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  • 1.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    et al.
    Department of Thematic Studies (Child Studies), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. .
    Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
    Department of Government, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Department of Thematic Studies (Gender Studies), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    Mediated communications of violence: the example of “happy slapping”2011In: Journal of Children and Media, ISSN 1748-2798, E-ISSN 1748-2801, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 230-234Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) afford new possibilities for complex interactions among young people. An Internet user can be both a consumer (receiver) and a producer (sender) of mediated communication, asynchronously or simultaneously—such as someone who both uploads and watches video clips on YouTube (von Feilitzen, 2009). “And between these two extremes—the reception and sender roles— the user can be interacting or participating to different extents, for example, in games and in communities owned, maintained and copywrited by someone else” (von Feilitzen, 2009, p. 36). Communication and socializing in virtual online and real offline life through ICTs provides new dimensions to young peoples’ “identity experiments and identity formation” (p. 38). As discussed by Wellman (2001), the “social affordances of computerized communication networks” provide youth with many possibilities for new forms of production and consumption of violence in and through media technology. In this Commentary we aim to outline some important, yet relatively underdeveloped, aspects of research that connect new media, violence, and young people.

  • 2.
    Belghiti-Mahut, Sophia
    et al.
    Université de Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
    Bergmann, Nadja
    L & R Social Research, Vienna, Austria.
    Gärtner, Marc
    Dissens Institute for Education and Research e.V., Berlin, Germany.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Univ. of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden; Hanken School of Econ., Helsinki, Finland; Univ. of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, United Kingdom.
    Holter, Øystein Gullvåg
    Centre for Gender Research, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Hrženjak, Majda
    Peace Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Puchert, Ralf
    Dissens Institute for Education and Research e.V., Berlin, Germany.
    Scambor, Christian
    Research Institute at Men's Counselling Centre, Graz, Austria.
    Scambor, Elli
    Research Institute at Men's Counselling Centre, Graz, Austria.
    Schuck, Hartwig
    Dissens e.V. Institut für Bildung und Forschung, Berlin, Germany.
    Seidler, Victor
    Goldsmiths University, London, United Kingdom.
    White, Alan
    Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds , United Kingdom.
    Wojnicka, Katarzyna
    Dissens e.V. Institut für Bildung und Forschung, Berlin, Germany.
    Study on the Role of Men in Gender Equality2013 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender relations have increasingly changed throughout the past decades, and European gender politics have productively accompanied these improvements. Still Europe is far from being a gender-equal society.

    For a long period gender equality policies have been contextualised mainly as a ’women’s issue’ – as women have been the driving force behind gender equality strategies and have been seen as the only ones who benefit from a more equal society. Men as the ‘other gender’ have been taken less into account in the context of gender equality. In the last decade, however, men and masculinities have increasingly become subjects of studies and gender policies in the EU. Under EU presidency, conferences on men, masculinities and equality took place in Sweden (2001) and Finland (2006). The Roadmap for equality between women and men 2006-20101 specifically encouraged men to take up care responsibilities and to share leave entitlements with women. A horizontal priority on gender roles including the need for involvement of men in gender equality policies and addressing inequalities affecting men, such as early school leaving, literacy and occupational health, is present in the current European Commission's Strategy for Equality between Women and Men (2010-2015)2. Additionally, strategies like gender mainstreaming seem to have created an initial awareness of the issue of men in gender equality and the establishment of some pathways towards institutional practice. Therefore, contemporary gender equality strategies as well as scientific studies should involve both men and women and take into account analysis of the role of both genders in

  • 3.
    Biricik, Alp
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hearn, JeffÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    GEXcel Work in Progress Report. Volume XV: gendered sexualed transnationalisations, deconstructing the dominant: transforming men, “centres” and knowledge/policy/practice2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Biricik, Alp
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hearn, JeffÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    GEXcel work in progress report. Volyme VI: deconstructing the hegemony of men and masculinities2009Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Blake, Vic
    et al.
    Nottingham, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Sociology, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    Jackson, Barber
    Nottingham, UK.
    Johnson, Rickard
    Nottingham, UK.
    Luczynski, Zbyszek
    Nottingham, UK.
    Doing memory work with older men: the practicalities, the process, the potential2016In: Working With Older People, ISSN 1366-3666, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 209-213Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Blake, Vic
    et al.
    Nottingham, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    Jackson, David
    Nottingham, UK.
    Barber, Randy
    Nottingham, UK.
    Johnson, Richard
    Leicester, UK.
    Luczynski, Zbyszek
    Nottingham, UK.
    Ageing, gender politics and masculinities : Reflections on collective memory work with older men2018In: Working with older people, ISSN 1366-3666, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the process of participating in a long-term collective memory work group of older men, focusing on the making/unmaking of older men and masculinities, and the potential of memory work with older men.

