oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 123
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Häller, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Panova, Elena
    St Petersburgs universitet, St Petersburg, Ryssland.
    Grawunder, Anja
    Friedrich Sciller Univ., Jena, Germany.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Water chemistry and trace metal concentrations in an acidic alum shale pit lake: effects of liming2011In: Mine water: managing the challenges: proceedings of the International Mine Water Association Congress 2011 / [ed] Trude R.Rüde, Antje Freund, Christian Wolkersdorfer, Aachen: RWTH , 2011, p. 503-508Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grawunder, Anja
    Institute of Geoscience, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, Germany .
    Neutralisation of an acidic pit lake by alkaline waste products2014In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 6930-6938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A former open pit where black shale (alum shale) was excavated during 1942-1965 has been water filled since 1966. The water chemistry was dominated by calcium and sulphate and had a pH of 3.2-3.4 until 1997-1998, when pH was gradually increasing. This was due to the intrusion of leachates from alkaline cement waste deposited close to the lake. A stable pH of around 7.5 was obtained after 6-7 years. The chemistry of the pit lake has changed due to the neutralisation. Concentrations of some dissolved metals, notably zinc and nickel, have gone down, as a result of adsorption/co-precipitation on solid phases (most likely iron and aluminium hydroxides), while other metals, notably uranium and molybdenum, are present at elevated levels. Uranium concentration is reaching a minimum of around pH 6.5 and is increasing at higher pH, which may indicate a formation of neutral and anionic uranyl carbonate species at high pH (and total carbonate levels around 1 mM). Weathering of the water-exposed shale is still in progress.

  • 3.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sartz, Lotta
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Bergskraft Bergslagen AB, Kumla, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sädbom, Stefan
    Bergskraft Bergslagen AB, Kumla, Sweden.
    Control of metal releases from historic sulphidic mine waste: Experience from the test site at the Ljusnarsberg mine field, Sweden (Project Bergskraft Bergslagen)2010In: Proc. EU Mine Drainage Research Exchange Conf. PADRE, June 11, Freiberg, Germany, 2010, p. 1 p-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sartz, Lotta
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Bergskraft Bergslagen AB.
    Sädbom, Stefan
    Bergskraft Bergslagen.
    Strategy for treatment of historic sulphidic mine waste: Experiences from the Ljusnarsberg Mine Field, Sweden2009In: Proc. 12th EuCheMS International Conference on Chemistry and the Environment, June 14-17, Stockholm, 2009, p. 197-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Black shale: a biogeochemical archive2014In: Sedimentary Pore Space Cementation: Role of Microbes / [ed] Kothe E, Büchel G, 2014, p. 6-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Remedy by Sweden AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Mälardalen Univ., Västerås, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Structor Miljöteknik AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Peter
    Remedy by Sweden AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Structor Miljöteknik AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Ingvar
    Remedy by Sweden AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Structor Miljöteknik AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Remedy by Sweden AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Metal mobility or metal concentration as the basis for remediation strategy: a case study2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Greis, Christina
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Pettersson, Håkan
    Linköpng Univ.
