then (Sect. 14.2), we sketch the landscape of representation languages available for the endeavor. After that (Sect. 14.3), we present approaches and results for several types of practical, robotics-related reasoning tasks, with an emphasis on temporal and spatial reasoning. Plan-based robot control is described in some more detail in Sect. 14.4. Section 14.5 concludes.

  • 9. Benedetti, Marco
    et al.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Policella, Nicola
    Anatomy of a scheduling competition2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Borissov, Alexei
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Janecek, Jakob
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Towards a network robot system for object identification and localization in RoboCup@Home2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a realization of a network robot system for autonomous object localization and identification. Developing a ``Lost \& Found'' capability, the use of which can be envisaged in a wide range of applicative domains including domestic assistive scenarios, is a challenging task for current AI and robotic technology. Indeed, this task is currently one of the core challenges within the RoboCup@Home competition. A number of approaches for implementing a robust and general Lost \& Found functionality are feasible. In this paper we present a solution which integrates state-of-the-art intelligent software, robotic and sensory components in a distributed network of cooperating modules. This article describes the design and implementation of the system, provides a preliminary experimental evaluation and discusses the applicability of our approach to the RoboCup@Home challenge.

  • 11.
    Bruno, Barbara
    et al.
    University of Genova, Genova, Italy.
    Chong, Nak Young
    Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Nomi [Ishikawa], Japan.
    Kamide, Hiroko
    Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan.
    Kanoria, Sanjeev
    Advinia Health Care Limited LTD, London, UK.
    Lee, Jaeryoung
    Chubu University, Kasugai, Japan.
    Lim, Yuto
    Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Nomi [Ishikawa], Japan.
    Kumar Pandey, Amit
    SoftBank Robotics.
    Papadopoulos, Chris
    University of Bedfordshire, Luton, UK.
    Papadopoulos, Irena
    Middlesex University Higher Education Corporation, London, UK.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sgorbissa, Antonio
    University of Genova, Genova, Italy.
    Paving the Way for Culturally Competent Robots: a Position Paper2017In: 2017 26th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN) / [ed] Howard, A; Suzuki, K; Zollo, L, New York: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017, p. 553-560Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural competence is a well known requirementfor an effective healthcare, widely investigated in thenursing literature. We claim that personal assistive robotsshould likewise be culturally competent, aware of generalcultural characteristics and of the different forms they take indifferent individuals, and sensitive to cultural differences whileperceiving, reasoning, and acting. Drawing inspiration fromexisting guidelines for culturally competent healthcare and thestate-of-the-art in culturally competent robotics, we identifythe key robot capabilities which enable culturally competentbehaviours and discuss methodologies for their developmentand evaluation.

  • 12.
    Bruno, Barbara
    et al.
    Department of Informatics, Bioengineering, Robotics and Systems Engineering, University of Genova, Genova, Italy.
    Grosinger, Jasmin
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Mastrogiovanni, Fulvio
    Department of Informatics, Bioengineering, Robotics and Systems Engineering, University of Genova, Genova, Italy.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sathyakeerthy, Subhash
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sgorbissa, Antonio
    Department of Informatics, Bioengineering, Robotics and Systems Engineering, University of Genova, Genova, Italy.
    Multi-modal sensing for human activity recognition2015In: Proceedings of the 24th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, Kobe, Japan, Aug 31 - Sept 4, 2015, New York: IEEE conference proceedings , 2015, p. 594-600Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robots for the elderly are a particular category of home assistive robots, aiming at assisting the elderly inthe execution of daily life tasks to extend their independent life. To this aim, such robots should be able to determine the level of independence of the user and track its evolution over time, to adapt the assistance to the person capabilities and needs. Human Activity Recognition systems employ various sensing strategies, relying on environmental or wearable sensors,to recognize various daily life activities which provide insights on the health status of a person. The main contribution of the article is the design of an heterogeneous information management framework, allowing for the description of a wide variety of human activities in terms of multi-modal environmental and wearable sensing data and providing accurate knowledge about the user activity to any assistive robot.

