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  • 1.
    Aktas, Oya
    et al.
    Kirklareli University, Turkey.
    Collinson, David L.
    Lancaster University Management School, Lancaster, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    Sünbüloğlu, Nurseli Yesim
    Men, masculinities and military organizations2023In: Routledge Handbook on Men, Masculinities and Organizations: Theories, Practices and Futures of Organizing / [ed] Jeff Hearn; Kadri Aavik; David L. Collinson; Anika Thym, London: Routledge, 2023, 1, p. 262-275Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Militaries and militarism are among the most obviously gendered of all organizational activities. The military is also one of the clearest arenas of social power, violence and killing in their many guises. Military matters are urgent, powerful and lethal. The ways armies and those in them are organized and act are literally questions of life and death for all concerned. This chapter brings together studies on men and masculinities with those in the military and military organizations. Men, militarism and the military are historically, profoundly and blatantly interconnected. These interconnections have often either been simply accepted or it has gone unnoticed that these military persons are largely men. Indeed, many, though not all, armies and other fighting forces of the world have been and still are armies composed mainly of men, young men and boys. Those engaged in active combat and direct fighting in wars are often young men and boys. In the chapter, we address the place of men and masculinities in some key organizational issues in military organization and militarism, most notably recruitment, hierarchies and segregations, disability and veterans, and the impacts of these organizations on civilians, before concluding remarks on wider processes and impacts, on research, scientific and technological organizations, on international relations and geopolitics, and on the environment.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    et al.
    Department of Thematic Studies (Child Studies), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. .
    Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
    Department of Government, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Department of Thematic Studies (Gender Studies), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    Mediated communications of violence: the example of “happy slapping”2011In: Journal of Children and Media, ISSN 1748-2798, E-ISSN 1748-2801, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 230-234Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) afford new possibilities for complex interactions among young people. An Internet user can be both a consumer (receiver) and a producer (sender) of mediated communication, asynchronously or simultaneously—such as someone who both uploads and watches video clips on YouTube (von Feilitzen, 2009). “And between these two extremes—the reception and sender roles— the user can be interacting or participating to different extents, for example, in games and in communities owned, maintained and copywrited by someone else” (von Feilitzen, 2009, p. 36). Communication and socializing in virtual online and real offline life through ICTs provides new dimensions to young peoples’ “identity experiments and identity formation” (p. 38). As discussed by Wellman (2001), the “social affordances of computerized communication networks” provide youth with many possibilities for new forms of production and consumption of violence in and through media technology. In this Commentary we aim to outline some important, yet relatively underdeveloped, aspects of research that connect new media, violence, and young people.

  • 3.
    Balkmar, Dag
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Men, Automobility, Movements, and the Environment: Imagining (un)sustainable, automated transport futures2019In: Unsustainable Institutions of Men: Transnational Dispersed Centres, Gender Power, Contradictions / [ed] Jeff Hearn, Ernesto Vasquez del Aguila, and Marina Hughson, London: Routledge, 2019, p. 227-254Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The place of ecological and environmental concerns have not usually been at the centre of debates and analyses of men, masculinities, and global and transnational processes of power, even though men and masculinities have played a key role in environmental damage. Accordingly, there is an urgent need for more research, analysis and action on ecological and environmental questions, ‘green’ issues, sustainability, and climate change, and how these link to men and masculinities. Against this background, this chapter addresses sustainability in relation to intersections of men and the environment, and with emphasis on movements and transport futures. The current transport system not only supports and enacts the predominant global form of ‘quasi-private’ mobility that subordinates other less resource intense means of movement, it also causes damaging effects on the environment locally and globally. Central actors are to an overwhelmingly degree men of power, and men that dominate andcontrol its interlinked centres, such as the auto-, oil-and road industry. However, while the automobile and automobility have changed the world, self-driving cars and related automations are imagined as the next major transportation technology revolution. In the context of automated transport futures, the balance of power between state bodies, the auto-industry and power enactments by individual men, are likely to change.

  • 4.
    Balkmar, Dag
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Strid, Sofia
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Humbert, Anne Laure
    Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.
    Disperse violence: gender-based violence and environmental violence2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is part of the session Violence Regimes: Analysing the Multiplicity of Gendered Violence(s). Violence regime is a framework developed for analysing the multiplicity of violence(s) (Hearn et al 2018; Strid et al 2018). The framework concerns direct and indirect violence; across four pillars of comprehensiveness; across macro, meso and micro levels; often with increasing amount of time and space between act and impact; and vary in both manifestation and understanding of violence, extending the continuum of violence (Kelly 1988) across four pillars: Deadly, Damaging, Diffuse and Dispersed violence.

    Empirically, this paper explores manifestations of violence in the first and fourth pillar of the violence regime framework:  deadly and direct forms of violence such as homicide, femicide and suicide; and dispersed manifestations not necessarily understood as violence, usually indirect, sometimes directed towards a group but with a less easily identifiable ‘victim’ or ‘object; manifestations not usually recognized as violence; e.g. environmental destruction. Two different cases will be discussed, 1) automobility and 2) killings of animals for food, both associated with negative impact on the environment. First, we examine the violent, damaging and deadly effects of automobility across country comparisons of the EU28. Second, we examine slow violence (Nixon 2011) and the levels of slaughtering of animals in relation to the levels of homicide, femicide and suicide through cross country comparisons of the EU28. The paper contributes to the violence regime framework analyzing how manifestations of violence not usually understood as violence correlate with the most direct and deadly forms of violence. 

