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  • 1. Andersson, Lisbet
    et al.
    Hannrup, Kerstin
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro läns landsting.
    Dagens rätta i Örebro: ett samverkansprojekt mellan AmuGruppen, miljökontoret och samhällsmedicinska enheten1996Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bergström, Kerstin
    et al.
    Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Inger M.Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.Prell, HilleviInstitutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.Wernersson, IngaHögskolan Väst, Trollhättan, Sweden.Åberg, HelenaInstitutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Mat är mer än Mat: Samhällsvetenskapliga perspektiv på mat och måltider2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Carlbäck, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Göran-Rodell, Annika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Heléne
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Teaching hospitableness: an educational dilemma?2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Carrillo, Julia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hult, KajsaÖrebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.Jonsson, Inger M.Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.Scander, HenrikÖrebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.Wellton, LotteÖrebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Nordic Association for Food Studies Workshop 2020: Foodways at a crossroads: Sustainability, Gastronomy and Rethinking the traditions of how to Eat2021Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Nordic Association for Food Studies Workshop 2020
  • 5.
    Carrillo Ocampo, Julia C.
    et al.
    School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts and Meal Science, Örebro University, Grythyttan, Sweden.
    Marshall, Matilda
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Wellton, Lotte
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    When sustainable cuisine imaginaries become unsustainable: Storage and preservation practices in Swedish restaurants2021In: International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Science, ISSN 1878-450X, E-ISSN 1878-4518, Vol. 24, article id 100353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability is a key concern within the restaurant industry, which offers a variety of initiatives and approaches to it. This, in turn, creates different shared understandings, what we here call sustainable cuisine imaginaries. The practices fostered by these imaginaries are now facing unforeseen challenges due to the coronavirus pandemic, creating a dissonance in the way restaurants normally operate. By using storage and preservation practices as an entry point, this ethnographic study of six Swedish restaurants uses the concept of imaginaries to explore the different beliefs and ideals for restaurant sustainability and the practices fostered by those ideals. Three distinct imaginaries of sustainable cuisine were identified: locality as a quality, reducing meat in favor of vegetables, and the creative and knowledgeable professional. These imaginaries are materialized through different storage facilities, like root cellars, wine cellars, or meat aging fridges. This study shows how disruptions in restaurants, triggered by unexpected situations, exposed the fragility of these imaginaries. We argue that the sustainable cuisine imaginaries, as a complexity reducing mechanism, help restaurant professionals manage the intricacy of sustainability. However, they also demonstrate an array of simple solutions very susceptible to external factors. Sustainable practices can thus easily become unsustainable.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Lars
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Waiter's craft-related actions studied from the perspective of time-geography2020In: Nordic Journal of Vocational Education and Training, E-ISSN 2242-458X, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 152-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to visualize, communicate and understand the vocational knowledge of a waiters craft, including how to perform table-setting and serving. The underlying theoretical perspectives are Culinary Arts and Meal Science, Craft Science, and Time-Geography. Basic time-geographical concepts used in the study are project, log, notation and constraint. The empirical data consist of two postulated serving methods wherein different procedures are identified. The data are based on the first author’s vocational experience and are described by logs of procedures. Questions in the logs concerning capacity, coupling, or authority constraints indicate limits to what is possible. Additionally, one of the serving methods is shown by a notation, displaying the waiter’s and the guests’ actions in relation to the procedures. The notation, complemented with a drawing of the room, provides knowledge about when, where, and for how long a serving procedure lasts. Through the use of time-geographical tools, the waiter’s craft procedures can be described and interpreted. Thus, it became possible to visualize, communicate, and acquire a deeper understanding of how the waiter in her vocational craft predicts and masters how time and materiality together with spatiality affect a meal event.

