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  • 1.
    Abdelzadeh, Ali
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Dissatisfied citizens: an asset or a burden in democratic functioning of a society?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Past research has shown that, whereas the majority of people in democracies support the idea of democracy as a form of governance, some citizens are dissatisfied with the democratic institutions and the way democracy performs. In this paper, we examined democratic characteristics of dissatisfied youths to understand the role they play in the democratic functioning of a society. Based on youth’s dissatisfaction with the performance of political institutions and the principles of democracy, we identified four groups distinct of citizens. Then, we compared these groups in terms of their political engagement, knowledge and interest, values and attitudes, and law breaking attitudes. The results showed that youths with high levels of principle- and performance-driven dissatisfaction were less likely to participate in politics, less knowledgeable and interested in political issues, and more likely to break the laws, even if people got hurt compared to other three groups. In contrast, youths who were only dissatisfied with the performance of democratic institutions were more likely to participate in politics, and have higher humanistic values and tolerance towards immigrants. By examining distinct groups of dissatisfied citizens and their democratic characteristics, the current study contributes to the general debate on the role of dissatisfied citizens in democracies.

  • 2.
    Abdelzadeh, Ali
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Dissatisfied Citizens: An Asset to or a Liability on the Democratic Functioning of Society?2015In: Scandinavian Political Studies, ISSN 0080-6757, E-ISSN 1467-9477, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 410-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Past research has shown that, although a majority of citizens in democracies support the idea of democracy as a form of governance, some tend to be distrustful of democratic institutions and express dissatisfaction with the way democracy works. It is argued in this article that to better understand the role of various groups of dissatisfied citizens in the democratic functioning of a society, one should examine their democratic characteristics. Based on youth's dissatisfaction with the performance of political institutions and the principles of democracy, four distinct groups of citizens are identified. These groups are then compared in terms of their political engagement, knowledge and interest, values and attitudes, and disposition to break the law. The results showed that youths with high levels of principle- and performance-driven dissatisfaction were less likely to participate in politics, less knowledgeable and interested in political issues, and more likely to break the law, even if people got hurt compared with other groups. In contrast, youths who were only dissatisfied with the performance of democratic institutions were more likely to participate in politics, and had higher tolerance towards immigrants, and political interest and knowledge. They were also more likely, peacefully and without harming other people, to break the law to change society. Overall, by examining distinct groups of dissatisfied citizens and their democratic characteristics, this study contributes to the general debate on the role of dissatisfied citizens in democracies.

  • 3.
    Bauducco, Serena V.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Flink, Ida K.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Too tired for school?: the effects of insomnia on absenteeism in adolescence2015In: Sleep Health, ISSN 2352-7218, E-ISSN 2352-7226, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 205-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Sleep has important consequences for a person's daytime functioning. Numerous studies have shown that insomnia predicts work absenteeism and work disability in adults, but only a few studies have examined this association in adolescents. This study aims to explore whether symptoms of insomnia in adolescents predict school absenteeism 1 year later, over and above known psychological risk factors for absenteeism.

    Design: The study used a longitudinal design with 2 measurement points over 1 year.

    Setting: The students completed questionnaires during school hours at baseline and again at follow-up.

    Participants: Students in the 10th to 12th grades in a Swedish upper secondary school were followed prospectively for 1 year (age, 16-20 years; N = 353; 48.1% girls).

    Measurements and results: We used logistic regression analyses, controlling for the known effects of psychological factors, and arrived at a model elucidating the role of insomnia. That is, besides symptoms of insomnia, the model included previous absenteeism, alcohol intoxication, school-related social phobia, social anxiety, depressive symptoms, somatic symptoms, and bully victimization. Symptoms of insomnia predicted school absenteeism 1 year later, over and above known risk factors for absenteeism. Adolescents reporting severe symptoms of insomnia were almost 3 times more likely than adolescents reporting no or low symptoms to report problematic absenteeism 1 year later. We did not find any gender difference.

    Conclusions: Our findings underscore the importance of sleep problems on adolescents' daytime functioning as measured by school absenteeism. Therefore, sleep may be an important target for preventive interventions with adolescents.