  • 5.
    Balkmar, Dag
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Strid, Sofia
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Humbert, Anne Laure
    Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.
    Disperse violence: gender-based violence and environmental violence2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is part of the session Violence Regimes: Analysing the Multiplicity of Gendered Violence(s). Violence regime is a framework developed for analysing the multiplicity of violence(s) (Hearn et al 2018; Strid et al 2018).

    The framework concerns direct and indirect violence; across four pillars of comprehensiveness; across macro, meso and micro levels; often with increasing amount of time and space between act and impact; and vary in both manifestation and understanding of violence, extending the continuum of violence (Kelly 1988) across four pillars: Deadly, Damaging, Diffuse and Dispersed violence. Empirically, this paper explores manifestations of violence in the first and fourth pillar of the violence regime framework:  deadly and direct forms of violence such as homicide, femicide and suicide; and dispersed manifestations not necessarily understood as violence, usually indirect, sometimes directed towards a group but with a less easily identifiable ‘victim’ or ‘object; manifestations not usually recognized as violence; e.g. environmental destruction. Two different cases will be discussed, 1) automobility and 2) killings of animals for food, both associated with negative impact on the environment.

    First, we examine the violent, damaging and deadly effects of automobility across country comparisons of the EU28. Second, we examine slow violence (Nixon 2011) and the levels of slaughtering of animals in relation to the levels of homicide, femicide and suicide through cross country comparisons of the EU28.

    The paper contributes to the violence regime framework analysing how manifestations of violence not usually understood as violence correlate with the most direct and deadly forms of violence. 

  • 6.
    Balkmar, Dag
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Strid, Sofia
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Humbert, Anne Laure
    Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.
    On violence policy and “women friendly” welfare regimes: From gender regimes to (gender) violence regimes?2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Belghiti-Mahut, Sophia
    et al.
    Université de Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
    Bergmann, Nadja
    L & R Social Research, Vienna, Austria.
    Gärtner, Marc
    Dissens Institute for Education and Research e.V., Berlin, Germany.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Univ. of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden; Hanken School of Econ., Helsinki, Finland; Univ. of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, United Kingdom.
    Holter, Øystein Gullvåg
    Centre for Gender Research, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Hrženjak, Majda
    Peace Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Puchert, Ralf
    Dissens Institute for Education and Research e.V., Berlin, Germany.
    Scambor, Christian
    Research Institute at Men's Counselling Centre, Graz, Austria.
    Scambor, Elli
    Research Institute at Men's Counselling Centre, Graz, Austria.
    Schuck, Hartwig
    Dissens e.V. Institut für Bildung und Forschung, Berlin, Germany.
    Seidler, Victor
    Goldsmiths University, London, United Kingdom.
    White, Alan
    Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds , United Kingdom.
    Wojnicka, Katarzyna
    Dissens e.V. Institut für Bildung und Forschung, Berlin, Germany.
    Study on the Role of Men in Gender Equality2013 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender relations have increasingly changed throughout the past decades, and European gender politics have productively accompanied these improvements. Still Europe is far from being a gender-equal society.

    For a long period gender equality policies have been contextualised mainly as a ’women’s issue’ – as women have been the driving force behind gender equality strategies and have been seen as the only ones who benefit from a more equal society. Men as the ‘other gender’ have been taken less into account in the context of gender equality.

    In the last decade, however, men and masculinities have increasingly become subjects of studies and gender policies in the EU. Under EU presidency, conferences on men, masculinities and equality took place in Sweden (2001) and Finland (2006). The Roadmap for equality between women and men 2006-20101 specifically encouraged men to take up care responsibilities and to share leave entitlements with women. A horizontal priority on gender roles including the need for involvement of men in gender equality policies and addressing inequalities affecting men, such as early school leaving, literacy and occupational health, is present in the current European Commission's Strategy for Equality between Women and Men (2010-2015)2. Additionally, strategies like gender mainstreaming seem to have created an initial awareness of the issue of men in gender equality and the establishment of some pathways towards institutional practice. Therefore, contemporary gender equality strategies as well as scientific studies should involve both men and women and take into account analysis of the role of both genders in romoting gender equality, dismantling structural inequalitiesand changing gender roles.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Bergman-Rosamond, Annika
    et al.
    Department of Political Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gammeltoft-Hansen, Thomas
    Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hamza, Mo
    Division of Risk Management and Societal Safety, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics, Finland; Sociology, University of Huddersfield, UK; Institute for Social and Health Studies, University of South Africa .
    Ramasar, Vasna
    Division of Human Ecology and Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rydström, Helle
    Department of Gender Studies, Lund University, Sweden.
    The Case for Interdisciplinary Crisis Studies2022In: Global Discourse: A Developmental Journal of Research in Politics and International Relations, ISSN 2326-9995, E-ISSN 2043-7897, Vol. 12, no 3-4, p. 465-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alarming reports on crises are appearing and being published on a daily basis in different expressions from climate change, to people’s movement and displacement, to armed conflict. Claims to crisis may involve tangible displays of desperate refugees, civilian casualties or persisting, if not, permanent poverty. Moreover, crisis relates to more abstract concepts such as failing democracy, instability in the liberal world order or national and global economic inequality. Crisis, in a sense, seemingly weaves the contemporary world together (Latour 1993), and this trend is reinforced by the frequent occurrence of mediatized or media-tuned global crisis narratives, many of which are currently shaped by populist apocalyptic ideology (Judis 2016). At the same time, crisis refers to social forces that can disrupt life and frame realities in ways, which go beyond prevalent discursive narratives (Jaques 2009; Smith and Vivekananda 2009). Crisis can also serve as a turning point and an opportunity for transformational change in a system (e.g. Polanyi 1944; Walby 2015). In particular, we outline an interdisciplinary approach to crisis as both concept and event, and thus to crisis studies, that moves away from some tendencies to see crisis as ahistorical, but rather emphasises uncertainty and contingency.

