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  • 1.
    Cao, Huiming
    et al.
    Hubei Key Laboratory of Environmental and Health Effects of Persistent Toxic Substances, Jianghan University, Wuhan, P. R. China; Institute of Environment and Health, Jianghan University, Wuhan, P. R. China.
    Zhou, Zhen
    Hubei Key Laboratory of Environmental and Health Effects of Persistent Toxic Substances, Jianghan University, Wuhan, P. R. China; Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Chemical Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Jianghan University, Wuhan, P. R. China.
    Wang, Ling
    Hubei Key Laboratory of Environmental and Health Effects of Persistent Toxic Substances, Jianghan University, Wuhan, P. R. China; Institute of Environment and Health, Jianghan University, Wuhan, P. R. China.
    Liu, Guangliang
    Hubei Key Laboratory of Environmental and Health Effects of Persistent Toxic Substances, Jianghan University, Wuhan, P. R. China; Institute of Environment and Health, Jianghan University, Wuhan, P. R. China.
    Sun, Yuzhen
    Hubei Key Laboratory of Environmental and Health Effects of Persistent Toxic Substances, Jianghan University, Wuhan, P. R. China; Institute of Environment and Health, Jianghan University, Wuhan, P. R. China.
    Wang, Yawei
    Institute of Environment and Health, Jianghan University, Wuhan, P. R. China; State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, P. R. China.
    Wang, Thanh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Liang, Yong
    Hubei Key Laboratory of Environmental and Health Effects of Persistent Toxic Substances, Jianghan University, Wuhan, P. R. China; Institute of Environment and Health, Jianghan University, Wuhan, P. R. China.
    Screening of Potential PFOS Alternatives To Decrease Liver Bioaccumulation: Experimental and Computational Approaches2019In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 2811-2819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is a persistent organic pollutant with significant bioaccumulation potential in liver tissues. Exposure to PFOS could cause increase of liver weight, induce adenomas of the liver, and cause hepatomegaly. Alternatives of PFOS might be designed and synthesized that have significantly lower liver bioaccumulation. In this study, we conducted animal exposure experiments to investigate tissue accumulations of 14 per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances. Correlation analysis demonstrated that accumulation of the compounds in rat liver had strong correlations with their binding affinities of liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP). Thus, we combined a quantitative structure-activity relationship model with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to develop computational models to predict the LFABP binding affinities of two newly synthesized alternatives, perfluorodecalin-2-sulfonic acid and N-diperfluorobutanoic acid. The binding characteristics of the PFOS alternatives for LFABP were elaborated to explore how the different structural modifications of molecules influenced the underlying binding mechanisms. Subsequent animal experiments demonstrated that the binding free energy calculations based on the MD simulations provided a good indicator to reflect the relative degree of liver accumulation of the PFOS alternatives in the same exposure doses and durations. Our findings from the combination of experimental exposure and computational model can provide helpful information to design potential alternatives of PFOS with weak LFABP binding capability and low liver accumulation.

  • 2.
    Chen, Baowei
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    He, Bin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Yuan, Chungang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Gao, Erle
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Simulate methylation reaction of arsenic(III) with methyl iodide in an aquatic system2006In: Applied organometallic chemistry, ISSN 0268-2605, E-ISSN 1099-0739, Vol. 20, no 11, p. 747-753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The methylation reaction of inorganic arsenic occurring in aquatic systems was studied by HPLC-HGAFS as a method to separate and detect soluble methylarsenic species. Transformation from inorganic arsenic to methylarsenic was essential for major changes in toxicity to organisms. Monomethylarsenic [AsOCH(3)(OH)(2)] was the only product in the methylation reaction of inorganic arsenic(III) with methyl iodide (MeI). This process can be described as an oxidative carbonium-ion transfer, with MeI acting as a methyl donor. From a thermodynamic point of view, the activity of the carbonium ion and pH were the two major influencing factors. The pH dependence of redox potential of As(III) was the reason for the effect of pH on methylation of arsenic. The influences of salinity and concentration of the methyl donor may be explained by their effects on the activity of carbonium. Moreover, kinetics experiments demonstrated that the methylation reaction was first-order for both As(III) and methyl iodide. First-order reaction rates were also calculated at different pH, salinity and MeI, and were found to be in the range 0.0026-0.0123 h(-1). The methylation rate varied largely under different reaction conditions.

  • 3.
    Chen, Baowei
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Yin, Yongguang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    He, Bin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Methylation of inorganic mercury by methylcobalamin in aquatic systems2007In: Applied organometallic chemistry, ISSN 0268-2605, E-ISSN 1099-0739, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 462-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The methylation of inorganic Hg(II) by methylcobalamin in aquatic systems was studied using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV-digestion cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-UV-CV AFS). Monomethylmercury (MMC) could be positively identified as the reaction product in the aqueous solution. The salinity and pH of the aquatic system have great effects on the formation of MMC, because they could change the species of the reactants in the solution. From an electrophile reaction point of view, salinity and pH alter the electron density of the methyl donor and the electrophilicity of metal ion in the reaction system. This methylation of inorganic Hg(II) is shown to be possible even in highly saline solutions, which indicates its importance in aquatic environments. Kinetic experiments showed that the methylation reaction was fast and first-order for Hg(II). The first-order reaction rate was determined to be 0.00612 and 0.000287 min-1 for pH 5.0 and 1.5, respectively. It is suggested that this methylation could occur in the absence of enzymes, in which Hg(II) acts as an electrophile to attack methylcobalamin with a subsequent transfer of carbanion methyl group to the higher oxidized state of Hg(II).

  • 4.
    Chen, Baowei
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhou, Qunfang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Liu, Jiyan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Cao, Dandan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Methylation mechanism of tin(II) by methylcobalamin in aquatic systems2007In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 414-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The methylation reaction of tin(II) with methylcobalamin (CH(3)B(12)) in aquatic systems was modeled in the laboratory. The products were detected by a sensitive gas chromatography-flame photometric detector (GC-FPD), and further identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Both monomethyltin (MMT) and dimethyltin (DMT) were found as methylation products. Three important effecting factors during the methylation reaction, salinity, pH and aerobic or anaerobic, were studied. The results showed that methyl group can be transferred from CH(3)B(12) to tin in aquatic solutions as a radical or carbonium, as well as a carbanion. Two explanations for the pH-dependency of the methylation reaction between tin(II) and CH(3)B(12) were proposed: pH-dependency of the equilibrium states of CH(3)B(12), and pH-dependency of inorganic tin(II) species whose reactivity vary with the redox potential in the solution. Salinity can influence the activity of the methyl donor, which cause changes in the methylation efficiency. Kinetic experiments showed that the methylation reaction was pseudo-first-order for CH(3)B(12).

  • 5.
    Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Wang, Thanh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Geng, Dawei
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Roos, A.
    Temporal trends of persistent organochlorine and bromine compounds in ringed seals from the Baltic Sea (Phoca hispida baltica) from year 1974 to 20152016In: Organohalogen Compounds, ISSN 1026-4892, Vol. 78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Fu, Jianjie
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Gao, Yan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Liang, Yong
    Jianghan University, Wuhan, China.
    Zhang, Aiqian
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Elevated levels of perfluoroalkyl acids in family members of occupationally exposed workers: the importance of dust transfer2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 9313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The exposure pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) to humans are still not clear because of the complex living environment, and few studies have simultaneously investigated the bioaccumulative behaviour of different PFAAs in humans. In this study, serum, dust, duplicate diet, and other matrices were collected around a manufacturing plant in China, and homologous series of PFAAs were analysed. PFAA levels in dust and serum of local residents in this area were considerably higher than those in non-polluted area. Although dietary intake was the major exposure pathway in the present study, dust ingestion played an important role in this case. Serum PFAAs in local residents was significantly correlated with dust PFAAs levels in their living or working microenvironment. Serum PFAAs and dust PFAAs were significantly higher in family members of occupational workers (FM) than in ordinary residents (OR) (p<0.01). After a careful analysis of the PFAAs exposure pathway, a potential pathway in addition to direct dust ingestion was suggested: PFAAs might transferred from occupational worker's clothes to dinners via cooking processes. The bioaccumulative potential of PFHxS and PFOS were higher than other PFAAs, which suggested a substantial difference between the bioaccumulative ability of perfluorinated sulfonic acids and perfluorinated carboxylic acids.

  • 7.
    Fu, Jianjie
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Pu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Qu, Guangbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Qinghua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Aiqian
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Temporal trends (2005-2009) of PCDD/Fs, PCBs, PBDEs in rice hulls from an e-waste dismantling area after stricter environmental regulations2012In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 88, no 3, p. 330-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primitive e-waste dismantling activities have been of increasing concern due to serious environmental and human health problems, and therefore authorities in China have strengthened the regulations on illegal e-waste recycling activities. In this work, we used rice hull as a passive sampler and investigated temporal trends of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in areas near e-waste recycling sites after the stricter regulations. Furthermore, the distribution patterns and composition profiles of these contaminants were also discussed. The average concentrations of the three groups of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in rice hulls have markedly decreased during the period of 2005-2009. Specifically, from 12.9 (average value in 2005) to 0.37 pg WHO-TEQ/g (dry weight, dw) (in 2009) for PCDD/Fs, 47.6 (2005) to 7.10 ng g(-1)dw (2009) for PCBs, and 2.51 (2005) to 0.89 ng g(-1), dw (2009) for PBDEs. The significant decrease of combustion markers 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF, 1,2,3,6,7,8HxCDF and PCB126, and the PCDD/PCDF ratio from 1:9 (2005) to 7:3 (2009) is likely a result of stricter regulations on open combustion activities. This study suggests that stricter control measures, strengthened laws and regulations and more environmental friendly techniques could be effective measures in reducing the release and formation of related POPs in typical e-waste dismantling sites, and these measures could further improve the quality of the environment and health of the local inhabitants.

