oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 81
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Kronlid, David
    Uppsala universitet.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Östman, Leif
    Uppsala universitet.
    Pragmatiska studier av meningsskapande2008In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 11-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the article is to present a pragmatic approach for studies of meaning-making used in the articles of this issue. The approach, which is developed within the SMEDgroup (Studies of Meaning-making in Educational Discourses), mainly builds on the writings of John Dewey, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Michel Foucault. A common ambition for the researchers in SMED is to enable studies and discussions on questions concerning how meanings are made in people’s actions. Another ambition is to carry out these studies beyond assumptions of dualism, essentialism, causality and determinism. In this perspective learning and socialization are viewed in a communicative perspective. We argue in the article that our approach makes it possible, and important, to study meaning-making in action in different kinds of educational practices.

     

  • 2.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Kronlid, David
    Uppsala universitet.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Östman, Leif
    Uppsala universitet.
    Tema: Didaktiska undersökningar2008In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 5-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    En presentation av det didaktiska angreppssättet som ligger till grund för temat Didaktiska undersökningar i Utbildning och demokrati nr 3, 2008.

  • 3.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Meckbach, Jane
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    How Wii Teach Physical Education and Health2016In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     The use of educational computer games in physical education (PE) has become more popular in recent years and has attracted research interest. The aim of the article is to investigate how physical activities and images of the human body are offered by the game. The results show how the “teacher” constituted in the games is one who instructs and encourages the players to exercise and think about their bodies, but not a “teacher” who can help students to investigate, argue, or discuss images of health and the human body. We argue that the use of a wide range and variety of ways of teaching would make the teaching richer and offer a deeper understanding about the body and health.

  • 4. Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Östman, Leif
    Pragmatic investigation: studies of meaning-making in educational practices2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this paper is to present and discuss a pragmatic approach for studies of meaning-making in different educational practices. The approach – built on a framework developed within the SMED-group (Studies of Meaning-making in Educational Discourses) at the universities of Uppsala and Örebro – is illustrated in a number of empirical studies. The main point of departure in the studies is taken in pragmatic curriculum theory and sociocultural perspectives on learning, and is inspired mainly by John Dewey, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Michel Foucault. A special focus is directed to communication practices and content selection within Physical education, Environmental education and Science education. A common ambition is to offer a language that enables studies and discussions on questions concerning how meanings are made in people’s actions. Another ambition is to make these investigations beyond assumptions of dualisms, essentialism, causality and determinism. In this perspective learning and socialisation is viewed in communicative perspective. Therefore, many of the studies are built on video recorded classroom conversations, but also on analysis of various kinds of written texts. We argue in the paper that this approach makes it possible to study meaning-making – learning and socialisation – in different kinds of educational practices.

  • 5.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    How Wii teach Physical Education and Health2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The potential use of exergames in Physical Education and Health is surrounded by a growing discussion among practitioners, policy makers and researchers focusing on different expectations about the games. In this discussion there is, however, a need to further include issues about the learning content offered by these games, how the content is expected to be taught and about the potential consequences the use of games may have for learning and socialisation. This study focus on how meanings about health and the human body are offered by the game: What kind of teaching is delegated to the artifact when used in Physical Education and Health?

    Focus of inquiry

    The aim of this article is to investigate how images of health and the human body and are taught by using exergames.

    Analytical framework and Research methods

    The empirical study builds on the use of an analytical tool called “Epistemological move analysis”. Studies of teaching and learning have shown how teachers use different kinds of actions (for example instructive, confirming, re-orienting, generative, re-constructive and evaluative moves) in order to try to direct the meaning making in educational settings. In this study, these categories are used, developed and specified in the context of teaching in Physical Education and Health. The empirical material used consists of video recordings from sessions where the games Wii Fit Plus and EA Sports Active were played.

    Research findings

    The results of the analyses show how the games offer different kinds of epistemological moves: Instructive moves about the fit body and how to play the game, re-orienting moves used in order to help the players to modify their action towards a more relevant and effective way, generative moves used to help the players to think about how to play the game and confirming move about the players’ gaming. In sum, the “teacher” constituted in the game is a teachers who instructs, confirms and encourages the players to move and exercise their bodies. But it is not a teacher who, in contrast to teaching in other contexts, is able to help the learners to make investigations or to participate in argumentation and discussion about for example images of health and the human body. Teaching in these games is constituted as a behavioral modification focused on an idea about a pre-defined and ideal body not expected to be discussed in education.

  • 6.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Meckbach, Jane
    GIH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    What do Wii teach in PE?2012In: ECER 2012, The Need for Educational Research to Champion Freedom, Education and Development for All, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In society, video- and computer games are often pointed out as risk factors in relation to physical inactivity, sedentary behaviour as well as increasing levels of obesity. At the same time, computers are an important source of knowledge where IT-competence and IT-experience provide pronounced advantages in society. 

    In the middle of this paradox a new type of videogames is introduced, where body movement and physical activity constitute the central element. These games, so called exergames or active video games, are games where physical movement is involved in the game through the use of for example balance-boards, step-up boards and dance-pads. Exergames are now more and more put forward in several countries as interesting tools to use in physical education in order to stimulate young people to be physically active.

    In a recent review and synthesis of research on video games and health, Papastergiou (2009) strongly argues that videogames can offer ”potential benefits as educational tools for Health Education and Physical Education, and that those games may improve young people’s knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours in relation to health and physical exercise” (Papastergiou, 2009, p 603). However, Vander Schee and Boyles (2010) argue that exergames rather should be seen as a body pedagogy producing certain narrow meanings about health, and that the uncritical implementation of exergames in school is a problematic way to place commercial products in school. Consequently, there are differences in views regarding exergames in educational settings that are worth paying attention to in research about people’s learning about the body, physical activity and health.