    Download full text (pdf)
    The Case for Interdisciplinary Crisis Studies
  • 9.
    Biricik, Alp
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hearn, JeffÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    GEXcel Work in Progress Report. Volume XV: gendered sexualed transnationalisations, deconstructing the dominant: transforming men, “centres” and knowledge/policy/practice2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Biricik, Alp
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hearn, JeffÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    GEXcel work in progress report. Volyme VI: deconstructing the hegemony of men and masculinities2009Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Blake, Vic
    et al.
    Nottingham, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Sociology, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    Jackson, Barber
    Nottingham, UK.
    Johnson, Rickard
    Nottingham, UK.
    Luczynski, Zbyszek
    Nottingham, UK.
    Doing memory work with older men: the practicalities, the process, the potential2016In: Working with Older People, ISSN 1366-3666, E-ISSN 2042-8790, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 209-213Article in journal (Refereed)
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    fulltext
  • 12.
    Blake, Vic
    et al.
    Nottingham, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    Jackson, David
    Nottingham, UK.
    Barber, Randy
    Nottingham, UK.
    Johnson, Richard
    Leicester, UK.
    Luczynski, Zbyszek
    Nottingham, UK.
    Ageing, gender politics and masculinities : Reflections on collective memory work with older men2018In: Working with Older People, ISSN 1366-3666, E-ISSN 2042-8790, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the process of participating in a long-term collective memory work group of older men, focusing on the making/unmaking of older men and masculinities, and the potential of memory work with older men.

    Design/methodology/approach: Participant review and reflection on collective memory work with a group of older men.

    Findings: Collective memory work provides a novel way to explore ageing, gendering, men, and masculinities. Its potential for working with older men is examined critically in relation to gender politics, power and (in)equalities, interconnections and contradictions of men’s ageing and gendering, the personal and the political, as well as working with older men more generally, including those in transition and crisis.

    Originality/value: There is little previous writing on this approach to ageing, men, and masculinities. The paper aims to stimulate wider applications of this approach.

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    AGEING, GENDER POLITICS AND MASCULINITIES: REFLECTIONS ON COLLECTIVE MEMORY WORK WITH OLDER MEN
  • 13. Blake, Vic
    et al.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Jackson, David
    Barber, Randy
    Johnson, Richard
    Luczynski, Zbyszek
    Collective memory work with older men: Ageing, gender politics and masculinities2021In: Reader Collective Memory-Work / [ed] R. Hamm, Sligo: Beltra Books , 2021, 1, p. 327-353Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over a thirteen-year period, between 2002 and 2015, we were part of what we now call the Older Men’s Memory Work Group (hereafter the group). During our final three years together, we also collaboratively produced and edited a collective book, Men’s Stories for a Change: Ageing Men Remember (Barber et al., 2016; also Blake et al., 2016, 2018) – though it should be said, at the outset, that this was not at all part of our agenda until late in the initial process.Memory work is work on memories, usually though not necessarily collective, and usually also focused on and about some agreed issue(s) of concern. In our case, these memories were about the making and unmaking of older men and masculinities through age, ageing, gender, gendering, and other intersections. Indeed, from the very beginning the group was part of a personal-political project of changing older men and masculinities against patriarchal and sexist ways and relations, and towards feminist and profeminist ways and relations. Here, in this contribution, we first describe the practicalities and the process of our memory work before placing the method itself in its broader framework, and considering its potential for working with older people, and specifically with older men, and with certain implications for practice.

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    Free fulltext
  • 14.
    Blake, Vic
    et al.
    Nottingham, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Luczynski, Zbyszek
    Nottingham, UK.
    Collective Memory Work with Older Men : Feminism, Experience and Reflection2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15. Blake, Vic
    et al.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Luczynski, Zbyszek
    Barber, Randy
    Jackson, David
    Johnson, Richard
    Men's stories for a change: ageing men remember2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Men’s Stories for a Change records and analyses stories written by a group of older men who met over thirteen years to share memories about ageing and masculinity. So here there are stories of love and sex, bodily change, crisis and disturbance, politics and power, struggles with violent feelings and action, work, sport, clothes, peeing, hair, and hairlessness. These men share a view of manhood, gender, and ageing that, while critical of dominant frames and inspired by feminist politics, is optimistic without underestimating the challenges of older age and old age, including the approach to the end of life. They see ageing as an opportunity for personal and social and, indeed, political change, for dealing with longstanding issues, especially around gender and power, and as a time of innovating too. This project aims to help, if only in some small way, in opening up these issues, freeing up in a profeminist direction the voices of other men individually or collectively, ageing or otherwise.

    The authors have all been involved in some kind of men’s anti-sexist, profeminist politics, and/or men’s personal development work, along with other personal and political activism in such arenas as anti-nuclear, anti-racism, green, left, socialist, and peace politics over the years. Using the methods of memory work, the writers are both subjects and objects; the text cuts across that division too. Similarly, this volume can be located in various traditions, genres, and forms of writing. This is a project that is both finished and unfinished.