    Design/methodology/approach: Participant review and reflection on collective memory work with a group of older men.

    Findings: Collective memory work provides a novel way to explore ageing, gendering, men, and masculinities. Its potential for working with older men is examined critically in relation to gender politics, power and (in)equalities, interconnections and contradictions of men’s ageing and gendering, the personal and the political, as well as working with older men more generally, including those in transition and crisis.

    Originality/value: There is little previous writing on this approach to ageing, men, and masculinities. The paper aims to stimulate wider applications of this approach.

  • 7. Blake, Vic
    et al.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Luczynski, Zbyszek
    Barber, Randy
    Jackson, David
    Johnson, Richard
    Men's stories for a change: ageing men remember2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Men’s Stories for a Change records and analyses stories written by a group of older men who met over thirteen years to share memories about ageing and masculinity. So here there are stories of love and sex, bodily change, crisis and disturbance, politics and power, struggles with violent feelings and action, work, sport, clothes, peeing, hair, and hairlessness. These men share a view of manhood, gender, and ageing that, while critical of dominant frames and inspired by feminist politics, is optimistic without underestimating the challenges of older age and old age, including the approach to the end of life. They see ageing as an opportunity for personal and social and, indeed, political change, for dealing with longstanding issues, especially around gender and power, and as a time of innovating too. This project aims to help, if only in some small way, in opening up these issues, freeing up in a profeminist direction the voices of other men individually or collectively, ageing or otherwise.

    The authors have all been involved in some kind of men’s anti-sexist, profeminist politics, and/or men’s personal development work, along with other personal and political activism in such arenas as anti-nuclear, anti-racism, green, left, socialist, and peace politics over the years. Using the methods of memory work, the writers are both subjects and objects; the text cuts across that division too. Similarly, this volume can be located in various traditions, genres, and forms of writing. This is a project that is both finished and unfinished.

  • 8.
    Burr, Viv
    et al.
    Huddersfield University, UK.
    Hearn, JeffÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sex, violence and the body: the erotics of wounding2008Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 9.
    de Boise, Sam
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK; Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Are men getting more emotional?: Critical sociological perspectives on men, masculinities and emotions2017In: Sociological Review, ISSN 0038-0261, E-ISSN 1467-954X, Vol. 65, no 4, p. 779-796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sociological research, influenced by feminist and other critical perspectives, has noted how men’s emotional inexpressiveness was influenced, and supported, by patriarchal privilege. Such approaches have argued that ‘inexpression’ needs to be broken down in order to build gender equality and improve men’s own wellbeing. Emerging research has, however, challenged the argument that men are ‘emotionally inexpressive’ on two main premises: that, as a result of feminist critiques, many men now practise ‘softer’ or ‘more emotional’ forms of masculinity; second, that emotions always influence social action and so need to be better incorporated into sociological accounts of men’s behaviour. Yet these approaches entail some conceptual confusion as to what emotions are, how they link to social action and whether men’s emotions are inherently transformative for gender relations. This article first details how emotions and masculinity have been theorized in feminist-inspired approaches. It outlines recent work on emotions, men and masculinities before arguing for an understanding of emotions that engages with both physiologically grounded and postconstructionist debates. It finally suggests incorporating a material-discursive approach to men’s emotions, through feminist work on affect, which is attentive to the political dimensions of ‘increasing emotionality’ in order to contribute to a developing field of sociological research.