    The aim of this paper is to investigate how images of the human body are expected to be learned when using exergames.

    The use of artifacts – physical objects made by humans – is a central part of human life. In fact, there are many activities that would not be possible to perform without the use of them. In schools, students learn to use paper and pencils, computers, vaulting-horses, footballs and so on. How and why artifacts are supposed to be used in educational settings is however not given beforehand (Cuban 1986). The use of artifacts mediates certain meanings about the view of learning and the goals and choices of content in education (Almqvist 2005, Quennerstedt et al in press).  

    In this paper, we will use discourse analytical strategies in order to analyse how meanings about the body are expected to be learned when playing exergames. The discourse analytical strategies involve an interest in how processes of discourse constitute how we experience or relate to ourselves as well as our environment (Laclau & Mouffe 1985). Discourses constitute what is possible to say or do as partial and temporal fixations (Foucault 1980). These fixations are imbued with power, values and ideologies. As Evans and colleagues argue: “/…/ health beliefs, perceptions and definitions of illness are constructed, represented and reproduced through language that is culturally specific, ideologically laden and never value free” (Evans et al 2008 p 46).

     

    Method

    To investigate what these games offer we have explored the manuals, the content, the animations of the games as well as the instructions and comments offered during game play. The empirical material consists of exergames most commonly used in schools: Wii fit and Wii sports (sports active). In the discourse analysis we have explored what is taken for granted in the empirical material in relation to other possible ways to argue. In this way we can explore what is included and excluded in the games and what is possible to think and act in relation to statements concerning the body.

     

    Expected Outcomes

    The analysis shows how the logic of the game, its animations, instructions and feedback to the player, constitutes the ideal body as a physically active, well-balanced, slim and strong body. The use of the game, the balance board and the hand control, makes it possible to measure and register how the player follows this logic. The analysis also shows how the way the player is supposed to learn about the body is strongly influenced by behaviorism. In the paper we argue that this way of learning about the body is narrow and limited and that it is important to critically discuss the effects of the use of these games in schools.

     

    References

    Almqvist, Jonas (2005). Learning and artefacts. On the use of information technology in educational settings. Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis. Cuban, Larry (1986). Teachers and machines. The classroom use of technology since 1920. New York: Teachers College Press. Evans, John, Rich Emma & Davies Bryan (2008). Education, disordered eating and obesity discourse: Fat fabrications. London: Routledge Foucault, Michel (1980). Power/knowledge. Selected interviews & other writings 1972-1977. New York: Pantheon Books. Laclau, Ernesto & Mouffe, Chantal (1985). Hegemony and socialist strategy. Towards a radical democratic politics. London: Verso. Papastergiou, Marina (2009). Exploring the potential of computer and video games for health and physical education: A literature review. Computers & Education, 53(3), 603-622. Quennerstedt, Mikael, Almqvist, Jonas & Öhman, Marie (in press). Keep your eye on the ball. Investigating artifacts in physical education. Interchange. Vander Schee, Carolyn J. & Boyles, Deron (2010): ‘Exergaming,’ corporate interests and the crisis discourse of childhood obesity. Sport, Education and Society, 15(2), 169-185.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Joacim
    et al.
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Garrison, Jim
    School of Education, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA, USA.
    Physical education teaching as a caring act: techniques of bodily touch and the paradox of caring2018In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 591-606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we investigate “no touch policies” as a practical teacher concern that includes the body as a location, a source, and a means in educational activity. We argue that to understand issues regarding physical touch within school practice we must conceive it as deeply associated with specific teaching techniques. Thus, the didactical challenge is not found in argumentations about the pro and cons of physical touch, but through analysis of how teachers handle student interaction and teaching intentions.

    We consider teaching as a caring profession. Caring, as a practical teacher concern, requires wisdom regarding the right time to use bodily touch and to refrain from such use. This wisdom involves the ability to discern people’s needs, desires, interests, and purposes in particular situations and act appropriately. From a body pedagogical perspective we approach intergenerational touch not only as a discursive and power related question but as an essential tension in the intersection of the; ambiguity attendant to any intentional act such as teaching, the conflict between the ethics of care and the ethics of justice, and finally, the paradox of caring.

    We draw on interviews with PE-teachers in Swedish primary, secondary, and upper-secondary schools and analyses of a collection of techniques of bodily touch that are established and practiced with specific pedagogical purposes. The results shows PE teacher’s competence in handling different functions of intergenerational touch in relation to three different techniques of bodily touch; 1) Security touch, which is characterized by intentions to handle the fragile; 2) Denoting touch, which is characterized by intentions to handle learning content; 3) Relational touch, which is characterized by caring intentions. Each of these is of importance for the teachers in carrying out their call to teach and each of these relies on professional assessments whether or not it meets its intended purpose.

     

  • 8.
    Andersson, Joacim
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Uppsala university, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Östman, Leif
    Uppsala university, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    I am sailing: towards a transactional analysis of ´body techniques´2015In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 722-740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in questions related to embodiment and learning. Within the field of ‘body pedagogics’ great efforts have been made to develop theory and methodology that can deal with the corporeal aspects of experience and knowledge without adopting any form of dualistic conceptions of body/mind and organism/environment. This article connects to this body of research. The purpose is to first present a synthesis of James’ radical empiricism, Dewey’s transactional understanding of experience and learning and Marcel Mauss’ concept of ‘body techniques’ and the notion of education embedded in it. Against the background of this theoretical development, and with a Transactional Model of Analyzing Bodying (TMAB), we then show how we can analytically come to terms with different dualistic problems that research into ‘body pedagogics’ has to deal with. We use an empirical example of dinghy sailing to create knowledge about what we learn when learning embodied knowledge, and how this learning takes place. We argue that experience is an important concept for understanding the acting knowing human being, describing how experience is organized and developed and outlining how this organization can be understood as learning. We hold that situations where someone learns to embody certain knowledge are cases of overt actions, in which we can see what kinds of relations are created and how these relations become meaningful for further action.