  • 13.
    Bruno, Barbara
    et al.
    Department of Informatics, Bioengineering, Robotics and Systems Engineering, University of Genova, Genova, Italy.
    Mastrogiovanni, Fulvio
    Department of Informatics, Bioengineering, Robotics and Systems Engineering, University of Genova, Genova, Italy.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sgorbissa, Antonio
    Department of Informatics, Bioengineering, Robotics and Systems Engineering, University of Genova, Genova, Italy.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    A framework for Culture-aware Robots based on Fuzzy Logic2017In: 2017 IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems (FUZZ-IEEE), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural adaptation, i.e., the matching of a robot's behaviours to the cultural norms and preferences of its user, is a well known key requirement for the success of any assistive application. However, culture-dependent robot behaviours are often implicitly set by designers, thus not allowing for an easy and automatic adaptation to different cultures. This paper presents a method for the design of culture-aware robots, that can automatically adapt their behaviour to conform to a given culture. We propose a mapping from cultural factors to related parameters of robot behaviours which relies on linguistic variables to encode heterogeneous cultural factors in a uniform formalism, and on fuzzy rules to encode qualitative relations among multiple variables. We illustrate the approach in two practical case studies.

  • 14.
    Cavallo, Filippo
    et al.
    BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
    Limosani, Raffaele
    BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
    Manzi, Alessandro
    BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
    Bonaccorsi, Manuele
    BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
    Esposito, Raffaele
    BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
    Di Rocco, Maurizio
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Teti, Giancarlo
    Robotech Srl, Peccioli, Italy.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Dario, Paolo
    BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
    Development of a socially believable multi-robot solution from town to home2014In: Cognitive Computation, ISSN 1866-9956, E-ISSN 1866-9964, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 954-967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological advances in the robotic and ICT fields represent an effective solution to address specific societal problems to support ageing and independent life. One of the key factors for these technologies is that they have to be socially acceptable and believable to the end-users. This paper aimed to present some technological aspects that have been faced to develop the Robot-Era system, a multi-robotic system that is able to act in a socially believable way in the environments daily inhabited by humans, such as urban areas, buildings and homes. In particular, this paper focuses on two services-shopping delivery and garbage collection-showing preliminary results on experiments conducted with 35 elderly people. The analysis adopts an end-user-oriented perspective, considering some of the main attributes of acceptability: usability, attitude, anxiety, trust and quality of life.

  • 15. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Bahadori, Shahram
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Grisetti, Giorgio
    Giuliani, Vittoria
    Iocchi, Luca
    Leone, Riccardo G.
    Nardi, Daniele
    Oddi, Angelo
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    Saggese, Anna
    Scopelliti, Massimiliano
    The RoboCare project, cognitive systems for the care of the elderly2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Giuliani, M. Vittoria
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Scopelliti, Massimiliano
    Tiberio, Lorenza
    The RoboCare project: the user’s view2008In: Aging, disability and independence: selected papers from the 4th international conference on aging, disability and independence / [ed] William C. Mann, IOS Press, 2008, p. 85-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Giuliani, Vittoria
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    Scopelliti, Massimiliano
    Tiberio, Lorenza
    Proactive assistive technology: an empirical study2007In: Human-Computer Interaction: INTERACT 2007 / [ed] Cécilia Calani Baranauskas, Philippe Palanque, Julio Abascal, Simone Diniz Junqueira Barbosa, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, p. 255-268Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes the problem of evaluating elderly people’s perception of assistive robots and domotic environments. Specifically, we focus on aspects related to the modalities in which interaction can occur between an elder user and an assistive robotic agent. Our work benefits from the products of project RoboCare, namely, a domestic environment in which sensors, intelligent software components and a domestic robot provide a set of cognitive support services for the elder user. This paper analyzes a number of evaluation criteria in detail, specifically related to the robot’s aspect, the way in which it communicates with the user, and the perceived usefulness of its support services. Among these criteria, the paper proposes and reports an evaluation of the Proactive interaction modality (where the system takes the initiative) and On-demand interaction (in which the user explicitly requests a service). Users evaluate the On-demand support services in personal safety scenarios as particularly useful, and less so in scenarios which are not critical. The paper also provides a discussion which can be useful for the design of future assistive agents and robotic companions. This research is partially supported by MIUR (Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research) under project RoboCare (A Multi-Agent System with Intelligent Fixed and Mobile Robotic Components).

