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  • 1.
    Azad, Azade
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Christianson, Sven-Åke
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Selenius, Heidi
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Children's reporting patterns after witnessing homicidal violence: the effect of repeated experience and repeated interviews2014In: Psychology, Crime and Law, ISSN 1068-316X, E-ISSN 1477-2744, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 407-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For both legal and clinical purposes, it is of importance to study children's memories and reports of stressful events. The present study investigated the reporting patterns of 83 children who had witnessed homicidal violence, which is considered to be a highly stressful experience. More specifically, we explored the possible effects of prior violence exposure and of repeated questioning on the amount of details reported. Results showed that the majority of children provided detailed reports about the homicidal violence they had witnessed, including details concerning what happened before, during, and after the violent act. The children provided detailed and vivid testimonies from their experiences, whether they witnessed the event for the first time or had prior experience of witnessing severe violence against the victim by the perpetrator. Children with no prior experience of repeated violence who underwent repeated interviews provided more details than those interviewed once. The present data indicate that children are competent witnesses when questioned in legal contexts after having been exposed to extremely stressful events. These findings have implications for research related to children's memories and reporting of traumatic experiences, as well as practical implications for future treatment and evaluation of children's testimonies.

  • 2.
    Christianson, Sven Å.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Azad, Azade
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leander, Lina
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Selenius, Heidi
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Children as witnesses to homicidal violence: What they remember and report2013In: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, ISSN 1321-8719, E-ISSN 1934-1687, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 366-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated how 96 children who have witnessed homicidal violence remember and report their experiences. The aims of the study were to describe the children’s reporting pattern and to investigate background factors that could affectthe children’s reporting. Police interviews with the children were analysed regarding theamount and type of information reported, as well as frequency of denial, withholding and claims of memory loss. Results showed that the majority of children provided detailed reports about the homicidal violence they had witnessed, including critical details about the abuse. Results also revealed that the child’s relationship to theperpetrator or the victim did not affect the children’s reporting pattern, indicating thatthe children’s willingness to report exceeds strong impact factors such as loyaltyconflicts. These findings are applicable in different legal contexts dealing with child witnesses and can be used as guidance when interviewing children and evaluating theirtestimony.

  • 3. McEwan, T.E.
    et al.
    Bateson, S.
    Pettersson, J.
    Selenius, Heidi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Strand, Susanne
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Enhancing Police Responses to Family Violence: A law enforcement and public health partnership2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Petersson, Joakim
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Strand, Susanne
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Selenius, Heidi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Risk factors for intimate partner violence: A comparison of antisocial and family-only perpetrators2019In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 219-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Subtyping male perpetrators of intimate partner violence (IPV) based ontheir generality of violence could facilitate the difficult task of matchingperpetrator subtype with efficient risk management strategies. As such, theaim of the present study was to compare antisocial and family-only maleperpetrators of interpersonal violence in terms of (a) demographic andlegal characteristics, (b) risk factors for violence, and (c) assessed risk andthe importance of specific risk factors for violence. A quantitative designwas used in this retrospective register study on data obtained from theSwedish police. Risk assessments performed with the Swedish version ofthe Brief Spousal Assault Form for the Evaluation of Risk (B-SAFER) andpolice registers were used. A sample of 657 male alleged IPV perpetratorswere classified as antisocial (n = 341) or family-only (n = 316) based on theirgenerality of violence. The results showed that the antisocial perpetratorswere significantly younger, as well as more psychologically abusive. Antisocialperpetrators also had significantly more present risk factors for IPV, and wereassessed with a significantly higher risk for acute and severe or deadly IPV, compared with the family-only perpetrators. The subtypes also evidencedunique risk factors with a significant impact on elevated risk for acute andsevere or deadly such violence. Key findings in the present study concernedthe subtypes evidencing unique risk factors increasing the risk for acute andsevere or deadly IPV. Major implications of this study include the findings ofsuch unique “red flag” risk factors for each subtype. To prevent future IPV,it is vital for the risk assessor to be aware of these red flags when makingdecisions about risk, as well as risk management strategies.