  • 10.
    de Boise, Sam
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    'The Expressive Male': Thinking Critically about Emotions in Critical Studies on Men and Masculinities2016In: The 7th Midterm Conference on Emotions, Stockholm: Abstracts, 2016, p. 18-18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his (1976) article, The Inexpressive Male: Tragedy or Sexual Politics? Sattel made the case that men’s relative lack of emotional expression emerged as a direct result of, and helped to sustain, men’s social privilege. Feminist and profeminist campaigners have (rightly) cited an increasing understanding of men’s emotional lives, and getting men to understand their own emotions, as central to any project addressing gender inequality. Some scholars within Critical studies on Men and Masculinities (CSMM), too, have often made the case that men need to become ‘more emotional’.

    Various authors have documented empirical research that argues, as a result of feminist gains, men are gradually getting ‘more in touch’ with their emotions, leading to a ‘softening’ of masculinity. There is a problem, however, with narratives around increasingly ‘more emotional’ men. These often fail to engage with literature on emotions and historical precedents of men being valued for displays of ‘authentic’ emotions - through music for instance – which have often supported privilege. In addition, assuming that men’s emotions are inherently gender-progressive, ignores more sinister examples of men’s rights activism, violence and online misogyny.

    This paper argues for the need to engage critically with how we think about both emotions and a history of emotions, in relation to CSMM. Considering how emotions are put into language, as well as the mechanisms by which emotions are identified and understood, have an impact on how emotions and ‘emotional’ behaviour are characterized in both research and everyday life. Crucially, it is important to retain a focus on the embodied aspects of experience. We suggest distinguishing between emotions, affect and kindred concepts as a productive way to approach issues of power and embodied experience in CSMM. Focusing on these areas, this paper aims to contribute a critical analysis on a developing and much-needed area of research.

     

  • 11.
    Egeberg Holmgren, Linn
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Gender Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Huddersfield University, UK; Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Framing ‘men in feminism’: theoretical locations, local contexts and practical passings in men’s gender-conscious positionings on gender equality and feminism2009In: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 403-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses some aspects of the 'Man Question' in feminism, by way of the analysis of men's diverse gender-conscious positionings in relation to gender, gender equality and feminism. It builds on earlier work, making use of theoretical models in feminist literature combined with the micro-sociological concept of passing. The article is primarily concerned with the theoretical and empirical complexities, contradictions and ambiguities of men's positionings, as when they are self-defined as 'feminists' (or similar identifications) in radical or deconstructive ways. In this, Swedish interview data are used. Sweden is considered particularly interesting, with a qualified societal consensus on gender equality and a broadly positive place accorded to men's relations with feminism. The authors argue in the final section that there is a need to further dialogue between analyses of men/masculinities and the multidimensionality of feminisms, as well as a need for more empirical studies of men's different (pro) feminist positionings in order to elaborate the theoretical implications of different social contexts. The framing presented seeks to provide greater possibilities for such complex, nuanced and situated understandings of men's relation to feminism, theoretically, analytically and politically.

  • 12. Flam, Helena
    et al.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Parkin, Wendy
    Huddersfield University, Huddersfield, UK.
    Organisations, violations and their silencing2010In: Emotionalizing organizations and organizing emotions / [ed] Barbara Sieben, Åsa Wettergren, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010, 1, p. 147-165Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    University od Derby, Derby, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK; School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland .
    Pornography: non-consensual, vengeful, online2017In: NOTA News, Vol. 82, p. 16-18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    Ulster University, Ulster, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    Revenge Pornography: Gender, Sexuality, and Motivations2018Book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Harrison, Katherine
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Hearn, JeffÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    GEXcel Work in Progress Report. Volume VII: deconstructing the hegemony of men and masculinities2009Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    A multi-faceted power analysis of men’s violence to known women: from hegemonic masculinity to the hegemony of men2012In: Sociological Review, ISSN 0038-0261, E-ISSN 1467-954X, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 589-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a multi-faceted power analysis of men's violence to known women, by way of assessing two main perspectives on research in men and masculinities: first, that founded on hegemonic masculinity, and, second, that based on the hegemony of men. Each perspective is interrogated in terms of understandings of men's violence to known women. These approaches are articulated in relation to empirical research, and conceptual and theoretical analysis. Thus this article addresses to what extent hegemonic masculinity and the hegemony of men, respectively, are useful concepts for explaining and engaging with men's violence to known women? The article concludes with discussion of more general implications of this analysis.