  • 18. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Giuliani, Vittoria
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Scopelliti, Massimiliano
    Tiberio, Lorenza
    Caring about the user’s view: the joys and sorrows of experiments with people2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Giuliani, Vittoria
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Scopelliti, Massimiliano
    Tiberio, Lorenza
    Psychological implications of domestic assistive technology for the elderly2007In: PsychNology Journal, ISSN 1720-7525, E-ISSN 1720-7525, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 229-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ROBOCARE Domestic Environment (RDE) is the result of a three-year project aimed at developing cognitive support technology for elderly people. Specifically, the domestic environment is equipped with sensors, intelligent software components and devices which cooperate to provide cognitive support to the assisted person. The ROBOCARE interaction capabilities have been concentrated in a robotic mediator who acts as the main communication channel between the users and the intelligent domestic environment. This paper presents an evaluation of elderly people's perception of assistive robots and smart domotic environments. Results show how the acceptability of robotic devices in home setting does not depend only on the practical benefits they can provide, but also on complex relationships between the cognitive, affective and emotional components of people's images of robot. Specially, we analyzes a number of evaluation criteria related to the robot's aspect, the way in which it communicates with the user, and the perceived usefulness of its support services. Among these criteria, the paper proposes and reports an evaluation of how perceived frailty, with reference to both health in general and fear of cognitive weakening, more specifically, can influence the evaluation of a potential aid in everyday life, namely the robotic assistant. The paper also provides a discussion which can be useful for the design of future assistive agents and socially interactive robotic.

  • 20. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    Coordinating heterogeneous agents to synthesize proactive monitoring2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    Intelligent supervision for ambient intelligence: customizing scheduling technology2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    Mediating the knowledge of end-users and technologists: a problem in the deployment of scheduling technology2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    Monitoring domestic activities with scheduling techniques2005In: RoboCare, RC-Ws-2: proceedings of the second RoboCare workshop / [ed] Amedeo Cesta, 2005, p. 31-38Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    Supporting interaction in the robocare intelligent assistive environment2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    Synthesizing proactive assistance with heterogeneous agents2007In: AI*IA 2007: Artificial Intelligence and Human-Oriented Computing: Proceedings of the 10th Congress of the Italian Association for Artificial Intelligence, Rome, Italy, September 10-13, 2007, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, Vol. 4733, no 1, p. 495-506Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Scopelliti, Massimiliano
    Tiberio, Lorenza
    Monitoring elderly people with the robocare domestic environment: interaction synthesis and user evaluation2011In: Computational intelligence, ISSN 0824-7935, E-ISSN 1467-8640, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 60-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes aspects of a fully implemented artificial intelligence (AI) system that integrates multiple intelligent components to actively assist an elderly person at home. Specifically, we describe how constraint-based scheduling technology is used to actively monitor a pattern of activities executed by the person and how detected temporal constraint violations are used to trigger meaningful and contextualized proactive interactions. This article also presents a psychological evaluation of the system focusing on elderly people’s attitudes, in which system acceptability, perceived utility, interaction modality, and emotional response are considered.

  • 27. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Farinelli, Alessandro
    Iocchi, Luca
    Leone, Riccardo G.
    Nardi, Daniele
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    “Robotically Rich” environments for supporting elderly people at home: the RoboCare experience2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Fratini, Simone
    Oddi, Angelo
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    APSI Case# 1: pre-planning science operations in Mars Express2008In: iSAIRAS-08, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Fratini, Simone
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    A multi-component framework for planning and scheduling integration2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Fratini, Simone
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Planning with multiple-components in OMPS2008In: New frontiers in applied artificial intelligence / [ed] Ngoc Thanh Nguyen, Leszek Borzemski, Adam Grzech, Moonis Ali, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2008, p. 435-445Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Fratini, Simone
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Unifying planning and scheduling as timelines in a component-based perspective2008In: Archives of Control Science, ISSN 1230-2384, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 231-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The timeline-based approach to planning represents an effective alternative to classical planning for complex domains requiring the use of both temporal reasoning and scheduling features. This paper discusses the constraint-based approach to timeline planning and scheduling introduced in OMPS.  OMPS is a an architecture for problem solving which draws inspiration from both control theory and constraint-based reasoning, and which is based on the notion of components.The rationale behind the component-based approach shares with classical control theory a basic modeling perspective: the planning and scheduling problem is represented by identifying a set of relevant domain components which need to be controlled to obtain a desired temporal behavior for the entire system. Components are entities whose properties may vary in time and which model one or more physical (or logical) domain subsystems relevant to a given planning context. The planner/scheduler plays the role of the controller for these entities, and reasons in terms of constraints that bound their internal evolutions and the desired properties of the generated behaviors (goals). Our work complements this modeling assumption with a constraint-based computational framework.  Admissible temporal behaviors of components are specified as a set of causal constraints within a rich temporal specification, and goals are specified as temporal constraint preferences.  The OMPS software architecture presented in this paper combines both specific and generic constraint solvers in defining consistent timelines which satisfy a given set of goals.