  • 16.
    Burr, Viv
    et al.
    Huddersfield University, UK.
    Hearn, JeffÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sex, violence and the body: the erotics of wounding2008Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Collinson, David
    et al.
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gendering Leadership in Times of COVID: The Case of the ‘Strong Man2020In: Leadership for the Greater Good: Reflections on Today's Challenges from Around the Globe, no October 15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Collinson, David
    et al.
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    University of Huddersfield.
    Trump v. Biden: A duel of contrasting masculinities2020In: The ConversationArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Collinson, David L.
    et al.
    Lancaster University Management School, Lancaster, UK.
    Aavik, Kadri
    Tallinn University, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; School of Human and Health Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    Thym, Anika
    Basel University, Basel, Switzerland.
    Men, masculinities, and leaderships: Emerging issues2023In: A Research Agenda for Gender and Leadership / [ed] Sherylle J. Tan; Lisa DeFrank-Cole, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2023, 1, p. 87-106Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter argues that combining recent work in critical studies on men and masculinities (CSMM) with critical leadership studies (CLS) has the potential to open up important new research agendas in the broad area of gender and leadership and more particularly in relation to men, masculinities, and leadership. Its starting point is Collinson and Hearn’s 1994 Gender, Work & Organization article, “Naming men as men: Implications for work, organizations and management. ”Collinson and Hearn sought to make the gendered social category of men explicit in studying work, organizations, and management. This involved interrogating debates on patriarchies and multiple masculinities, as well as analytical questions around exclusion, differences, meaning, and power. The relevance of these issues was discussed in relation to (material) discourses of masculinity in management: paternalism, authoritarianism, entrepreneurialism, informalism, careerism.

  • 20.
    Cornell, Josephine
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, Birmingham City University, Birmingham, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. FLO, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    Ratele, Kopano
    Psychology Department, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa.
    Kessi, Shose
    Faculty of Humanities, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Sexual justice and sexualities2023In: Handbook of Social Sciences and Global Public Health / [ed] Pranee Liamputtong, New York: Springer, 2023, p. 1-21Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexualities research is a diverse and wide-ranging field, comprising a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches. Mainstream public health scholars have tended to approach the study of sexualities from an essentialist and biomedical framework, at times drawing on deficit-focused interpretations of sexuality and neglecting questions of power, context, and sexual diversity. Public health researchers have an important role to play in promoting and working toward sexual justice, and critical perspectives and understandings of sexuality are crucial in this regard. Approaching sexualities with a critical lens requires always paying attention to the power relations that shape sexual experiences, identities, and practices. This is of particular urgency in light of the many forms of repression, exclusion, and regressive backlash occurring across the globe, despite the many successes of the struggle for sexual rights and justice. This chapter provides a historical overview of sexualities research in the social sciences and public health and delineates some of the key theoretical trends within sexualities scholarship. It then presents some key priorities for critical research into sexualities within public health that may meaningfully contribute to advancing sexual justice globally.

  • 21.
    de Boise, Sam
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK; Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Are men getting more emotional?: Critical sociological perspectives on men, masculinities and emotions2017In: Sociological Review, ISSN 0038-0261, E-ISSN 1467-954X, Vol. 65, no 4, p. 779-796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sociological research, influenced by feminist and other critical perspectives, has noted how men’s emotional inexpressiveness was influenced, and supported, by patriarchal privilege. Such approaches have argued that ‘inexpression’ needs to be broken down in order to build gender equality and improve men’s own wellbeing. Emerging research has, however, challenged the argument that men are ‘emotionally inexpressive’ on two main premises: that, as a result of feminist critiques, many men now practise ‘softer’ or ‘more emotional’ forms of masculinity; second, that emotions always influence social action and so need to be better incorporated into sociological accounts of men’s behaviour. Yet these approaches entail some conceptual confusion as to what emotions are, how they link to social action and whether men’s emotions are inherently transformative for gender relations. This article first details how emotions and masculinity have been theorized in feminist-inspired approaches. It outlines recent work on emotions, men and masculinities before arguing for an understanding of emotions that engages with both physiologically grounded and postconstructionist debates. It finally suggests incorporating a material-discursive approach to men’s emotions, through feminist work on affect, which is attentive to the political dimensions of ‘increasing emotionality’ in order to contribute to a developing field of sociological research.

  • 22.
    de Boise, Sam
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    'The Expressive Male': Thinking Critically about Emotions in Critical Studies on Men and Masculinities2016In: The 7th Midterm Conference on Emotions, Stockholm: Abstracts, 2016, p. 18-18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his (1976) article, The Inexpressive Male: Tragedy or Sexual Politics? Sattel made the case that men’s relative lack of emotional expression emerged as a direct result of, and helped to sustain, men’s social privilege. Feminist and profeminist campaigners have (rightly) cited an increasing understanding of men’s emotional lives, and getting men to understand their own emotions, as central to any project addressing gender inequality. Some scholars within Critical studies on Men and Masculinities (CSMM), too, have often made the case that men need to become ‘more emotional’.

    Various authors have documented empirical research that argues, as a result of feminist gains, men are gradually getting ‘more in touch’ with their emotions, leading to a ‘softening’ of masculinity. There is a problem, however, with narratives around increasingly ‘more emotional’ men. These often fail to engage with literature on emotions and historical precedents of men being valued for displays of ‘authentic’ emotions - through music for instance – which have often supported privilege. In addition, assuming that men’s emotions are inherently gender-progressive, ignores more sinister examples of men’s rights activism, violence and online misogyny.