  • 4.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Youth's Initiations of Civic and Political Discussions in Class: Do Youth's Perceptions of Teachers' Behaviors Matter and Why?2016In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 45, no 11, p. 2233-2245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers are thought to play an important role in fostering youth civic engagement; however, the current literature is limited with regard to providing concrete suggestions as to what teachers can do to promote youth civic engagement and why teachers have an impact on youth. To address these limitations, we simultaneously tested three alternative explanations to identify the critical way(s) in which perceived teachers' behaviors might contribute to youth civic engagement in school. We also investigated the underlying processes that may explain why youth's perceptions of teachers' behaviors matter, by focusing on the mediating roles of young people's feelings about politics and their political efficacy beliefs. The sample included 7th (n = 876, M age  = 13.42, SD = .71; 51 % girls) and 10th grade students (n = 857, M age  = 16.62, SD = .71; 51 % girls) residing in Sweden. Among the different aspects of perceived teacher behaviors, only an engaged and inspiring teaching style fostered youth's initiations of civic and political discussions in class over time among both early and late adolescents. Moreover, youth's feelings about politics significantly mediated the effect of perceived teachers' behaviors on youth civic engagement in class. Contrary to our expectation, youth's political efficacy did not act as a mediator. The present study sheds light on what teachers can do to promote youth civic and political engagement in a school setting.

  • 5.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Sun, Shuyan
    Baltimore County, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD, USA.
    Korol, Liliia
    National University of Ostroh Academy, Ostroh, Ukraine.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Adolescents' Engagement in Ethnic Harassment: Prejudiced Beliefs in Social Networks and Classroom Ethnic Diversity2018In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1151-1163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on ethnic victimization to date has done little to identify the reasons why adolescents victimize their peers due to their ethnic background. To address this limitation, we examined: (1) the extent to which prejudiced attitudes within adolescents' close and larger social networks determine their engagement in ethnic harassment, and (2) the extent to which classroom ethnic diversity plays a role in any such link. Our sample included 902 Swedish adolescents (M age  = 14.40, SD = .95; 50.3% girls). We found that Swedish adolescents who held negative attitudes toward immigrants or who were surrounded by prejudiced peers were more likely to be involved in ethnic harassment, particularly in classrooms with high ethnic diversity. Adolescents in classrooms with a high anti-immigrant climate were more likely to harass their immigrant peers. These findings suggest that prejudiced beliefs in youth social networks put young people at risk of engaging in ethnic harassment, particularly in ethnically diverse classrooms.

  • 6.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ethnic Harassment and Immigrant Youth's Engagement in Violent Behaviors: Understanding the Risk Factors2019In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 90, no 3, p. 808-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to examine whether ethnic harassment was related to violent behaviors among immigrant youth over time and to identify the risk factors. The sample comprised immigrant adolescents living in Sweden (N = 365; Mage  = 13.93, SD = 0.80). Results showed that the more youth were ethnically harassed, the more they engaged in violent acts over time. A separated identity significantly moderated the effect of ethnic harassment on youth's engagement in violent behaviors. Specifically, ethnic harassment positively predicted engagement in violent behaviors only at high levels of separated identity. Impulsivity and school ethnic composition did not act as moderators. The findings suggest that preventing violent behaviors among immigrant youth requires a focus on promoting positive interethnic relationships, and multicultural identity among immigrant youth.

  • 7.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    What does make youth with negative attitudes towards immigrants bully their immigrant peers?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    What makes youth harass their immigrant peers?: understanding the risk factors2016In: Journal of Early Adolescence, ISSN 0272-4316, E-ISSN 1552-5449, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 601-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    mmigrant youth are at risk of experiencing harassment in school; however, we have only limited understanding of what makes youth harass their peers on ground of their ethnic origin. To address this major limitation, we examined (a) whether youth’s negative attitudes toward immigrants impact their engagement in ethnic harassment over time and (b) whether youth’s impulsivity, their tendencies to engage in risky behaviors, and a chaotic surrounding school environment moderate the link between their negative attitudes toward immigrants and their involvement in ethnic harassment. The sample included 583 Swedish youth (Xage = 13.93, SD = .71). Youth with negative attitudes toward immigrants ethnically were found to harass their immigrant peers when they had high levels of impulsivity and violent tendencies. Contrary to our expectation, youth perceptions of school atmosphere did not act as a moderator. The present study highlights the importance of identifying risk factors to reach a comprehensive understanding of ethnic harassment.