    Düker, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Redistribution of Pu, Am, Cs and Np in salt marsh sediment: Wigtown Merse, Irish Sea2009In: 8th International Conference on Methods and Applications of Radioanalytical Chemistry (MARC VIII) / [ed] Rolf Zeisler, Kenan Ünlü, Susan Heller-Zeisler, Melville, N.Y.: American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2009, p. 1-24Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Metal loads or metal concentrations as the basis for risk assessment of a polluted site: a case study2013In: Sardinia 2013: executive summaries : proceedings of the fourteenth International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium / [ed] Raffaello Cossu, Pinjing He, Peter Kjeldsen, Yasushi Matsufuji, Debra Reinhart, Rainer Stegmann, Cagliari: CISA , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Remedy by Sweden AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Mälardalen Univ., Västerås, Sweden.
    Martell, Ulrika
    Structor Miljöteknik AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Andersson, Matilda
    Structor Miljöteknik AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Nordén, Anna
    Structor Miljöteknik AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Remedy by Sweden AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Carlsson, Peter
    Remedy by Sweden AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Structor Miljöteknik AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Reduction in situ of chromium(VI) at a heavily polluted site: a feasible remediation strategy2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sartz, Lotta
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Metal releases from historic sulphidic mine site (Ljusnarsberg, Sweden): mobilization and attenuation processes2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Arwidsson, Zandra
    et al.
    SAKAB AB, Norrtorp, Sweden.
    Ålund, Marie
    SAKAB AB, Norrtorp, Sweden.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Metal mobilisation from soils and sediments by hydroxycarboxylic acids of natural origin2011In: Programme and Abstracts: 25th International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 22-26 August, 2011, Rovaniemi, Finland / [ed] Pertti Sarala, V. Juhani Ojala, Marja-Leena Porsanger, Vuorimiesyhdistys - Finnish Association of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers , 2011, p. 77-77Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Bohlin, Hanna
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Holm, Nils
    Element (Ag, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn), element ratio and lead isotope profiles in a sediment affected by a mining operation episode during the late 19th century2006In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 177, no 1-4, p. 285-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mining operations at Maarsaetter in 1877-81 resulted in increased metal loading to a small lake, notably as sulphidic tailings. The event is taken as an opportunity to study the present environmental impact of a historical single major metal release. Lake water and four sediment cores were sampled and analysed for principal and trace elements in solid and aqueous phases as well as general hydrochemical conditions. Chronologies were determined from super(206)Pb/ super(207)Pb ratios and historical records.Ordinary sedimentation after the event has lead to that the tailings are found as a distinct layer at a depth of 18-22 cm in the sediment. The layer is characterized by elevated metal concentrations in the solid and pore water phases, respectively, circum neutral pH and sulphate concentrations below detection. Geochemical modelling indicated a preference for carbonate equilibrium in the waste while sulphides prevailed above it. It is concluded that the growth of the ordinary sediment on top of the waste has lead to a physicochemical barrier that seals of the waste from the overlying sediment. Chemical or physical rupture of the barrier will release the metals to downstream regions.According to the chronologies at least three sources have contributed to the present elevated levels of metals, in additions to the release of tailings. Copper from a historical blast furnace prior to the event at Maarsaetter, transport from mineralized parts of the watershed and release of contaminated water from present mining operations maintain elevated levels of notably zinc, silver, cadmium and lead. At present less than 10% of the lead content at the sediment/water interface comes from atmospheric deposition. Increased levels of antimony and thallium were not observed prior to ca 1950.