  • 7.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Måltidskunskap och hantverk – i grundutbildning och forskning2004In: Kunskap i det praktiska / [ed] Bernt Gustavsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2004, p. 51-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Hult, Kajsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Jonsson, Inger M.Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.Scander, HenrikÖrebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.Wellton, LotteÖrebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Nordic Association for Food Studies Workshop 2021: Communicating and presenting food from the past to the future: Historical, contemporary and evolving perspectives: NAFS Workshop 2021: Grythyttan, November 25th2022Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Fulltext
    Download full text (txt)
    Publiceringsmedgivande
  • 9.
    Hult, Kajsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Lainpelto, Jack
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Walter, Ute
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Constructing the hospitality superstar: A document analysis of job advertisements in Sweden2022In: Menu: Volume 10 - Special issue. Report of ICCAS Proceedings. Twelfth International Conference on Culinary Arts and Sciences / [ed] M. Michaud; A. Giboreau; A. Perez-Cueto, Institut Paul Bocuse , 2022, Vol. 10, p. 92-92Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hult, Kajsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Lainpelto, Jack
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Walter, Ute
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Constructing the hospitality superstar in restaurant dining rooms2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 23, no 2-3, p. 264-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for competent hospitality workers is significant for the sustainable development of the restaurant industry. However, with the recurring challenges of recruiting and retaining a competent workforce, there is a need to understand how employers portray and communicate hospitality work in the recruitment process. Therefore, this study examines how employers construct the image of the hospitality worker, by analyzing what job advertisements signal and communicate to the applicants. Through thematic analysis of 100 job advertisements in Sweden, we found that the ideal hospitality worker is an individualized team player with occupational passion. This means that social capacities and commitment to hospitality and gastronomy, factors that are difficult to measure, are of relevance to gaining employment. Additionally, by asking for social capacities, the distance between work and leisure is diminished and the employee is constructed as a commodity for the purpose of improving service. In contrast to the common image that hospitality work is work that anyone could do, we conclude that the qualifications for becoming a hospitality worker in the restaurant industry are fairly complex.

  • 11.
    Jonsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Nyberg, Maria
    Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Experiencing hospitality through people, places and artefacts within an institutional setting: A qualitative interview study with eleven in patients across three hospital wards in Sweden2020In: Nordic Association for Food Studies Workshop 2020: Foodways at a crossroads: Sustainability, Gastronomy and Rethinking the traditions of how to Eat / [ed] Julia Carrillo; Kajsa Hult; Inger M. Jonsson; Henrik Scander; Lotte Wellton, Örebro University , 2020, p. 23-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eating and sharing meals are essential parts of everyday life and expressed through tradition and culture. This everyday expression of who we are is argued to be taken away from us during hospitalization. Few studies have qualitatively explored hospitalized older patients experiences with their mealtimes. This is a perspective that could increase the understanding of how to provide enhanced dining experiences during time of illness for this malnutrition prune age group. The study objective was therefore to explore older patients’ (> 65 years) mealtime experiences during hospital stay with an emphasis towards the social interactions taking place before, during and after their meals. Eleven semi structured interviews were conducted and analysed through the lens of hospitality and the dramaturgical theory outlined by Goffman. The preliminary results indicate that the patients experience hospitality through materiality (e.g. the menu), commensality (with fellow patients and staff) an d individuality (the possibility to make own meal choices) but also inhospitality through conformity (not expressing their wishes or conforming to the situation) and locality (e.g. being lonely in ther oom). The patients are seen to reinforce the role of the non-complaining patient as well as not being a burden. The understanding of these kinds of role making and role taking by the patients is important to recognize within healthcare to be able to ensure that the mealtime and the meal service is provided with a person- centered approach together with the recognition that hospitality can bring fourth the practical doings in how to perform during meal service.

  • 12.
    Jonsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Nyberg, Maria
    Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Hospitality and mealtime approaches in hospitals – perspectives from nursing- and meal-staff2020In: The INC 2020: Conference proceedings, 2020, p. 98-99Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to understand the provision of meals to older patients in hospitals, the notion of hospitality is interesting. Previous research has found that even if adequate nutrition is provided the food served to the patients is not always consumed (Agarwal et al. 2013). Therefore, it is essential to also highlight aspects related to how and where the meals areserved, as well as the interaction between the staff and the patients.

    The overall aim of this study was to explore how nursing staff and meal-hosts approached the mealtime for older patients and what aspects impacted on how the meals were served to the patients.

    Method: Twenty mealtimes was observed across four wards within two hospitals in Sweden that had nursing staff serving meals on wards with a dayroom (2 wards) and meal-host serving meals on the wards with a dining room (2 wards). The objectives of the observations was to observe how the staff served the meals to the patients with as special focus on the hospitality approaches provided and the overall dining area. The Five Aspect Meal Model (Gustafsson, Öström, Johansson & Mossberg, 2006; Edwards & Gustafsson, 2008) and the notion of hospitality (Lashley, 2000; Telfer, 2000) serves as main frameworks. Moreover, Goffman’s dramaturgical theory (Goffman, 2014) is used to understand the scenery observed during the mealtimes.

    Preliminary findings: Two overall themes were identified in the initial analyses, 1) atmosphere in the dining area; 2) and serving style and hospitality approaches.

    The overall atmosphere differed between the two dining areas which impacted on how the patients were approached during mealtimes. The observations disclosed several encounters were the atmosphere in the dining area in the wards with meal-hosts serving were perceived as a regular restaurant with patients approached and asked what they would like to eat and drink in relation to the menu that was available. It was also observed in several occasions that the meal-host sat down next to the patients and helped the patients to choose a dish from the menu, asking if they were satisfied with the meal or if they needed anything else. The meal-host constant presence in the dining room contributed to a positive atmosphere as well as opportunities for the patients to get direct assistance. In the wards with nursing staff serving the food in the dayroom the patients were not as frequently out for lunch or dinner and several observations disclosed that no patients were taken to dine outside the own room. However, when the patients were out the hospitality approaches differed. Most often the patients were nicely talked and attended to in the moment of providing the meal tray and when the tray was taken away. However, the time between service and closing of the meal the patients was most often left unattended for. The atmosphere was most often sensed as “heavy” and silent. It was observed that the nursing staff not always thought of turning the lights on in the dayroom contributing to a less positive atmosphere. The staff was observed to just passing by the dayroom without visiting the dayroom to ask if the meal was of satisfaction or overall seeing the patients.

    The serving style and hospitality approaches differed in some aspects between meal-hosts and nursing staff at the observed wards. The nursing staff was observed on all wards, including the wards with meal-host serving the meals, to be more hands-on and talking closer with the patients, which also disclosed different caring roles during mealtimes. If patients wanted anything else, a hand was often seen to be touched upon the patient or confirmed the wish by talking near and close to the patient. The meal-host was observed to both display a near service style with taking orders by sitting next to the patient or squatting to be on the same level as the patient, and, in some occasions, take orders as in restaurants with the help of a note pad standing next to the table.

    Conclusion: The preliminary findings of this study indicate that a constant presence of a meal-host or nursing staff would be beneficial for both the overall atmosphere in the dining area as well as for patients getting timely assistance. However, further analyses are needed to fully understand and report the findings of this study.

  • 13.
    Jonsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Nyberg, Maria
    Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Hospitality practices during mealtime in hospitals: Perspectives and experiences from staff and older patients2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Jonsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Nyberg, Maria
    Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Mealtime experiences through the lens of hospitality: a qualitative interview study with older adult inpatients in SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Jonsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Nyberg, Maria
    Department of Food and Meal Science, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Older patients' perspectives on mealtimes in hospitals: a scoping review of qualitative studies2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 390-404Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing age of populations throughout the world means that healthcare services are faced with new challenges, not least regarding the provision of food during hospital stay. There is a lack of knowledge of how hospital mealtimes are experienced by older patients, and so the aim of this article was to review current knowledge regarding mealtimes in hospitals from the perspectives of older patients. A literature search was performed using seven databases: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Sociological Abstracts, SweMed+, ASSIA and CINAHL with no limits regarding publication date. The inclusion criteria were peer‐reviewed articles in English or Swedish that used qualitative methods to examine older patients’ (>65 years) mealtime experiences. The Five Aspect Meal Model (FAMM) served as a framework for understanding the complexity behind a mealtime experience. Qualitative content analysis was used as a guide when analysing the material. The search produced 415 studies, 14 of which were included in the review. The findings generated three main themes for understanding how older patients experience mealtimes while in hospital: (1) the food and the food service, (2) mealtime assistance and commensality during mealtimes and (3) the importance of retaining one’s independence. The review also clearly indicated a shortage of studies that solely focus on older patients’ experiences of their mealtime. More research is therefore needed to be fully able to understand the complex task of providing meals in hospitals.

  • 16.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Att skapa upplevelser eller informera om gastronomi, välbefinnande och hälsa?: studenters visioner om ett gränsöverskridande yrkesliv2009In: Gastronomisk forskning / [ed] Christina Fjellström, Stockholm: Gastronomiska akademien , 2009, p. 161-172Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Culinary knowledge in different arenas of society2005In: Culinary arts and sciences V: global and national perspectives / [ed] J.S.A. Edwards, B. Kowrygo, K. Rejman, Bournemoth: Worshipful Company of Cooks Research Centre, Bournemouth University , 2005, p. 95-97Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Den kulturella smaken av en måltid2004In: Tid för måltidskunskap: en vänbok till Birgitta Ulmander / [ed] Gustafsson, Inga-Bitt, Strömberg Ulla-Britt, Örebro: Örebro Universitet , 2004, p. 139-147Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Ett lustfyllt lärande om mat: utvärdering av Sapere-metoden2000In: Måltidsakademiens årsbok 2001: Kommunikativa måltider del II, Örebro: Färgspelet förlag , 2000, p. 59-59Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Familjemåltiden en hemvist för kulinarisk kulturell kunskap av betydelse för information och utbildning om mat och måltider2005In: Kulturstudier i Sverige: nationell forskarkonferens, Norrköping 13-15 juni, 2005, Norrköping, Sweden / [ed] Bodil Axelsson, Johan Fornäs, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press. Linköping universitet , 2005, p. 527-530Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I information och utbildning om mat och måltider på olika nivåer i det svenska samhället riktas insatserna mot familjer och hushåll och förmodas i en framtid komma till användning i vardaglig måltidspraxis. På den officiella nivån skapas råd och riktlinjer baserade på internationell och nationell vetenskaplig kunskap oftast naturvetenskapligt nutritionell. Dessa råd och riktlinjer är sedan tänkta att sändas vidare via hälso- och sjukvården och i skolan till hemmet/hushållet. Vilken är då jordmånen för denna information och utbildning dvs. hur tänker och handlar barn och familjer i ett kulturellt vardagsperspektiv när det gäller realiserandet av vad som kan betecknas som ”familjemåltider”? Via bosniska, somaliska och svenska familjer ges här en bild av det mångkulturella Sverige, där offentliga måltider i skola och barnomsorg, och mötesplatser för matinformation t.ex. inom mödra-, barnhälsovårdens verksamheter är vardagligt förekommande. Våra upplevelser av att tillaga och delta i familjemåltider formar hur vi praktiskt gör och skapar identitetskänsla i alla familjer oavsett etnisk tillhörighet. Därför är familjemåltiden och dess måltidspraxis den kulturella, kulinariska kunskapsbank som bildar fonden mot vilken all information och utbildning om mat kan förstås.

  • 21.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Family meal experiences: perspectives on practical knowledge, learning and culture2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis consists of four studies reflecting information and education on food and meals at different levels of society. The educational efforts are directed towards everyday family practices. The overall aim of this thesis, therefore, was to obtain a grasp of the way children and families think of food and meals in a cultural perspective, in order to understand the areas where food information and education appears to take root. Further, the thesis aims to study the potential of tasting lessons as an educational tool in compulsory school. The methods used were qualitative:repeated focus groups with immigrant women from Bosnia-Herzegovina and Somalia, focus groups with pupils and school staaf, and telephone interviews with school heads. Further it were semi-structured life world interviews and groupinterviews with Swedish children and their families. The analytical methods were based on grounded theory, and systematic and reflexive analysis. The results generated a model showing immigrant women struggling for their cultural identity, oscillating between remining Somalian and becoming part of Swedish society in their food and meal choices. The Swedish families described coping with the past and the present, and their children the different food and taste worlds at school and at home. The study of an educational tool for educationused in the fifth class at compulsory school showed both pupils and staff were prepared to be exposed to new tastes and new educational work and co-operation at school. In conclusion, the studies showed the imortance of culture for family identity, aswell as ideas and practices whithin family meal experiences in both immigrant and Swedish families. Further, an educational tool using children's senses might be a valuable practical contribution in food education. Neither food and meal information nor education and learning should, therefore, be separated from their practical and cultural components. Such factors should be taken into account in official guidelines for applied learning.

    List of papers
    1. Choice of food and food traditions in pre-war Bosnia-Herzegovina: focus goup interviews with immigrant women in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Choice of food and food traditions in pre-war Bosnia-Herzegovina: focus goup interviews with immigrant women in Sweden
    2002 (English)In: Ethnicity and Health, ISSN 1355-7858, E-ISSN 1465-3419, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 149-161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Immigrants in Sweden have on average poorer health than native Swedes, including the risk of nutritional problems. In Sweden's multicultural society there is a need for increased knowledge about eating habits in public health work within health and education. A survey of refugees from Bosnia-Herzegovina living in Sweden was undertaken to describe the choice of food and food traditions in pre-war Bosnia. The purpose was to introduce the subject of food, health and migration into public health work and develop culture-adapted food and health advice.

    Design: Focus-group interviews were undertaken with a total of 20 women refugees from Bosnia-Herzegovina.

    Results: Qualitative data analysis identified a large consumption of bread as a staple food with meat, vegetables, milk, cheese, legumes, egg and fish as additions. Self-sufficiency was noted with milk souring, jam making and the production of sweet fruit drinks. Home made cheese and drying or smoking of meat were common methods of food storage. In child rearing, breast-feeding for 6-8 months was most common. Home made breast milk replacements were made from semolina, rice and 'petit biscuits'.

    Conclusion: Several important factors need to be taken into account when giving culturally adapted food and health advice to Bosnian families, such as encouraging bread, vegetable and legume consumption and giving advice on substituting sweet fruit drinks for natural fruit. One should be conscious of how religious beliefs as well as socio-cultural, historical, ecological, economical and psychological influences may guide food choices.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Abingdon, Oxfordshire: Carfax, 2002
    Keywords
    Bosnia-Herzegovina; Focus groups; Food traditions; Immigrant women; Public health
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3177 (URN)10.1080/1355785022000041999 (DOI)000180092700002 ()12523942 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-0036705487 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2004-09-02 Created: 2004-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Cultural foodways in Sweden: repeated focus group interviews with Somalian women
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cultural foodways in Sweden: repeated focus group interviews with Somalian women
    2002 (English)In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 328-339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to provide increased understanding of what 'feeding the family' means to Somalian women in Sweden. Focus group interviews were carried out with Somalian women, analysed by means of the Grounded theory method. The results show that factors both in the family and in the outside world influenced their food choice and traditions, both in their home country of Somalia and in their new country, Sweden, after migration. The categories generated in the analysis were brought together in a model showing the women 'struggling for their own cultural identity' and oscillating between 'remaining Somalian' and 'becoming part of Swedish society', food being an important instrument in maintaining the cultural identity of their families. Cultural identity in this respect is a matter of the wishes of the husband, followed by those of the women and children and, at the same time, the strong pressure of the Swedish host country. This indicates how important it is for professionals to be aware of the trust people have in their own cultural food and therefore also how necessary it is to give culturally adapted food advice through public health work, in this case to Somalian families.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford: Blackwell Science, 2002
    Keywords
    Foodways, Somalia, Sweden, identity, focus groups
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3178 (URN)10.1046/j.1470-6431.2002.00247.x (DOI)2-s2.0-34447570032 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2004-09-02 Created: 2004-09-02 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
    3. Appetizing learning in Swedish comprehensive schools: an attempt to employ food and tasting in a new form of experimental education
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Appetizing learning in Swedish comprehensive schools: an attempt to employ food and tasting in a new form of experimental education
    2005 (English)In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 78-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The word taste has several meanings: biopsychological, and cultural and social. Taste also influences food choice, though there is a widespread belief that tasty food is not synonymous with healthy eating patterns. In Sweden compulsory school daily meals are provided and Home Economics is a compulsory subject, while tasting lessons form an additional experimental form of education. The aim of this study has been to make a general evaluation of tasting lessons in four fifth-year classes. The focus of the results is on pupils’ learning about, and interest in, food, and the opinions and reflections of teachers, catering staff and school heads. The participants were three professional focus groups comprising staff from four schools, and 48 pupils (eight groups with boys and girls in separate groups) from the same schools. Results showed that the children were prepared to be exposed to different foodstuffs, and the adults were prepared to be exposed to new educational methods. Two stages of children's learning have been described in connection with tasting: practice and experience, and verbalization and reflection.

    Keywords
    Tasting lessons, experimental food education, practice and experience
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3179 (URN)10.1111/j.1470-6431.2005.00382.x (DOI)2-s2.0-58149272944 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2004-09-02 Created: 2004-09-02 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
    4. Family meals at home: food education and tasting lessons at school : is there a link?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family meals at home: food education and tasting lessons at school : is there a link?
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3180 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-09-02 Created: 2004-09-02 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
  • 22.
    Jonsson, Inger M
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science. Nordiska hälsovårdshögskolan, Göteborg.
    Food - traditions and thinking: focus group interviews with women from Bosnia-Herzegovina and Somalia2001Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Franska smakklasser prövas i den svenska skolan2002In: Vård, ISSN 0281-921X, no 4, p. 56-60Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gränsöverskridanden mellan gastronomi, hälsa och välbefinnande i studenters framtida yrkesliv2007In: Hushållsvetenskap & Co / [ed] Marianne Pipping Ekström, Helena Åberg, Kerstin Bergström, Hillevi Prell, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet , 2007, , p. 161-178p. 161-178Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Måltider i skolan: gastronomi och hälsa i vardagen2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    New Nordic Food for Many: in Nordic Higher Education2014In: The Emergence of a New Nordic Food Culture: Final report from the program New Nordic Food II, 2010-2014, Copenhagen: Nordisk Ministerråd, 2014, p. 52-53Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    På spaning efter en måltidens pedagogik…: där sinnenas förnimmelser och handens intelligens beaktas 2004In: Kultur och identitet: doktorandkurs i spetsen "Sinnena och konsten" / [ed] Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Börje Stålhammar, Örebro: Örebro universitetsbibliotek , 2004, Vol. 3, p. 123-139Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Reflektioner om smak och lärande2008In: Smaksinnet och den goda smaken: ett seminarium om människans smaksinne / [ed] Marieanne Alsne, Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2008, p. 75-78Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Jonsson, Inger M
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    "Äta ute" – måltidsupplevelser på restaurang för personal och gäster: exempel på forskningsperspektiv inom ämnet måltidskunskap vid Örebro universitet2013In: Från matproduktion till gastronomi / [ed] Paulina Rytkönen, Madeleine Bonow, Per Wramner, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2013, p. 135-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Äta ute
  • 30.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Hallberg, L. R. M.
    Nordiska hälsovårdshögskolan Restauranghögskolan, Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Ett lustfyllt lärande om mat: SAPERE-metoden2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R-M
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The SAPERE-method: evaluation of a method for sensory training of children at school2001In: Culinary arts and sciences III: global and national perspectives / [ed] John S. A. Edwards, M. M. Hewedi, Bournemouth: Worshipful Company of Cooks Centre for Culinay Research at Bournemouth University , 2001, p. 459-468Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Culinary arts and tasting classes: a better way of food education for children at school?2003In: Culinary arts and sciences IV: global and national perspectives / [ed] John S. A. Edwards, Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Bournemoth: Worshipful Company of Cooks Research Centre at Bournemouth University , 2003, p. 194-194Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Hallberg, L. R. M.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Somalian food choice -  focus groups as a method for gathering facts about food and traditions in a new country: qualitative methods in the service of health2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts. Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts. Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Cultural foodways in Sweden: repeated focus group interviews with Somalian women2002In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 328-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to provide increased understanding of what 'feeding the family' means to Somalian women in Sweden. Focus group interviews were carried out with Somalian women, analysed by means of the Grounded theory method. The results show that factors both in the family and in the outside world influenced their food choice and traditions, both in their home country of Somalia and in their new country, Sweden, after migration. The categories generated in the analysis were brought together in a model showing the women 'struggling for their own cultural identity' and oscillating between 'remaining Somalian' and 'becoming part of Swedish society', food being an important instrument in maintaining the cultural identity of their families. Cultural identity in this respect is a matter of the wishes of the husband, followed by those of the women and children and, at the same time, the strong pressure of the Swedish host country. This indicates how important it is for professionals to be aware of the trust people have in their own cultural food and therefore also how necessary it is to give culturally adapted food advice through public health work, in this case to Somalian families.

  • 35.
    Jonsson, Inger M
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Johansson, Jesper
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Newsletter Autumn 2013 Network: New Nordic Food & Cuisine for Many. Meeting at the Nordic House of Culinary Art & Meal Science, Campus Grythyttan, Örebro University. 10 to 11 October, 20132013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Nygren, Tobias
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Mentorskap, mat- och vinkunskap, arbetskläder, yrkesbenämningar: nycklar till positionering av genus i restaurangmiljön2006In: Genus på krogen / [ed] Marianne Pipping Ekström, Örebro: Örebro universitetsbibliotek , 2006, p. 7-34Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    A case study on tangible gender research education2010In: CHME 19th annual research conference, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Restaurang- och hotellhögskolan, Grythytte Akademi, Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Arbete och liv i restaurangbranschen2009In: Rapport från konferensen Arbete, livsval och ideal, 2009, p. 36-37Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Restaurang- och hotellhögskolan, Grythytte akademi, Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Forskning om arbete och liv på restaurang2009In: Livsmedelsforskardagarna, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gender perspectives on the solo diner as restaurant customer2009In: Meals in science and practice: interdisciplinary research and business applications / [ed] Herbert L. Meiselman, Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press , 2009, p. 236-248Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter eating out at restaurants, i.e. meal experiences outside home, are discussed. Dining out in upper-class restaurants is a worldwide trend nowadays and includes an extensive range of consumer groups. Internationally, there is a large number of solitary customers, both male and female, for whom lone dining is not as easy as they would like it to be. Furthermore, women, and naturally also men, today wish to take their place in urban settings, for instance by eating in restaurants, even if they are alone. They should be seen as a potentially important clientele group worthy of the attention of the restaurant branch.

  • 41.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    How to study life and work in an expanding restaurant industry2011In: ICHLAR/International Conference on Hospitality & Leisure Applied Research. Balancing Art, Innovation & Performance In Food & Beverage, Hotel and Leisure Industries / [ed] Andrew Mungall, 2011, p. 126-143Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Fulltext
    Download full text (pdf)
    Konferens
  • 42.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Restaurang- och hotellhögskolan, Grythytte akademi, Örebro universitet, Grythyttan, Sweden.
    Restaurangen - ett publikt och professionellt rum2010In: Rapport från konferensen Rum för arbete / [ed] Sofia Seifert, 2010, p. 14-15Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Self-management and meal experiences in Swedish prisons2007In: Inter: A European Cultural Studies: Conference in Sweden 11–13 June 2007, Linköping, Sweden: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2007, p. 291-295Conference paper (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 44.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    "Solodining": restaurangmåltidens tillgänglighet för ensamstående kvinnor och män2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Jonsson, Inger M
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Restaurang- och hotellhögskolan, Grythytte akademi, Örebro universitet, Grythyttan, Sweden.
    The households in your environment: Culinary Art students in Sweden change perspective on everyday gendered food and health culture2010In: Council 2010: ., 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Jonsson, Inger M
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts. Department of Home Economics, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Swede.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts. Department of Home Economics, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Swede.
    Appetizing learning in Swedish comprehensive schools: an attempt to employ food and tasting in a new form of experimental education2005In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 78-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The word taste has several meanings: biopsychological, and cultural and social. Taste also influences food choice, though there is a widespread belief that tasty food is not synonymous with healthy eating patterns. In Sweden compulsory school daily meals are provided and Home Economics is a compulsory subject, while tasting lessons form an additional experimental form of education. The aim of this study has been to make a general evaluation of tasting lessons in four fifth-year classes. The focus of the results is on pupils’ learning about, and interest in, food, and the opinions and reflections of teachers, catering staff and school heads. The participants were three professional focus groups comprising staff from four schools, and 48 pupils (eight groups with boys and girls in separate groups) from the same schools. Results showed that the children were prepared to be exposed to different foodstuffs, and the adults were prepared to be exposed to new educational methods. Two stages of children's learning have been described in connection with tasting: practice and experience, and verbalization and reflection.

  • 47.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Family meals at home: food education and tasting lessons at school : is there a link?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Nygren, Tobias
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Key concepts towards a stance on gender in the restaurant2008In: Journal of Foodservice, ISSN 1748-0140, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 53-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine how men and women behave together working in restaurants and how they cooperate with one another (both in the kitchen and in the dining room). An à la carte restaurant situated in one of the largest cities in Sweden was chosen for investigation. The project is an explorative 'intensive field study' using conversation and observation as the method of data compilation. The team met four employees for individual conversation: the owner, the restaurant manager, a chef and a waiter. Key concepts found towards understanding stance and cooperation among staff on the floor of the restaurant were mentorship, occupational nomenclature, working clothes, and expertise in food and wine. In our restaurant study, we met both positive and negative feelings among the staff. The rewards included the pleasure of working in a 'fine restaurant', moving among well-known people and handling good food and fine wines, all status symbols for a life among the upper classes. Those who made for the hotel and restaurant area were on the hunt for the good life but were dependent on seasons, irregular working hours and insecure forms of employment which were difficult or impossible to combine with family life, and the work developed into a lifestyle. Several left the sector after a few strenuous years.

  • 49.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Wallin, Anne-Marie
    Samhällsmedicinska enheten, Örebro läns landsting, Örebro, Sweden.
    Studier bland bosniska och somaliska kvinnor för mat-hälsa-migration, ett nytt område inom folkhälsoarbetet: mat och förändring, kulturella likheter och skillnader1999Report (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts. Department of Public Health, Örebro County Council, Sweden, Örebro, Sweden; Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Wallin, Anne-Marie
    Department of Public Health, Örebro County Council, Sweden, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Choice of food and food traditions in pre-war Bosnia-Herzegovina: focus goup interviews with immigrant women in Sweden2002In: Ethnicity and Health, ISSN 1355-7858, E-ISSN 1465-3419, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 149-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Immigrants in Sweden have on average poorer health than native Swedes, including the risk of nutritional problems. In Sweden's multicultural society there is a need for increased knowledge about eating habits in public health work within health and education. A survey of refugees from Bosnia-Herzegovina living in Sweden was undertaken to describe the choice of food and food traditions in pre-war Bosnia. The purpose was to introduce the subject of food, health and migration into public health work and develop culture-adapted food and health advice.

    Design: Focus-group interviews were undertaken with a total of 20 women refugees from Bosnia-Herzegovina.

    Results: Qualitative data analysis identified a large consumption of bread as a staple food with meat, vegetables, milk, cheese, legumes, egg and fish as additions. Self-sufficiency was noted with milk souring, jam making and the production of sweet fruit drinks. Home made cheese and drying or smoking of meat were common methods of food storage. In child rearing, breast-feeding for 6-8 months was most common. Home made breast milk replacements were made from semolina, rice and 'petit biscuits'.

    Conclusion: Several important factors need to be taken into account when giving culturally adapted food and health advice to Bosnian families, such as encouraging bread, vegetable and legume consumption and giving advice on substituting sweet fruit drinks for natural fruit. One should be conscious of how religious beliefs as well as socio-cultural, historical, ecological, economical and psychological influences may guide food choices.

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