  • 9.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Why and when ethnic harassment is a risk for immigrant adolescents?: understanding the processes and conditions2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immigrant adolescents who experience ethnic devaluation are prone to having adjustment difficulties, including school dissatisfaction and low academic performance. However, it is unclear why and under what conditions experiencing ethnic harassment lead to school adjustment difficulties. This lack of understanding limits our ability of developing strategies to reduce negative consequences of ethnic harassment. To address this limitation, we examined the mediating roles of self-esteem and depressive symptoms in the association between ethnic harassment and immigrant youths’ school outcomes, including school satisfaction, perceived academic failure, and cutting classes. We also explored whether youths’ relationship with their teachers or democratic school environment buffer these processes.

    The data are part of a longitudinal study on youths’ experiences inside and outside of school and their relationships with their parents, peers, and teachers. The sample included 394 first- and second-generation immigrant youths (50% girls; M = 14.08, SD = .90).

    The findings suggested that immigrant youths who experienced ethnic harassment decreased in self-esteem, and so became less satisfied with school, and increased in expectations of academic failure. In addition, youths’ relationship with their teachers and their perception of school democracy moderated these mediation processes. When youths had low positive relationships with their teachers or perceived their school context as less democratic, being exposed to ethnic harassment leaded to a decrease in their self-esteem, and so they reported low school satisfaction and perceived themselves as not being successful in school. Contrary, youths’ self-esteem did not significantly decrease in the face of ethnic harassment when they had supportive relations with teachers or perceived the school as a democratic environment. These findings highlight the importance of understanding the underlying processes and conditions when examining the effects of migration related risk factors in order to reach a more comprehensive understanding of immigrant youths’ school adjustment.

  • 10. Demir, Meliksah
    et al.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Marum, Kendra Patrice
    Perceived autonomy support, friendship maintenance, and happiness2011In: Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0022-3980, E-ISSN 1940-1019, Vol. 145, no 6, p. 537-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decades of empirical research have shown that perceived autonomy support in close relationships is an essential correlate of happiness. However, what might account for the relationship between the 2? For this article, 4 studies (total N = 1325) investigated friendship maintenance as a mediator of the association between friendship autonomy support and happiness. The first 3 studies supported the model for the best friendship of the individual when happiness was assessed with 3 different measures. The 4th study extended the findings by showing that the model was generalizable to the other close friendship of the individual. Overall, the results supported the idea that engaging in routine and strategic behaviors to maintain friendships explains how perceived autonomy support in friendships is associated with happiness. The theoretical and applied implications of the findings were discussed and suggestions for future research were made.

  • 11. Demir, Melikşah
    et al.
    Orthel, Haley
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Friendship and happiness among young adults2015In: Friendship and happiness: across the life-span and cultures / [ed] Melikşah Demir, Springer, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Demir, Melikşah
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff AZ, United States .
    Özdemir, Metin
    Department of Psychology, University of Maryland in Baltimore County, Baltimore MD, United States .
    Friendship, need satisfaction, and happiness2010In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 243-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friendship quality is an important predictor of happiness, however, what might account for the association between the two? Two studies investigated satisfaction of basic psychological needs as a mediator of the relationship between friendship quality and happiness. Study 1 (n = 424) found support for the model for best friendship. Second study (n = 176) replicated the first study and showed that needs satisfaction in best and two closest friendships mediated the relationship between the quality of all friendships and happiness. The findings suggest that one reason why the quality of friendships is related to happiness is because friendship experiences provide a context where basic needs are satisfied.

  • 13.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Alcohol use and delinquency: is positive school experience an antecedent or a consequence?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Parenting programs to prevent conduct problems in children: can we detect an interventionist effect?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    School bonding and alcohol use in Italian early adolescents: what comes first?2013In: Merrill-Palmer quarterly, ISSN 0272-930X, E-ISSN 1535-0266, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 280-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has identified school bonding as protective against substance use during adolescence. However, there is still a question as to whether school involvement predicts changes in substance use or if substance use actually predicts changes in level of school bonding. This study investigated the relationship between school bonding and alcohol use, which is commonly recognized as gateway drug, during early adolescence. A three-wave longitudinal analysis was conducted on a sample composed of 161 Italian adolescents (51% boys, 49% girls, mean age = 11.14 years, standard deviation =. 40). Associations were analyzed by using crossed-lagged autoregressive models in MPlus. Findings revealed that greater school involvement decreased alcohol consumption from Grade 6 to Grade 7. However, greater alcohol use decreased school involvement from Grade 7 to Grade 8. Findings of this study underlined the importance of choosing the right time for prevention.