  • 32. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Iocchi, Luca
    Leone, Giuseppe R.
    Nardi, Daniele
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Robotic, sensory and problem-solving ingredients for the future home2009In: Intelligent environments: methods, algorithms and applications / [ed] Dorothy Monekosso, Yoshinori Kuno, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009, p. 67-87Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    The robocare project: intelligent systems for elder care2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    The robocare project: multi-agent systems for the care of the elderly2003In: ERCIM News, ISSN 0926-4981, E-ISSN 1564-0094, no 53Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    A component-based framework for loosely-coupled planning and scheduling integrations2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    Biasing the structure of scheduling problems through classical planners2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Cirillo, Marcello
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lanzellotto, Federica
    Roma 3 University, Rome, Italy.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Monitoring domestic activities with temporal constraints and components2009In: Intelligent environments 2009 / [ed] V. Callaghan, A. Kameas, A. Reyes, D. Royo, M. Weber, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2009, p. 117-124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intelligent environments are increasingly rich in ubiquitous sensing capabilities that can be leveraged to know which actions a user is engaged in at any given moment in time. The ability of an intelligent environment to recognize a high-level plan of activities performed by the user in a smart home would allow to construct proactive services, such as reminding, forecasting and providing timely physical support. This article proposes an approach to human activity recognition based on temporal planning. The approach leverages on one hand the ubiquitous sensors provided by the PEIS-Home, a sensor-rich intelligent environment, and, on the other hand, the temporal representation and reasoning capabilities of OMPS, a constraint-based temporal planning and scheduling framework.

  • 38.
    Cirillo, Marcello
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Andreasson, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Uras, Tansel
    Department of Computer Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Koenig, Sven
    Department of Computer Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Integrated Motion Planning and Coordination for Industrial Vehicles2014In: Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Automated Planning and Scheduling, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing interest in the industrial sector for autonomous ground vehicles has prompted significant investment in fleet management systems. Such systems need to accommodate on-line externally imposed temporal and spatial requirements, and to adhere to them even in the presence of contingencies. Moreover, a fleet management system should ensure correctness, i.e., refuse to commit to requirements that cannot be satisfied. We present an approach to obtain sets of alternative execution patterns (called trajectory envelopes) which provide these guarantees. The approach relies on a constraint-based representation shared among multiple solvers, each of which progressively refines trajectory envelopes following a least commitment principle.

  • 39.
    Cirillo, Marcello
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Proactive assistance in ecologies of physically embedded intelligent systems: a constraint-based approach2011In: Handbook of research on ambient intelligence and smart environments: trends and perspectives / [ed] Nak-Young Chong, Fulvio Mastrogiovanni, IGI Global, 2011, p. 534-557Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main goal of this Chapter is to introduce SAM, an integrated architecture for concurrent activity recognition, planning and execution. SAM provides a general framework to define how an intelligent environment can assess contextual information from sensory data. The architecture builds upon a temporal reasoning framework operating in closed-loop between physical sensing and actuation components in a smart environments. The capabilities of the system as well as possible examples of its use are discussed in the context of the PEIS-Home, a smart environment integrated with robotic components.