    This paper argues for the need to engage critically with how we think about both emotions and a history of emotions, in relation to CSMM. Considering how emotions are put into language, as well as the mechanisms by which emotions are identified and understood, have an impact on how emotions and ‘emotional’ behaviour are characterized in both research and everyday life. Crucially, it is important to retain a focus on the embodied aspects of experience. We suggest distinguishing between emotions, affect and kindred concepts as a productive way to approach issues of power and embodied experience in CSMM. Focusing on these areas, this paper aims to contribute a critical analysis on a developing and much-needed area of research.

     

  • 23.
    de Boise, Sam
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    King, Martin
    Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
    Critical Perspectives on Men and Masculinity in Popular Music : An All-Male Gender-Critical Panel2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Delaunay, Marine
    et al.
    Bordeaux University, France.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Strid, Sofia
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gendered violence regimes: Context, policy and practice in intimate partner violence in France and Sweden2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues for more complex analyses of welfare state gender regimes by focusing on a key element frequently forgotten in cross-national comparisons: intimate partner violence (IPV) and responses thereto, especially criminal justice system (CJS) responses. We return to the notions of gender regime and welfare regimes, and critically elaborate them through the notion of gendered violence regime, to analyse gendered socio-political and judicial institutions and practices. According to Haney (2004), welfare state regimes, gender regimes and judicial regimes tend to match together in how policies are named, debated and implemented. However, many comparative welfare analyses do not attend to violence; moreover, violence and responses thereto are rooted in institutions and inequality regimes (Walby 2008).

    Building on earlier work (Hearn, Strid et al. 2016), we use comparative methods to address discursive dynamics and judicial practices in France and Sweden in the light of transformations in gender regimes, illustrative of broader contextualizing and theoretical concerns. First, we review relevant laws and policy, inspired by the Critical Frame Analysis (Verloo 2007), noting differences, similarities and convergences in welfare and judicial systems. Second, we focus on judicial practices in two countries, particularly in CJS treatment of IPV. In Sweden, more explicitly gendered structural policy is accompanied by cases being constructed and treated more individually by professionals with real expertise on domestic violence; while in more corporatist regime France, only very serious cases are so treated, and less individual, more proceduralised assessment of cases by workdays lost is used. CJS procedure impact the construction and definition of the problem, especially regarding how professionals consider the gendering and seriousness of the violence in making a case.

    Finally, we critically interrogate how useful “regime” typologies are, including in providing avenues for intersectional analyses combining sociological theories of change (Muller 2005) and transformation (Felstiner et al. 1980).

  • 25.
    Egeberg Holmgren, Linn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK; Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Erkekleri Feminizmin İçinde ve Dışında Çerçevelemek: [Framing ‘men in and not in feminism]2017In: Fe Dergi: Feminist Eleştiri, ISSN 1309-128X, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 85-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses some aspects of the “Man Question” in feminism, by way of the analysis ofmen’s diverse gender-conscious positionings in relation to gender, gender equality and feminism. Itbuilds on earlier work, making use of theoretical models in feminist literature combined with themicro-sociological concept of passing. Consideration is also given to men’s non-gender-consciouspositionings. The article is primarily concerned with the theoretical and empirical complexities,contradictions and ambiguities of men’s positionings, as when they are self-defined as “feminists” (orsimilar identifications) in radical or deconstructive ways. In this, a Swedish interview data is used.Sweden is considered particularly interesting, with a qualified societal consensus on gender equalityand a broadly positive place accorded to men’s relations with feminism. The authors argue in the finalsection that there is a need to further dialogue between analyses of men/masculinities and themultidimensionality of feminisms, as well as a need for more empirical studies of men’s different(pro)feminist positionings in order to elaborate the theoretical implications of different socialcontexts. The framing presented seeks to provide greater possibilities for such complex, nuanced andsituated understandings of men’s relation to feminism, theoretically, analytically and politically.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Erkekleri Feminizmin İçinde ve Dışında Çerçevelemek
  • 26.
    Egeberg Holmgren, Linn
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Gender Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Huddersfield University, UK; Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Framing ‘men in feminism’: theoretical locations, local contexts and practical passings in men’s gender-conscious positionings on gender equality and feminism2009In: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 403-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses some aspects of the 'Man Question' in feminism, by way of the analysis of men's diverse gender-conscious positionings in relation to gender, gender equality and feminism. It builds on earlier work, making use of theoretical models in feminist literature combined with the micro-sociological concept of passing. The article is primarily concerned with the theoretical and empirical complexities, contradictions and ambiguities of men's positionings, as when they are self-defined as 'feminists' (or similar identifications) in radical or deconstructive ways. In this, Swedish interview data are used. Sweden is considered particularly interesting, with a qualified societal consensus on gender equality and a broadly positive place accorded to men's relations with feminism. The authors argue in the final section that there is a need to further dialogue between analyses of men/masculinities and the multidimensionality of feminisms, as well as a need for more empirical studies of men's different (pro) feminist positionings in order to elaborate the theoretical implications of different social contexts. The framing presented seeks to provide greater possibilities for such complex, nuanced and situated understandings of men's relation to feminism, theoretically, analytically and politically.