  • 8.
    Fu, Jianjie
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Aiqian
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Qinghua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhao, Zongshan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Spatial distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated biphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in an e-waste dismantling region in Southeast China: use of apple snail (Ampullariidae) as a bioindicator2011In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 82, no 5, p. 648-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fengjiang is a large e-waste dismantling site located in southeast China. In this paper, apple snail and soil samples were collected from this e-waste dismantling site and 25 vicinal towns to investigate the contamination status, spatial distributions and congener patterns of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated biphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Total PCB concentrations in apple snails (3.78-1812ngg(-1) dry weight (dw)) were significant higher than that in soil samples (0.48-90.1ngg(-1) dw). PBDE (excluding BDE 209) concentrations in apple snail and soil samples ranged from 0.09 to 27.7ngg(-1) dw and 0.06 to 31.2ngg(-1) dw, respectively. Concentrations of PCBs and PBDEs in snails and soils correlated negatively with the distance from Fengjiang. Both the concentrations and profiles of the pollutants were significantly correlated (p<0.05) between the snail and soil samples, indicating the suitability of apple snail as a reliable bioindicator for PCBs and PBDEs contamination in this region. Relatively high concentrations of PCBs and PBDEs at locations far from e-waste dismantling sites implied that these pollutants have been transported to surrounding regions.

  • 9.
    Fu, Jianjie
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Zhang, Aiqian
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Qu, Guangbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Shao, Junjuan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Yuan, Bo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Influence of e-waste dismantling and its regulations: temporal trend, spatial distribution of heavy metals in rice grains, and its potential health risk2013In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 47, no 13, p. 7437-7445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhanced regulations, centralized dismantling processes, and sophisticated recycling technologies have been implemented in some e-waste dismantling areas in China with regard to environmental and economic aspects since 2005. In this study, rice grain samples were collected from 2006 to 2010 in an e-waste dismantling area to investigate the temporal trends and spatial distribution of As, Cd, Cu, and Pb. Geometric means of As, Cd, Cu, and Pb in rice samples from the e-waste dismantling area were 111, 217, 4676, and 237 ng g(-1), respectively. Levels of Pb showed a significant decreasing trend during the sampling period, whereas the other three elements remained relatively constant or even increased. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, and Pb in the e-waste dismantling area were significantly higher than those in the non-e-waste dismantling area (p < 0.05), which showed a close connection between e-waste dismantling activities and elevated Pb, Cu, and Cd contents. Risk assessment for human via rice consumption indicated that over 60% of the hazard quotient of Cd exceeded 1 in the e-waste dismantling area. Our study implied that stricter implementation of regulatory measures might lead to positive effects in controlling the release of some heavy metals to the environment. However, environmental behaviors differed with geochemical characteristics of individual elements. Further remediation actions to reduce heavy metal pollution to the surrounding environment might still be needed.

  • 10.
    Fu, Jianjie
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhou, Qunfang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Liu, Jiemin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Liu, Wei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Qinghua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    High levels of heavy metals in rice (Oryza sativa L.) from a typical E-waste recycling area in southeast China and its potential risk to human health2008In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 71, no 7, p. 1269-1275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Very few studies have investigated the heavy metal contents in rice samples from a typical E-waste recycling area. In this study, 10 heavy metals (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni and Pb) in 13 polished rice and relevant hull samples, six relevant paddy soil samples were investigated. The geometric mean concentrations of Cd, Cu and Hg in soil samples were 1.19, 9.98 and 0.32 microg g(-1), respectively, which were 4.0, 2.0 and 1.1-folds of the maximum allowable concentration (MAC) (0.30, 50.00, 0.30 microg g(-1), respectively) for Chinese agricultural soils. The analyzed metal concentrations were significantly different between rice and relevant hull except for As, Cd and Hg (p<0.05). All metal concentrations, except for Co, in rice hull were higher than those in polished rice. The geometric mean of Pb in polished rice reached 0.69 microg g(-1), which was 3.5-folds higher than the MAC (0.20 microg g(-1)) by the safety criteria for milled rice. Cd contents in 31% of the rice samples exceeded the national MAC (0.20 microg g(-1)), and the arithmetic mean also slightly exceeded national MAC. In addition, Cd and Pb contents in local rice were much higher than commercial rice samples examined in this work and previous studies. Comparing the tolerable daily intakes given by FAO/WHO with the mean estimated daily intakes; Pb daily intake through rice consumption in this area was 3.7 microg day(-1)kg(-1) body weight (bw), which already exceeded the FAO tolerable daily intake, and the Cd daily intake (0.7 microg day(-1)kg(-1) bw) through rice had already taken up 70% of the total tolerable daily intake (1 microg day(-1)kg(-1) bw). The daily intake of Hg and As through rice was much lower than the tolerable daily intakes, but bioaccumulation of Hg through the food chain and intake of As from other food stuff should also be of concern.

  • 11.
    Gao, Yan
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Fu, Jianjie
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Cao, Huiming
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Institute of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Jianghan University, Wuhan, China.
    Zhang, Aiqian
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Liang, Yong
    Institute of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Jianghan University, Wuhan, China; School of Medicine, Ministry of Education, Jianghan University, Wuhan, China; Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Chemical Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, Jianghan University, Wuhan, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Zhao, Chunyan
    School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Differential accumulation and elimination behavior of perfluoroalkyl acid isomers in occupational workers in a manufactory in China2015In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 49, no 11, p. 6953-6962Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, serum and urine samples were collected from 36 occupational workers in a fluorochemical manufacturing plant in China from 2008 to 2012 to evaluate the body burden and possible elimination of linear and branched perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs). Indoor dust, total suspended particles (TSP), diet, and drinking water samples were also collected to trace the occupational exposure pathway to PFAA isomers. The geometric mean concentrations of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), and perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) isomers in the serum were 1386, 371, and 863 ng mL(-1), respectively. The linear isomer of PFOS, PFOA, and PFHxS was the most predominant PFAA in the serum, with mean proportions of 63.3, 91.1, and 92.7% respectively, which were higher than the proportions in urine. The most important exposure routes to PFAA isomers in the occupational workers were considered to be the intake of indoor dust and TSP. A renal clearance estimation indicated that branched PFAA isomers had a higher renal clearance rate than did the corresponding linear isomers. Molecular docking modeling implied that linear PFOS (n-PFOS) had a stronger interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) than branched isomers did, which could decrease the proportion of n-PFOS in the blood of humans via the transport of HSA.

  • 12.
    Geng, Dawei
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Dunstan, Jody
    Waters Corporation, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Hagberg, Jessika
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wang, Thanh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ruzzin, Jerome
    Department of Biology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi
    Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal, Montréal QC, Canada; Montreal Diabetes Research Centre at the Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CRCHUM) Montréal QC, Canada; Nutrition Department of Université de Montréal, Montréal QC, Canada; Endocrinology Division, Montreal University Hospital, Montréal QC, Canada.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Oslo, Norway.
    Gas chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry for the analysis of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in human serum2016In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 1453, p. 88-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method using a novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for coupling gas chromatography (GC/APCI) to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the determination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention is presented. One microliter injection of a six-point calibration curve of native PCBs and OCPs, ranging from 0.04 to 300 pg/μL, was performed. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the relative response factors (RRFs) was less than 15% with a coefficient of determination (r2) &gt;0.995. Meanwhile, two calibration solutions (CS), CS 2 (0.4 pg/μL) and CS 3 (4 pg/μL) were analyzed to study the repeatability calculated for both area and RRFs. The RSD for RRF ranged from 3.1 to 16% and 3.6 to 5.5% for CS 2 and CS 3, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) determined by peak-to-peak signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 were compared between the GC/APCI/MS/MS and a GC coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (GC/HRMS) system. GC/APCI/MS/MS resulted in lower LOD for most of the compounds, except for PCB#74, cis-chlordane and trans-chlordane. GC/APCI/MS/MS and GC/HRMS were also compared by performing analysis on 75 human serum samples together with eight QA/QC serum samples. The comparison between GC/APCI/MS/MS system and GC/HRMS system for 16 of the targeted compounds was carried out. No statistically significant difference was discovered. Due to increased sensitivity and user friendly operation under atmospheric pressure, GC/APCI/MS/MS is a powerful alternative technique that can easily meet the specification of GC/HRMS.

  • 13.
    GuangBo, Qu
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    JianBo, Shi
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    ZhuoNa, Li
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Ting, Ruan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    JianJie, Fu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Pu, Wang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    GuiBin, Jiang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Detection of tris-(2,3-dibromopropyl) isocyanurate as a neuronal toxicant in environmental samples using neuronal toxicity-directed analysis2011In: Science in China Series B: Chemistry, ISSN 1674-7291, E-ISSN 1869-1870, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 1651-1658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuronal toxic pollutants in environment possess hazards to human health. It is essential to determine the causative neuronal toxicants in environmental samples. In the present study, viability of primary cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), combined with sample extraction, chemical fractionation and identification, was applied for screening acid-resistant neuronal toxic substances in environmental samples. River sediments and agricultural soils along the river near a brominated flame retardant (BFR) manufacturing plant in South China were collected to screen the key neuronal toxicants. The results indicated that the manufacturing plant was a source of neuronal toxicity risks. In the sediment and soil near the plant, one of the causative toxicants was identified as tris-(2,3-dibromopropyl) isocyanurate (TBC) using HPLC-MS/MS. In addition, an unknown chemical possibly causing significant neuronal toxicity was isolated from all the soil samples in the region.

  • 14.
    Guo, Liangqia
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Analysis and Detection for Food Safety, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, China .
    Liu, Qian
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Li, Guoliang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Shi, Jianbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Liu, Jiyan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    A mussel-inspired polydopamine coating as a versatile platform for the in situ synthesis of graphene-based nanocomposites2012In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 4, no 19, p. 5864-5867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A facile and universal approach to prepare graphene-based nanocomposites by in situ nucleation and growth of diverse noble metals, metal oxides and semiconducting nanoparticles on the surface of RGO is proposed.

  • 15.
    Hao, Yanfen
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Li, Yingming
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Han, Xu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Yang, Ruiqiang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Pu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Xiao, Ke
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Li, Wenjuan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Lu, Huili
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Fu, Jianjie
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Shi, Jianbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Qinghua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Air monitoring of polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and organochlorine pesticides in West Antarctica during 2011-2017: Concentrations, temporal trends and potential sources2019In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 249, p. 381-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Annual air samples were collected at various sites in the Fildes Peninsula, West Antarctica from December 2010 to January 2018 using XAD-2 resin passive air samplers to investigate concentrations, temporal trends and potential sources of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Antarctic air. Relatively low concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (Σ19PCBs: 1.5-29.7 pg/m3), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) (Σ12PBDEs: 0.2-2.9 pg/m3) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) (Σ13OCPs: 101-278 pg/m3) were found in the atmosphere of West Antarctica. PCB-11, BDE-47 and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were the predominant compounds in the atmosphere. The concentrations of PCBs, HCHs, DDTs and endosulfans were found to show decreasing temporal trends, whereas uniform temporal trends were observed for HCB. The atmospheric half-life values for PCBs, HCHs, DDTs and endosulfans in Antarctic air were estimated for the first time, using regressions of the natural logarithm of the concentrations versus the number of years, obtaining the values of 2.0, 2.0, 2.4 and 1.2 year, respectively. An increasing ratio of α-HCH/γ-HCH indicated long residence time for α-HCH and possible transformation of γ-HCH to α-HCH in the atmosphere. The ratios of p,p'-DDT/p,p'-DDE were mostly lower than unity in this study, which could be attributed to aged sources. It was found that long-range atmospheric transport was still considered to be the main contributing factor to the atmospheric levels of the POPs in West Antarctica whereas the contribution of human activities at the Chinese Great Wall Station was minor. The results of this study give a view on the most recent temporal trends and provide new insights regarding the occurrence of various POPs in the Antarctic atmosphere.

  • 16.
    Hao, Yanfen
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Li, Yingming
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hu, Yongbiao
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Sun, Huizhong
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Matsiko, Julius
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zheng, Shucheng
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Pu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Qinghua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Distribution, seasonal variation and inhalation risks of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the atmosphere of Beijing, China2018In: Environmental Geochemistry and Health, ISSN 0269-4042, E-ISSN 1573-2983, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 1907-1918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatial distribution, seasonal variation and potential inhalation risks of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were investigated in the atmosphere of Beijing, using passive air samplers equipped with polyurethane foam disks. Concentrations of ΣPCDD/Fs, ΣPCBs and ΣPBDEs ranged from 8.4 to 179 fg WHO2005-TEQ/m(3), 38.6-139 and 1.5-176 pg/m(3), respectively. PCDFs showed higher air concentrations than those of PCDDs, indicating the influence of industrial activities and other combustion processes. The non-Aroclor congener, PCB-11, was detected in air (12.3-99.4 pg/m(3)) and dominated the PCB congener profiles (61.7-71.5% to ∑PCBs). The congener patterns of PBDEs showed signatures from both penta-BDE and octa-BDE products. Levels of PCDD/Fs, PCBs and PBDEs at the industrial and residential sites were higher than those at rural site, indicating human activities in urban area as potential sources. Higher air concentrations of PCDD/Fs, PCBs and PBDEs were observed in summer, which could be associated with atmospheric deposition process, re-volatilization from soil surface and volatilization from use of technical products, respectively. Results of inhalation exposure and cancer risk showed that atmospheric PCDD/Fs, dioxin-like PCBs and PBDEs did not cause high risks to the local residents of Beijing. This study provides further aid in evaluating emission sources, influencing factors and potential inhalation risks of the persistent organic pollutants to human health in mega-cities of China.

  • 17.
    Hou, Qihui
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; College of Life Sciences, Shandong Agricultural University, Taiwan, China.
    Ma, Anzhou
    Key Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Lin, Jianqiang
    State Key Laboratory of Microbial Technology, Shandong University, Jinan, China.
    Wang, Hailin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Du, Binghai
    College of Life Sciences, Shandong Agricultural University, Taiwan, China.
    Zhuang, Xuliang
    Key Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhuang, Guoqiang
    Key Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Detection of bioavailable cadmium, lead, and arsenic in polluted soil by tailored multiple Escherichia coli whole-cell sensor set2015In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 407, no 22, p. 6865-6871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microbial whole-cell sensor has been widely used to assess bioavailability and risk of toxic elements, but their environmental use is still limited due to the presence of other interfering pollutants and the nonspecific binding in cells, which leads to inaccurate results. Here, we proposed a strategy combining Escherichia coli sensor set with binary regression models for the specific detection of bioavailable cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and arsenic (As) in a co-polluted environment. Initial tests suggested that the sensor set respectively termed pcadCluc, pzntRluc, and parsRluc could be classified into two groups according to their specific response to Cd, Pb, and As: group 1 (pcadCluc and pzntRluc) induced by a Cd-Pb mix and group 2 (parsRluc) induced by a Cd-As mix. Based on the variance in responses of each sensor to mixtures of target elements, three binary linear equations for two sensor groups were set up to calculate the individual concentrations in the mixture solutions. This method was then used to quantify the bioavailable Cd, Pb, and As in soils from a co-polluted mining region and to compare the results with other methods. Results showed that the conventional single target sensor method overestimated the bioavailability of each element, while sensor set was credible for accurate bioavailable Cd, Pb, and As quantification and comparable with the results from inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis. Our method can potentially be extended to cover the specific detection of other bioavailable toxic elements in different environmental settings.

  • 18.
    Koch, Alina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kärrman, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Yeung, Leo W. Y.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Jonsson, Micael
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ahrens, Lutz
    Section for Organic Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wang, Thanh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Point source characterization of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and extractable organofluorine (EOF) in freshwater and aquatic invertebrates2019In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 1887-1898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major point sources of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) cause ubiquitous spread of PFASs in the environment. In this study, surface water and aquatic invertebrates at three Swedish sites impacted by PFAS point sources were characterized, using homologue, isomer and extractable organofluorine (EOF) profiling as well as estimation of bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and mass discharge. Two sites were impacted by fire training (sites A and R) and the third by industrial runoff (site K). Mean Σ25PFASs concentration in water was 1920 ng L-1 at site R (n = 3), which was more than 20- and 10-fold higher than those from sites A and K, respectively. PFOS was the most predominant PFAS in all waters samples, constituting 29-79% of Σ25PFAS concentrations. Several branched isomers were detected and they substantially contributed to concentrations in surface water (e.g. 49-78% of ΣPFOS) and aquatic invertebrates (e.g. 15-28% of ΣPFOS). BAFs in the aquatic invertebrates indicated higher bioaccumulation for long chain PFASs and lower bioaccumulation for branched PFOS isomers compared to linear PFOS. EOF mass balance showed that Σ25target PFASs in water could explain up to 55% of EOF at site R. However, larger proportions of EOF (>92%) remained unknown in water from sites A and K. Mass discharges were for the first time estimated for EOF and revealed that high amounts of EOF (e.g. 8.2 g F day-1 at site A) could be transported by water to recipient water bodies relative to Σ25PFASs (e.g. 0.15 g day-1 at site A). Overall, we showed that composition profiling, BAFs and EOF mass balance can improve the characterization of PFASs around point sources.

  • 19.
    Li, Hongcheng
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Jinsong
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Luo, Wenru
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhou, Qunfang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Elemental selenium particles at nano-size (Nano-Se) are more toxic to Medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a consequence of hyper-accumulation of selenium: a comparison with sodium selenite2008In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 89, no 4, p. 251-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have shown that elemental selenium particles at nano-size (Nano-Se) exhibited comparable bioavailability and less toxicity in mice and rats when compared to sodium selenite, selenomethinine and methylselenocysteine. However, little is known about the toxicity profile of Nano-Se in aquatic animals. In the present study, toxicities of Nano-Se and selenite in selenium-sufficient Medaka fish were compared. Selenium bioaccumulation and subsequent clearance in fish livers, gills, muscles and whole bodies were examined after 10 days of exposure to Nano-Se and selenite (100 microg Se/L) and again after 7 days of depuration. Both forms of selenium exposure effectively increased selenium concentrations in the investigated tissues. Surprisingly, Nano-Se was found to be more hyper-accumulated in the liver compared to selenite with differences as high as sixfold. Selenium clearance of both Nano-Se and selenite occurred at similar ratios in whole bodies and muscles but was not rapidly cleared from livers and gills. Nano-Se exhibited strong toxicity for Medaka with an approximately fivefold difference in terms of LC(50) compared to selenite. Nano-Se also caused larger effects on oxidative stress, most likely due to more hyper-accumulation of selenium in liver. The present study suggests that toxicity of nanoparticles can largely vary between different species and concludes that the evaluation of nanotoxicology should be carried out on a case-by-case basis.

  • 20.
    Li, Hongcheng
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhou, Qunfang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wu, Yuan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Fu, Jianjie
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Effects of waterborne nano-iron on medaka (Oryzias latipes): antioxidant enzymatic activity, lipid peroxidation and histopathology2009In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 684-692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Toxicity tests were performed to investigate possible harmful effects on medaka exposed to nano-iron. Dose-dependent decreases of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and increases of malondialdehyde (MDA) were induced in the medaka embryo, suggesting that oxidative damage was induced by nano-iron. For adult medaka, the disturbance of antioxidative balance was observed during the early exposure period based on the monitoring of the hepatic and cerebral SOD and reduced glutathione (GSH). No terminal oxidative damage occurred during the whole exposure period, probably due to the high self-recovering capability of the adult fish. Some histopathological and morphological alterations (cell swelling, hyperplasia, and granulomas, etc.) were observed in gill and intestine tissues, which confirmed that deleterious effects occurred as a result of direct contact with nano-iron. It is suggested that further evaluation should be made concerning the risk assessment of waterborne nano-iron on aquatic life.

  • 21.
    Li, Honghua
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Zhang, Qinghua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Pu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Li, Yingming
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Lv, Jianxia
    Weifang Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Weifang, China.
    Chen, Weihai
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Geng, Dawei
    School of Energy Resources, China University of Geosciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Levels and distribution of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in environmental samples near manufacturing facilities in Laizhou Bay area, East China2012In: Journal of Environmental Monitoring, ISSN 1464-0325, E-ISSN 1464-0333, Vol. 14, no 10, p. 2591-2597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A total of 55 samples including soil, sediment, plants (cypress, reed and seepweed) and aquatic species were collected at locations around hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) manufacturing facilities in Laizhou Bay area, East China. HBCD was determined at concentrations ranging between 0.88 and 6901 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw), 2.93-1029 ng g(-1) dw, 8.88-160241 ng g(-1) dw, and 7.09-815 ng g(-1) lipid weight (lw), respectively. Significant negative correlations (r(2) = 0.54, p = 0.006) were observed between HBCD concentrations in soils and the distance from the manufacturing facility, and the concentrations became constant when the distance was >4 km. The calculation results on the bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) suggested that HBCD may be accumulated in plants. Tissue-specific bioaccumulation of HBCD diastereoisomers was found in aquatic species. For example, in crabs the highest concentrations of HBCD (815 ng g(-1) lw for female and 446 ng g(-1) lw for male) were observed in the gill. Besides the gill, α-HBCD was more preferentially accumulated in the spermary and ovary, while β- and γ-HBCD were more accumulated in the muscle. A similar distribution was also observed in roe and muscle of goby fish.

  • 22.
    Li, Juan
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Development and Evaluation of Chemical and Herbal Drugs for Animal Use, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China; Ministry of Health Key Laboratory, China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing, China; Key Laboratory of Chemical Safety and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    Research Center for Eco-Environment Science, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, China.
    Shao, Bing
    Beijing Key Laboratory of Food Poison Diagnostic and Traceability, Beijing Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China; College of Public Health and Family Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China .
    Shen, Jianzhong
    Key Laboratory of Development and Evaluation of Chemical and Herbal Drugs for Animal Use, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Shaochen
    Ministry of Health Key Laboratory, China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing, China; Key Laboratory of Chemical Safety and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
    Wu, Yongning
    Key Laboratory of Development and Evaluation of Chemical and Herbal Drugs for Animal Use, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China; Ministry of Health Key Laboratory, China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing, China; Key Laboratory of Chemical Safety and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
    Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and antibiotic residues in wastewater and soil adjacent to swine feedlots: potential transfer to agricultural lands2012In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 120, no 8, p. 1144-1149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Inappropriate use of antibiotics in swine feed could cause accelerated emergence of antibiotic resistance genes, and agricultural application of swine waste could spread antibiotic resistance genes to the surrounding environment.

    OBJECTIVES: We investigated the distribution of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes from swine feedlots and their surrounding environment.

    METHODS: We used a culture-independent method to identify PMQR genes and estimate their levels in wastewater from seven swine feedlot operations and corresponding wastewater-irrigated farm fields. Concentrations of (fluoro)quinolones in wastewater and soil samples were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    RESULTS: The predominant PMQR genes in both the wastewater and soil samples were qnrD, qepA, and oqxB, whereas qnrS and oqxA were present only in wastewater samples. Absolute concentrations of all PMQR genes combined ranged from 1.66 × 107 to 4.06 × 108 copies/mL in wastewater and 4.06 × 106 to 9.52 × 107 copies/g in soil. Concentrations of (fluoro)quinolones ranged from 4.57 to 321 ng/mL in wastewater and below detection limit to 23.4 ng/g in soil. Significant correlations were found between the relative abundance of PMQR genes and (fluoro)quinolone concentrations (r = 0.71, p = 0.005) and the relative abundance of PMQR genes in paired wastewater and agricultural soil samples (r = 0.91, p = 0.005).

    CONCLUSIONS: Swine feedlot wastewater may be a source of PMQR genes that could facilitate the spread of antibiotic resistance. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the occurrence of PMQR genes in animal husbandry environments using a culture-independent method.

  • 23.
    Li, Yingming
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Geng, Dawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; School of Energy Resources, China University of Geosciences, Beijing, China.
    Liu, Fubin
    National Marine Environmental Forecasting Center, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Pu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Qinghua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Study of PCBs and PBDEs in King George Island, Antarctica, using PUF passive air sampling2012In: Atmospheric Environment, ISSN 1352-2310, E-ISSN 1873-2844, Vol. 51, p. 140-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyurethane foam (PUF)-disk based passive air samplers were deployed in King George Island, Antarctica, during the austral summer of 2009-2010, to investigate levels, distributions and potential sources of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in Antarctic air. The atmospheric levels of Sigma indicator PCBs and Sigma(14) PBDEs ranged from 1.66 to 6.50 pg m(-3) and from 0.67 to 2.98 pg m(-3), respectively. PCBs homologue profiles were dominated by di-PCBs, tri-PCBs and tetra-PCBs, whereas BDE-17 and BDE-28 were the predominant congeners of PBDEs, which could be explained by long-range atmospheric transport processes. However, the sampling sites close to the Antarctic research stations showed higher atmospheric concentrations of PCBs and PBDEs than the other sites, reflecting potential local sources from the Antarctic research stations. The non-Aroclor congener PCB-11 was found in all the air samples, with air concentrations of 3.60-31.4 pg m(-3) (average 15.2 pg m(-3)). Comparison between the results derived from PUF-disk passive air sampling and high-volume air sampling validates the feasibility of using the passive air samplers in Antarctic air. To our knowledge, this study is the first employment of PUF-disk based passive air samplers in Antarctic atmosphere.

  • 24.
    Li, Yingming
    et al.
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Pu
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Ding, Lei
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Li, Xiaomin
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Qinghua
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Yang, Hongbiao
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wei, Fusheng
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Atmospheric distribution of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls around a steel plant area, northeast China2010In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 253-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Air monitoring of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was carried out in June 2008 and January 2009 to investigate the concentrations, profiles and estimating potential inhalation risks to the local residents around a steel plant area in northeast China. The air concentrations and WHO-TEQs of PCDD/Fs ranged 94-4944fgm(-3) (average 1352fgm(-3)) and 3-247fgm(-3) (average 81fgm(-3)), respectively. The WHO-TEQ concentrations of dioxin-like PCBs ranged 1-18fgm(-3) (average 5fgm(-3)), contributing to 3.6-26% of the total TEQ. Higher PCDD/F concentrations were observed in the winter, whereas higher dioxin-like PCB concentrations were found in the summer. The seasonal trend can be related to the significant correlation between the concentrations of dioxins and the reciprocal of temperature (positive for PCDD/Fs, P<0.01; negative for dioxin-like PCBs, P=0.05). A significant positive correlation (P<0.0001) was found between the concentration of total suspended particulate (TSP) and PCDD/F concentrations, but not for PCB congeners. Although the steel plant sites showed higher dioxin levels than the residential and background areas, the PCDD/F levels in the atmosphere of the steel plant area was at a relatively low level. The results from this study provides further aid in evaluating the impact of steel plants as PCDD/Fs emission sources to the ambient air in China.

  • 25.
    Li, Yingming
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Wang, Pu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Ding, Lei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Li, Xiaomin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Zhang, Qinghua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Li, An
    School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago IL, United States .
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Reduction of atmospheric polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) during the 2008 Beijing Olympic games2011In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 3304-3309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A total of 120 air samples were collected at three urban and one rural location in Beijing, China in the summers of 2007-2010, and before, during, and after the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games (BOG), in order to assess the effectiveness of long-term and short-term emission-control measures in reducing polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in the atmosphere. During the BOG (August, 2008), the PCDD/Fs concentrations decreased to an average value of 1150 fg m−3 (63 fg I-TEQ m−3), which was reduced by approximately 70% from the average in 2007 and by 29% from that in July 2008, before the Olympic event began. Although 2009-2010 levels of PCDD/Fs were significantly higher than 2008, the overall temporal trend was decreasing for summer months during the sampling campaign period. The apparent half-lives of atmospheric PCDD/Fs were estimated to be 3.2-5.8 years by statistically regressing the logarithm PCDD/Fs concentrations versus the number of years passed since 2006. The air concentrations of total suspended particulates (TSP) during the BOG ranged between 135 and 183 μg m−3, showing a 52% reduction from 2007 and 26% decrease from those prior to the Olympic event. No significant relationships were found between meteorological parameters (temperature, humidity, and wind speed) and PCDD/Fs or TSP during the BOG, whereas the PCDD/Fs concentrations were significantly dependent on the air quality (p < 0.05, positive against TSP and negative against visibility). This work is one of few temporal trend studies of atmospheric PCDD/Fs in mainland China, and provides unique insight into the effects of large-scale control measures in improving air quality and reducing one of the most ubiquitous and toxic organic pollutants in the environment.

  • 26.
    Li, Yingming
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, People’s Republic of China.
    Zhang, Qinghua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, People’s Republic of China.
    Ji, Dongsheng
    Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, People’s Republic of China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, People’s Republic of China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, People’s Republic of China.
    Wang, Pu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, People’s Republic of China.
    Ding, Lei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, People’s Republic of China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, People’s Republic of China.
    Levels and vertical distributions of PCBs, PBDEs, and OCPs in the atmospheric boundary layer: observation from the Beijing 325-m meteorological tower2009In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 1030-1035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyurethane foam disk passive air sampling was carried out to investigate the levels, vertical distributions, and potential sources of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the atmospheric boundary layer of an urban site in Asia. Sampling was performed at nine heights (15, 47, 80, 120, 160, 200, 240, 280, 320 m) of the 325-m meteorological tower in Beijing, China over three 2-month periods between December 2006 and August 2007. This is the first study to report vertical variations of PBDEs in the ABL and one of only a few studies to investigate vertical distributions of persistent organic pollutants. The levels of sigma19PCBs and sigma8PBDEs were relatively low, ranging from 22 to 65 and from 2.3 to 18 pg m-3, respectively. Air concentrations of gamma-HCH were high, with values in the range of 39-103 pg m-3 in winter, 100-180 pg m-3 in spring, and 115-242 pg m-3 in summer, respectively. alpha-HCH concentrations ranged from 20 to 86 pg m-3, p,p'-DDT between 7.3 and 78 pg m-3, and HCB between 15 and 160 pg m-3. The seasonal variations of PCBs, PBDEs, and OCPs may reflect different sources for these chemicals, such as those related with regional use (gamma-HCH), volatilization/re-emission (PBDEs, PCBs, alpha-HCH), and pesticide impurities (HCB). Although the performance reference compounds (PRCs) were spiked before deployment, the sampling rates showed strong dependency on wind speeds, resulting in large variations in uptake rates in the ABL, ranging from approximately 7.0 m3 day-1 at ground level to 11 m3 day-1 at 320 m. Levels of PCBs, PBDEs, and OCPs decreased with increasing ABL height indicating the potential of Beijing as the local sources.

  • 27.
    Li, Zhuona
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Yin, Nuoya
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Liu, Qian
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Chang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Yichen
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Qu, Guangbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Liu, Jiyan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Cai, Yaqi
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Zhou, Qunfang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Effects of polycyclic musks HHCB and AHTN on steroidogenesis in H295R cells2013In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 90, no 3, p. 1227-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1,3,4,6,7,8-Hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta-(γ)-2-benzopyran (HHCB) and 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (AHTN) are widely used in personal care products. Previous studies showed that HHCB and AHTN can be found in various environmental matrices and have potential endocrine disrupting effects. However, the effects on adrenocortical function of HHCB and AHTN are not fully understood. This study evaluated the influences of HHCB and AHTN on seven steroid hormones (progesterone, aldosterone, cortisol, 17α-OH-progesterone, androstenedione, 17β-estradiol, and testosterone) and 10 genes involved in steroidogenic pathways (HMGR, StAR, CYP11A1, 3βHSD2, CYP17, CYP21, CYP11B1, CYP11B2, 17βHSD, and CYP19) using the H295R cell line in the absence and presence of 8-Br-cAMP. MC2R transcription on the cell membrane was also examined to further investigate the effects of HHCB and AHTN on adrenal steroidogenesis. The results demonstrated that HHCB and AHTN could inhibit progesterone and cortisol production mainly by the suppression of 3βHSD2 and CYP21. Meanwhile, high concentrations of AHTN can affect the sensitivity of H295R cells to ACTH by disrupting MC2R transcription. Overall, the results indicate that high concentrations of HHCB and AHTN can affect steroidogenesis in vitro using the H295R cell line.

  • 28.
    Liao, Chunyang
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China; Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research for Sustainable Development, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai, Shandong 264003, China .
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China .
    Cui, Lin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China .
    Zhou, Qunfang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China .
    Duan, Shumin
    Institute of Neuroscience, Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China .
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China .
    Changes in synaptic transmission, calcium current, and neurite growth by perfluorinated compounds are dependent on the chain length and functional group2009In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 2099-2104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientific and public concerns on perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are increasingly growing because of their environmental persistency, bioaccumulation, and extensive distribution throughout the world. Little is known about the effects of PFCs on neural function and the underlying mechanisms. Recent evidence suggests that the toxicological effects of PFCs are closely correlated with their carbon chain lengths. In this present work, the actions of PFCs with varying chain length on cultured rat hippocampal neurons and possible action patterns were examined. Increases in the frequencies of spontaneous miniature postsynaptic current (mPSC) were commonly found in cultured neurons when perfused with PFCs. The increase of mPSC frequency was in proportion to the carbon chain length, and the potency of perfluorinated carboxylates was less pronounced than that of perfluorinated sulfonates. A comparable but less perceptible trend was also found for the amplitudes of voltage-dependent calcium current (ICa). No regular change in pattern was observed for the effects of PFCs on activation and inactivation kinetics of ICa. Furthermore, prolonged treatment of PFCs inhibited the neurite growth of neuronsto various degrees. Comparisons between nonfluorinated and perfluorinated analogues demonstrated thatthefluorination in alkyl chain exerts stronger actions on neurons as compared to the surfactant activity. This study shows that PFCs exhibit adverse effects on cultured neurons to various extents, which is dependent on the carbon chain length and functional group attached to the fully fluorinated alkyl chain.

  • 29.
    Liu, Qian
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Cheng, Mengting
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Long, Yanmin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Yu, Miao
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Graphenized pencil lead fiber: facile preparation and application in solid-phase microextraction2014In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 1325, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graphenized pencil lead fiber was facilely prepared by in situ chemical exfoliation of graphite in pencil lead fiber to few-layered graphene sheets via a one-pot, one-step pressurized oxidation reaction for the first time. This new fiber was characterized and demonstrated to be a highly efficient but low-cost solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber. The extraction performance of the fiber was evaluated with four bisphenol analogs [bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol S (BPS), bisphenol AF (BPAF), and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA)] as model analytes in direct SPME mode. Unlike commercially available fibers, the graphenized pencil lead fiber showed an excellent chemical stability in highly saline, acidic, alkaline and organic conditions due to its coating-free configuration. The fiber also showed a very long lifespan. Furthermore, high extraction efficiency and good selectivity for the analytes with a wide polarity range could be obtained due to the exceptional properties of graphene. The detection limits (LODs) for the analytes were in the range of 1.1-25ng/L. The fiber was successfully applied in the analysis of tap water and effluent samples from a waste water treatment plant with spike recoveries ranging from 68.5 to 105.1%. Therefore, the graphenized pencil lead fiber provides a high performance, cheap, robust, and reliable tool for SPME.

  • 30.
    Liu, Qian
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Shi, Jianbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Sun, Jianteng
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Zeng, Lixi
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Graphene and graphene oxide sheets supported on silica as versatile and high-performance adsorbents for solid-phase extraction2011In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 50, no 26, p. 5913-5917Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Liu, Qian
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Shi, Jianbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Sun, Jianteng
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zeng, Lixi
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhu, Nali
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Graphene-assisted matrix solid-phase dispersion for extraction of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and their methoxylated and hydroxylated analogs from environmental samples2011In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 708, no 1-2, p. 61-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, we developed a novel graphene-assisted matrix solid-phase dispersion (GA-MSPD) method for extraction of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their methoxylated (MeO-) and hydroxylated (OH-) analogs from environmental samples. We found that grinding the solid sample with chemically converted graphene (CCG) powder yielded a tight contact and sufficient dispersion of the sample matrix due to the large surface area and flexible nanosheet morphology of CCG. The resultant blend was eluted using a two-step elution strategy: PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs were eluted firstly by hexane/dichloromethane and analyzed by GC-ECD, and then OH-PBDEs were eluted by acetone and determined by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The GA-MSPD conditions were optimized in detail. Better recoveries were obtained with GA-MSPD than with other sorbents (C18 silica, Florisil and carbon nanotubes) and other extraction techniques (Soxhlet and accelerated solvent extraction). Other advantages of GA-MSPD, including reduced consumption of sorbent and solvent, good selectivity and short extraction time, were also demonstrated. In analysis of soil samples, the method detection limits of five PBDEs, ten MeO-PBDEs and ten OH-PBDEs were in the range of 5.9-28.7, 14.3-46.6, and 5.3-212.6 pg g(-1) dry weight, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the extraction of PBDEs, MeO-PBDEs and OH-PBDEs from different kinds of spiked environmental samples, including soil, tree bark and fish.

  • 32.
    Liu, Qian
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Shi, Jianbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China.
    Guo, Feng
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Liu, Lihong
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Hemimicelles/admicelles supported on magnetic graphene sheets for enhanced magnetic solid-phase extraction2012In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 1257, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, superparamagnetic nanoparticle-decorated graphene (MG) sheets were synthesized and used as support for hemimicelles/admicelles for solid-phase extraction (SPE) of different compounds from environmental water samples for the first time. The MG sheets were facilely synthesized by a one-step, one-pot redox reaction between graphene oxide and Fe(II). Due to the large surface area and unique nanosheet morphology, MG served as an excellent nano-scaled support material for hemimicelles and admicelles, exhibiting higher loading capacity than conventional materials and pure Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles. The MG sheets could be negatively or positively charged depending on solution pH, allowing the extraction to be conducted in different modes. In cationic mode, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was used as micelle-forming reagent, and perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and alkylphenols were used as model analytes. In anionic mode, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used as micelle-forming reagent and alkyltrimethylammonium salts were selected as analytes. In both modes, the formation processes of hemimicelles/admicelles on MG sheets were studied and the extraction conditions were optimized. For PFASs, the analytical sensitivity was enhanced by 50-113-fold by the extraction, and the method detection limits (MDLs) ranged from 0.15 to 0.50 ng/L. For alkyltrimethylammonium salts, the MDLs were in the range of 1.4-8.0 ng/L. In both modes, good recoveries (56.3-93.9%) and reproducibility (run-to-run RSDs<9.3%) were obtained. The results from this work show a potential new role of graphene in analytical sample preparation.

  • 33.
    Liu, Qian
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Shi, Jianbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zeng, Lixi
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Cai, Yaqi
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Evaluation of graphene as an advantageous adsorbent for solid-phase extraction with chlorophenols as model analytes2011In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 1218, no 2, p. 197-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graphene, a novel class of carbon nanostructures, possesses an ultrahigh specific surface area, and thus has great potentials for the use as sorbent materials. We herein demonstrate the use of graphene as a novel adsorbent for solid-phase extraction (SPE). Eight chlorophenols (CPs) as model analytes were extracted on a graphene-packed SPE cartridge, and then eluted with alkaline methanol. The concentrations in the eluate were determined by HPLC with multi-wavelength UV detection. Under the optimized conditions, high sensitivity (detection limits 0.1-0.4 ng/mL) and good reproducibility of CPs (RSDs 2.2-7.7% for run-to-run assays) were achieved. Comparative studies showed that graphene was superior to other adsorbents including C18 silica, graphitic carbon, single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the extraction of CPs. Some other advantages of graphene as SPE adsorbent, such as good compatibility with various organic solvents, good reusability and no impact of sorbent drying, have also been demonstrated. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of tap and river water samples with recoveries ranging from 77.2 to 116.6%. This work not only proposes a useful method for environmental water sample pretreatment, but also reveals great potentials of graphene as an excellent sorbent material in analytical processes.

  • 34.
    Liu, Runzeng
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Ruan, Ting
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Song, Shanjun
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Guo, Feng
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Determination of nine benzotriazole UV stabilizers in environmental water samples by automated on-line solid phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry2014In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 120, p. 158-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method using automated on-line solid phase extraction coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system was developed for the determination of emerging benzotriazole UV stabilizers (BZTs) in different environmental water matrices including river water, sewage influent and effluent. Water sample was injected directly and the analytes were preconcentrated on a Polar Advantage II on-line SPE cartridge. After cleanup step the target BZTs were eluted in back flush mode and then separated on a liquid chromatography column. Experimental parameters such as sample loading flow rate, SPE cartridge, pH value and methanol ratio in the sample were optimized in detail. The method detection limits ranged from 0.21 to 2.17 ng/L. Recoveries of the target BZTs at 50 ng/L spiking level ranged from 76% to 114% and the inter-day RSDs ranged from 1% to 15%. The optimized method was successfully applied to analyze twelve water samples collected from different wastewater treatment plants and rivers, and five BZTs (UV-P, UV-329, UV-350, UV-234 and UV-328) were detected with concentrations up to 37.1 ng/L. The proposed method is simple, sensitive and suitable for simultaneous analysis and monitoring of BZTs in water samples.

  • 35.
    Liu, Runzeng
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Ruan, Ting
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Song, Shanjun
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Yu, Miao
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Gao, Yan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Shao, Junjuan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Trace analysis of mono-, di-, tri-substituted polyfluoroalkyl phosphates and perfluorinated phosphonic acids in sewage sludge by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry2013In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 111, p. 170-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new method using ultrasonic extraction and solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up pretreatments was developed for the analysis of mono-, di- and tri-substituted polyfluoroalkyl phosphates (abbreviated as mono-PAPs, di-PAPs and tri-PAPs) and perfluorinated phosphonic acids (PFPAs) in sludge from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). For the ultrasonic extraction of three mono-PAPs, three di-PAPs and three PFPAs in sludge samples, a mixture of tetrahydrofuran/acetic acid (1:1, v/v) was found to be the most suitable extraction solvent. The subsequently optimized clean-up and enrichment procedures were carried out with weak anion exchange (WAX) cartridges in-line coupled with graphitized carbon black (ENVI-Carb) tubes. Two tri-PAPs were ultrasonically extracted by acetonitrile/tetrahydrofuran (1:1, v/v) and cleaned by mixed-mode anion exchange (MAX) in-line coupled with ENVI-Carb cartridges. The analytes were analyzed by optimized high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method either in negative or positive ionization mode. The method quantification limits (MQLs) of the 11 analytes in sludge ranged from 0.6 to 5.1 ng/g, meanwhile the total recoveries of the pretreatment varied from 24% (6:2 mono-PAP) to 107% (PFDPA). The method was successfully applied to analyze 16 sewage sludge samples collected from seven provinces in China, and two mono-PAPs were identified with concentrations ranging from <MQLs to 10.7 ng/g.

  • 36.
    Liu, Wei
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wu, Yuan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Chang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Li, Hong C
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Liao, Chun Y
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research for Sustainable Development, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai, China .
    Cui, Lin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Zhou, Qun F
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Yan, Bing
    School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, China; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, United States .
    Jiang, Gui B
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Impact of silver nanoparticles on human cells: effect of particle size2010In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 319-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work investigated the cytotoxicities of three silver nanoparticles (SNPs) SNP-5, SNP-20 and SNP-50 with different sizes ( approximately 5 nm, approximately 20 nm and approximately 50 nm) using four human cell models (A549, SGC-7901, HepG2 and MCF-7). Endpoints included cell morphology, cell viability, cellular membrane integrity, oxidative stress and cell cycle progression. Observable deleterious effects on the cell morphologies and membrane integrity were induced by SNP-5 and SNP-20. SNPs elevated the ROS levels in cells and arrested the cells at S phase. Apoptosis occurred for 4-9% of the exposed cells. All these cellular responses as well as EC50 values were found to be size-dependent for the tested SNPs. Ultrastructural observations confirmed the presence of SNPs inside cells. Elemental analysis of silver in cells by ICP-MS showed that smaller nanoparticles enter cells more easily than larger ones, which may be the cause of higher toxic effects. The findings may assist in the design of SNP applications and provide insights into their toxicity.

  • 37.
    Meng, Mei
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Li, Bing
    Ecological Civilization Construction Committee of Guiyang, Guiyang Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Guiyang, China .
    Shao, Jun-juan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    He, Bin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Shi, Jian-bo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Ye, Zhi-hong
    State Key Laboratory for Bio-control, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China .
    Jiang, Gui-bin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Accumulation of total mercury and methylmercury in rice plants collected from different mining areas in China2014In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 184, p. 179-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A total of 155 rice plants were collected from ten mining areas in three provinces of China (Hunan, Guizhou and Guangdong), where most of mercury (Hg) mining takes place in China. During the harvest season, whole rice plants were sampled and divided into root, stalk & leaf, husk and seed (brown rice), together with soil from root zone. Although the degree of Hg contamination varied significantly among different mining areas, rice seed showed the highest ability for methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation. Both concentrations of total mercury (THg) and MeHg in rice plants were significantly correlated with Hg levels in soil, indicating soil is still an important source for both inorganic mercury (IHg) and MeHg in rice plants. The obvious discrepancy between the distribution patterns of THg and MeHg reflected different pathways of IHg and MeHg accumulation. Water soluble Hg may play more important role in MeHg accumulation in rice plants.

  • 38.
    Persson, Josefin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hagberg, Jessika
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Arvidsson, H.
    Wang, Thanh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Chemical emissions from building materials used in low-energy constructions and their presence in the indoor airManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Persson, Josefin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Wang, Thanh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hagberg, Jessika
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Indoor air quality of newly built low-energy preschools: Are chemical emissions reduced in houses with eco-labelled building materials?2019In: Indoor and Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 506-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of an airtight frame in low-energy buildings could increase the risk of health-related problems, such as allergies and sick building syndromes (SBS), associated with chemical emissions from building materials, especially if the ventilation system is not functioning properly. In this study, the indoor air quality (IAQ) was investigated in newly built low-energy and conventional preschools by monitoring the indoor air temperature, relative humidity, particle-size distribution and levels of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde and total volatile organic compounds (TVOC). The thermal comfort was satisfactory in all preschools, with average indoor air temperature and a relative humidity at 21.4C and 36%, respectively. The highest levels of TVOC (range: 130–1650 mg/m3 toluene equivalents) and formaldehyde (range: 1.9–28.8 mg/m3) occurred during the first sampling period associated with strong emissions from building materials. However, those preschools constructed with environmental friendly building materials (such as Swan Eco-label) had lower initial TVOC levels compared to those preschools constructed with conventional building materials. The IAQ and indoor chemical emissions were also strongly dependent on the functioning of the ventilation system. Preliminary risk assessment indicated that exposure to acrolein and crotonaldehyde might lead to respiratory-tract irritation among occupants.

  • 40.
    Persson, Josefin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Wang, Thanh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hagberg, Jessika
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Organophosphate flame retardants and plasticizers in indoor dust, air and window wipes in newly built low-energy preschools2018In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 628-629, p. 159-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction of extremely airtight and energy efficient low-energy buildings is achieved by using functional building materials, such as age-resistant plastics, insulation, adhesives, and sealants. Additives such as organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) can be added to some of these building materials as flame retardants and plasticizers. Some OPFRs are considered persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic. Therefore, in this pilot study, the occurrence and distribution of nine OPFRs were determined for dust, air, and window wipe samples collected in newly built low-energy preschools with and without environmental certifications. Tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) were detected in all indoor dust samples at concentrations ranging from 0.014 to 10 μg/g and 0.0069 to 79 μg/g, respectively. Only six OPFRs (predominantly chlorinated OPFRs) were detected in the indoor air. All nine OPFRs were found on the window surfaces and the highest concentrations, which occurred in the reference preschool, were measured for 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP) (maximum concentration: 1500 ng/m2). Interestingly, the OPFR levels in the environmental certified low-energy preschools were lower than those in the reference preschool and the non-certified low-energy preschool, probably attributed to the usage of environmental friendly and low-emitting building materials, interior decorations, and consumer products.

  • 41.
    Persson, Josefin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Wang, Thanh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hagberg, Jessika
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Temporal trends of decabromodiphenyl ether and emerging brominated flame retardants in dust, air and window surfaces of newly built low-energy preschoolsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Persson, Josefin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Wang, Thanh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hagberg, Jessika
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Temporal Trends of Decabromodiphenyl Ether and Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Dust, Air and Window Surfaces of Newly Built Low-Energy Preschools2019In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 263-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The envelope of low-energy buildings is generally constructed with significant amounts of plastics, sealants and insulation materials that are known to contain various chemical additives to improve specific functionalities. A commonly used group of additives are flame retardants to prevent the spread of fire. In this study, decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) and fourteen emerging brominated flame retardants (BFRs) were analyzed in indoor dust, air and on the window surface of newly built low-energy preschools to study their occurrence and distribution. BDE-209 and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) were frequently detected in the indoor dust (BDE-209: <4.1-1200 ng/g, DBDPE: <2.2-420 ng/g) and on window surfaces (BDE-209: <1000-20 000 pg/m2 , DBDPE: <34-5900 pg/m2 ) while the other thirteen BFRs were found in low levels (dust: <0.0020-5.2 ng/g, window surface: 0.0078-35 pg/m2 ). In addition, the detection frequencies of BFRs in the indoor air were low in all preschools. Interestingly, the dust levels of BDE-209 and DBDPE were found to be lower in the environmentally certified low-energy preschools, which could be attributed to stricter requirements on the chemical content in building materials and products. However, an increase of some BFR levels in dust was observed which could imply continuous emissions or introduction of new sources.

  • 43.
    Qu, Guangbo
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Liu, Aifeng
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Zhang, Chaoli
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Fu, Jianjie
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Yu, Miao
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Sun, Jianteng
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Zhu, Nali
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Li, Zhuona
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Wei, Guohua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Du, Yuguo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Shi, Jianbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Liu, Sijin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Identification of tetrabromobisphenol A allyl ether and tetrabromobisphenol A 2,3-dibromopropyl ether in the ambient environment near a manufacturing site and in mollusks at a coastal region2013In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 4760-4767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and has been frequently detected in the environment and biota. Recent studies have found that derivatives of TBBPA, such as TBBPA bis(allyl) ether (TBBPA BAE) and TBBPA bis(2,3-dibromopropyl) ether (TBBPA BDBPE) are present in various environmental compartments. In this work, using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS), TBBPA allyl ether (TBBPA AE) and TBBPA 2,3-dibromopropyl ether (TBBPA DBPE) were identified in environmental samples and further confirmed by synthesized standards. Soil, sediment, rice hull, and earthworm samples collected near a BFR manufacturing plant were found to contain these two compounds. In sediments, the concentrations of TBBPA AE and TBBPA DBPE ranged from 1.0 to 346.6 ng/g of dry weight (dw) and from 0.7 to 292.7 ng/g of dw, respectively. TBBPA AE and TBBPA DBPE in earthworm and rice hull samples were similar to soil samples, which ranged from below the method limit of detection (LOD, <0.002 ng/g of dw) to 0.064 ng/g of dw and from below the LOD (<0.008 ng/g of dw) to 0.58 ng/g of dw, respectively. Furthermore, mollusks collected from the Chinese Bohai Sea were used as a bioindicator to investigate the occurrence and distribution of these compounds in the coastal environment. The detection frequencies of TBBPA AE and TBBPA DBPE were 41 and 32%, respectively, and the concentrations ranged from below LOD (<0.003 ng/g of dw) to 0.54 ng/g of dw, with an average of 0.09 ng/g of dw, for TBBPA AE, and from below LOD (<0.008 ng/g of dw) to 1.41 ng/g of dw, with an average of 0.15 ng/g of dw, for TBBPA DBPE.

  • 44.
    Qu, Guangbo
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Shi, Jianbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Fu, Jianjie
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Li, Zhuona
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Pu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Ruan, Ting
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Identification of tetrabromobisphenol A diallyl ether as an emerging neurotoxicant in environmental samples by bioassay-directed fractionation and HPLC-APCI-MS/MS2011In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 45, no 11, p. 5009-5016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been widely used as additives in products to reduce their flammability. Recent findings suggested that some BFRs exhibit neurotoxicity and thus might pose a threat to human health. In this work, a neurotoxicity assay-directed analysis was developed, combining sample cleanup, fractionation, chemical identification, and bioassay. Viability of primary cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) was used to evaluate the neurotoxicity of extracts or separated fractions from environmental samples. Tetrabromobisphenol A diallyl ether (TBBPA DAE) was identified as the causative toxicant in sediment samples collected from a river near a brominated flame retardant (BFR) manufacturing plant in South China. Liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS/MS) was optimized to determine TBBPA DAE levels in the potent fractions and to confirm TBBPA DAE as the key neurotoxicant. On the basis of comparison with the structure of other TBBPA derivatives, the 1-propenyl group in TBBPA DAE appears to be the cause for the neurotoxic potency. The levels of TBBPA DAE in samples along the river were found at up to 49 ng/L for river water, 10,183 ng/g dry weight (dw) in surface sediments, and 42 ng/g dw in soils. According to the distribution of TBBPA DAE in the environmental samples, the manufacturing plant was identified as the release source of TBBPA DAE. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate potential neurotoxicity induced by TBBPA DAE in real environmental samples.

  • 45.
    Ruan, Ting
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Lin, Yongfeng
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Liu, Runzeng
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Identification of novel polyfluorinated ether sulfonates as PFOS alternatives in municipal sewage sludge in China2015In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 49, no 11, p. 6519-6527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 6:2 chlorinated polyfluorinated ether sulfonate (6:2 Cl-PFAES) with the trade name F-53B, is an alternative to perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) in electroplating industry that is uniquely used in China. It was developed as a mist suppressant initially in the 1970s, but the environmental behaviors and potential adverse effects of the 6:2 Cl-PFAES have only recently been investigated. In this work, the occurrence and distribution of perfluoroalkyl sulfonate (PFSA), fluorotelomer sulfonate (FTSA), and PFAES analogues were investigated in municipal sewage sludge samples collected around China. Perfluorobutane, perfluorohexane, perfluorooctane, and perfluorodecanesulfonates, 6:2 and 8:2 FTSAs, and the emerging 6:2 Cl-PFAES were detected. Moreover, 8:2 and 10:2 Cl-PFAESs were identified for the first time as new polyfluorinated contaminants using high resolution mass spectrometry. These fluorinated analytes were further quantified with the aid of commercial and laboratory-purified standards. PFOS was the predominant contaminant with a geometric mean (GM) value of 3.19 ng/g dry weight (d.w.), which was subsequently followed by 6:2 Cl-PFAES and 8:2 Cl-PFAES (GM: 2.15 and 0.50 ng/g d.w., respectively). Both 6:2 and 8:2 Cl-PFAES were positively detected as the major components in the F-53B commercial product, and discrete 6:2 Cl-PFAES/8:2 Cl-PFAES ratios in the product and sludge samples might suggest 8:2 Cl-PFAES had enhanced sorption behavior in the sludge due to the increase in hydrophobicity.

  • 46.
    Ruan, Ting
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Liu, Runzeng
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Fu, Qiang
    China National Environmental Monitoring Center, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Song, Shanjun
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Pu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing , China.
    Teng, Man
    China National Environmental Monitoring Center, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Concentrations and composition profiles of benzotriazole UV stabilizers in municipal sewage sludge in China2012In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 2071-2079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental contamination and fate of benzotriazole UV stabilizers (BZTs) have received increasing attention due to their large production volume and wide usage in various consumer and industrial products. In the present work, 60 municipal sewage sludge samples from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in 33 cities in China were collected to investigate the occurrence and distribution of 9 frequently used BZTs. The most dominant analogue was 2-[3,5-bis(1-methyl-1-phenylethyl)-2-hydroxyphenyl]benzotriazole (UV-234) at a median concentration of 116 ng/g (dry weight) and accounted on average for 27.2% of total BZTs. The abundance was successively followed by 2-(2-hydroxy-5-tert-octylphenyl)benzotriazole (UV-329, average 24.3%), 2-(2-hydroxy-3-tert-butyl-5-methylphenyl)-5-chlorobenzotriazole (UV-326, average 22.2%), 2-(3,5-di-tert-amyl-2-hydroxyphenyl)benzotriazole (UV-328, average 17.7%), and 2-(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)benzotriazole (UV-P, average 6.6%), with median concentrations of 66.8, 67.8, 57.3, and 20.6 ng/g, respectively. 5-Chloro-2-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxyphenyl)benzotriazole (UV-327) and 2-(3-sec-butyl-5-tert-butyl-2-hydroxyphenyl)benzotriazole (UV-350) had low detection frequency, while 2-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxyphenyl)benzotriazole (UV-320) and 2-(5-tert-butyl-2-hydroxyphenyl)benzotriazole (UV-PS) were not detectable in any sample. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the occurrence of UV-234, UV-329, and UV-350 in sewage sludge in China. Significant correlations were found among the BZT concentrations and also with a WWTP characteristic (daily treatment volume). Furthermore, results from degradation prediction and multimedia fate simulation based on a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) model at screening level also implied that the commercial BZT chemicals and their plausible transformation products might be persistent in the environment.

  • 47.
    Ruan, Ting
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Song, Shanjun
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Liu, Runzeng
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Lin, Yongfeng
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Identification and composition of emerging quaternary ammonium compounds in municipal sewage sludge in China2014In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 4289-4297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) have raised considerable attention due to their wide commercial applications and recent discovery of unknown persistent analogues in aqueous environment. In this work, the occurrence and distribution of alkyltrimethylammonium (ATMAC), benzylakyldimethylethylammonium (BAC) and dialkyldimethylammonium (DADMAC) homologues were investigated in fifty-two municipal sewage sludge samples. ATMAC C10-18, BAC C8-18 and paired DADMAC C8:8-C18:18 as well as emerging homologues such as ATMAC-20, 22 and mixed DADMAC-16:18 and 14:16 were present. Furthermore, paired DADMAC-20:20 and mixed DADMAC-14:18, 18:20 were identified for the first time by nontarget qualitative strategies. A triple quadruple mass spectrometer quantification method was also initially verified with the aid of laboratory synthesized standards for the analysis of the mixed DADMACs with no certificated commercial standards currently available. The total concentrations of ATMACs, BACs and DADMACs were in the range of 0.38-293, 0.09-191 and 0.64-344 μg/g dry weight, respectively, and particularly, mixed DADMACs constituted 39 ± 7% of total DADMAC concentrations. The concentrations and profiles of individual homologues further suggested different QAC applications and fate in China. Significant correlations were also found among the concentrations of various QAC homologues as well as wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) characteristics (total organic carbon contents and daily treatment volumes).

  • 48.
    Ruan, Ting
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China.
    Wang, Chang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China.
    Wang, Pu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China.
    Fu, Jianjie
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China.
    Yin, Yongguang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China.
    Qu, Guangbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China.
    Identification and evaluation of a novel heterocyclic brominated flame retardant tris(2,3-dibromopropyl) isocyanurate in environmental matrices near a manufacturing plant in southern China2009In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 43, no 9, p. 3080-3086Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A brominated flame retardant (BFR), hexabrominated heterocyclic tris-(2,3-dibromopropyl) isocyanurate (TBC), was identified,forthe first time, in the natural environment.The chemical was found in river water (2.33-163 ng/L), surface sediments (85.0 ng/g-6.03 microg/g dry weight (dw)), soils (19.6-672 ng/g dw), earthworm (9.75-78.8 ng/g dw), and carp samples (12.0-646 ng/g dw) from a factory-polluted area in southern China. It was found that TBC can strongly adsorb to organic material in sediment, and a trend of decreasing concentration with distance from the source in soil and earthworm samples, combined with calculated Kow (octanol-water partition coefficient) and Koa (octanol-air partition coefficient), suggests its potential ability to undergo regional transportation through dust deposition. Calculated results showed high Kow (log Kow = 7.37) and bioaccumulation factor (BAF) (log BAF = 4.30) of this BFR and indicate that TBC has semivolatile properties and bioaccumulation characteristic in certain biological species. Quantitative structure property relationships (QSPRs) modeling revealed that TBC has Koa (log Koa = 23.68) and Kaw (air-water partition coefficient) (log Kaw = -16.31) values several orders higher than those of other BFRs. The identification of this chemical additive further reminds us that the production and usage of heterocyclic BFRs may cause potential contamination to the surrounding environment

  • 49.
    Ruan, Ting
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Zhang, Qinghua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Ding, Lei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Liu, Jiyan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Wang, Chang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Qu, Guangbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Presence and partitioning behavior of polyfluorinated iodine alkanes in environmental matrices around a fluorochemical manufacturing plant: another possible source for perfluorinated carboxylic acids?2010In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 44, no 15, p. 5755-5761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The indistinct origins of some ubiquitous perfluorinated alkyl acids have attracted great attention in recent decades. In this present work, even-chained polyfluorinated iodides (PFIs), a group of volatile perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), including four perfluorinated iodine alkanes (FIAs) and three polyfluorinated telomer iodides (FTIs) were confirmed to be present in the environment. A wide concentration range was found for FIAs at 1.41 to 3.08x104 pg/L, and for FTIs at 1.39 to 1.32x103 pg/L in the ambient air collected around a fluorochemical manufacturing plant in Shandong province, northern China. Whereas for surface soils, most of these PFIs were below detection limits and only small amounts of analytes with higher carbon chain (such as perfluorododecyl iodide and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl iodide, 16.6-499 pg/g) could be sporadically detected. The presence of the PFIs in different environmental matrices in the investigated area and calculated vapor pressures (0.095-20.4 Torr) verify that they can be considered as volatile organic chemicals and easily be released into the atmosphere. Together with reported degradation ability and long-range transport potential, the identification of these PFIs indicates that unintentional release during the telomer reaction process might also be another route for the formation and distribution of certain polyfluorinated alcohols, aldehydes, and carboxylic acid derivatives under oxidative conditions in the environment.

  • 50.
    Ruan, Ting
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Zhang, Qinghua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Ding, Lei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Wang, Pu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Qu, Guangbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Wang, Chang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Trace determination of airborne polyfluorinated iodine alkanes using multisorbent thermal desorption/gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry2010In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 1217, no 26, p. 4439-4447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry method coupled with multisorbent thermal desorption cartridges has been developed for the determination of volatile neutral polyfluorinated iodine alkanes (PFIs) in airborne samples. It allows, for the first time, simultaneous analysis of four mono-iodized perfluorinated alkanes, three diiodized perfluorinated alkanes and four mono-iodized polyfluorinated telomers in ambient air samples. 3.75 L air sample was passed through a sorbent tube packed with 150 mg of Tenax TA and 200mg of Carbograph 1 TD for analyte adsorption. Important factors during the analysis procedures, such as safe sampling volume, air sampling rate, analyte desorption and transfer strategies, were optimized and good thermal desorption efficiencies were obtained. The method detection limit (MDL) concentration ranged from 0.04 pg/L for 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorododecyl iodide to 1.2 pg/L for perfluorohexyl iodide, and instrument response of a seven-point calibration was linear in the range of 10-1000 pg. Travel spike recoveries ranged from 83% to 116%. Small variabilities of less than 36% were obtained near the MDLs and the differences between triplicates were even smaller (2.1-7.3%) at 200 pg spiked level. The method was successfully applied to analyze ambient air samples collected near a point source, and five PFIs were identified (10.8-85.0 pg/L), with none of the analytes detectable at the background site.

123 1 - 50 of 113
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