  • 16.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Division of Public Health Sciences, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardarens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    The Implementation Integrity of Parenting Programs: Which Aspects Are Most Important?2019In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 917-933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The implementation of preventive interventions is considered a crucial aspect of their success. However, few studies have investigated which components of implementation are most important.

    Objective: We aimed to understand whether the components of implementation integrity—adherence, quality of delivery, dose, and participants’ involvement—influenced the effectiveness of four parenting programs. We also investigated factors associated with these components.

    Method: Data come from a national evaluation of parenting programs in Sweden. The study was a randomised controlled effectiveness trial, with a sample of 535 parents with 3–12-year-old children. Measures included parenting behaviors (angry outbursts, harsh parenting, attempts to understand, rewarding, and praising), child conduct problems (ECBI and SNAP-V), and measures tapping into the four components (adherence, quality of delivery, dose, and participant involvement).

    Results: We ran multilevel models and found that implementation quality (adherence and quality of delivery) did not influence the effects on parents and children. Conversely, participant involvement was associated with improvements in parenting and child conduct. Finally, parents’ perceptions of their leaders as supportive and understanding were associated with parents’ responsiveness and attendance.

    Conclusions: Our study highlights the importance of having actively engaged parents to maximise intervention effects.

  • 17.
    Högström, Jens
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Viveca
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Enebrink, Pia
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Two-Year Findings from a National Effectiveness Trial: Effectiveness of Behavioral and Non-Behavioral Parenting Programs2017In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 527-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term follow-up studies of selective parent training (PT) programs are scarce, particularly in the case of effectiveness trials conducted within regular care settings. This study evaluated the 2-year effects of 4 programs: Comet, Incredible Years, Cope, and Connect and differences in the rate of change among programs were investigated using Latent Growth Modeling (LGM). Participants were parents who had sought help at 30 local service sector units (e.g., child psychiatric clinics and social services centers) for major problems in managing their children's externalizing behavior. Parents of 749 children (63 % boys) with moderate levels of externalizing behavior, aged 3-12, were randomized to one of the 4 PT programs. Assessments included parent-reported measures of child externalizing, hyperactivity and inattention, as well as parenting practices, sense of competence, and parents' stress and depressive symptoms. At 2-year follow-up, there were no differences in any of the child outcomes among the programs. All programs had reduced externalizing behaviors with large effect sizes (d = 1.21 to d = 1.32), and negative parenting practices with moderate to large effect sizes (d = 0.49 to d = 0.83). LGM analyses showed that the 2 behavioral programs, Comet and Incredible Years, produced more rapid reductions in externalizing behavior during the course of the intervention than the non-behavioral program, Connect. Connect, however, was the only program where children continued to improve after the intervention. Overall, the results indicate that the 4 programs were equally effective in a clinical setting, despite differences in their theoretical origin.

  • 18.
    Högström, Jens
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Olofsson, Viveca
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Enebrink, Pia
    Karolinska Institute.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Two-Year Findings from a National Effectiveness Trial: Effectiveness of Behavioral and Non-Behavioral Parenting Programs on Children’s Externalizing BehaviorsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Jaf, Darun
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Does parenting behavior influence youth’s participation in organized sports activities?2017In: 6th ENSEC Conference: Programme & Information, 2017, p. 69-69Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Participation in organized sports activities is linked with positive developmental outcomes for youth. However, the literature consistently shows that immigrant youth are less likely to participate in organized sports compared to their native counterparts. Thus, they are at risk for missing of the positive benefits of sports. The aim of this study was to investigate why immigrant youth are less likely to participate in organized sports activities compared to their native counterparts. The data come from self-reports from 679 students in 7th grade. Immigrant youth were less likely (57%) to participate in organized sports activities compared to native youth (73%). Further, parents’ engagement in sports and fathers’ employment status significantly predict Nordic youths’ sports involvement (p < .05). For immigrant youth, only fathers’ employment status did (p < .05). These finding support Eccles’ expectancy-value model, which states that parents as role-models can influence youths’ participation in organized sports activities. However, this seems to only be the case for native youth.