  • 27.
    Erlingsdóttir, Irma
    et al.
    University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Husu, Liisa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Shefer, Tamara
    University of Western Cape, Bellville, Republic of South Africa.
    Panel: Tensions between building up feminist academic infrastructure and feminist visions for the future: an interactive panel2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28. Flam, Helena
    et al.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Parkin, Wendy
    Huddersfield University, Huddersfield, UK.
    Organisations, violations and their silencing2010In: Emotionalizing organizations and organizing emotions / [ed] Barbara Sieben, Åsa Wettergren, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010, 1, p. 147-165Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29. Folbre, Nancy
    et al.
    Olin Wright, Erik
    Andersson, Jenny
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Himmelweit, Sue
    Open University, UK.
    Sterling, Andrew
    The multiple directions of social progress: ways forward2018In: Rethinking Society for the 21st Century: Report of the International Panel on Social Progress. Volume 3 Transformations in Values, Norms, Culture / [ed] International Panel on Social Progress, Cambridge UK: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 815-846Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    The Multiple Directions of Social Progress: Ways Forward
  • 30.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    et al.
    Stockholms University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Emma
    Using feminist theory in violence prevention programmes with men and boys 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    Arden University, UK; University of Derby, UK .
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Huddersfield, UK; Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Physical violence and online violation: Concepts, terminologies and comparison2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance and centrality of measuring direct physical violence in the measurement and analysis of violence is well recognized and widely debated (Walby et al., 2016). Physical violence is clearly of utmost importance, yet is not the whole story; indeed, some victims/survivors of ‘domestic violence’ and gendered interpersonal violence report non-physical, psychological, emotional and other forms of non-(directly)physical violence may be more impactful (Herman, 2015). Such issues echo longstanding debates on gender violence(s), direct physical violence and other non-physical or less directly physical violences, for example, representational, psychological, coercive control, and link back to debates on representational violence, and especially pornography. But, with the proliferation of the various forms of online violences and abuses (for example, revenge pornography, upskirting, happy slapping, sexual spycamming), there is a need to explore the nature and limits of violence and violation by way of a comparison of online violence/abuse/violation and in-the-flesh physical and psychological violences. We argue that clarifying and untangling these differences may make it easier to draw comparisons with ‘domestic’/offline/fleshy abuse, as well as physical/non-physical violences, such as representational, psychological, coercive control, as well as attending to their overlaps, intersections and combinations.

  • 32.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    Arden University, UK; University of Derby, UK .
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Physical violence and online violence/abuse: concepts, terminologies and comparison2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance and centrality of measuring direct physical violence in the measurement and analysis of violence is well recognized and widely debated (Walby et al., 2016). Physical violence is clearly of utmost importance, yet is not the whole story; indeed, some victims/survivors of ‘domestic violence’ and gendered interpersonal violence report non-physical, psychological, emotional and other forms of non-(directly)physical violence may be more impactful (Herman, 2015). Such issues echo longstanding debates on gender violence(s), direct physical violence and other non-physical or less directly physical violences, for example, representational, psychological, coercive control, and link back to debates on representational violence, and especially pornography. But, with the proliferation of the various forms of online violences and abuses (for example, revenge pornography, upskirting, happy slapping, sexual spycamming), there is a need to explore the nature and limits of violence and violation by way of a comparison of online violence/abuse/violation and in-the-flesh physical and psychological violences. We argue that clarifying and untangling these differences may make it easier to draw comparisons with ‘domestic’/offline/fleshy abuse, as well as physical/non-physical violences, such as representational, psychological, coercive control, as well as attending to their overlaps, intersections and combinations.

  • 33.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    University od Derby, Derby, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK; School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland .
    Pornography: non-consensual, vengeful, online2017In: NOTA News, Vol. 82, p. 16-18Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Pornography: Non-consensual, Vengeful, Online
  • 34.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    Arden University, UK; University of Derby, UK .
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Revenge pornography and discourses of masculinity2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    School of Health and Social Care, University of Derby, Derby, UK; School of Psychology, Ulster University, Coleraine, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; Institute for Social and Health Studies, University of South Africa, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Revenge pornography and manhood acts: A discourse analysis of perpetrators’ accounts2019In: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 158-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Revenge pornography (hereafter, revenge porn) is the online, sometimes offline, non-consensual distribution or sharing, of explicit images of someone else by ex-partners, partners, others or hackers seeking revenge or entertainment – also referred to as non-consensual pornography. The vast majority of revenge porn is committed by men on women ex-partners. In this paper, we discursively analyse men’s electronic texts accompanying their posting of explicit images on arguably the most popular revenge porn-specific website MyEx.com. Situating our analysis as a contemporary form of online gendered violence and abuse, we show the complex ways in which manhood acts are invoked by men to account for their practices. The impacts on victims/survivors and possible interventions are also discussed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Revenge pornography and manhood acts: a discourse analysis of perpetrators’ accounts
  • 36.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    Ulster University, Ulster, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    Revenge Pornography: Gender, Sexuality, and Motivations2018Book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    Arden University, UK; University of Derby, UK .
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Revenge Pornography: Gender, Sexuality, and Motivations2019Book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    Ulster University, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Violation by sexual image distribution, “revenge pornography”, cyberabuses, and prevention2018In: 6th International Report. Crime Prevention and Community Safety: Preventing Cybercrime / [ed] Pablo Madriaza, Montreal, Canada: International Centre for the Prevention of Crime (ICPC) , 2018, p. 103-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Violation by sexual image distribution, “revenge pornography”, cyberabuses, and prevention
  • 39.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    Ulster University, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Huddersfield, UK; Hanken School of Economics, Finland; South Africa.
    Written Submission (SPP0100): House of Commons The Women and Equalities Committee. Sexual harassment of women and girls in public places inquiry2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY     

    1.1 The UK Government’s Ending Violence against Women and Girls Strategy  2016–2020, which includes sexual harassment in public places needs to be  more comprehensive to include a wider range of:

    • Offline and online violences, and their connections with each other;

    • Consider the interaction between violences in public and private spaces, and appropriate responses;

    • Consider the interaction between violences at the local, national and international levels, and appropriate responses;

    • Involve a range of organisations and actors at the international, national and local levels.    