  • 13.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Börjesson, Erika
    SWECO VBB VIAK, SE-61132 Nykoping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Diurnal variations of abiotic parameters in a stream, recipient for drainage water in Ranstad, southwest Sweden2002In: Journal of Environmental Monitoring, ISSN 1464-0325, E-ISSN 1464-0333, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 772-777Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During 24 h, water samples were taken for determination of a number of key parameters in a water system containing high concentrations of FeII at circumneutral pH. None of the major constituents (Ca, Mg, Na, K and sulfate) showed diurnal variations, while dissolved oxygen and pH increased during the night. This increase could entirely be explained by the decrease in water temperature. However, the concentration of FeII slightly increased at constant concentration of total Fe during the night, opposite to earlier observations in other systems where the presence of FeII was shown to be controlled by photoreduction. Nocturnal peaks of FeII have also been observed in other systems with high iron concentrations, however, at acidic pH, but without obvious explanation. The mechanisms for this process therefore need further investigation.

  • 14.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dario, Mårten
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Effects of a fulvic acid on the adsorption of mercury and cadmium on goethite2003In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 304, no 1-3, p. 257-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of an aquatic fulvic acid on the pH-dependent adsorption of Hg(II) and Cd(II) to particulate goethite (a-FeOOH) were studied in batch systems. The ionic medium consisted of 0.01 M HClO and the total concentrations 4 of mercury and cadmium were maintained at 10y8 M with 203Hg and 109Cd as tracers. pH In the systems was varied in the range 3–10 by addition of HClO and NaOH.All commercial chemicals were of analytical grade or better. An 4 aquatic fulvic acid (20 ppm), previously isolated and characterised in detail, was used as a model for humic substances and its adsorption to goethite is included in this study. The adsorption of the fulvic acid (20 ppm) onto goethite decreased slowly from 90% at pH 3–7.5 to 10% at pH 10. In systems without fulvic acid the adsorption of mercury increased in a linear fashion from 10% at pH 3 to 70% at pH 10.In the presence of fulvic acid (20 ppm), the adsorption was almost quantitative in the intermediate pH range (pH 5–7), and exceeded 92% over the entire pH range. Thus, association between mercury and the fulvic acid enhanced adsorption in general although the largest impact was found at low pH.Adsorption of cadmium increased from nearly 0 to almost 100% at approximately pH 6. In the presence of fulvic acid, the adsorption increased below pH 7 and decreased above pH 7. The adsorption isotherm for mercury when the concentration was increased from 10y8 to 1.8=10y4 M showed a corresponding increase of K (lyg) up to a total concentration at 10y6 M.At higher mercury concentrations K was lowered. In the presence of fulvic acid the corresponding relationship of K was bi-modal, i.e. high values at low and intermediate concentrations of mercury. This behaviour suggests that in the absence of fulvic acid the adsorption follow the expected behaviour, i.e. adsorption sites with similar affinity for mercury. In the presence of fulvic acid, additional adsorption sites are available by the organic molecule (possibly sulfur groups) when it is associated to the goethite. The adsorption isotherm for cadmium indicates a lowering of K at 10y4 M. Cadmium had no competitive effect on mercury and vice versa. Zinc, however, affected the adsorption of cadmium but not the adsorption of mercury.

  • 15.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Multielement contamination at a skeet and trap shooting range: I: mobility assessment through sequential extractionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Metal leachability and anthropogenic signal in roadside soils estimated from sequential extraction and stable lead isotopes2004In: Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, ISSN 0167-6369, E-ISSN 1573-2959, Vol. 90, no 1-3, p. 135-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several roadside soil samples were collected at two field sites in Sweden. They were analysed for total elemental content (using both ICP-MS and XRF) and stable lead isotopes. Extraction with deicing salt solution and sequential extraction were performed in order to elucidate the potential mobility due to the use of deicing agents. The total concentrations of elements, especially lead, have decreased and lead is presently almost at background concentrations (15–51 ppm for surface samples). However, the isotopic signature indicates that old gasoline lead still is left at the site constructed prior to 1975. The field site constructed in 1992 showed, however, no 206Pb/207Pb ratio below 1.14. Only minor amounts were leached using deicing salt solutions; for lead only 0.29%, on average, was extracted indicating that the mobile fraction already was released. Sequential extraction indicated that lead mainly was associated with reducible (34.4%) and oxidisable (35.4%) fractions. Exchangable and acid soluble fractions contained 20.3% while 10.0% was found in the residual fraction. The salt extraction released, however, very low concentrations indicating that most in fraction 1 is acid soluble (e.g. carbonates). Tungsten was also found at high concentrations indicating a possible impact from studded tires. For tungsten the following composition was obtained: residual (48.0%) > oxidisable (47.6%) > reducible (3.3%) > exchangeable/acid soluble (1.1%). From the isotopic studies it was also suggested that the order for incorporating anthropogenic lead into soils is exchangeable/carbonates > (hydr)oxides > organic matter > residual. The multivariate technique principal component analysis (PCA) seems promising for evaluating large sequential extraction datasets.

  • 17.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Mobilisation of lead: field measurements at a trap range compared to solubility experiments2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Bäckman, Lars
    Folkeson, Lennart
    Lind, Bo
    Mobilisation of heavy metals by deicing salts in a roadside environment2004In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 720-732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The seasonal variations of some selected heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) and principal anions in soil solutions were monitored as a function of distance from the road at two field sites in Sweden. During the winter, the conductivity, concentrations of dissolved sodium and chloride increased dramatically due to the application of deicing agents (i.e. NaCl). Due to ion exchange, the pH decreased one unit in the soil solutions, whereas the concentrations of total organic carbon decreased due to coagulation and/or sorption to stationary solids. The heavy metal concentrations increased during the winter, but through different mechanisms. Cadmium concentrations in the aqueous phase increased as a response to ion exchange, possibly also enhanced by the formation of chloride complexes. Similarly, the concentrations of zinc increased, due to ion exchange, with calcium and protons. The mechanisms of mobilisation for copper and lead were not that clear probably due to association with coagulated or sorbed organic matter in combination with colloid dispersion