  • 9.
    Caldeborg, Annica
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Touching the didactic contract: a student perspective on intergenerational touch in PE2017In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing anxiety around intergenerational touch in educational settings has both emerged and increased in recent years. Previous research reveals that Physical Education (PE) teachers have become more cautious in their approaches to students and they avoid physical contact or other behaviour that could be regarded as suspicious (Fletcher, 2013; Öhman, 2016; Piper, Garratt, & Taylor, 2013). Some also feel anxious about how physical contact might be perceived by the students. The purpose of this article is to investigate physical contact between teachers and students in PE from a student perspective. This is understood through the didactic contract. For this purpose, focus group interviews using photo elicitation have been conducted with upper secondary school students in Sweden. One of the major findings is that intergenerational touch is purpose bound, that is, physical contact is considered relevant if the teacher has a good intention with using physical contact. The main agreements regarding physical contact as purpose bound are the practical learning and emotional aspects, such as learning new techniques, preventing injury, closeness and encouragement. The didactic contract is in these aspects stable and obvious. The main disagreements are when teachers interfere when the students want to feel capable or when teachers interfere when physical contact is not required in the activity. In these aspects the didactic contract is easily breached. It is also evident that personal preference has an impact on how physical contact is perceived. In conclusion, we can say that physical contact in PE is not a question of appropriate or inappropriate touch in general, but rather an agreement between the people involved about what is expected. Consequently, we should not ban intergenerational touch, but rather focus on teachers’ abilities to deal professionally with the didactic contract regarding physical contact.

  • 10.
    Caldeborg, Annica
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Touching the didactic contract: a student perspective on intergenerational touch in PE2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Kjell
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Öijen, Lena
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    A national evaluation of the school subject physical education and health: I. methodological approaches and challenges2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Kjell
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Öijen, Lena
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    A national evaluation of the school subject physical education and health: II. on the importance of subject content and focus2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Kjell
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Öijen, Lena
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    A national evaluation of the school subject physical education and health: III. ”More for boys than girls?”2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Kjell
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öijen, Lena
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Idrott och hälsa – ämnesrapport NU-03.2005Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Kjell
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öijen, Lena
    Physical education in Sweden2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Idrott och hälsa: ett ämne för hälsa i rörelse!?2005In: Grundskolans ämnen i ljuset av nationella utvärderingen 2003: nuläge och framåtblickar, Stockholm: Skolverket , 2005, p. 177-195Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Eriksson, Charli
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Physical education in Sweden2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Forest, Emmanuelle
    et al.
    Université Toulouse Jean Jaures, France.
    Lenzen, Benoit
    Université de Genève, Switzerland.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Teaching traditions in physical education in France, Switzerland and Sweden: A special focus on official curricula for gymnastics and fitness training2018In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 71-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to identify and discuss similarities and differences between the curricula for physical education (PE) in secondary schools in Sweden, France and the canton of Geneva (Switzerland) in the light of PE teaching traditions (PETTs). Teaching traditions concern ideas about the goals of school disciplines and therefore about the kind of learning pupils are expected to acquire. The paper focuses more specifically on two subjects, gymnastics and fitness training, because these physical activities are liable to highlight the similarities and differences across contexts in terms of didactic transposition. A content analysis of current curriculum materials of the three countries was conducted taking the following dimensions into account: (a) the general structure of the curriculum texts; (b) the general recommendations; and (c) the learning outcomes expected from the pupils in terms of knowledge and values, with examples of contents in gymnastics and fitness training. The results show the entanglement of various PETTs in each country: PETT as Sport-Techniques primarily shapes French and Swiss-Genevan curricula, PETT as Health Education is more present in Sweden and, to a lesser extent, in Switzerland, while PETT as Physical Culture Education tends to be more visible in France.

  • 19.
    Gibbs, Beatrice
    et al.
    GIH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Meckbach, Jane
    GIH,Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    TV-spel som läromedel i idrott och hälsa?2012In: Idrott & hälsa : organ för Svenska idrottslärarföreningen, ISSN 1653-1124, Vol. 2, no 8, p. 11-14Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I projektet TV-spel som hälsofostran, som presenterades i nr 6 i Idrott och hälsa 2011, undersöks det lärande avseende kropp, fysisk aktivitet och hälsa som sker i ungdomars spelande av TV-spel som innefattar rörelse, så kallade exergames (Quennerstedt, Almqvist, Meckbach, & Öhman, 2011). I artikeln lyfte vi bland annat fram hur exergames i allt större utsträckning återfinns i flera länder (till exempel England, Kanada, Australien och USA) som intressanta redskap att använda i skolan, bland annat för att i utbildning stimulera barns och ungdomars vilja att vara fysiskt aktiva samt för att tackla överviktsfrågor. I samband med artikeln bifogades även en enkät i tidskriften som vände sig till lärare i idrott och hälsa i både grund- och gymnasieskolan. Enkäterna nådde med andra ord de som prenumererar på tidningen såsom idrottslärarstudenter och lärare i idrott och hälsa samt även de som tar del av tidningen vid samtliga grund- och gymnasieskolor i Sverige. Vi vill här samtidigt tacka alla lärare som tog sig tid att besvara enkäten.

    I denna artikel kommer vi som en uppföljning av våra analyser av enkätstudien att beskriva svenska lärares användning av TV-spel i idrott och hälsa samt de hinder och motiv som kan finnas med att använda spelen i undervisningen.