  • 40.
    Coradeschi, Silvia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Cesta, Amadeo
    Consiglio Nazionale Delle Ricerche, Bari, Italy.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Consiglio Nazionale Delle Ricerche, Bari, Italy.
    Coraci, Luca
    Consiglio Nazionale Delle Ricerche, Bari, Italy.
    Gonzalez, Javier
    Málaga University, Málaga, Spain.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Furfari, Francesco
    Consiglio Nazionale Delle Ricerche, Bari, Italy.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Orlandini, Andrea
    Consiglio Nazionale Delle Ricerche, Bari, Italy.
    Palumbo, Filippo
    Consiglio Nazionale Delle Ricerche, Bari, Italy.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    von Rump, Stephan
    Giraff AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ullberg, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    GiraffPlus: combining social interaction and long term monitoring for promoting independent living2013In: 2013 6TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HUMAN SYSTEM INTERACTIONS (HSI), New York, 2013, p. 578-585Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early detection and adaptive support to changing individual needs related to ageing is an important challenge in today’s society. In this paper we present a system called GiraffPlus that aims at addressing such a challenge and is developed in an on-going European project. The system consists of a network of home sensors that can be automatically configured to collect data for a range of monitoring services; a semi-autonomous telepresence robot; a sophisticated context recognition system that can give high-level and long term interpretations of the collected data and respond to certain events; and personalized services delivered through adaptive user interfaces for primary users. The system performs a range of services including data collection and analysis of long term trends in behaviors and physiological parameters (e.g. relating to sleep or daily activity); warnings, alarms and reminders; and social interaction through the telepresence robot. The latter is based on the Giraff telepresence robot, which is already in place in a number of homes. Particular emphasis is put on user evaluation outside the laboratories. A distinctive aspect of the project is that the GiraffPlus system will be installed and evaluated in at least 15 homes of elderly people. The concept of “useworthiness” is central in order to assure that the GiraffPlus system provides services that are easy to use and worth using. In addition, by using existing and affordable components we strive to achieve a system that is affordable and close to commercialization.

  • 41. Cortellessa, Gabriella
    et al.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    An on-going evaluation of domestic robots2008In: Robotic helpers: user interaction, interfaces and companions in assistive and therapy robotics, 2008, p. 87-91Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this position paper we describe an on-going effort to provide an in-depth and cross-cultural evaluation of how elderly users perceive robotic systems for domestic cognitive support. Our work is grounded on two implemented smarthome prototypes, namely the RoboCare Smart Home developed in Italy, and the PEIS Home developed in Sweden. The former project has provided a testbed for an a-posteriori evaluation of smart home technology with Italian user groups. The presence in Sweden of the PEIS Home, a system which shares numerous commonalities with the RoboCare Smart Home, gives us the opportunity to extend these results by (1) providing a cross-cultural perspective on the perception of smart home technology, and (2) lay the foundations for a live, Wizard of Oz based evaluation within the PEIS Home.

     

  • 42. Cortellessa, Gabriella
    et al.
    Scopelliti, Massimiliano
    Tiberio, Lorenza
    Koch Svedberg, Gion
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    A cross-cultural evaluation of domestic assistive robots2008In: AAAI fall symposium: technical report, v FS-08-02, American Association for Artificial Intelligence , 2008, p. 24-31Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the first steps in a series of on-going user evaluations of intelligent environments for supporting elderly users at home. We specifically focus on a comparison of elderly perceptions of social assistive domestic robots between Italian and Swedish user groups. The evaluation was carried out in Rome, Italy and O¨ rebro, Sweden, including surrounding towns. The results, obtained through a videobased methodology, highlight the variety in level of appreciation of domestic robots for elderly care as it relates to a number of aspects of culture which are not necessarily trivial to identify. Our results suggest some specific factors as important for interpreting the difference in perception, e.g., the user’s acquaintance with ICT (Information and Communication Technology) and the social policies implemented in the two countries. Also, the results show interesting commonalities, such as the general agreement among Swedish and Italian user groups on the physical aspect of the robot.

  • 43.
    Di Lello, Enrico
    et al.
    Dept. of Informatics and Automation, University Roma-3, Italy.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Robotic furniture in a smart environment: the PEIS table2009In: Workshops Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Intelligent Environments / [ed] Michael Schneider et al., Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2009, p. 185-192Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to a recent trend, robotic technologies will be included into domestic environments in the form of simple, networked robotic devices able to cooperate in the performance of tasks. These devices may take the form of smart appliances, distributed sensors, or robotic furniture. In this paper, we describe the design of an autonomous robotic table and its inclusion in a smart environment, the PEIS Ecology. The design takes into account the constraints posed by the domestic environment. The robotic table can perform autonomous point-to-point navigation, and it can collaborate with the other devices in the ecology to perform complex tasks that go beyond simple navigation.