    1.2 Interventions should include:  

    • Pursuing international cooperation between states, and between states and non-state actors;

    • The development of international legislation to target transnational perpetrators of these crimes, and those who profit from these crimes;

    • The development of greater regulation and responsibility of internet providers and other relevant technology companies;

    • Civil laws so that victims-survivors can sue for damages from perpetrators and those who profit;

    • Current copyright and privacy laws should be more comprehensive;

    • Better coordination and cooperation of service provision from the myriad of specialist and mainstream services;

    • More should be done to assist victims-survivors deal with the fallout of crimes;

    • More education programmes and awareness-raising in the public, workplace and domestic realms; 

    • Re-education of offenders;

    • A greater focus on research, data and statistics collection to facilitate strategic planning; and 

    • Should be conducted with awareness of intersectional gendered analysis, including of men and masculinities.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Written submission from Dr Matthew Hall and Professor Jeff Hearn (SPP0100)
  • 40.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    British University in Egypt, Cairo, Egypt.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Lewis, Ruth
    Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    Digital Gender-Sexual Violations: Violence, Technologies, Motivations2022Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This groundbreaking book argues that the fundamental issues around how victim-survivors of digital gender-sexual violations (DGSVs) are abused can be understood in terms of gender and sexual dynamics, constructions, positioning and logics. The book builds upon Hall and Hearn's previous work, Revenge Pornography, but has been substantially reworked to examine other forms of DGSV such as upskirting and sexual deepfakes, as well as the latest research and debates in the field.

    Facilitated by developments in internet and mobile technologies, the non-consensual posting of real or fake sexually explicit images of others for revenge, entertainment, homosocial status or political leverage has become a global phenomenon. Using discourse and thematic analytical approaches, this text examines digital, survey and interview data on gendered sexual violences, abuses, and violations. The words of both the perpetrators and victim-survivors are presented, showing the impact on victim-survivors and the complex ways in which phallocentric power relations and existing hegemonic masculinities are reinforced and invoked by perpetrators to position girls and women as gendered and sexualised commodities to be traded, admired, violated or abused for the needs of individual men or groups of men.

    Hall, Hearn and Lewis explore their research in a broader social and political context, evaluating and suggesting changes to existing legislative frameworks, education, victim support, and practical and policy interventions against DGSV, along with wider political considerations. This is a unique resource for students, academics and researchers as well as professionals dealing with issues around digital gender-sexual violations.

  • 41.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, British University in Egypt, El Shorouk City, Egypt.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; School of Human and Health Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    Lewis, Ruth
    Department of Social Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    Image-Based Sexual Abuse: Online Gender-Sexual Violations2023In: Encyclopedia, E-ISSN 2673-8392, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 327-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Image-based sexual abuse describes the offline or online non-consensual sharing of real or fake images or videos with (un)known others of a person that are either sexually explicit or sexually suggestive. New information and communication technologies (ICTs) provide many open-ended and undefined possibilities for image-based sexual abuse (IBSA), such as ‘revenge pornography’, ‘upskirting’, deepfake pornography, sexual spycamming, and cyberflashing, to name just a few. These forms of abuse refer to the online, and also at times offline, non-consensual distribution or sharing of explicit images or videos of someone else by ex-partners, partners, others, or hackers seeking revenge, entertainment, or peer group status. The vast majority of these are committed by men against women. Given the many adverse impacts on physical and psychological health and well-being it has on its victim-survivors, exploring this form of online gender-sexual abuse and violation becomes an important endeavor. Situating the discussion within debates on gender and sexuality, the entry discusses the increasing use of new technologies for online gender-sexual abuse and violation, highlighting the motivations of those perpetrating IBSA, the negative physical and psychological impacts of IBSA on victim-survivors, and what has been, and could be, done to combat image-based sexual abuses and other misuses of new technologies, notably through legal, policy, and practice interventions within and between nations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Image-Based Sexual Abuse: Online Gender-Sexual Violations
  • 42.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    Arden University, Coventry, UK; University of Derby, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Huddersfield, UK; Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lewis, Ruth
    Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    "Upskirting," Homosociality, and Craftmanship: A Thematic Analysis of Perpetrator and Viewer Interactions2021In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 532-550, article id 10778012211008981Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "Upskirting" is the action or practice of surreptitiously taking photographs or videos up a female's skirt or dress. In the United Kingdom, it is an offense. However, internationally, laws are uneven. Understanding how perpetrators account for their actions becomes an important question. Here, we present the findings of our thematic analysis of posts on the "upskirting" website, The Candid Zone. Our analysis shows that posters and respondents frame this activity as artistic and technical, providing each other with advice and guidance on where and how to get the "best" shots. We conceptualize this form of abuse as homosociality and craftsmanship. 

  • 43.
    Harrison, Katherine
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Hearn, JeffÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    GEXcel Work in Progress Report. Volume VII: deconstructing the hegemony of men and masculinities2009Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    ‘A life of violence’: Some theoretical/political/policy/personal accountings on ‘masculinities’ and ‘intimate partner violence’2020In: Men, Masculinities and Intimate Partner Violence / [ed] Lucas Gottzén, Margun Bjørnholt and Floretta Boonzaier, London: Routledge, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reflecting on “a life of violence”, I had no idea that this issue would be such a key thread, provocation and problematic in most of my academic life, albeit in many different ways. Much, though not all, of this work has been within academic framework of Critical Studies on Men and Masculinities (CSMM), as a sub-field within Gender Studies, alongside policy development and profeminist activism. Indeed, I came to realise fairly early on if one is interested in studying, and changing, men and masculinities, whether in research, politics or everyday practice, it is really very difficult to do this without giving attention to violence and anti-violence.  In this chapter, I suggest, as invited by the editors, some theoretical/political/policy/reflexive personal accountings of these various engagements with men, masculinities and violences, especially in terms of bringing together CSMM, Violence Studies, Sexuality Studies, Organization Studies, Social Policy, and Sociology, along with my place and positioning, some contributions, and some difficulties. This theoretical/political/policy/reflexive personal positioning reflects a broader ontoepistemological question: the relation of the personal is political is theoretical is work.

  • 45.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    A Lurking Doom this Side of the Abyss: Working In, Around and Away from Nation and Nationalism in Studying Men and Masculinities2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    A multi-faceted power analysis of men’s violence to known women: from hegemonic masculinity to the hegemony of men2012In: Sociological Review, ISSN 0038-0261, E-ISSN 1467-954X, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 589-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a multi-faceted power analysis of men's violence to known women, by way of assessing two main perspectives on research in men and masculinities: first, that founded on hegemonic masculinity, and, second, that based on the hegemony of men. Each perspective is interrogated in terms of understandings of men's violence to known women. These approaches are articulated in relation to empirical research, and conceptual and theoretical analysis. Thus this article addresses to what extent hegemonic masculinity and the hegemony of men, respectively, are useful concepts for explaining and engaging with men's violence to known women? The article concludes with discussion of more general implications of this analysis.

  • 47.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Afterword: Men, Masculinities, Careers and Careering2020In: Men, Masculinities and the Modern Career: Contemporary and Historical Perspectives / [ed] Kadri Aavik; Clarice Bland; Josephine Hoegaerts; Janne Tuomas Vilhelm Salminen, De Gruyter Open, 2020, 1, p. 261-271Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Afterword: Men, Masculinities, Careers and Careering
  • 48.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Autoethnography, theorizing and transnational movements and moments2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is in three parts: a brief overview of the relevance of autoethnography for transnational sociological theorizing; critical interrogation of my previous work on autoethnography; re-evaluation of their implications for transnational sociological theorizing.

    The second part investigates four different interpretations of my own personal, work/employment, political, and theoretical change over time. In this, I build on previous autoethnographic work to examine how theorizing develops and changes with transnational movements and moments. The first is based on different relations to nation and nations: England, Ireland, Finland (‘Autobiography, nation, postcolonialism and gender’, Irish Journal of Sociology, 2005). The second focuses on changing relations to children, family and household (‘‘The personal is work is political is theoretical: continuities and discontinuities in (pro)feminism, Women’s Studies, men and my selves’, NORA, 2008). The third concerns changing relations to transnationalisations, transdisciplinary and transinstitutional developments (’Opening up material-discursive (trans-)forms of life … politically, theoretically, institutionally, personally’, in M. Wojtaszek and E. Just (eds.) Quilting Stories: Essays in Honor of Elzbieta H. Oleksy, 2012). And the fourth highlights the relations of men, intersectionality, organizations and profeminism in research and fieldwork in the diversity and equalities field, with a focus on gender and intersectional dynamics and research processes (Equality, Diversity and Inclusion, 2014).

    In the third part I discuss more general implications of these four perspectives for the analysis of intersectionality and intellectual biographies, in terms of: the politics of location; reflexivity and its limitationss; critical positionality of members of superordinate groups; the problematisation of the male “I” (‘Contradictory male/masculine/men’s “I”s: the unwriting of men, and the concept of gex’, Revista Canaria de Estudios Ingleses, 2013); and the relation of body and writing (‘Writing as intimate friends … how does writing profeminist research become methodologically challenging?’, in M. Livholts (ed.) Emergent Writing Methodologies in Feminist Studies, Routledge, 2011).

  • 49.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Huddersfield, United Kingdom; Hanken School of Economics, Finland; University of South Africa, South Africa.
    Boyhood, Sport, and the Mild Brutalization of the Body2021In: Boyhood Studies - An Interdisciplinary Journal, ISSN 2375-9240, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 104-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this contribution, I consider some appreciative links and qualified connections between Raewyn Connell's work and my own. In particular, I use the example of sport, a key area in the making of boys and young men in many parts of the world, with special reference to body, practice, and theoretical and empirical conceptualizations of masculinity.

  • 50.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economics, Finland; University of Huddersfield, UK; Professor Extraordinarius, University of South Africa.
    Contextualising Conferences: Ten Reflections on Ten Years of Swedish Local Authority Events on “Masculinity in Change”2020In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 276-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reflects on the ten-year long series of one-day conferences, Maskulinitet i förändring [Masculinity in change] organised by Länsstyrelsen i Örebro län (county), beginning in 2010, in terms of considering these questions: is this a unique phenomenon and achievement? How do we explain it? How do we understand it? In response, the main issues discussed are: the context of and background to the conferences series; the nature of conferences themselves; relations to the state and local state; geographical location; framings and words used in organising the conferences; political and policy orientations of the conferences; the range and gender of invited speakers; the frequency of working across sectoral boundaries; topics addressed and possible gaps; and the impact and interrelations of key individual and institutions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Contextualising Conferences: Ten Reflections on Ten Years of Swedish Local Authority Events on “Masculinity in Change”
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