  • 17.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Contextualising gender mainstreaming: text, context, subtext2012In: Gender mainstreaming in public sector organisations: policy implications and practical applications / [ed] Kristina Lindholm, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2012, 1, p. 13-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Contextualizing men, masculinities, leadership and management: gender/intersectionalities, local/transnational, embodied/virtual, theory/practice2014In: The Oxford handbook of gender in organizations / [ed] Savita Kumra, Ruth Simpson, R. J. Burke, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, 1, p. 417-437Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses mainly on men, masculinities, and leadership, though connections with management are also considered. This emphasis is partly because there has been more critical attention to the gendering of men and masculinities in management than the more specific area of leadership. Following discussion of the broad fields of, first, organization, leadership, and management, and, second, gendering and non-gendering, a personal reflection on this area is used as a prelude to examining recent developments in Critical Studies on men and masculinities. This is followed by discussion of three neglected aspects or absences: gender and intersectionalities; localization and transnationalization; and embodiment and virtualization. The article concludes with remarks on the importance of the relations of theory and practice.

  • 19.
    Hearn, Jeff
    University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    Contradictory male/masculine/men’s “I”s: the unwriting of men, and the concept of sex2013In: Revista Canaria de Estudios Ingleses (RCEI), ISSN 0211-5913, Vol. 66, no April, p. 13-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    May I start with two observations? First, men’s relations to feminism are problematic—there is always a gap, a gap between men and feminism; second, the gendering of men and masculinities is now recognised. There are several challenges here. The gender challenge concerns how to move from the presumed "genderlessness" of men towards the gender-consciousness of being a man/men. Another challenge concerns the "public/private," the disruption of dominant narratives of "I" of men and the masculine "I." There is also a temporal challenge, of moving away from simple linearity of the "I." Together, these challenges can be seen as moving away from taken-for-granted "gender power-coherence" towards gender power-consciousness. To address these kinds of question means interrogating the uneven non-equivalences of what it means to be male, a man, masculine. This is not easily reduced to sex or gender. Rather gender/sex, or simply gex, helps to speak of such blurrings.

  • 20.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Critical perspectives on gendering older men: power and losing power?2010In: Journal of Men's Health, ISSN 1875-6867, E-ISSN 1875-6859, Vol. 5, no 3, p. A17-A18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Thematic Studies (Gender Studies), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Equality, growth, sustainability: adding some more missing ingredients to the mixture2010In: Equality, growth, sustainability: do they mix? / [ed] Anna Fogelberg Eriksson, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2010, 1, p. 11-17Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I discuss some ingredients that may be overlooked in considering, or constructing, the mix of equality, growth, and sustainability. First, the mixture of equality, growth and sustainability appears rather differently depending on the scale and scope of concern (for example, global, national, organisational, personal and interpersonal). Second, there are a number of more specific ingredients that can easily be forgotten. These include: not just gender equality but also equality around sexuality; violence and violation; intersectionalities; and a critical engagement with men and masculinities. To neglect such questions may leave a stodgy and unresponsive mixture.