  • 44.
    Di Rocco, Maurizio
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    When Robots are Late: Configuration Planning for Multiple Robots with Dynamic Goals2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unexpected contingencies in robot execution may induce a cascade of effects, especially when multiple robots are involved. In order to effectively adapt to this, robots need the ability to reason along multiple dimensions at execution time. We propose an approach to closed-loop planning capable of generating configuration plans, i.e., action plans for multirobot systems which specify the causal, temporal, resource and information dependencies between individual sensing, computation, and actuation components. The key feature which enables closed loop performance is that configuration plans are represented as constraint networks, which are shared between the planner and the executor and are continuously updated during execution.We report experiments run both in simulation and on real robots, in which a fault in one robot is compensated through different types of planmodifications at run time.

  • 45.
    Di Rocco, Maurizio
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sivakumar, Prasanna Kumar
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Configuration Planning with Multiple Dynamic Goals2013In: Designing intelligent robots: reintegrating AI II. Papers from the AAAI Spring Symposium, AAAI Press, 2013, p. 12-17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose an approach to configuration planning for robotic systems in which plans are represented as constraint networks and planning is defined as search in the space of such networks. The approach supports reasoning about time, resources, and information dependencies between actions. In addition, the system can leverage the flexibility of such networks at execution time to support dynamic goal posting and re-planning.

  • 46.
    Di Rocco, Maurizio
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sathyakeerthy, Subhash
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grosinger, Jasmin
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bonaccorsi, Manuele
    The BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
    Cavallo, Filippo
    The BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
    Limosani, Raffaele
    The BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
    Manzi, Alessandro
    The BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
    Teti, Giancarlo
    Dario, Paolo
    The BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
    A Planner for Ambient Assisted Living: From High-Level Reasoning to Low-Level Robot Execution and Back2014In: Papers from the AAAI Spring Symposium, AAAI Press, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robot ecologies are a growing paradigm in which oneor several robotic systems are integrated into a smartenvironment. Robotic ecologies hold great promises forelderly assistance. Planning the activities of these systems,however, is not trivial, and requires considerationof issues like temporal and information dependenciesamong different parts of the ecology, exogenous actions,and multiple, dynamic goals. We describe a plannerable to cope with the above challenges. We showin particular how this planner has been incorporatedin closed-loop into a full robotic system that performsdaily tasks in support of elderly people. The full robotecology is deployed in a test apartment inside a real residentialbuilding, and it is currently undergoing an extensiveuser evaluation.

  • 47.
    Grosinger, Jasmin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Find Out Why Reading This Paper is an Opportunity of Type Opp02014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Under what conditions should a cognitive robot act? How do we define “opportunities” for robot action? How can we characterize their properties? This paper offers an apparatus to frame thediscussion. Starting from a simple introductory example, we specifyan initial version of a formal framework of opportunity which relates current and future states and beneficial courses of action in a certain time horizon. An opportunity reasoning algorithm is presented,which opens up various new questions about the different types of opportunity and how to interleave opportunity reasoning and action execution. An implementation of this algorithm is tested in a simple experiment including a real mobile robot in a smart home environment and a user.

  • 48.
    Grosinger, Jasmin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Making Robots Proactive through Equilibrium Maintenance2016In: 25th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Grosinger, Jasmin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Proactivity through equilibrium maintenance with fuzzy desirability2017In: 2017 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proactive cognitive agents need to be capable ofboth generating their own goals and enacting them. In thispaper, we cast this problem as that ofmaintaining equilibrium,that is, seeking opportunities to act that keep the system indesirable states while avoiding undesirable ones. We characterizedesirability of states as graded preferences, using mechanismsfrom the field of fuzzy logic. As a result, opportunities for anagent to act can also be graded, and their relative preferencecan be used to infer when and how to act. This paper providesa formal description of our computational framework, andillustrates how the use of degrees of desirability leads to well-informed choices of action.

  • 50.
    Grosinger, Jasmin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Robots and Bananas: Exploring Deliberation in Cognitive Robots2014In: AI and Robotics: Papers from the AAAI-14 Workshop, 2014, , p. 2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Under what conditions should a cognitive robot act? How do we define “opportunities” for robot action? How can we characterize their properties? In this po-sition paper, we offer an initial apparatus to formalize opportunities and to frame this discussion.

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