    Quennerstedt, M., Almqvist, J., Meckbach, J., & Öhman, M. (2011). Tv-spel som hälsofostran: om exergaming och ungdomars lärande om kropp, fysisk aktivitet och hälsa. Idrott och hälsa, 138 (6), pp. 34-35.

    Statistiska centralbyrån. (2012-10-27). Statistiska centralbyrån. From Register över pedagogisk personal: http://www.scb.se/Pages/Product____8480.aspx

     

  • 20.
    Hemstad, Hanna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    “Jag har ansträngt mig så himla mycket och mår så himla dåligt och ändå är det ingen som ser”: elever med anorexia nervosa möter skolämnet idrott och hälsa2010In: Idrottsforum.org, ISSN 1652-7224, p. 1-16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med artikeln är att redogöra för hur individer som har haft diagnosen anorexia nervosa har upplevt mötet med skolämnet idrott och hälsa

  • 21.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, sverige.
    Annerstedt, Claes
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Barker, Dean
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Karlefors, Inger
    Umeå universitet, Umeå, Sverige.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Redelius, Karin
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan GIH, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Physical education: a subject for learning?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Caldeborg, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Janemalm, Lucas
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Ridderlund, Sara
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Segolsson, Joakim
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Vesterlund, Sabina
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barker, Dean
    Gothenburgh university, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Teachers as researchers investigating their PE practice!2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    GIH Swedish Sch Sport & Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Heterotopias in physical education: towards a queer pedagogy?2014In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 135-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article sets out to outline how prevailing gender structures can be challenged in physical education (PE) by exploring queer potentials in an event that took place during a dancing lesson in an upper secondary PE class. The event and its features were documented through video recording and post-lesson interviews with the teacher and some of the students. It is argued that the event can be seen as a heterotopia, according to Michel Foucault a 'counter-site' enabling the resistance to authority, where the production of normalcy was challenged. Furthermore, even though the event happened spontaneously, the authors suggest that it can show a way towards a queer pedagogy for PE through teaching paradoxically; it indicates a preferred ethos of the lesson and the use of conceptual tools by teachers and students that make them able to intervene in the production of normalcy.

  • 24.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    GIH, Stockholm,Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Normkritisk undervisning i idrott och hälsa?: Ett queert fall2012In: SVEBIs forskningskonferens, Perspektiv på idrottens prestationssystem: från debut till avslut, 2012, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion: Studier pekar på att stabila könsmönster dominerar undervisningen i idrott och hälsa (se t ex Brown, 2005; Paechter, 2003). Under det senaste decenniet har vidare ett antal studier om heteronormativitet i ämnet presenterats (Clarke, 2006; Hunter, 2004; Larsson, m fl, 2011a). Larsson, m fl (2011b) hävdar att heteronormer bidrar till att reproducera könsmönstren, inte minst genom att låsa fast elevers kroppar och handlingar vid förment heterosexuella identiteter. Detta fastlåsande hänger delvis samman med idrottslärares benägenhet att vilja ”anpassa” undervisningen efter kön (Larsson, m fl 2010). Sådan ”anpassning” sker alltid i förhållande till ett försanthållande (norm) och bidrar på så vis till reproduktionen av könsmönstren. Med utgångspunkt hos den amerikanske pedagogen Kevin Kumashiro (2004) föreslår Larsson, m fl (2011b) att lärare i idrott och hälsa, istället för att ”anpassa” undervisningen efter kön, ska undervisa paradoxalt (teaching paradoxically) för att utmana könsmönstren. Hittills har det emellertid varit svårt att i litteraturen identifiera vad denna paradoxala undervisning skulle kunna bestå i. Inom ramen för projektet ”Idrott och hälsa – ett ämne för lärande?” utspelades emellertid en lektionssekvens som kan betraktas som en så kallad heterotopi, en plats i rummet där dominerande normer utmanas.

    Syfte & teoretisk ram: Syftet med presentationen är att visa en analys av denna heterotopi, detta tillfälle i undervisningen där heteronormer utmanas, avseende dess möjlighetsvillkor. I förlängningen är ambitionen att, utifrån analysen, diskutera normkritisk undervisning i idrott och hälsa i termer av hur kan man undervisa paradoxalt i idrott och hälsa?

    Den teoretiska referensramen formas i mötet mellan normkritisk pedagogik (att undervisa paradoxalt) och sociokulturell lärandeteori (se t ex Säljö, 2000). Analytiskt riktas fokus mot heterotopins möjlighetsvillkor, framför allt avseende det sociala sammanhang vari den uppstår (inklusive den aktivitet som står på schemat) samt de normkritiska resurser som lärare och elever ger uttryck för.

    Metod: Empirin består av videofilmer av lektioner samt intervjuer med lärare och elever där delar av intervjun kretsar kring filmsnuttar av ”didaktiska ögonblick” (Quennerstedt, m fl, pågående; se även Rønholt, 2002). I presentationen används videofilmer av två lektioner som innehåller undervisning i dans (schottis), där samtal mellan elever och mellan elever och lärare hörs. I intervjuerna med läraren och tre elever som deltog på lektionen ägnas särskild uppmärksamhet åt en situation i samband med dansen, där en elev ifrågasätter tvåkönad dans med hänvisning till sexuell läggning: ”Jag kanske är lesbisk”. När läraren blir uppmärksam på sitt försanthållande att man ”ska” dansa schottis i tvåkönade par, utbrister han: ”Det är min heteronormativitet som spökar.”

    Resultat: Av den preliminära analysen framgår att danslektionen erbjuder tillfällen av tydlig heteronormativitet (dans pojke-flicka) som eleverna kan utmana. För att utmana normerna använder sig flickan i exemplet av en argumentationsteknik som ingått i undervisningen i ett annat av skolans ämnen (SO) samt uppmaningar från lärare på utvecklingssamtal att hon ska ”ta för sig mer” i diskussioner i skolan. Läraren förstår situationen utifrån ett begrepp – heteronormativitet – som han tillsammans med klassen har fördjupat sig i under lektioner i ytterligare ett annat ämne (NO).