  • 22.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economy, Helsinki, Finland ; Univ Huddersfield, Huddersfield, England.
    Femininity at Work: Gender, Labour and Changing Relations of Power in a Swedish Hospital2013In: European Societies: The Official Journal of the European Sociological Association, ISSN 1461-6696, E-ISSN 1469-8307, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 783-785Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    For Joan: Some letters with reverence, an honorary degree, and a dialogical tribute2017In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    From Masculinity to Masculinities and Back to Men … and Fame too …2016In: Discover Society, Vol. 30Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Geschlechterverhältnisse und soziale Transformationsprozesse: Eine Annäherung aus der Perspektive von Männern und Männlichkeiten2015In: Geschlecht in gesellschaftlichen Transformationsprozessen / [ed] K. Walgenbach and A. Stach, Opladen: Verlag Barbara Budrich, 2015, 1, p. 91-111Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    GEXcel Work in Progress Report Volume V: Deconstructing the Hegemony of Men and Masculinities2008Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Global/transnational gender/sexual scenarios2011In: Sexuality, gender and power: intersectional and transnational perspectives / [ed] A.G. Jónasdóttir, V. Bryson and K.B. Jones, London: Routledge, 2011, 1, p. 209-226Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    How about transpatriarchies?2008In: Gender and the interests of love: essays in honour of Anna Jónasdóttir / [ed] Kathleen Jones and Gunnel Karlsson, Örebro: Örebro University Press , 2008, 1, p. 197-222Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    International studies on men, masculinities and gender equality2014In: Men and Masculinities, ISSN 1097-184X, E-ISSN 1552-6828, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 455-466Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Male bodies, masculine bodies, men’s bodies: The need for a concept of gex2015In: Gender and Psychology: Volume 2 / [ed] V. Burr, London: Routledge, 2015, 1, p. 363-379Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Male bodies, masculine bodies, men’s bodies: the need for a concept of gex2012In: Routledge handbook of body studies / [ed] Bryan S. Turner, London: Routledge, 2012, 1, p. 307-320Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Men and gender equality2015In: Visions for Gender Equality / [ed] Francesca Bettio and Silvia Sansonetti, Brussels, Belgium: European Commission, 2015, 1, p. 24-27Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Men and masculinities2013In: Gender: the key concepts / [ed] M. Evans and C. H. Williams, London: Routledge, 2013, 1, p. 149-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Men around the world: Global and transnational masculinities2017In: Masculinities and Literary Studies: Intersections and New Directions / [ed] J. M. Armengol, M. Bosch-Vilarrubias, À. Carabí and T. Requena, New York: Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 39-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Men as perpetrators of violence against women: perspectives, polices, practices2009In: Violence in the EU examined: policies on violence against women, children and youth in 2004 EU accession countries / [ed] M. Antic Gaber, Llubjlana: University of Ljubjlana , 2009, 1, p. 125-135Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Men changing gender regimes or gender regimes changing men?: challenges for national and transnational social policy, gender equality and organising with men2011In: Men and development: politicizing masculinities / [ed] Andrea Cornwall, Jerker Edström and Alan Greig, London: Zed Books, 2011, 1, p. 155-169Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Men, gender equality, and gender equality policy2009In: Equality, diversity and inclusion at work: a research companion / [ed] Mustafa Özbilgin, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2009, 1, p. 372-382Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Men in the middle: men, feminism, voices, discourses … and materiality2010In: Bøygen : Organ for nordisk språk og litteratur, ISSN 0806-8623, E-ISSN 0809-5000, E-ISSN 0809-5000, Vol. 22, p. 13-17Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, United Kingdom.
    Men, masculinities and the material(-)discursive2014In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 5-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the relations of materialist and discursive analyses of men and masculinities. More specifically, it argues for a materialist-discursive, material/discursive or even a materialdiscursive approach to men and masculinities. In the first part, some of the intellectual and political influences on the development of this approach are outlined. These include elaborations on materialism towards discourse, elaborations on discourse towards materialism, and attempts to work across that boundary. This is followed by focusing on, first, the example of men and violence, second, the topic of men, and, third, men's and males' materialdiscursive bodies. The concluding section discusses the importance of situatedness of knowledge, and the possibility of working towards the abolition of the social category of ‘men’. To deal with this complex problematic, a concept that speaks across the non-equivalence of males, men, masculinity is needed, and for this I suggest ‘gex’, rather than sex or gender.

  • 40.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Men, masculinities, gender equality and excellence in science?2012In: Hat wissenschaftliche Leistung ein Geschlecht? [Has scientific performance a gender? Recent contributions to the excellence debate]: aktuelle Beiträge zur Exzellenzdebatte / [ed] K. Gutiérrez-Lobos, S. Lydtin and K. Rumpfhuber, Vienna: Medizinische Universität Wien, Facultas Verlags- und Buchhandels AG , 2012, 1, p. 75-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there have been major policy developments and policy debates on both the search for excellence in science, and the need for more effective gender mainstreaming and gender equality measures. However, these two sets of initiatives have usually been promoted rather separately from each other, whether at organisational, national and European levels. The move to “excellence” may involve both intended and unintended consequences, including those relating to gender relations, biases and inequalities. Gender relations, gender biases, gender inequalities in the construction of “excellence” can occur in terms of:

    • Individuals: Who does what in science, including women’s participation

    • Organisations: Gender in organisations, organising, and cultures of science

    • Knowledge: Gender in research process and knowledge production in science

    These processes of gender relations, gender biases, gender inequalities are not only about women, but equally the gendering of men and masculinities, including men’s domination of the scientific leadership. Changing this situation means changing men, not changing women to “fit in”. Gendering – of men and women – is also intersectional, complicating the picture further.

  • 41.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Men of the world: genders, globalizations, transnational times2015Book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Men/masculinities: war/militarism - searching (for) the obvious connections?2012In: Making gender, making war: violence, military and peacekeeping practices / [ed] Annica Kronsell and Erika Svedberg, New York: Routledge, 2012, 1, p. 35-48Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK .
    Men’s health and well-being: the case against a separate field2015In: International Journal of Men's Health, ISSN 1532-6306, E-ISSN 1933-0278, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 301-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article begins with an examination of the development of the academic and policy field of men’s health and well-being. This includes the form and shape of the field, its ideological positivity, and the different, sometimes contradictory, interests that construct the field. This prompts the question: why study men’s health? Diverse possible answers to this question are outlined, in terms of different personal, policy and theoretical political contexts of men’s relations to feminism, gender and gender equality. These differing contexts are further elaborated through attention to the importance of transnational political contexts. The article concludes with discussion of the special journal issue to which this article relates, with a coda on ageing and the body.

  • 44.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Men’s violence against women: practices, policies, theories2010In: Violence against women: interventions & masculinities. [conference in Linköping Nov 3rd 2009] / [ed] K. Swahnberg and B. Wijma, Linköping: Linköping University , 2010, 1, p. 22-42Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Methods and methodologies in critical studies on men and masculinities2013In: Men, masculinities and methodologies / [ed] Babara Pini, Bob Pease, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, 1, p. 26-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Män, maskulineter, krig och militarism2013In: Internationella relationer: könskritiska perspektiv / [ed] Paulina De los Reyes, Maud Eduards, Fia Sundevall, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, 1, p. 147-163Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Neglected intersectionalities in studying men: age/ing, virtuality, transnationality2009In: Framing intersectionality: debates on a multi-faceted concept in gender studies / [ed] Helma Lutz, Maria Teresa Herrera Vivar and Linda Supik (eds.), Farnham: Ashgate, 2009, 1, p. 89-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, United Kingdom; Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Neoliberal universities, patriarchies, masculinities, and myself: Transnational personal reflections on and from the global North2017In: Gender, rovné prílezitosti, vyzkum, ISSN 1213-0028, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 16-41Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Management and Organization, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Sociology, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, United Kingdom.
    On men, organizations and intersectionality: personal, working, political and theoretical reflections (or how organization studies met profeminism)2014In: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion, ISSN 2040-7149, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 414-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to reflect, personally, regarding work, politically and theoretically, on 40 years of involvement in organization studies, profeminism and intersectionality.

    Design/methodology/approach: The paper uses autoethnography.

    Findings: The paper shows the need for a broad notion of the field and fieldwork, the development of intersectional thinking, the complexity of men's relations to feminism and intersectionality and the need to both name and deconstruct men in the research field.

    Research limitations/implications: The paper suggests amore explicit naming and deconstruction of men and other intersectional social categories in doing research.

    Practical implications: The paper suggests a more explicit naming and deconstruction of men and other intersectional social categories in equality practice.

    Social implications: The paper suggests a more explicit naming and deconstruction of men and other intersectional social categories in social, political and policy interventions.

    Originality/value: The paper points to recent historical changes in the connections between feminism, gender, profeminism, organizations and intersectionality in relation to equality, diversity and inclusion.

  • 50.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Opening up material-discursive (trans-)forms of life: … politically, theoretically, institutionally, personally2012In: Quilting stories: essays in honor of Elżbieta H. Oleksy / [ed] Marek M. Wojtaszek and Edyta Just, Łódź: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Lodzkiego , 2012, 1, p. 135-158Chapter in book (Other academic)
1234 1 - 50 of 161
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