  • 5.
    Petersson, Joakim
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Strand, Susanne
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Storey, Jennifer E.
    Selenius, Heidi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Fröberg, Sofi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Implementing effective police risk assessment and management for family violence2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Division of Biological Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Dåderman, Aanna Maria
    Department of Psychology, Division of Biological Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden; Department of NEUROTEC, Division of Forensic Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hellström, Åke
    Department of Psychology, Division of Biological Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Memory performance in dyslexic male juvenile delinquents convicted of severe offences does not differ from that in dyslexic male junior college students2006In: World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 1562-2975, E-ISSN 1814-1412, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 41-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There are different research approaches regarding the causes and possible overrepresentation of dyslexia in criminals. One approach focuses on sociological explanations such as under-stimulation at home, while another focuses on the importance of cognitive neurobiological dysfunctions. In several studies, poor memory for digits and poor verbal learning ability have been found in non-criminal dyslexics.

    AIM: To compare memory performance in two groups of dyslexics, namely, juvenile delinquents and junior college students, in order to discuss their dyslexic problems in the light of sociocultural and cognitive neurobiological approaches.

    PARTICIPANTS: Two groups of male adolescent dyslexics: 11 juvenile delinquents (mean age 18.55 years, SD = 2.07), all of them convicted for severe offences, and 11 junior college students (mean age 17.09 years, SD = 0.83).

    RESULTS: Matched-samples t-tests indicate that there is no difference in memory performance between the two different groups of dyslexics, which supports the accuracy of the diagnoses of dyslexia in the group of juvenile delinquents.

    CONCLUSIONS: The present results show that the memory performance of dyslexic juvenile delinquents does not differ from that of dyslexic junior college students. A sociocultural approach, therefore, cannot plausibly explain the high prevalence of reading and writing difficulties among juvenile delinquents.

  • 7.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dåderman, Anna M.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wirsén Meurling, Ann
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Levander, Sten
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Assessment of dyslexia in a group of male offenders with immigrant backgrounds undergoing a forensic psychiatric investigation2006In: Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, ISSN 1478-9949, E-ISSN 1478-9957, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is known that offenders with immigrant backgrounds are over-represented in criminal as well as forensic psychiatric populations and that the prevalence of dyslexia among prisoners with Swedish as a native language is much higher than in the general population in Sweden. The aim of this study was to diagnose dyslexia in a sample of 23 male offenders with immigrant backgrounds undergoing a forensic psychiatric investigation with the objective to discuss the appropriateness of a commonly used assessment procedure in accordance with DSM-IV. Dyslexia was diagnosed individually; the participants took reading and writing tests, as well as intelligence and neuropsychological tests. Nine out of 23 participants (39%) were diagnosed as having dyslexia. Thus, dyslexia seems to be common among male offenders with immigrant backgrounds undergoing FPI, and for that reason it is important to investigate their reading and writing abilities. Dyslexia is regarded as a functional impairment in Sweden, and therefore all offenders with dyslexia undergoing a forensic psychiatric investigation, irrespective of their background, should receive help with the legal procedure, for example their crime files and police investigation documents should be read to them. We conclude that in addition to the criteria in DSM-IV the assessment procedure should be extended with phonological tests.

  • 8.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Hellström, Åke
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dyslexia Prevalence in Forensic Psychiatric Patients: Dependence on Criteria and Background Factors2015In: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, ISSN 1321-8719, E-ISSN 1934-1687, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 586-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on dyslexia in forensic psychiatric patients is limited, and therefore one aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of dyslexia in a sample of forensic psychiatric patients by using different criteria. Another aim was to investigate how phonological-processing skills in these patients might be related to disadvantageous background factors and poor reading habits. Forensic psychiatric patients performed reading, writing and intelligence tests, as well as a battery of phonological processing tasks. They were also interviewed about reading habits and literacy conditions in their childhood homes. Data regarding the patients’ dyslexia diagnoses and backgrounds were collected from forensic psychiatric investigations and patient records. The results showed that 11–53% of the patients met the discrepancy criteria for dyslexia, whereas 50% fulfilled the phonological core deficit criterion. Neither disadvantageous background factors nor reading habits were related to phonological-processing skills.

  • 9.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hellström, Åke
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Belfrage, Henrik
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden; Forensic Psychiatric Centre, Sundsvall, Sweden .
    Aggression and Risk of Future Violence in Forensic Psychiatric Patients with and without Dyslexia2011In: Dyslexia, ISSN 1076-9242, E-ISSN 1099-0909, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 201-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dyslexia does not cause criminal behaviour, but it may worsen aggressive behaviour tendencies. In this study, aggressive behaviour and risk of future violence were compared between forensic psychiatric patients with and without dyslexia. Dyslexia was assessed using the Swedish phonological processing battery 'The Pigeon'. The patients filled in the Aggression Questionnaire, and trained assessors performed the risk assessments using HCR-20 version 2. Patients with dyslexia self-reported more aggressive behaviour compared with those without dyslexia. There was only a nearly significant tendency (p = 0.06) for the patients with dyslexia to receive higher scores in the HCR-20 compared with the patients without dyslexia, and phonological processing skills did not significantly predict aggression or risk of future violence. However, regression analyses demonstrated that poor phonological processing skills are a significant predictor of anger, which in turn significantly predicts risk of future violence.

  • 10.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Leppänen Östman, Sari
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Strand, Susanne
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Self-harm as a risk factor for inpatient aggression among women admitted to forensic psychiatric care2016In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 70, no 7, p. 554-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Inpatient aggression among female forensic psychiatric patients has been shown to be associated with self-harm, that is considered to be a historical risk factor for violence. Research on associations between previous or current self-harm and different types of inpatient aggression is missing.

    Aim: The aim of this register study was to investigate the prevalence of self-harm and the type of inpatient aggression among female forensic psychiatric inpatients, and to study whether the patients’ self-harm before and/or during forensic psychiatric care is a risk factor for inpatient aggression.

    Methods: Female forensic psychiatric patients (N=130) from a high security hospital were included.

    Results: The results showed that 88% of the female patients had self-harmed at least once during their life and 57% had been physically and/or verbally aggressive towards staff or other patients while in care at the hospital. Self-harm before admission to the current forensic psychiatric care or repeated selfharm were not significantly associated with inpatient aggression, whereas self-harm during care was significantly associated with physical and verbal aggression directed at staff.

    Conclusions: These results pointed towards self-harm being a dynamic risk factor rather than a historical risk factor for inpatient aggression among female forensic psychiatric patients. Whether self-harm is an individual risk factor or a part of the clinical risk factor ‘Symptom of major mental illness’ within the HCR-20V3 must be further explored among women. Thus, addressing self-harm committed by female patients during forensic psychiatric care seems to be important in risk assessments and the management of violence, especially in reducing violence against staff in high-security forensic psychiatric services.

  • 11.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strand, Susanne
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Experiences of self-injury and aggression among women admitted to forensic psychiatric care2017In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 304-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Self-injury and institutional violence are well-known characteristics of female forensic psychiatric patients, but research on patients' experiences of these behaviours is limited.

    Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate how female forensic psychiatric patients describe their self-injury and aggression.

    Methods: The authors performed qualitative in-depth interviews with 13 female forensic psychiatric inpatients. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis.

    Results: The analysis resulted in three themes describing the process of handling negative thoughts and emotions by using self-injury or aggression towards others and thereby experiencing satisfaction. Both self-injury and aggression were experienced as strategies for emotional regulation. The forensic psychiatric care was perceived as important for the women in developing less harmful strategies for coping with negative thoughts and emotions instead of injuring themselves or others.

    Conclusions: Self-injury and aggression are often risk-assessed separately, but results from the present study suggest that these behaviours need a more holistic approach.

  • 12.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Strand, Susanne
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden; Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Institutional violence and self harm2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Strand, Susanne
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden; Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Reconvictions among forensic psychiatric patients being discharged or transferred from a high security psychiatric hospital2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Strand, Susanne
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden; Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Self-harm and aggression2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Strand, Susanne
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden; Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Superficiality in forensic psychiatric patients is related to superior phonological, semantic and syntactic skills2015In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 69, no 5, p. 392-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Psychopaths are reported to have unusual language processing, and they have beensuggested to have better phonological awareness than do non-psychopaths. Phonologicalprocessing skills have not been studied among psychopathic persons, and it is unclear how thedegree of psychopathy is related to such skills.

    Aims: One aim of the present study was toinvestigate this relationship. An additional aim was to investigate how affective-interpersonaltraits and antisocial lifestyle of psychopaths are related to verbal skills such as reading andspelling, as well as to phonological processing skills.

    Material and methods: Forty (80% male)forensic psychiatric patients participated. They were all Swedish speaking and their mean agewas 36 years. The patients performed reading and spelling tests as well as a battery of tasksassessing phonological processing. The patients were also assessed using the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV).

    Results: The patients’ scores on Factor 1 (affective andinterpersonal traits) of the PCL:SV were significantly positively correlated with results on decoding of sentences and reading speed tests as well as with phonological processing skills. However, the only item that was significantly related to phonological processing skills as wellas semantic and syntactic skills was Superficial.

    Conclusions: In general, psychopaths easilyshift conversational topics, and it may be due to a certain cognitive skill such as rapidautomatized naming. We suggest that further studies focus on rapid automatized naming inpsychopaths to clarify whether their superficial character might be related to rapid naming.

  • 16.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Strand, Susanne
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden; Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science at Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Validation of the risk factors of the Female Additional Manual to the HCR-20 in a Swedish context, with a specific focus on psychopathy2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Strand, Susanne
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Childhood maltreatment, school-related problems and psychopathic traits among offenders admitted to forensic psychiatric care2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Childhood maltreatment and school-related problems are both related to psychopathy among juvenile delinquents and prisoners. Whether maltreatment and school-related problems are associated or not with psychopathy among forensic psychiatric patients is unclear. Therefore, our aim was to investigate a) the prevalence of childhood maltreatment and school-related problems among offenders admitted to forensic psychiatric care, and b) how both childhood maltreatment and school-related problems were associated with psychopathy among these offenders. We conducted a register study on 21 female and 96 male offenders who had been admitted to forensic psychiatric care and then been discharged from the high-security hospital. Psychopathy assessments were conducted with the PCL:SV. Data on childhood maltreatment and school-related problems were collected from forensic psychiatric investigations. The results showed that neglect or abuse was experienced by 50% of the female and 40% of the male offenders. Childhood sexual abuse was more prevalent among female offenders with psychopathic traits than without (67% vs 14%). Male offenders with psychopathic traits had experienced emotional abuse more prevalent than male offenders without such traits (40% vs 14%). More male offenders had some type of school-related problems (learning problems, behaviour problems, remedial class and/or being bullied at school) than the female offenders (79% vs 45%). The school-related problems were more preva-lent among male offenders with psychopathic traits than among offenders without (93% vs 66%). Behaviour problems at school were more prevalent among both female and male offenders with psychopathic traits compared to those without. In line with previous research on male offenders, childhood maltreatment was also related to psychopathy among forensic psychiatric patients. Our results, like others, speak for gender differences in the development and manifestation of psychopathy among male and female offenders admitted to forensic psychiatric care.

  • 18.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Strand, Susanne
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden; Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Petersson, Joakim
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Recidivism among perpetrators of gross violation of a woman´s integrity in Sweden2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Strand, Susanne
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Storey, Jennifer E.
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Psychopathy and motive for violent offences: Offenders admitted to forensic Psychiatric care2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are two primary motives for violence; instrumental violence is goal-directed and committed with a motive to obtain money, social status or territory, whereas reactive violence is impulsive, a reaction to frustration, insults or dangerous situations. In a meta-analysis by Blais et al. (2014) psychopathy was moderately related to instrumental as well as reactive violence. Most studies have been performed within male prison populations; only a few have been done with forensic psychiatric patients. Our aim was to study motive of violent offences by forensic psychiatric patients and how the motive was related to gender and psychopathy. Data were collected from verdicts and medical records for 100 (15 female, 85 male) offenders admitted to forensic psychiatric care. Psychopathy was assessed with the PCL:SV. The offenders’ violent index offence was rated as instrumental or reactive according to the coding guide by Cornell (1996). The results showed that 7% of the female and 25% of the male offenders had committed an instrumental offence, whereas 33% of the females and 49% of the males committed a reactive offence. Female offenders had more frequently committed offences characterised as being both instrumental and reactive compared to male offenders (60% vs 27%). PCL:SV total scores were not significantly related to motives. When broken down into four facets, as per the four-factor model, results showed that offenders who committed an instrumental offence scored higher on facet 4, the anti social facet. Factors related to violent offences such as level of provocation, relationship with the victim, intoxication, and presence of psychotic symptoms, were not associated with offence motive, however level of arousal was associated with offence motive. Therefore, we suggest that further studies on emotional regulation in relation to motive and psychopathy should be conducted.

  • 20.
    Storey, Jennifer, E.
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Selenius, Heidi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Strand, Susanne
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Age and Violence Risk Assessment for Intimate Partner Violence: Is Age Really Just a Number?2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) has serious consequences for victims and high recidivism rates. In an effort to reduce these issues much focus has been placed on the assessment and management of IPV. Within the IPV literature distinctions have been made around age. For instance, a debate has arisen regarding whether IPV against a senior victim is elder abuse or IPV grown old? As a result some studies include all violence against a victim over 60 as elder abuse while others argue that IPV grown old may result in different management than other IPV, but maintains the same dynamics and risk factors as IPV. This debate has important implications for how IPV against senior victims is assessed and managed. Data was collected in Sweden from IPV police files wherein officers used theBrief Spousal Assault Form for the Evaluation of Risk(B-SAFER; Kropp, Hart, & Belfrage, 2010). B-SAFER assessments, management plans, demographic information and recidivism data were collected. The sample included 723 cases, 688 (95%) cases with victims 59 or younger, and 35 cases with victims over 60 (5%). Data collection is ongoing. Comparisons will be made across offense type, B-SAFER risk factors, overall risk ratings, recommended management strategies and recidivism. Preliminary results reveal no statistical difference in overall risk ratings between groups, c2 (2,N=682) = .448,p= .799. Should results remain non-significant this will lend support to the argument that IPV against elderly victims should be assessed as IPV not elder abuse.

  • 21.
    Strand, Susanne
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    De Vogel, V.
    Van der Hoeven Kliniek, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Selenius, Heidi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    De Vries, M.
    Van der Hoeven Kliniek, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Risk Assessment in Women admitted to Forensic Psychiatric Care2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychopathy is well researched in male offender populations, but not in female samples. This presentation focuses on one Dutch and one Swedish sampleof female psychiatric patients, which are merged. The aim of the study was to investigate the construct of psychopathy in women and compare data between the Netherlands and Sweden. A sample of 283 female forensic psychiatric patients was included in the study. Psychopathy was measured with the PCL-R for the Dutch sample and the PCL:SV for the Swedish sample. The PCL-R was transformed into the PCL:SV for comparisons. The results showed that the Dutch sample had a higher mean score on factor one, while for factor two and the total score there were no differences, although when controlling for substance abuse there were no differences. Specific items still differed across samples, especially when controlling for the diagnosis of the borderline personality disorder. The implications of these results will be discussed.

  • 22.
    Strand, Susanne
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden; Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Selenius, Heidi
    Department of Social Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Assessing risk for violence in female forensic psychiatric patients2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Strand, Susanne
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Selenius, Heidi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Charing panel: Psychopathic traits and behaviour: Does gender matter?2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Strand, Susanne
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Selenius, Heidi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Psychopathy in female forensic psychiatric patients: a comparative study between samples from the Netherlands and Sweden2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Strand, Susanne
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Selenius, Heidi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Risk factors for violence in female forensic psychiatric patients: a comparative study between samples from the Netherlands and Sweden2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Strand, Susanne
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science at Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Selenius, Heidi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The prevalence of severe intimate partner violence in Sweden2017In: Domestic violence in international context / [ed] Diana Scharff Peterson and Julie A. Schroeder, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 41-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
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