    Additional analysis will be run in order to find out other predictors that might explain the low rates of sports involvement of immigrant youth. The findings will supplement the scarce literature on immigrant youths’ low engagement in organized sports activities.

  • 20.
    Jaf, Darun
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Why are immigrant youths less involved in organized sports than their native peers?: The role of parenting behaviors2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Kerr, Margaret
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Perceived parenting style and adolescent adjustment: revisiting directions of effects and the role of parental knowledge2012In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 1540-1553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present research on parenting and adolescent behavior, there is much focus on reciprocal, bidirectional, and transactional processes, but parenting-style research still adheres to a unidirectional perspective in which parents affect youth behavior but are unaffected by it. In addition, many of the most cited parenting-style studies have used measures of parental behavioral control that are questionable because they include measures of parental knowledge. The goals of this study were to determine whether including knowledge items might have affected results of past studies and to test the unidirectional assumption. Data were from 978 adolescents participating in a longitudinal study. Parenting-style and adolescent adjustment measures at 2 time points were used, with a 2-year interval between time points. A variety of internal and external adjustment measures were used. Results showed that including knowledge items in measures of parental behavioral control elevated links between behavioral control and adjustment. Thus, the results and conclusions of many of the most highly cited studies are likely to have been stronger than if the measures had focused strictly on parental behavior. In addition, adolescent adjustment predicted changes in authoritative and neglectful parenting styles more robustly than these styles predicted changes in adolescent adjustment. Adolescent adjustment also predicted changes in authoritativeness more robustly than authoritativeness predicted changes in adjustment. Thus, parenting style cannot be seen as independent of the adolescent. In summary, both the theoretical premises of parenting-style research and the prior findings should be revisited.

  • 22.
    Koutakis, Nikolaus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Is promoting parents’ norms against underage alcohol use an effective strategy for prevention?2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23. Kumru, Asiye
    et al.
    Yagmurlu, Bilge
    Sayil, Melike
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Crockett, Lisa
    Guzman, M.R.
    The relations of parental control and friendship quality with prosocial behaviors among Turkish early adolescents2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Olofsson, Viveca
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bergström, Martin
    Lund University.
    Do parenting programs work differently in different sectors of care?: Results from a Swedish national evaluation of parenting programsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Olofsson, Viveca
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Enebrink, Pia
    Karolinska institutet.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Uppsala university.
    One-Year Follow-Up of Comet, Cope, Incredible Years, and Connect: findings from a National Effectiveness TrialManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Pettersson, Camilla
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Effects of a parental program for preventing underage drinking: the NGO program Strong and Clear2011In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, article id 251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The present study is an evaluation of a 3-year parental program aiming to prevent underage drinking. The intervention was implemented by a non-governmental organization and targeted parents with children aged 13-16 years old and included recurrent activities during the entire period of secondary school. The program consisted of four different types of group and self-administered activities: parent meetings, family dialogues, friend meetings, and family meetings.

    Methods

    A quasi-experimental design was used following parents and children with questionnaires during the three years of secondary school. The analytic sample consisted of 509 dyads of parents and children. Measures of parental attitudes and behaviour concerning underage drinking and adolescents' lifetime alcohol consumption and drunkenness were used. Three socio-demographic factors were included: parental education, school, and gender of the child. A Latent Growth Modelling (LGM) approach was used to examine changes in parental behaviour regarding youth drinking and in young people's drinking behaviour. To test for the pre-post test differences in parental attitudes repeated measures ANOVA were used.

    Results

    The results showed that parents in the program maintained their restrictive attitude toward underage drinking to a higher degree than non-participating parents. Adolescents of participants were on average one year older than adolescents with non-participating parents when they made their alcohol debut. They were also less likely to have ever been drunk in school year 9.