    Diskussion: Vi menar att fallet pekar ut en väg som kan utvecklas mot en normkritisk pedagogik i idrott och hälsa. Se till att skapa situationer där heteronormerna är så tydliga att de blir lättillgängliga för eleverna, utrusta eleverna med redskap för att utmana normerna, utrusta lärarna med redskap för att skapa potentiellt queera situationer samt för att förvalta elevernas utmaningar av heteronormativiteten. Detta kan vara att undervisa paradoxalt.

  • 25.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), Stocholm, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Queering physical education 2.02013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Students’ Aesthetic Experiences of Playing Exergames: A Practical Epistemology Analysis of Learning2015In: International Journal of Games Based Learning, ISSN 2155-6849, E-ISSN 2155-6857, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 11-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore Swedish junior high school students meaning-making of participating in exergaming in school based on their aesthetic judgments during game play. A transactional approach, drawing on the work of John Dewey, was used in the study and the data consisted of video- and audio recordings of ongoing video gaming. A practical epistemology analysis (PEA) was used in order to explore the students’ meaning-making in depth. When analyzing the data, the importance of performing well in relation to the challenges the game offers; developing techniques suitable for the game; and interacting socially with one’s peers emerged as main themes in the students’ meaning-making and learning. It was clear that the students’ taste for gaming played a crucial role in how they proceeded in the activity and that meaningful gaming included an intrinsic combination of pleasure and displeasure. 

  • 27.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Young people’s aesthetic experience of playing Wii2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, scholars in physical education have begun to explore how young people experience exergames. The research is often undertaken in the light of increasing public health problem among young people. The purpose of this study was to investigate students’ experiences when playing the exergame Wii in an educational context. Questions that have guided the analysis were: (1) Which meanings do the students make when playing Wii exergames? (2) How are aesthetic experiences in terms of likes and dislikes used in this meaning-making process?

    Drawing on the work of John Dewey, the later works of Ludwig Wittgenstein and socio-cultural approaches, a practical epistemology analysis (PEA) with focus on aesthetic judgments was used as approach in order to investigate situated learning.

    The empirical data consists of video recordings of two groups of 15 year olds (3 boys and 3 girls) playing different exergames once a week for ten weeks.

    When analyzing the data three themes emerged as essential to students’ meaning-making. The major theme was to interact socially with their peers, and the two minor themes were to participate in a struggle and to develop technical skills suitable for the game. By analyzing the aesthetic judgments used by the students during gaming it was clear that participating could not be reduced as just being “fun”, instead the students showed feelings ranging from enjoyment, engagement, isolation to frustration. Conclusions: To understand the healthy aspects of exergaming we must broaden the definition of health, not to only interpret health in terms of physiological benefit, but as psychological and sociological benefit as well. It is also clear that the understanding of “fun” must be problematized. It is not appropriated to only understand young people’s gaming in terms of enjoyment, but as a complex social interaction were young people form their identity in relation to the social situation as well as the game. 

  • 28.
    McCuaig, Louise
    et al.
    The University of Queensland, St Lucia Qld, Australia.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Wright, Jan
    University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia.
    Shepherds in the gym: employing a pastoral power analytic on caring teaching in HPE2013In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 788-806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on research conducted in Australian Health' and Physical Education (HPE) and Swedish Physical Education and Health (PEH), this paper demonstrates the analytic possibilities of Foucault's notion of pastoral power to reveal the moral and ethical work conducted by HPE/PEH teachers in producing healthy active citizens. We use the pastoral power analytic to make visible the consequences of caring HPE/PEH teaching practices which appear unassailable as producing a general good' for all students. In so doing we undertake the challenge posed by Nealon to be attuned to those social practices that appear beyond reproach as power becomes more effective while offering less obvious potential for resistance'. From this Foucauldian perspective we argue that caring HPE/PEH teachers employ a wide range of normalization tools to interpellate young people into a specific model of normal' healthy living, simultaneously determining those who represent problematic deviations from the norm. We further argue that instead of discarding or ignoring these students, such deviations call upon the HPE/PEH teacher to care more fervently, to employ more intense strategies of individualization such as togetherness, encouragement and familiarity. In conclusion, we highlight the tensions and implications that may result for HPE/PEH teachers and their students.

  • 29.
    Meckbach, Jane
    et al.
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health sciencies (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Uppsala Universityt, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gibbs, Beatrice
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health sciencies (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Idrottslärare vill ha tv-spel på lektionerna2013In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 39-43Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    TV-spel, så kallade exergames, där kroppsrörelse är i fokus har under senare år ökat i popularitet. Kan detta spel användas i undervisningen i idrott och hälsa? I denna artikel presenteras lärares uppfattning om och inställning till exergames.

     

  • 30.
    Meckbach, Jane
    et al.
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, Sverige.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gibbs, Beatrice
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, Sverige.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Use of exergames in PE: Exergames as a teaching tool?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Meckbach, Jane
    et al.
    The Swedish School od Sport and Health Sciencies (GIH), stockholm, Sweden.
    Gibbs, Beatrice
    The Swedish School od Sport and Health Sciencies (GIH), stockholm, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Exergames as a Teaching Tool in Physical Education?2013In: Sport Science Review, ISSN 2066-8732, Vol. 12, no 5-6, p. 369-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Video games are often highlighted as risk factors in relation to

    physical inactivity and increasing levels of obesity. Now a new

    type of video game, the exergame, has entered the market. In recent years,

    several countries have increasingly foregrounded exergames as a possible

    activity for use in school PE and as perhaps improving young people’s

    knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors in relation to health and physical

    exercise. The purpose of this study is to explore Swedish PE teachers’

    perceptions and use of exergames and also the barriers to and reasons for

    using exergames based on a survey containing closed- and open-ended

    questions. A total of 493 teachers (10% of all Swedish PE teachers)

    answered the questionnaire. The responses were coded and entered into

    SPSS, allowing for both descriptive data and cross-table analyses. The

    results show that 80 percent are familiar with exergames, 17 percent are

    recreational exergamers, and a few (3%) have tried using exergames in

    physical education and health. The reasons for introducing exergames are

    generally as follows: encouraging physical activity, offering different types

    of movement, and having fun. The barriers to introducing exergames

    are mainly: financial, prioritizing other activities, and the teachers’ own

    knowledge. The majority of the PE teachers are generally positive to

    introducing exergames as a teaching aid into their subject. However, this

    requires developing the teachers’ own knowledge of exergames. The

    choice of teaching content and the introduction of new activities and

    teaching tools also involve critically examining the games, and this, in turn,

    entails didactic reflection

  • 32.
    Meckbach, Jane
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gibbs, Beatrice
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Exergames som läromedel i idrott och hälsa?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    TV-spel, så kallade exergames, där kroppsrörelse är i fokus har under senare år ökat i popularitet. Kan detta spel användas i undervisningen i idrott och hälsa? I denna artikel presenteras lärares uppfattning om och inställning till exergames. Bakgrunden till denna studie är att en ny typ av TV-spel (exergames) har trätt in på marknaden, t. ex. Wii sports, Dance Dance Revolution, Your Shape. I dessa spel utgör fysiska aktiviteter och kroppsrörelser det centrala inslaget och utförs genom användandet av balansplattor, step-up brädor, motionscyklar, dansmattor eller genom att en handkontroll används som racket vid exempelvis tennisspelande. Under de senaste åren har spelen i allt större utsträckning lyfts fram i flera länder, t. ex. England, Kanada, Australien och USA, som en möjlig aktivitet att använda i skolans undervisning i idrott och hälsa. Avsikten med forskningsprojektet TV-spel som hälsofostran är att studera spelen i termer av dess utbildningsvärde. I denna studie är syftet att beskriva svenska lärares uppfattning om och användning av exergames i idrott och hälsa samt de hinder och motiv som finns med att använda spelen i undervisningen utifrån en enkätstudie. Ett första led i detta projekt var att presentera projektet i tidskriften Idrott & Hälsa under hösten 2011. Till detta nummer av tidskriften bifogades även en enkät, som vände sig till lärare i idrott och hälsa i både grund- och gymnasieskolan. Enkäterna nådde med andra ord de som prenumererar på tidningen och de som tar del av tidningen i landets samtliga skolor. Enkätsvaren har kodats och förts in i statistikprogrammet SPSS och därefter har den statistiska bearbetningen, tabeller och analyser genomförts i nämnda program. I huvudsak använder vi oss av deskriptiv data och korstabellsanalyser i resultaten. Totalt har enkäten besvarats av 493 lärare (40% män 60% kvinnor), vilket motsvarar 10 procent av samtliga lärare i idrott och hälsa. Nästan 80% av lärarna var bekanta med spelen Nintendo Wii, Kinect eller Move. Var sjätte lärare spelade själva på fritiden och 17 lärare (3%) hade provat på att använda exergames i sin undervisning; som en valbar aktivitet, stationsträning, ett moment där hela klassen deltog framför en skärm, en möjlighet för elever som ej vill delta i storklass eller för elever med funktionsnedsättning. Hinder för att använda spelen är:att spelen kostar för mycket men också att lärarna själva har för dåliga kunskaper om spelen samt att de prioriterar andra aktiviteter. Det främsta motivet till att använda spelen i undervisningen är att spelen har ganska eller stora möjligheter att stimulerar eleverna till fysisk aktivitet. Vid analysen av resultaten framkommer att majoriteten har en positiv inställning till spelen, dock behöver troligtvis lärarnas egna kunskaper om spelen öka för att möjliggöra en implementering av ett nytt läromedel inom ämnet idrott och hälsa. För lärare handlar undervisningssituationer om att planera, genomföra och följa upp undervisningen. Det handlar således om att göra urval av olika lärsituationer med stöd av olika läromedel och till detta krävs en didaktisk reflektion. Forskning kan här bidra med att problematisera användandet av exergames som läromedel för att visa på om och i så fall hur spelen kan användas i en lärsituation. Det centrala vid införandet av alla läromedel i skolan är således dess utbildningsvärde, och inte som en del forskning framhåller dess värde för individers energiförbrukning.

    Referenser

    Quennerstedt, M. et.al. (in press). Why do Wii teach physical education in school? Swedish journal of Sport Research

    Meckbach, J. et al. (in press). Exergames as a teaching tool in physical education? Sport Science Review.

  • 33.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gibbs, Beatrice
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Meckbach, Jane
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Learning and active video gaming in school2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Video- and computer games are an important part of youth culture, criticised in terms of sedentary lifestyles as well as held forth as an important competence for the future in terms of IT-competence. A certain type of videogames, so called exergames, is now put forward as interesting tools in schools since they combine IT-technology and physical activity.

    In this symposium we will present results from a four-year study with the aim to investigate the learning regarding the body, physical activity and health that take place in young peoples playing of exergames.

    The project has first investigated if teachers use videogames in health- and physical education as well as explored the arguments for doing that. Secondly, the content offered in the games regarding the body, physical activity and health has been explored in game manuals and in the game-play content. Thirdly, and in focus for this symposium, the project has explored what young people learn playing videogames and how this learning occurs. The study has been carried out through video- and audio recordings of on-going video gaming both during physical education lessons in Sweden, and when small groups of youth have played the games once a week during ten weeks.

    The analysis have focused on spoken as well as embodied actions appearing in young peoples playing of different exergames. In the symposium results will be presented and discussed in relation to (i) How images of health and the human body is taught by using exergames in school, (ii) Young people’s aesthetic experiences of playing exergames, (iii) How exergames are used to teach dance in PE, and (iv) How Laban Movement Analysis can be used to understand the learning of movement qualities in game-play.

  • 34.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gibbs, Beatrice
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    LEXIS: Learning and Exergames in School2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Forskning framhåller ofta att ungdomar blir fysiskt inaktiva och överviktiga av att de spelar för mycket dator- och TV-spel. Samtidigt är datorer en viktig källa till kunskap, och IT-kompetens ses som en nödvändig kunskap i framtiden. Mitt i denna paradox introduceras ett nytt sorts datorspel där fysisk aktivitet utgör det centrala inslaget, och inte enbart stillasittande framför en skärm. Dessa spel, så kallade ’exergames’ är spel där kroppsrörelse ingår genom användandet av balansplattor, ’step-up bänkar’, motionscyklar, dansmattor eller att en fjärrkontrollen används som racket vid exempelvis tennisspelande.

    Exergames lyfts nu i allt större utsträckning fram i flera länder som ett potentiellt läromedel i skolan, bl a för att i utbildning stimulera barns och ungas vilja att vara fysiskt aktiva, samt för att tackla överviktsfrågor. Inte minst har de lyfts fram som intressant i framtidens skolämne idrott och hälsa.

    De problem som lyfts fram i debatten med användandet av exergames i skolan är främst av teknisk eller ekonomisk art, dvs att det är dyrt att köpa in eller att teknik lätt går sönder. På intet sätt syns en diskussion om vad införande av exergames i skolan innebär för elevers kunskaper och lärande, utan de framhålls istället som ett modernt sätt att motionera. Frågan om hur och till vad exergaming kan användas i undervisningen görs därmed främst till en fysiologisk fråga om energiförbrukning snarare än en fråga om utbildning, kunskaper och lärande.

    Projektet LEXIS – Learning and EXergames In School – består av flera delstudier som undersöker användandet av exergames som läromedel i skolan. I projektet riktas blicken mot vad ungdomarna lär sig när de spelar TV-spelen samt hur detta lärande sker. I projektet studerar vi därmed samspelet mellan ungdomars erfarenheter, de sociala relationerna mellan deltagarna samt mellan deltagarna och det innehåll som spelet erbjuder.

    Vid presentationen på konferensen kommer vi att presentera, diskutera och problematisera det lärande avseende kropp, rörelse, fysisk aktivitet och hälsa som sker i ungdomars spelande av exergames i olika undervisningssituationer. Vi kommer också presentera en processtudie från en skola där dansspel har använts som läromedel och där skapandet av danser i grupp samt användandet av olika rörelsekvaliteter i dans står i fokus.

  • 35.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Meckbach, Jane
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    TV- och dataspel som hälsofostrare2011In: Idrott & Hälsa, ISSN 1653-1124, no 6, p. 34-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Department of Education, Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, Sverige.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Why do Wii teach physical education in school?2013In: Swedish Journal of Sport Research, ISSN 2001-6018, E-ISSN 2001-9475, Vol. 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Videogames including bodily movement have recently been promoted as tools to be used in school to encourage young people to be more physically active.The purpose of this systematic review has been to explore the arguments for and against using exergames in school settings and thus facilitate new insights into this field. Most of the arguments for and/or against these of exergames can be organised in relation to health and sport. In relation to health, the dominant theme is about fitness and obesity. In relation to sport, the two main themes were skill acquisition, and exergames as an alternative to traditional PE. Theidea why Wii teach PE in schools is that children are becoming more obese, which in turn threatens the health of the population. Schools seem to be an appropriate arena for this intervention, and by using exergames as an energy consuming and enjoyable physical activity a behaviour modification and the establishment of good healthy habits is argued to be achieved

  • 37.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Keep your eye on the ball: investigating artifacts-in-use in physical education2012In: Interchange, ISSN 0826-4805, E-ISSN 1573-1790, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 287-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to develop a method of approach that can be used to explore the meaning and use of artifacts in education by applying a sociocultural perspective to learning and artifacts. An empirical material of video recorded physical education lessons in Sweden is used to illustrate the approach in terms of how artifacts in different ways can play a part in meaning making processes in physical education. The illustration from the video recordings shows that a ball can be constituted as a “great toy” and that in the practice of physical education being physically active and an active participant in a certain game is regarded as reasonable. However, it also illustrates that the ball can be constituted as a “lethal projectile” and a pupil positioned as lazy and unwilling. In the article we argue that empirical studies of “artifacts-in-use” using visual methodologies are both important and valuable, challenging physical education teachers’ reflections about the role of artifacts in their teaching.

  • 38.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Annerstedt, Claes
    Dept Food & Nutr & Sport Sci, Gothenburg Univ, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker, Dean
    Dept Food & Nutr & Sport Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlefors, Inger
    Dept Educ, Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden; Luleå Univ Technol, Luleå, Sweden.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Redelius, Karin
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan GIHGymnastik och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    What did they learn in school today?: A method for exploring aspects of learning in physical education2014In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 282-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper outlines a method for exploring learning in educational practice. The suggested method combines an explicit learning theory with robust methodological steps in order to explore aspects of learning in school physical education. The design of the study is based on sociocultural learning theory, and the approach adds to previous research within the field, both in terms of the combination of methods used and the claims made in our studies. The paper describes a way of collecting and analysing the retrieved data and discusses and illustrates the results of a study using this combination of explicit learning theory and robust methodological steps.

  • 39.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Investigating learning in physical education2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Investigating learning in physical education: a transactional approach2011In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 159-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to suggest and describe a methodological approach for studies of learning within school physical education (PE) in order to investigate and clarify issues of learning in an embodied practice. Drawing on John Dewey’s work, and especially his use of the concept transaction, a transactional approach is suggested as a way of developing an action-orientated method necessary for investigating learning in PE. The approach is illustrated by extracts from a video analysis of a PE lesson in Sweden, and shows how an analytical focus on meaning making, actions, events and participators in meaning-making processes can help to overcome methodological challenges related to dualist and cognitivist approaches and reach a deeper knowledge of student learning issues in PE.

  • 41.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Att skapa hälsosamma kroppar2004In: SVEBIS årsbok: aktuell beteendevetenskaplig idrottsforskning / [ed] Göran Patriksson, Lund: SVEBI , 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Kropp, hälsa och genus – kritiska perspektiv på idrott och hälsa?2007In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 5-16Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    On the use of artefacts in physical education2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall objective of this article is to discuss and problematize the meaning and use of artefacts in physical education by applying a sociocultural perspective to learning and artefacts. An empirical material of video recorded physical education lessons in Sweden is used to illustrate how artefacts in different ways can play a part in meaning making processes in physical education. The results of the study illustrate that a ball can be constituted as a “great toy” and that in the practice of physical education being physically active and an active participant in a certain game is regarded as reasonable. However, the results also illustrate that the ball can be constituted as a “lethal projectile” and a pupil positioned as lazy and unwilling. In the article we argue that empirical studies of “artefacts-in-use” are both important and valuable, as are physical education teachers’ reflections about the role of artefacts in their teaching.

  • 44.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Salutogenic approaches to health and the body2014In: Health education: Critical perspectives / [ed] Katie Fitzpatcrick & Richard Tinning, London: Routledge, 2014, p. 190-203Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sport pedagogy and questions about learning2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One important challenge ahead for sport pedagogy researchers is to consider afresh challenging questions about learning. Learning in the fields of sport, physical activity and physical education is a particularly complex business, since most existing theories of learning are defined cognitively. Learning in sport is, however (to a large extent) practical and embodied, and it is not just an individual affair but is closely linked to the wider cultural contexts of sport and related areas such as health. This paper will critically review notions of learning process, direction and content as key concerns for sport pedagogy researchers.

  • 46.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Swedish physical education research2008In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 295-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article does not have an abstract.

  • 47.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Teachers-as-researchers exploring PE-practice2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Vaulting horses, basket balls and lines in the floor: understanding artefacts in physical education2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall objective of this article is to discuss and problematize the meaning and use of artefacts in physical education by applying a sociocultural perspective to learning and artefacts. An empirical material of video recorded physical education lessons in Sweden is used to illustrate how artefacts in different ways can play a part in meaning making processes in physical education. The results of the study illustrate that a ball can be constituted as a “great toy” and that in the practice of physical education being physically active and an active participant in a certain game is regarded as reasonable. However, the results also illustrate that the ball can be constituted as a “lethal projectile” and a pupil positioned as lazy and unwilling. In the article we argue that empirical studies of “artefacts-in-use” are both important and valuable, as are physical education teachers’ reflections about the role of artefacts in their teaching.

  • 49.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Armour, Kathleen
    School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Sport and exercise pedagogy and questions about learning2014In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 885-898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One important challenge ahead for sport and exercise pedagogy (SEP) researchers is to consider a fresh questions about learning. Learning in the fields of sport, physical activity and physical education (PE) is a particularly complex business. Most existing theories of learning are defined cognitively, yet learning in sport and physical activity contexts is also practical and embodied, and is linked to the powerful wider cultural contexts of sport and related areas such as health. Yet, even though learning in these contexts is particularly complex, practitioners rarely draw upon specific learning theories to ask questions about practice, and researchers in SEP have tended to focus on content and issues of teaching and coaching instead of using learning theories as a way to explore learning or investigate learning. This paper draws on data from a project in Sweden on learning in PE to illustrate the ways in which a learning theory framework can be used to guide research questions, offer important insights into the learning process and make a contribution to the wider literature on learning theory. We also argue that research design grounded in learning theories has the potential to result in greater coherence across studies, thereby offering a more valuable service to practitioners.

  • 50.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Physical education in Sweden: a national evaluation2008In: Education-line, p. 1-17Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A national evaluation of Swedish compulsory schools was undertaken in 2003. This evaluation covers 16 compulsory school subjects in Year 9, including physical education (PE). The PE study includes a sample of 6,788 pupils and 1,688 teachers in Year 9 for background data and school subject comparisons. A questionnaire was also sent to the parents of the 6,788 pupils, and register data was collected on pupils’ final grades and parents’ educational levels. A smaller sample of 2,407 pupils and 82 PE teachers has been used in order to analyse pupils’ and teachers’ attitudes towards PE. The main focus of this article is the subject content in PE, with a particular focus on the teaching, the learning, and the teachers’ and pupils’ attitudes towards the subject. The results of the study show that PE is valued highly by both pupils and parents. Pupils active in sports enjoy PE the most, and the subject content is characterised by enjoyment in movement. The majority of the pupils are physically active during the lessons (85.2 percent), although at the same time a significant minority of the girls are present but inactive during PE. Of all the school subjects in Sweden, PE is the only ‘boyish’ subject and boys attain higher grades, enjoy it more and are more involved in and able to influence the content. The most important determining factors affecting grades in PE are leisure sport activity, parents’ educational levels, gender and cultural capital.

12 1 - 50 of 81
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf