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  • 1. Duhart, Frédéric
    et al.
    Haid, Oliver Meinhardt
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Sobre la pizza: identificación y apropiación alimenticias en el mundo contemporáneo2006In: Ámbitos. Revista de estudios de ciencias sociales y humanidades, ISSN 1575-2100, no 15, p. 63-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg
    et al.
    Health Faculty, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Justesen, L.
    Department of Nutrition and Midwifery, Metropolitan University College, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wendin, Karin
    The Research Group MEAL - Food and Meal for Everyday Life, Food and Meal Science, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Olsson, V.
    The Research Group MEAL - Food and Meal for Everyday Life, Food and Meal Science, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Scander, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Junttila, M.
    School of Business, JAMK University of Applied Sciences, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Mertanen, Enni
    School of Business, JAMK University of Applied Sciences, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Research based educations for future foodscapes: the New NordicFood4Many experience2015In: Culinary Arts and Sciences IX, 2015, Vol. IX, p. 56-68Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Nilsen, Bente B.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science. Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Oslo and Akershus University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science. Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Monteagudo, Celia
    Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Research Group Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Scander, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Werner, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts and Meal Sciences, Örebro University, Grythyttan, Sweden.
    Reported habitual intake of breakfast and selected foods in relation to overweight status among seven-to nine-year-old Swedish children2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 886-894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the reported frequency of breakfast intake and selected food and beverages in the investigated group of Swedish children in comparison with recommended intakes. Furthermore, the study analyses these food habits and some demographic and lifestyle factors in relation to overweight and obesity.

    Methods: This cross-sectional study builds on data collected in 2008 and 2010. Measured anthropometric data and parent questionnaire data were collected. A total of 2620 Swedish children (52.1% boys) aged seven to nine years were included.

    Results: The majority of parents reported that their children (95.4%) had breakfast every day. The majority of children had fresh fruit (84.7%) and vegetables (83.9%) most days a week. Only 1.6% of the children were reported to have fast food and 6.0% to have sugar containing soft drinks, four days a week or more. The prevalence of overweight including obesity (OW/OB) was 17.8% for boys, 18.6% for girls. The odds of being OW/OB was higher among those not having breakfast every day (odds ratio (OR) 1.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-2.96), drinking diet soft drink (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.52-4.42) and skimmed/semi-skimmed milk (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.37-2.36) four days a week or more. Parents being overweight and having low education levels were also related to a higher risk of their children being overweight.

    Conclusions: The parental reports of children's food habits pointed at favourable eating patterns for most investigated children. Breakfast skipping, diet soft drinks and low-fat milk consumption were more frequent among OW/OB children. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the causal relationships.

  • 4. Sarlöv-Herlin, Ingrid
    et al.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Storstadsbornas matval formar landsbygdens landskap2008In: Ska hela Sverige leva? / [ed] Birgitta Johansson, Stockholm: Formas , 2008, p. 299-310Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Scander, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Energy contribution patterns from drink and food in Riksmaten2015In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 67, no Suppl. 1, p. 200-200Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Since appetite control works differently in fluid and solid intake we wanted to analyse the energy contribution from those two types of energy sources.

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the beverage contribution of energy in Swedish meals, according to data from the National Survey (Riksmaten 2010-2011).

    Method / Design: Around 1800 adult Swedes reported dietary intake data for four consecutive days - specified by portion size, type of meal, time point, day of the week and venue. The intake was reported in a web-based food diary. Energy contribution from drinks and food respectively was analysed, by weekday and type of meal, in regards to sugar containing drinks and those containing alcohol.

    Results: The results show that the reported consumption of al-cohol was highest at home on weekends. The contribution of energy from drinks could be rather high, especially at dinner on Friday and Saturday night. The mean energy contribution from drinks in the daily intake was 235 kcal ± 231 (SD). This corresponds to 11.8 ± 10.8 (SD) energy percent (E%), varying from 9.1 (Wednesday) to 17.1 (Satur-day) E%. Problems in the interpretation of the data that need to be closely monitored are for example portion size, reluctance to report sweet and alcohol-containing drinks, difficulties in estimating dilution of different types of cordial and alcohol content in wine and beer.

    Conclusions: Drinks were contributing substantially to the total energy intake over the day. The sweet and alcoholic drinks are im-portant in this regard, but also juices and coffee drinks. The problems in regards to the increased alcohol content of beer and red wine on the Swedish market will be further discussed with the Swedish Food Administration, to encourage development of a more comprehensive set of alternatives in the database

  • 6.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Besticklådan tränar oss för bordets balett2013In: GUIDE till Årets Svenska Måltidslitteratur 2013 / [ed] Carl Jan Granqvist, Birgit Hemberg, Christina Möller, Dick Norberg, Barbro Stanley, Karsten Thurfjell, Ann Häppich, Grythyttan: Måltidsakademiens förlag i Grythyttan AB , 2013, p. 41-43Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Bordsplacering2008In: Service på restaurang / [ed] Lena Mossberg, Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2008, p. 25-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Brutna och levande smaklinjer: om den praktiska kunskapens betydelse för vetenskaplig forskning om äldre måltidskultur2004Other (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Brännvinsbordet: smakintensitet från lagringens hyllor2006In: Årets svenska måltidslitteratur 2006 / [ed] Barbro Stanley, Ann Häppich, Grythyttan: Måltidens hus i Norden , 2006, p. 44-46Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Brödets geografi: 2008In: Forskning och framsteg, ISSN 0015-7937, no 1, p. 18-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    City branding through food culture: insights from the regional branding level2011In: City branding: theory and cases / [ed] Keith Dinnie, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, p. 62-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Crispbread dәn tutmuş ciabatta ya qәdәr2006In: Kulina Elmi-Praktiki Jurnal, Vol. 18, p. 22-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Danish food culture: [Recension av Madkultur – opbrud og tradition]2004In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, p. 200-201Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Den politiska måltiden2004In: Tvärsnitt, ISSN 0348-7997, no 4, p. 57-60Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Den politiska måltiden: ärebetygelse och problemlösare2004In: Tid för måltidskunskap: En vänbok till Birgitta Ulmander / [ed] Gustafsson, Inga-Britt, Strömberg, Ulla-Britt, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2004, p. 119-127Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Den röda nationaldagens mat2005In: Årets svenska måltidslitteratur 2005, Grythyttan: Måltidens hus i Norden , 2005, p. 42-43Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    En smak av Sverige: recept för många gäster [av Inger Claesson Wästberg och Olle Wästberg]2005In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 3, p. 179-180Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    En smakbit av landskapet: sinnesförnimmelser och platsegenskaper i den lokala och regionala måltidslitteraturen 20032005In: Hörsel och lyssnande: ett seminarium om människans hörselsinne, dess funktion och betydelse, januari 2004 / [ed] Lisbeth Axelsson, Örebro: Örebro universitetsbibliotek , 2005, p. 57-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Femaspektsmodellen: en metod att undersöka den lokala måltidskulturens revitalisering2006In: Festmåltid och vardagsmat: föredrag vid ett symposium till Anders Salomonssons minne 3–4 juni 2005 / [ed] Mats Hellspong, Uppsala: Kungl. Gustav Adolfs Akademien för svensk folkkultur , 2006, p. 103-112Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    From crispbread to ciabatta2005In: Culinary cultures of Europe: identity, diversity and dialogue / [ed] Darra Goldstein, Kathrin Merkle, Strasbourg: Council of Europe Publishing , 2005, p. 423-434Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    God smak, dålig smak och avsmak: om den kulturella och korrekta smaken2008In: Smaksinnet och den goda smaken: ett seminarium om människans smaksinne : [januari 2005] / [ed] Marieanne Alsne, Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2008, p. 51-58Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Historical aspects of commensality during meals in Europe2015In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 67, no Suppl. 1, p. 13-14Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Who are we eating with? There are always companions to relate to in a meal, both to those who are present and they who are on another place or even in a past history. The choice of food and beverages at the market, the selection of flavour and texture combinations, coo-king processes and serving the food with different utensils are all originating from a cultural, religious or social context. Commensality therefore seems to not only to be eating together at the same table but also eating with non-present table guests and relations.

    During the 20th century in Sweden the eating context and commensality has changed due to urbanization, changing of how families are created, education levels and gender equality. An increased distance between living place and work has made commuting necessary, which effects the commensality at home but also how meals are shared within the work team you belong to. In Sweden’s major cities it is today often more common to live as single but is a single person eating done alone or do you take part of an immaterial commensality when you live by yourself ? The societal changes give an indication that commensality is changing over time and this is probably an expression of values related to the present time and trends (Zeitgeist). The current use of “communal tables” at restaurants might illustrate a need for socializing when eating and also make it easier to go to restaurants when single.

    In my presentation I will discuss the question of foods’, beverages’ and the meals’ inner cultural values which can be observed in Sweden the last hundred years and how they interact with the purpose of eating. I will also discuss eating events and raise the question if it is actually the commensality we are consuming, and not the food.

  • 23.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Historiebok för kakälskare [av Dick Harrison och Eva Helen Ulvros]2003In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 4, p. 255-256Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Knyt tallriken till marken: ursprungsgestaltning i den kommersiella restaurangen2006In: Mat: genealogi och gestaltning / [ed] Anna Burstedt, Cecilia Fredriksson, Håkan Jönsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2006, p. 55-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Kok-konsten som vetenskap och konst [av Charles Emil Hagdahl]2005In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 1, p. 45-46Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Känslan som restaurangupplevelse: symbolik och estetik i den kommersiella måltiden2005In: Kulturstudier i Sverige: nationell forskarkonferens, Norrköping 13-15 juni, 2005, Norrköping, Sweden / [ed] Bodil Axelsson, Johan Fornäs, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2005, p. 1015-1026Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Liselotte Bergström: Gräddat – Brödkultur under järnåldern i östra Mälardalen. Avhandlingsanmälan2009In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 1, p. 46-49Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Maten ger oss mycket mer än bara näring2011In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 20 oktoberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    MÅLTIDENS DAG

    Alltför länge har vi bortsett från att måltiden är en gestaltning av mänskliga värden. Det är dags att gastronomin ges sin berättigade plats bland andra kulturyttringar.

  • 29.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Matkulturen i Tornedalen2008In: Kangos: framtidslandet / [ed] Rolf Berggård, Christer Frånlund, Uppsala: Uppsala Publishing House , 2008, p. 95-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Matrike Norrland: norrländska mattraditioner och måltidsseder med nya och gamla recept [av Kurt Genrup och Ulla Tham]2003In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 3, p. 179-181Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Mediterranean food and its influences abroad2005In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 35, p. 100-101Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Modern European political food culture: in search of the optimal balance of food and political factors2005In: Etnološka istraživanja : Ethnological Researches, ISSN 0351-4323, Vol. 1, no 10, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meetings with other politicians, business people and NGO representatives, and the discussion of ideas on how to formulate new policies constitute a major part of politicians’ work in Europe today. Many meetings take place during meals; which may be ceremonial, but are often informal. The food served during these meals is commonly carefully selected to support the political strategy of the meeting. The dayto-day political meal, with its strong functional element, has until now been of little interest to the ethnological research tradition. The aim of this study is to analyse how a group of politicians in contemporary Sweden use meals in their daily work, how they choose food in relation to the purpose of the meeting, and what role they give the meal in political discussions and negotiations. The method used is semi-structured interviews with ten Swedish politicians; ministers and permanent secretaries (both politically appointed in Sweden).The politicians explained how they select topics that should be discussed during the formal meeting, and which topics might better be discusse dduring the meal following the meeting. The analysis showedthat several ministers and permanent secretaries use the meal as a political tool, and that there is a perceived benefit for those who use the meal in a strategic way. The politicians’ interest in food can be seen as a reflection of post-modern society’s interest in food and meal culture.

  • 33.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Måltidskultur – värde och form för kulturell evolution?2007In: Den medvetna måltidskunskapen: en vänbok till Inga-Britt Gustafsson / [ed] Richard Tellström, Lena Mossberg, Inger M. Jonsson, Örebro: Örebro universitetsbibliotek , 2007, p. 189-198Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Norwegian Food Culture [av Virginie Amilien, Erling Krogh (red)]2008In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 38, p. 195-196Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    När folkhemmet fylldes med smörgåsbord: Under Strecket, Svenska Dagbladet, 5 juni 20112011In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 5 juniArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    När folkhemmet fylldes med smörgåsbord

    SVENSKA KÖKET. Redan på 1730-talet grillade man shish kebab-spett i Sverige. Det var först under 1800-talet som man började betrakta vissa maträtter som typiska för den ena eller andra nationen, och då gällde det att framhäva det unika framför det gemensamma.

  • 36.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pizzasallad: en riktigt ursvensk matkulturell egenhet2005In: Gastronomisk kalender: Gastronomiska Akademiens årsbok. 2006, Stockholm: Prisma , 2005, p. 123-129Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Politisk gastronomi - om måltiden som politiskt medel2004In: Gastronomisk kalender, Stokholm: Prisma , 2004, Vol. 43, p. 77-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Potatisens smakord: en pilotstudie om hur potatissmak kan beskrivas2008Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    På julbordet samlas de värden vi värnar om2012In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 24 december, p. 14-14Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kanske tänker man sig att rätterna på det typiska julbordet har varit oförändrade sedan urminnes tider, men det mesta gjorde entré först på 1900-talet. Varje ny generation sätter sin prägel på julmaten och omdefinierar traditionerna.

  • 40.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Slagfältsgastronomi: oupptäckt motiv i 1600-talets militära planscher2010In: Guide till Årets svenska måltidslitteratur 2010 / [ed] Carl Jan Granqvist, Birgit Hemberg, Christina Möller, Dick Norberg, Barbro Stanley, Karsten Thurfjell, Ann Häppich, Grythyttan: Måltidsakademiens förlag i Grythyttan AB , 2010, p. 37-39Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Surdegen som inte är någon surdeg: Understreckare i Svenska Dagbladet2010In: Svenska Dagbladet, no 1 aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Surdegen som inte är någon surdeg

    VÄRDEMARKÖR Det osyrade brödets högtid är här. I kristen tradition står ofta det osyrade brödet för det goda och heliga, och det syrade för något befläckat. Men surdegen häver sig gång på gång som ett kulturellt ställningstagande.

  • 42.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Susanna Heldt Cassel: Att tillaga en region. Den regionala maten i representationer och praktik. Exemplet Skärgårdssmak2004In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 2, p. 98-100Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    The construction of food and meal culture for political and commercial ends: EU-summits, rural businesses and World Exhibitions2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines how cultural values of food and meal culture were expressed and used by professional agents. The overall aim was to analyse and synthesise the interpretation and creation by professionals in commercial food and meal production of what they defined as a local, regional or national food and meal culture. Four groups of professional agents were interviewed on their use of food and meal culture as cultural value and form when: organising meals for ministerial meetings during Sweden’s first tenure of the rotating European Union presidency (chairmanship) in 2001 (political civil servants, meal editors, chefs and sponsors), producing and marketing food and meals in rural areas (restaurateurs, food producers and event organisers), branding food products with a place-related origin (marketing consultants), and when food products and meals were deployed in the international political arena of world exhibitions, 1851–2005 (political civil servants). Data was gathered using qualitative methods: semi-structured interviews, various observation techniques and analysis of contemporary and historical government and commercial documents. The analytical methods used were based on how agents in a field interact to negotiate the values significant in the field, and on how the use of cultural form as symbol affects the presentation. Culinary arts and meal science methodology as followed using ethnological research techniques. The results showed that food and meal culture for commercial and political use was carefully shaped to achieve specific professional goals: to be bought or accepted by the customer or citizen. Meals for EU ministers were designed to match those visitors’ apprehensions of high-status Swedish food and of local food and meal culture. In marketing situations, food product brands were created and shaped to match consumer ideas of place-related origin and ‘genuineness’. At world exhibitions, food and meals were presented as entertainment based on stereotypes of pre-existing food and meal culture. Concepts of the ‘commercial’ and ‘political’ dimensions became cultural values affecting the cultural form, demonstrating that in these cases culture was manufactured to be acceptable to its consumers.

    List of papers
    1. Food culture as a political tool: meal construction during the Swedish EU-chairmanship 2001
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food culture as a political tool: meal construction during the Swedish EU-chairmanship 2001
    2003 (English)In: Food Service Technology, ISSN 1471-5732, E-ISSN 1471-5740, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyse how the European Union (EU) ministerial meals during Sweden's EU-chairmanship 2001 were devised, and how the official representatives of Sweden chose to interpret and present a national image based on local and regional food identities. The manufacture of the Swedish culinary profile was compared with the same process during Finland's EU-chairmanship 1999 and Denmark's EU-chairmanship 2002. Sixteen professionals involved in the decision-making process in the three countries were interviewed in 2001 and 2002. The regional food profile chosen in Sweden supported different political goals such as the idea of the production of local food and local economic development. Local and regional food culture had a broad and open definition, but the decisions as to what constituted local and regional food culture as served at the ministerial meals were made at the top political level. The central decision-making process transformed the concept of a typical local and regional food culture into a political tool serving political goals, with the end product presented at different EU-ministerial meals.

    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3107 (URN)10.1046/j.1471-5740.2003.00069.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-09-07 Created: 2006-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Local food cultures in the Swedish rural economy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local food cultures in the Swedish rural economy
    2005 (English)In: Sociologia Ruralis, ISSN 0038-0199, E-ISSN 1467-9523, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 346-359Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A rising interest in the commercial benefits of locally and regionally connoted food culture for rural development is notable in Sweden. Local and regional food culture is used as a tool both to encourage the rural economy, but also to fulfil urban residents' dreams of an authentic rural idyll. A qualitative study of a government project involving ten rural food businesses was performed to analyse how local food culture was used as a business advantage. The managers were interviewed and their conceptions analysed using company documents, observational notes and photographs. The results revealed that the managers do use food culture to gain a competitive advantage. They produce only those products that signal perceived 'good taste' and those that best reflect urban customers' ideas of rurality. It is also important to satisfy their kitchen staff's demands to work with developing urban food trends, otherwise the managers risk losing skilled staff. Rural customers are of minor day-to-day economic value, except when using the restaurant on festive occasions. But on those occasions, rural customers demand meals prepared in an urban classical style, not the local and regional food culture they eat at home. The most advantageous local and regional food culture for rural development is therefore that which best combines the urban ideal of the countryside, authentic rural products, and the rural ideal of urban classical cuisine.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford: Blackwell, 2005
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3108 (URN)10.1111/j.1467-9523.2005.00309.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-09-07 Created: 2006-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Consuming heritage: the use of local food culture in branding
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consuming heritage: the use of local food culture in branding
    2006 (English)In: Place Branding, ISSN 1744-070X, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 130-143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper was to examine how specialised food marketing consultants interpret local and regional food culture and locality in branding food products to match consumer ideals. Interview data were collected from eight food marketing consultants. The interviews were conducted in two parts: semi-structured interviews, followed by confrontation with actual 'stimulus products'. The data were analysed using current theories on country-of-origin. Results indicate that an association to an alleged origin in a local or regional food culture is seen as an attractive way to interest the urban consumer in new food product brands. The marketing consultants conceive of local and regional food culture as an invention to reflect urban consumers' ideas of the countryside.

    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3109 (URN)10.1057/palgrave.pb.5990051 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-09-07 Created: 2006-09-07 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    4. Constructed national food and meal archetypes at international exhibitions from Paris 1867 to Aichi 2005
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constructed national food and meal archetypes at international exhibitions from Paris 1867 to Aichi 2005
    2008 (English)In: National Identities, ISSN 1460-8944, E-ISSN 1469-9907, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 313-327Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the selection of food culture objects by the Swedish state for presentation at the international exhibitions (world fairs) of 1851 to 2005, and in particular the methodologies used by Swedish National Exhibition Committees to select representative national food culture to be served in national exhibition arenas. The material used consists of government documents from 1846 to 2000, semi-structured interviews of six civil servants responsible for the joint Scandinavian pavilion at the Aichi International Exhibition in 2005 (Japan), field diary notes and photographs from observations, and exhibition brochures. The process of political selection in creating a representative national food cultural heritage, with the aim of promoting the sale of national produce and a positive reputation abroad, as well as of fostering national pride at home, is delineated. The importance of economic and marketing values in shaping a national cultural form designed as a symbol of the nation is examined, and the question of whose food cultures are selected for inclusion and whose are excluded are addressed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Routledge, 2008
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3110 (URN)10.1080/14608940802249957 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-09-07 Created: 2006-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
  • 44.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Tyvärr det är fullt!: Restaurangen som arena för en offentlig gemenskap2009In: Gastronomisk forskning / [ed] Christina Fjellström, Stockholm: Gastronomiska akademien , 2009, p. 123-133Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Ulrica Söderlind: Skrovmål - Kosthållning och matlagning i den svenska flottan från 1500-tal till 1700-tal2007In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 4, p. 233-235Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    UNDER STRECKET  – Besticklådan tränar oss för bordets balett2013In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 25 juni, p. 27-27Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I en nyutkommen studie frågar Bee Wilson hur kökets föremål påverkar vår upplevelse av det vi äter. Gaffeln är en nykomling på matbordet, introducerad på 1400-talet, när man hade börjat tröttna på klibbig afingrar.

  • 47.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Ursprung som krydda: kommersiell gestaltning i restaurangmiljön av en måltidskultur och dess geografiska hemvist2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Tellström, Richard
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Food culture as a political tool: meal construction during the Swedish EU chairmanship 20012003In: Culinary arts and sciences IV: global and national perspectives / [ed] John S. A. Edwards, Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Bournemouth: Worshipful Company of Cooks Research Centre at Bournemouth University , 2003, p. 341-352Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Tellström, Richard
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Food culture as a political tool: meal construction during the Swedish EU-chairmanship 20012003In: Food Service Technology, ISSN 1471-5732, E-ISSN 1471-5740, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyse how the European Union (EU) ministerial meals during Sweden's EU-chairmanship 2001 were devised, and how the official representatives of Sweden chose to interpret and present a national image based on local and regional food identities. The manufacture of the Swedish culinary profile was compared with the same process during Finland's EU-chairmanship 1999 and Denmark's EU-chairmanship 2002. Sixteen professionals involved in the decision-making process in the three countries were interviewed in 2001 and 2002. The regional food profile chosen in Sweden supported different political goals such as the idea of the production of local food and local economic development. Local and regional food culture had a broad and open definition, but the decisions as to what constituted local and regional food culture as served at the ministerial meals were made at the top political level. The central decision-making process transformed the concept of a typical local and regional food culture into a political tool serving political goals, with the end product presented at different EU-ministerial meals.

  • 50.
    Tellström, Richard
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Lindgren, Håkan
    Constructed national food and meal archetypes at international exhibitions from Paris 1867 to Aichi 20052008In: National Identities, ISSN 1460-8944, E-ISSN 1469-9907, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 313-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the selection of food culture objects by the Swedish state for presentation at the international exhibitions (world fairs) of 1851 to 2005, and in particular the methodologies used by Swedish National Exhibition Committees to select representative national food culture to be served in national exhibition arenas. The material used consists of government documents from 1846 to 2000, semi-structured interviews of six civil servants responsible for the joint Scandinavian pavilion at the Aichi International Exhibition in 2005 (Japan), field diary notes and photographs from observations, and exhibition brochures. The process of political selection in creating a representative national food cultural heritage, with the aim of promoting the sale of national produce and a positive reputation abroad, as well as of fostering national pride at home, is delineated. The importance of economic and marketing values in shaping a national cultural form designed as a symbol of the nation is examined, and the question of whose food cultures are selected for inclusion and whose are excluded are addressed.

12 1 - 50 of 56
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