    Conclusion

    The results of the study suggested that Strong and Clear contributed to maintaining parents' restrictive attitude toward underage drinking during secondary school, postponing alcohol debut among the adolescents, and significantly reducing their drunkenness

  • 27.
    Salihovic, Selma
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Pakalniskiene, Vilmante
    Vilnius University, Vilnius, Litauen.
    Directions of effects between adolescent psychopathic traits and parental behavior2012In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 957-969Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Salihovic, Selma
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Trajectories of adolescent psychopathic traits2014In: Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, ISSN 0882-2689, E-ISSN 1573-3505, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 47-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is growing evidence that psychopathic traits are stable across the adolescent developmental period. Yet, no previous studies have examined the longitudinal course of these traits across adolescence. In this study, we examined joint developmental trajectories of grandiose-manipulative traits, callous-unemotional traits, and impulsive-irresponsible behavior and how these trajectories were related to changes in parental behavior and delinquency over time. Participants were 1,068 adolescents from a community sample, who were followed annually over 4 years. Overall, our results showed that a four-class latent class growth model best represented the developmental pattern of adolescent psychopathic traits. Although the majority of adolescents showed low or moderate initial levels that also decreased over time, there was a small group of adolescents who, despite significant decreases in two out of three dimensions, still maintained relatively high levels on all three dimensions. We also found that parental behavior and delinquency developed differently for the groups over time, with the high-decreasing group engaging in more delinquent behavior over time and experiencing more negative parental behavior than any other group. In sum, our findings suggest that there is a group of adolescents at particular risk for negative development.

  • 29.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Skoog, Per
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ungdomars identitetsutveckling och idrottande2015In: Skolhälsan, ISSN 0284-284X, no 1, p. 12-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ruiselova, Zdena
    Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia .
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Female pubertal timing and problem behaviour: the role of culture2013In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 357-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested the peer-socialization/contextual-amplification explanation for the link between early female puberty and problem behaviour. We propose that in cultures with high tolerance for adolescent heterosexual involvement, early puberty should be linked with problem behaviournot in other cultures. We compared girls in two cultures (Slovakia and Sweden) that differ in acceptance of adolescent girls' heterosexual involvement. Findings supported the hypothesis by showing that in Sweden, a culture that facilitates adolescent heterosexual involvement, early-maturing girls reported more problem behaviours than in Slovakia. The mediation link (heterosexual involvement as the mechanism linking early puberty with problem behaviour) was moderated by culture. The findings expand our understanding of the role of macro-cultural contexts in the developmental significance of female puberty.

  • 31.
    Sohl, Sofia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Potential leverage effects of political efficacy on youths’ political participationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of some people engage frequently in political activities while others rarely or never get involved is a key theme in the field of political socialization. In this paper we study three of the main predictors of youths’ political behavior: political interest, political knowledge and political efficacy. Much attention has already been paid to the influence each of these factors have on political participation separately but few studies have investigated the potential interaction effects between them. Our study takes this step and explores the possible leverage effects of strong political efficacy beliefs in combination with high political interest orpolitical knowledge.

    The data consist of a longitudinal study including 1857 youths at Time 1 (M age=15.03; 51.1% male, 48.9% female) and 1530 youths at Time 2 (M age=15.79; 50.3% male, 49.7% female). Moderated regression analysis in Mplus is used to investigate the impact of political knowledge, political interest and political efficacy on political participation. The interaction effects of political efficacy and the two other predictors are then tested using simple slope tests.

    We conclude that, political efficacy and political interest show a significant interaction effect on political participation, while no effect is found for political efficacy and knowledge. In other words, the effect of high political interest on political participation is stronger for youths who also have a strong belief in their own capacity to perform political actions. A politically interested person is more likely to take political action if s/he also believes in her/his ability to produce a change in society.

  • 32.
    Stattin, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Enebrink, Pia
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A National Evaluation of Parenting Programs in Sweden: The Short-Term Effects Using an RCT Effectiveness Design2015In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0022-006X, E-ISSN 1939-2117, Vol. 83, no 6, p. 1069-1084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of 4 parent-training programs for children with externalizing problems. We tested the effectiveness of 3 behavioral programs (Comet, Cope, and Incredible Years) and 1 nonbehavioral program (Connect) in reducing child behavior problems and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, in improving positive parenting and parenting competence, and in decreasing negative parenting and parents’ stress and depressive symptoms.

    Method: This national study was designed as a randomized-controlled effectiveness trial (RCT). The treatments were carried out in 30 clinical and community-based practices. Parents of 908 children (ages 3–12 years) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 parent training programs available at each practice, or to a wait-list condition, where parents had sought help from regular services. Before and after treatment, parents rated child behavior problems and parenting strategies.

    Results: At posttreatment, children whose parents had received interventions showed a strong decrease in child conduct problems and a moderate to strong decrease in ADHD symptoms. About half of parents whose children scored over the 95th percentile on the behavior measures (Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory, Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham Rating Scale), a clinically meaningful cutoff, reported that their children were no longer above the cutoff after the intervention. Parents showed considerably less negative behaviors toward their children at posttest compared with pretest; they increased in parental competence, and decreased in both stress and depressive symptoms. Overall, the behavioral programs were more effective than the nonbehavioral program.

    Conclusions: The results support the general efficacy of parent training in a short-term perspective.

  • 33.
    Stattin, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hussein, Oula
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Why do some adolescents encounter everyday events that increase their civic interest whereas others do not?2017In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 306-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a longitudinal design, we asked 2 age cohorts of adolescents (15- and 18-year-olds) whether they, during the last year, had experienced events that had increased their civic interest and about details of their experiences. Based on self-determination theory, we predicted that the adolescents who reported having experienced events of this kind had already been more interested and had had more positive feelings about politics much earlier in time, and that this original interest would have increased more over time, than that of other adolescents. Second, we proposed that the adolescents who had encountered events that triggered their civic interest would have been engaged in behaviors that reflected their needs for autonomy, relatedness, and competence, much earlier in time, and that, over time, they would have increased these behaviors more than other adolescents. These 2 predictions were largely confirmed. As for the content of the events the adolescents reported, many of them concerned national and international issues experienced as threatening, and that challenged the adolescents' beliefs and morality. Overall, a previous interest in politics and engagement in exploratory behaviors that reflect the adolescents' psychological needs seem to play crucial roles in understanding why adolescents in their everyday life encounter events that trigger their civic interest. Further, the findings show that having had everyday experiences that trigger the adolescents' civic interests are associated with a later increase in political interest more broadly.

  • 34.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    How does parents’ reaction to adolescents’ misbehaviors influence academic adjustment?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    How much do we know about the long-term effectiveness of parenting programs? Advances, shortcomings, and future directions2015In: Journal of Children's Services, ISSN 1746-6660, E-ISSN 2042-8677, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 120-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Parenting programmes are seen as feasible and cost-effective in preventing early behavioural problems in children and adolescents. A number of studies have concluded that such programmes are effective in reducing child problem behaviours and improving the skills and well-being of parents. Nevertheless, less is known about long-term programme effects.

    Design/methodology/approach: A non meta-analytic discussion.

    Findings: Long-term evaluations of parenting programmes suffer from a number of methodological weaknesses resulting in an inability to make robust causal inferences about child and parent outcomes in the longer term. The current evidence is favorable but is likely to be biased by methodological weaknesses. There is a need for more studies of greater methodological strength to obtain conclusive evidence that would guide empirical research, practice and policy.

    Originality/value: The paper discusses weaknesses in long-term evaluations of parenting programmes and highlights concrete future directions toward improving the quality of study design, evaluation and data analysis.

  • 36.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Similar, yet different!: a longitudinal examination of immigrant and Swedish youths' developmental outcomes2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Özdemir, Metin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Youth & Society (YeS) .
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Youth & Society (YeS).
    The Role of School Context in Adolescents’ Attitudes Towards Immigrants and Inter-ethnic Friendships2017In: The Mechanisms of Tolerance: An anthology / [ed] Erik Lundberg, Stockholm: The Living History Forum , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Özdemir, Metin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Why Do Some Immigrant Adolescents Do Well in School Whereas Others Fail?: Current State of Knowledge and Directions for Future Research2019In: Contextualizing Immigrant Resilience: Cultural and Acculturation Perspectives / [ed] Güngör, D. & Strohmeier, D., Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Özdemir, Metin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Improving dissemination of evidence‐based programs through researcher–practitioner collaboration2014In: New Directions for Youth Development, ISSN 1533-8916, E-ISSN 1537-5781, Vol. 141, p. 107-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prevention field has achieved major advances in developing, implementing, and testing the efficacy of preventive interventions in controlled settings. Nevertheless, there is still a gap in translating the success of programs in efficacy trials into real-life settings. Dissemination of evidence-based programs is a major challenge. The authors argue that promoting adoption of evidence-based programs requires further improvements in three areas, and collaboration between researchers and practitioners. First, there is a need to develop a holistic assessment system encompassing both risk/need and readiness assessments. Second, there is need for new methods for improving implementation quality. Third, prevention research needs to focus more on identifying the mechanisms that explain how programs work and the core elements of the program. Both researchers and practitioners have roles and opportunities to collaborate to achieve developments in these areas.

  • 40.
    Özdemir, Metin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Koutakis, Nikolaus
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. External Relations, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Does promoting parents' negative attitudes to underage drinking reduce adolescents' drinking?: the mediating process and moderators of the effects of the Örebro prevention programme2016In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 111, no 2, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: The Örebro Prevention Programme (ÖPP) was found previously to be effective in reducing drunkenness among adolescents [Cohen's d = 0.35, number needed to treat (NNT) = 7.7]. The current study tested the mediating role of parents’ restrictive attitudes to underage drinking in explaining the effectiveness of the ÖPP, and the potential moderating role of gender, immigration status, peers’ and parents’ drinking and parent–adolescent relationship quality.

    Design: A quasi‐experimental matched‐control group study with assessments at baseline, and at 18‐ and 30‐month follow‐ups.

    Participants: Of the 895 target youths at ages 12–13 years, 811 youths and 651 parents at baseline, 653 youths and 524 parents at 18‐month and 705 youths and 506 parents at 30‐month follow‐up participated in the study.

    Measurements: Youths reported on their past month drunkenness, their parents’ and peers’ alcohol use and the quality of their relationship with parents. Parents reported on their attitudes to underage drinking.

    Findings: The mediation analyses, using latent growth curve modeling, showed that changes in parents’ restrictive attitudes to underage drinking explained the impact of the ÖPP on changes in youth drunkenness, which was reduced, and onset of monthly drunkenness, which was delayed, relative to controls. Mediation effect explained 57 and 45% of the effects on drunkenness and onset of monthly drunkenness, respectively. The programme effects on both parents’ attitudes and youth drunkenness were similar across gender, immigrant status, parents’ and peers’ alcohol use and parent–youth relationship quality.

    Conclusions: Increasing parents’ restrictive attitudes to youth drinking appears to be an effective and robust strategy for reducing heavy underage drinking regardless of the adolescents’ gender, cultural origin, peers’ and parents’ drinking and relationship quality with parents.

  • 41.
    Özdemir, Metin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Koutakis, Nikolaus
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    What makes it effective?: testing the mediating mechanisms of an alcohol prevention program for youths2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Özdemir, Metin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    A national evaluation of parenting programs in Sweden: the short-term effects using a RCT effectiveness design2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Özdemir, Metin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bullies, victims, and bully-victims: a longitudinal examination of the effects of bullying-victimization experiences on youth well-being2011In: Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, ISSN 1759-6599, E-ISSN 2042-8715, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 97-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate how children's involvement in bullying (as bullies, victims and bully-victims) is related to longer term levels of various internalizing problems such as depression and self-harm.

    Design/methodology/approach – A prospective longitudinal design was used based on data from the Swedish Seven Schools Longitudinal Study. The authors also examined whether bullying/victimization experiences predict changes in internalizing problems.

    Findings – Results vary depending on children's participation in bullying behavior as bullies, victims or bully-victims.

    Originality/value – Overall, the paper's findings highlight the importance of uniqueness of different bullying/victimization experiences. This study showed that the bully-victims, followed by the victimized group, were more at risk for displaying internalizing problems. Bullies showed neither higher internalizing problems nor increases over time in symptom levels compared to the youths who were neither bullies nor victims.

  • 44.
    Özdemir, Metin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Does the Örebro Prevention Programme prevent youth drinking?2012In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 107, no 9, p. 1705-1706Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Özdemir, Metin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Konsekvenser av att börja, fortsätta eller sluta idrotta: en longitudinell studie av ungdomars psykologiska och beteendemässigt anpassning2012In: Är idrott nyttigt?: En antologi om idrott och samhällsnytta, Stockholm: SISU idrottsböcker , 2012, 1, p. 112-135Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Özdemir, Metin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Åström, Frida
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Are group-based parenting program equally effective for children with clinical and non-clinical problem levels?2014Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 46 of 46
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