  • 19.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ekholm, David
    Evenhamre, Per
    Skogsjö, Erika
    Sediment quality before, during and after remediation of historical mine waste at Bersbo, Sweden2009In: Securing the Future and 8th ICARD, 2009, p. 11 pages-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Lifvergren, Thomas
    Estimation of molecular weight distributions of humic substances in sediment pore waters: PLS modelling of field data2001In: 8th Nordic IHSS symposium on humic substances: characterisation, dynamics, transport and effects, Copenhagen: Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University , 2001, p. 17-21Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Mellberg, Karin
    Factors affecting the dissolution of lead pellets in natural watersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Salih, Isam
    Pettersson, Håkan
    Chemical character of drinking water from Swedish crystaline bedrockManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Ulrika
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hydrogeochemical interpretations of a fly ash/municipal sludge covered sulphidic mine waste deposit: a case study of alkaline leachates in an acidic environmentManuscript (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Lifvergren, Thomas
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Migration and mobility of lead and antimony from a heavily polluted lake sedimentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Nilsson, Ulrika
    Håkansson, Karsten
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Speciation of heavy metals in road runoff and roadside total deposition2003In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 147, no 1-4, p. 343-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Pb, W and Zn were measured in road runoff and total deposition at two Swedish field sites during one year. It was found that the concentrations of most elements increased significantly during the winter, up to one order of magnitude. For cobalt and tungsten, it was found that around 90% of the total mass transport occurred during the winter, whereas for Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn and Na, the corresponding figures were 70–90, 40–80, 60–90, 50–70 and >99% depending on site specific conditions. The deicing salts (rock salts) did not significantly contribute to the increase in trace element concentrations. Instead, the increased concentrations were due to more intense wearing of the pavement during the winter because of the use of studded tires in combination with the chemical effects caused by the use of deicing salts. New potential elemental markers for roads and traffic are suggested.

  • 26.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Sartz, Lotta
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Multielement contamination at a skeet and trap shooting range: II: seasonal and spatial variations in surface and groundwatersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sartz, Lotta
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Prevention of ARD through stabilization of waste rock with alkaline by-products: results from a meso-scale experiment2010In: Mina Water & Innovative Thinking: proceedings 2010 / [ed] Wolkersdorfer, C. & Freund, A, Nova Scotia, Canada: Cape Breton University Press , 2010, p. 559-563Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sartz, Lotta
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Larsson, Erik
    Bergskraft Bergslagen, Kopparberg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Properties of alkaline materials for injection into weathered mine waste piles: methods and initial pilot trials2011In: Mine water: managing the challenges: proceedings of the International Mine Water Association Congress 2011 / [ed] Rüde, Thomas R.; Freund, Antje; Wolkersdorfer, Christian, Aachen: RWTH , 2011, p. 265-269Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several alkaline materials were studied with regards to their ability to form stable suspensions withwater. Gravitational injection of alkaline materials were performed into weathered mine waste in two differentpilot scales (25 L and 1 000 L). When water was added after injection lime mud (LM) was flushed out whilelime kiln dust (LKD) and green liqour (GLD) remained within the mine waste. Deconstruction of the pilot sys-tems showed that both materials had penetrated the voids present. LKD and GLD increased pH significantlyand reduced trace metal concentratios. It is concluded that both LKD and GLD are suitable for stabilizing acidgenerating mine waste.

  • 29.
    Grahn, Evastina
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Greis, Christina
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Düker, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Pettersson, Håkan
    Failure of 137Cs and 239/240Pu dating of lake sediments: fallout from nuclear weapons testing and from the Chernobyl accident as well as redistribution processes?Manuscript (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Grahn, Evastina
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Düker, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Sediment reference concentrations of seldom monitored trace elements (Ag, Be, In, Ga, Sb, Tl) in four Swedish boreal lakes: comparison with commonly monitored elements2006In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 367, no 2-3, p. 778-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents reference and recent acid-leachable concentrations of some seldom monitored trace elements (SMTE; Ag, Be, Ga, In, Sb and Tl) in sediments from four boreal oligotrophic lakes in a south to north transect in Sweden. For comparison commonly monitored trace elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) are included as well as those of relevance for redistribution processes (Al, Ca, Fe, Mg and Mn).

    Pore water pH and the corresponding solid/solution distribution coefficients (Kd) indicated that redistribution of the elements due to acidification is minor. The depth of impact was defined as the level in the sediment where the mean values became constant on successive exclusion of metal concentrations in overlying strata. Reference concentrations were calculated below the depth of impact. The present concentration changes are estimated by the ratio between the average concentration above the depth of impact and the reference concentration.

    Reference concentration ranges for the SMT-elements are (mg/kg, dry wt.): Ag 0.16–0.66; Be 1.6–3.7; Ga 2.0–5.1; In 0.05–0.22; Sb 0.05–0.11 and Tl 0.17–0.70. The concentration ratios for these elements ranged in the two most southern lakes from 1.5 to 4.5 and in the two northern ones from 0.6 to 1.6. A high correlation between Kd for the SMT-elements, and iron, except for Sb and Tl, infer that the biogeochemistry of iron is quantitatively important for the accumulation of these elements.

    The reference concentration ranges for the commonly monitored trace elements are (mg/kg, dry wt.): As 7.0–29.6; Cd 0.33–0.98; Co 5.7–23.8; Cr 15.2–26.1; Cu 27.6–58.4; Ni 5.4–20.8; Pb 44–96. The corresponding concentration ratios were 1.2–18 (second highest 3.9) in the two most southern lakes and 0.8–1.6 in the two northern ones. Declining ratios were found from south to north, most obvious for cobalt and zinc. The copper ratios did not show a regional pattern, partly because of the impact from old mine waste.

    Increased concentrations of Ag, Be, Ga, In, Sb and Tl in recent sediments up to 4.5 times the reference levels in combination with the geographical pattern infer an elevated loading of these elements.

  • 31.
    Grahn, Evastina
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Düker, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Seldom monitored trace elements (Ag, Au, Ga, In, Sb, Tl) in two urban lake sediments in Central Sweden: a case studyManuscript (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Grahn, Evastina
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Ulrika
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Düker, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Historical pollution of seldom monitored trace elements in Sweden: Part B: sediment analysis of silver, antimony, thallium and indium2006In: Journal of Environmental Monitoring, ISSN 1464-0325, E-ISSN 1464-0333, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 732-744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sediment cores from four boreal and remote lakes in a south to north transect in central Sweden were analysed for acid leachable silver, antimony, thallium and indium in the solid sediment phase and the corresponding porewater. Dating of the cores was made by their content of acid leachable lead and the 206Pb/207Pb ratio, in one lake also by 210Pb. The impact of diagenesis on element redistribution in the sediments was included and found to be minor except for thallium. The results show lowered concentrations towards the north and most intense accumulation after the Second World War, which is taken as evidence for atmospheric deposition being the primary source. Indium has declining concentrations in recent strata while silver and antimony increase. Thallium has lowered acid-leachable concentrations in recent strata. For all metals the impact of domestic industrialisation as well as the early industrialisation of central Europe is discernible. Only thallium appears to reach a geological background at depths that correspond to the late 18th century. For the other metals elevated levels are concluded.

  • 33. Grandin, Anna
    et al.
    Ogar, Anna
    Institute of Environmental Science, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Potential use of native fungal strains for assisted uranium retention2015In: Minerals Engineering, ISSN 0892-6875, E-ISSN 1872-9444, Vol. 81, p. 173-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uranium-stabilizing ligands can be useful complexing agents for uranium in aqueous solution. The discovery of novel ligand candidates for selective uranium capture in artificial and natural waters could provide scope for their use in water remediation and metal recovery from low- and high grade ores. In this study we used seven fungal strains, isolated from shale waste, to monitor the uranium retention capacity from an aqueous solution. After four weeks of incubation, suspensions containing the fungal strains were filtered, and up to 100% of the total uranium inventory was removed from a 10 mg L-1 solution. Approximately 70% of the total uranium removal is attributed to complexation and/or adsorption by particles in the malt extract and some 10% is adsorbed by the fungal biomass. The additional 20% uranium removed could be related to the excretion of fungal metabolites. From 58% to 90% of the uranium is removed within ten minutes. The formation of colloidal/particulate uranium is proposed to be controlled by organic ligands in the culture medium and organic ligands excreted by the fungi where phosphorus moieties seem to be important. Membrane fouling by the hydrocarbons is also suggested to contribute to a loss of uranium from the aqueous phase.

  • 34.
    Grandin, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ogar, Anna
    Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland. .
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Biosorption of uranium by fungi isolated from weathered alum shale residues2013In: / [ed] E. Kothe and G. Büchel, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Grandin, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ogar, Anna
    Jagellonian University, Krakow, Poland.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Uranium induced stress promotes fungal excretion of uranium/metal stabilizing ligands: Analysis of metal-organic compounds with Size Exclusion Chromatography and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy2014In: Uranium - Past and Future Challenges: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Uranium Mining and Hydrogeology, Springer Publishing Company, 2014, p. 347-354Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Grandin, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Mobilization of vanadium from LD slag by salt-roasting/alkaline heterotrophic leaching2011In: 25th International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 22-26 August, 2011, Rovaniemi, Finland / [ed] Pertti Sarala, V. Juhani Ojala, Marja-Leena Porsanger, Vuorimiesyhdistys , 2011, p. 135-136Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Grandin, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Stability of weathered shales at water field capacity in the presence of Aspen wood shavings2011In: Mine water: managing the challenges:  proceedings of the International Mine Water Association Congress 2011 / [ed] Trude R.Rüde, Antje Freund, Christian Wolkersdorfer, Aachen: RWTH , 2011, p. 331-335Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Grawunder, A
    et al.
    Friedrich - Schiller - University, Jena, Germany.
    Meissner, S
    Friedrich - Schiller - University, Jena, Germany.
    Merten, D
    Friedrich - Schiller - University, Jena, Germany.
    Basilie, S
    Friedrich - Schiller - University, Jena, Germany.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Büchel, G
    Friedrich - Schiller - University, Jena, Germany.
    Origin of REE patterns in AMD-impacted areas2013In: Mineralogical magazine, ISSN 0026-461X, E-ISSN 1471-8022, Vol. 77, p. 1210-1210Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Grawunder, Anja
    et al.
    Friedrich Sciller Univ., Jena, Germany.
    Schäffner, Franziska
    Friedrich Sciller Univ., Jena, Germany.
    Merten, Dirk
    Friedrich Sciller Univ., Jena, Germany.
    Büchel, Georg
    Friedrich Sciller Univ., Jena, Germany.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Rare earth elements distribution and fractionation in a former acidic shale pit lake2011In: / [ed] E. Kothe, G. Büchel, 2011, p. 44-44Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Greis, Christina
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Düker, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Pettersson, Håkan
    Radiofysikavdelningen, O-centrum US, Universitetssjukhuset, Linköping, Sweden .
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Determination of plutonium in environmental samples with quadrupole ICP-MS2008In: Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry, ISSN 0236-5731, E-ISSN 1588-2780, Vol. 275, no 1, p. 55-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for rapid determination of plutonium isotopes in environmental samples with ultrasonic nebulisation and quadrupole ICP-MS detection was established. Techniques for sample dissolution, pre-concentration and chemical separation were evaluated and the optimal scheme outlined. Comparisons with α-spectrometry and high resolution ICP-MS confirmed the suitability of the method when applied to different environmental matrices within the global fallout concentration range in the northern hemisphere as well as more contaminated sites. Operational detection limits were 0.5–1.5 fg/l for fresh waters and 0.03–0.1 ng/kg for lake sediments and saline marsh sediments.

  • 41.
    Hagberg, Jessika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsgren, Britt-Marie
    Lifvergren, Thomas
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Organic acids excreted by soil-living fungi as a response to heavy metal (Pb and Cd) stress: Part 1: capillary zone electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry for quantitative analysisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Karlsson, Lovisa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Release of metals from unprocessed and processed black shale due to natural weathering2013In: Annual International Mine Water Association Conference: Reliable Mine Water Technology / [ed] Adrian Brown, Linda Figueroa, Christian Wolkersdorfer, Colorado, USA: IMWA , 2013, p. 391-397Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Black shale was mined and processed for recovery of hydrocarbons in Kvarntorp, some 200 km SW of Stockholm, Sweden, during 1942–66. Remains from the mining period is a deposit with 40 Mm³ of crushed shale residues: Unprocessed 3ne-grained shale as well as processed shale. The deposit is still hot; oxidation of sulphides as well as burning of hydrocarbons are still in progress some 50 years a1er closure. Weathering of the shale leads to releases of metal-rich leachates which will increase with time. The release of metals from pristine shale as well as weathered shale (exposed to the atmosphere for 50 years) and two di2erent processed shale residues have been studied using water of di2erent pH as leaching solution, to simulate extreme pH-variations in environmental waters: 3.0 (determined by oxidation of iron sulphides), 5.5 (bu2ered by carbon dioxide), 8.5 (bu2ered by calcite) and 12.5 (bu2ered by calcium hydroxide). Extraction of cationic elements was substantial (several percent of the total content) for Ca and Mg, as well as Ni, Co and U at pH 3, and very high (up to 50–60 %) for anionic elements (V, Mo, As) at pH 12.5. Especially the high-temperature processed shale would be a potential source for As and Mo at high pH. The pH-dependence of the weathering processes should be considered when future remediation (or metal recovery) processes and strategies are designed.

  • 43. Karlsson, Lovisa
    et al.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bark compost for removal of Nickel in complex waste water2012In: / [ed] E. Kothe and G. Büchel, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Concentration dynamics and speciation of uranium in a boreal forest creek: six years of weekly observations2011In: The new uranium mining boom: challenges and lessons learned / [ed] Broder Merkel, Mandy Schipek, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, p. 119-126Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concentrations of major components as well as uranium and some transition metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) and DOC were measured in a small creek within a boreal catchment during a six years time period. Variations up to four orders were found during the entire period. There was an evident correlation between uranium concentration with concentrations of Fe and Al, however not with DOC (in the absence of carbonate, average pH of 5.5). It is evident that environmental quality monitoring in small catchments must include the highly variable conditions leading to large variations in concentrations and speciation.

  • 45.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Changes in hydrochemistry some 15 years after covering of sulphidic mine waste, Bersbo, Sweden2005In: Securing the future: international conference on mining and the environment, metals and energy recovery : proceedings, 2005, p. 509-518Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Weathering mechanisms and composition of effluents from a sulphide mine waste deposit after covering: twenty years of field data2010In: Mine water and innovative thinking: proceedings 2010 / [ed] Christian Wolkersdorfer, Antje Freund, Nova Scotia, Canada: Cape Breton, University Press , 2010, p. 359-362Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1988 a deposit with some 500,000 m³ of coarse sulphidic mine waste at Bersbo, Sweden, was covered with compacted illitic clay or cement stabilised coal fly-ash (CeFill) to prevent  eathering and the transport of metals. Theoretically, oxidation of pyrite would give a sulphate/iron ratio in solution exceeding 2, if oxygen is the electron acceptor, but below 2 if Fe(III) is the oxidizing agent. The effluents had ratios of 35—50 and 2—0.8 before and after covering, respectively, why it is concluded that weathering continued. The altered hydrological regime contributes to changes in metal concentrations in the surrounding surface water.

  • 47.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grahn, Evastina
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Mobility of Cs and Pu from fallout in boreal lake sediments2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Concentration dynamics in a boreal catchment: trace elements, REEs and humic substances2011In: 25th International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 22-26 August, 2011, Rovaniemi, Finland / [ed] Pertti Sarala, V. Juhani Ojala, Marja-Leena Porsanger, Rovaniemi, Finland: Vuorimiesyhdistys - Finnish Association of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers , 2011, p. 63-63Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Surface water quality in Bersbo, Sweden: fifteen years after amelioration of sulphidic waste2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Düker, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Grahn, Evastina
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Sediment chronologies of As, Bi, and Ga in Sweden - impact of industrialisation2007In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 155-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acid-leachable amount and pore water concentration of As, Bi and Ga in sediment cores from four remote lakes in a south to north transect in Sweden were used to recapitulate the pollution history of the elements. The diagenetic impact on the element distribution was elucidated from their solid/solution partition and relationships to elements indicative for diagenesis. Dating was made by their acid-leachable lead content in combination with the Pb-206/Pb-207 ratio. In one of the lakes this approach was validated against dating with Pb-210. The impact of diagenesis on the sediment distribution of theses elements was found to be low enough for a chronological interpretation of the sediment profiles, as evidenced by their ratios to elements indicative of the geological background. A closer examination of the diagenetic impact would however be required if a more detailed chronology is desired. This study has demonstrated that atmospheric deposition of arsenic, bismuth and gallium contributes to the sediment inventory of these elements. The major part of the deposition of arsenic and bismuth took place after the Second World War. For gallium no concentrations exceeding background were detected before circa 1930. Increased levels of arsenic are traceable to circa 1850. For bismuth increased levels are concluded to extend before 1790, i.e., background concentrations were not reached in the present cores. For all elements the atmospheric deposition has been lower towards the north.

123 1 - 50 of 123
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf