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  • 1.
    Andersson Bruck, Kjerstin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Cater, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Men for Gender Equality: promising projects for preventing men’s violence against women2016In: Preventie van intergenerationeel geweld in Nederland en EU: Verkenning van wat werkt. Bijlagen / [ed] Majone Steketee, Reneé Römkens, Eliane Smits van Waesberghe, Trees Pels, Katinka Lünnemann, Jodi Mak, Jamila Mejdoubi, Hanna Harthoorn, Atria & Verwey-Jonker Instituut , 2016, , p. 13p. 51-63Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Män för jämställdhet (eng: Men for Gender Equality - MfGE) is a non-government Swedish organisation with a vision for “a gender equal society without violence”. Critical gender theory serves as the platform for the organisation and its projects. Two of MfGE’s projects: Jämt föräldraskap (eng: Equal Parenthood - EP) and Frihet från våld (eng: Freedom From Violence - FFV) are particularly good examples of how MfGE is working to prevent men’s violence against women. EP promotes equal parenting by developing and offering activities directed at new and expectant parents, with special focus on fathers. Half of their activities are directed at local parental and father groups across the country. FFV offers early violence prevention aimed at children and young people in order to limit the incidence and consequences of violence in young people’s intimate relationships by adopting methods that highlight the importance of bystanders. This programme is an adaptation of the American Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP). Although the programmes in their Swedish versions need further evaluation to establish their evidence base, their firm correspondence to what the literature identifies as important aspects for succeeding in preventing men’s violence qualifies them as promising projects.

  • 2.
    Andersson Bruck, Kjerstin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindström, Helene
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Barnavårdsutredningen som relationell praktik2018In: Relationer i socialt arbete: I gränslandet mellan profession och person / [ed] Bruhn, Anders & Källström, Åsa, Stockholm: Liber AB , 2018, 1, p. 92-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Tema Barn, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige.
    Above All Else, Do Not Snitch: Constructing Criminal Identities and Negotiating Masculinities in Agression Replacement Training2008Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present article, the issue of snitching is analysed as part of a convict code, drawn upon by young men detained for assessment at a youth detention home and participating in Aggression Replacement Training (ART). ART is viewed in light of other research on peer interventions. The analysis shows how sticking to the convict code facilitates positioning oneself as knowledgeable within a field of criminality. Perhaps more important, however, is how drawing on the code regulates the relationship to other men and polices one's own behaviour, as well as that of others. Both the trainers and the young men can be seen to use different discourses of masculinity as interactional resources.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    “Allt började med en sockerbit!”: ett diskursivt perspektiv på unga mäns berättelser om eget våldsutövande2010In: Locus, ISSN 1100-3197, no 2-3, p. 77-90Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Att be om ursäkt: interpersonell färdighetsträning och ART i praktiken2007In: Socionomens forskningssupplement, no 22, p. 36-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Constructing and being ‘the Other’: young men’s talk on ethnic racist violence2013In: Social inequality & the politics of representation: a global landscape / [ed] Celine-Marie Pascale, Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Tema Barn, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige.
    Constructing the Other: Ethnic and Racist Categorizations in Talk on Violence2008Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is increasingly becoming multiethnic, resulting in a complex ethnic landscape. The present article documents how two young men in Sweden use ethnic and racist categories in talk about violence, from two distinct but mirroring positions: one explicitly non-Swedish and one a former neo-Nazi. Both young men describe being the target of violence due to being identified as the Other, and both use ethnic and racist categorizations to describe their fighting opponents. It is also argued here that both men are problematizing and deconstructing present and previous identities.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Tema Barn, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Construction Young Masculinity: A Case of Heroic Discourse of Violence2008In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 139-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, a young man's narratives of violence are analysed, and a culturally shared storyline is identified as the basis of these narratives. It is argued that the stories are organized so as to construct a preferred self-presentation. One strategy to achieve this is to establish boundaries for what type of violence to use, whom to fight, where and for what reasons. I also argue that the narratives are structured to avoid being categorized as either victim or perpetrator, although both categories are drawn upon. Issues of masculinity are made relevant through categorization of the characters in the narrative, and positions are made available. Different masculine categories such as the hero/villain/non-man become relevant in the analysis. Different gendered positions are used in negotiating a masculine identity around narratives of and through telling about violence.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gola aldrig!: pedofilen som undantag2012In: Andra män: maskulinitet, normskapande och jämställdhet / [ed] Lucas Gottzén & Rickard Jonsson, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2012, p. 135-148Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Mellan offer och förövare: att berätta om våld2009In: Den väsentliga vardagen: Några diskursanalytiska perspektiv på tal, text och bild / [ed] Anna Sparrman, Jakob Cromdal, Ann-Carita Evaldsson, Viveka Adelswärd, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2009, p. 289-310Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Over gravlax sandwiches and a coke,: a lunch conversation on masculinities with Professor James W. Messerschmidt2008In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 5-12Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    James Messerschmidt, professor of Sociology (Dept. of Criminology and Women’s and Gender Studies program) at University of Southern Maine, USA has, since he received his Ph.D. from the Criminology Institute in the Department of Sociology at the Stockholm University, had a close relationship with Sweden and the Nordic counties. During the first week of September of 2007 he visited both the University of Oslo and the Linköping University. At Tema Barn in Linköping professor Messerschmidt presented a lecture on, “From Being Bullied to Bullying: Bodies, Masculinities, and In-School Violence”. His research interests focus on the interrelation of gender, race, class, and crime. In addition to numerous articles and book chapters, he is the author of eight books, including Masculinities and Crime (1993), Nine Lives: Adolescent Masculinities, the Body, and Violence (2000) and Flesh and Blood: Adolescent Gender Diversity and Violence, (2004). A co-authored article with R.W. Connell, “Hegemonic Masculinity: Rethinking the Concept” (in Gender and Society, 19 (6): 829–859) has been much debated since its publication in 2005. Prior to professor Messerschmidt’s lecture in Sweden, I had the opportunity to interview him over lunch.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Department of Child Studies, The Tema Institute, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Talking violence, constructing identities: young men in institutional care2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to investigate how young men constructing identities in talk about their own use of violence. The study is based on a fieldwork at a youth detention home in Sweden. The data consists of individual interviews and video recordings of the treatment programme Aggression Replacement Training (ART). Detailed analyses have been made of conversations between the young men, between the young men and the trainers, and of the narratives generated in the individual interviews. The study has a social constructionist approach to identity, which is seen as constructed in a joint achievement in social interaction. An important analytical perspective in the study is how social categories and subcategories are constructed. The study has a particular focus on gender, primarily masculinity, but age and ethnicity are also being emphasised.

    The analysis draws on four empirical studies. It is shown how the young men construct a preferred self-presentation when talking about violent events. The narratives on violence are either based on experiences or talked about as a hypothetical use of violence. Violence based on personal experience is problematized and legitimized in terms of self-defence, defending friends, restraint and justified violence. Narratives of violence are shown to be interactional resources available to the young men. When talking about violence, the young men can be seen to regulate social relations, and to position themselves in relation to particular discourses of masculinity. The specific understanding of what it entails to be a man enables the use of violence with respect to social categorizations such as age, ethnicity or criminal identity. It is also argued that the treatment programme ART may, at times, facilitate maintaining a criminal identity.

    List of papers
    1. Construction Young Masculinity: A Case of Heroic Discourse of Violence
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Construction Young Masculinity: A Case of Heroic Discourse of Violence
    2008 (English)In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 139-161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, a young man's narratives of violence are analysed, and a culturally shared storyline is identified as the basis of these narratives. It is argued that the stories are organized so as to construct a preferred self-presentation. One strategy to achieve this is to establish boundaries for what type of violence to use, whom to fight, where and for what reasons. I also argue that the narratives are structured to avoid being categorized as either victim or perpetrator, although both categories are drawn upon. Issues of masculinity are made relevant through categorization of the characters in the narrative, and positions are made available. Different masculine categories such as the hero/villain/non-man become relevant in the analysis. Different gendered positions are used in negotiating a masculine identity around narratives of and through telling about violence.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London, UK: Sage Publications, 2008
    Keywords
    Discourses of masculinity, hero, morality-in-practice, narrative identity, preferred self-presentation, storyline, victim/perpetrator, violence
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38636 (URN)10.1177/0957926507085949 (DOI)000255167100001 ()
    Available from: 2008-09-17 Created: 2014-11-14 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    2. To Slap A  ‘Kraxelhora’: Violence as Category-Bound Activity in Young Men's Talk
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>To Slap A  ‘Kraxelhora’: Violence as Category-Bound Activity in Young Men's Talk
    2007 (English)In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 144-162Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Much of the research, on young men’s violence towards girls is problematised, and linked to sexist attitudes held by young men towards girls. In this article I intend to show that, in discussing violence, violence towards girls is not generally accepted among the young men with a documented history of violence. In a study of violent young men in residential care, undergoing Aggression Replacement Training (ART) the issue becomes pertinent in an ART-discussion. One of the young men discloses that he has hit a girl once. In different accounts he elaborates the motives for doing this, and works to justify his actions. He gives two accounts of the episode in the ART-lesson; in an interview afterwards he produces yet another version. In this article I examine the variations he gives of what happened, how he is striving to position himself as morally justifiable and produce a successful masculine position for himself.

    Keywords
    Masculinity, violence, interaction, categorisations, discourse analysis, child studies
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38635 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-09-17 Created: 2014-11-14 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Above All Else, Do Not Snitch: Constructing Criminal Identities and Negotiating Masculinities in Agression Replacement Training
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Above All Else, Do Not Snitch: Constructing Criminal Identities and Negotiating Masculinities in Agression Replacement Training
    2008 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present article, the issue of snitching is analysed as part of a convict code, drawn upon by young men detained for assessment at a youth detention home and participating in Aggression Replacement Training (ART). ART is viewed in light of other research on peer interventions. The analysis shows how sticking to the convict code facilitates positioning oneself as knowledgeable within a field of criminality. Perhaps more important, however, is how drawing on the code regulates the relationship to other men and polices one's own behaviour, as well as that of others. Both the trainers and the young men can be seen to use different discourses of masculinity as interactional resources.

    Keywords
    Aggression Replacement Training, convict code, identity, peer intervention, violence
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38634 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-09-17 Created: 2014-11-14 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    4. Constructing the Other: Ethnic and Racist Categorizations in Talk on Violence
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constructing the Other: Ethnic and Racist Categorizations in Talk on Violence
    2008 (English)Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is increasingly becoming multiethnic, resulting in a complex ethnic landscape. The present article documents how two young men in Sweden use ethnic and racist categories in talk about violence, from two distinct but mirroring positions: one explicitly non-Swedish and one a former neo-Nazi. Both young men describe being the target of violence due to being identified as the Other, and both use ethnic and racist categorizations to describe their fighting opponents. It is also argued here that both men are problematizing and deconstructing present and previous identities.

    Keywords
    Categorization, ethncity, neo-Nazi, positioning, racism, Sweden, violence, young men
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38633 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-09-17 Created: 2014-11-14 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
  • 13.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Tema Barn, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige.
    To Slap A  ‘Kraxelhora’: Violence as Category-Bound Activity in Young Men's Talk2007In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 144-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much of the research, on young men’s violence towards girls is problematised, and linked to sexist attitudes held by young men towards girls. In this article I intend to show that, in discussing violence, violence towards girls is not generally accepted among the young men with a documented history of violence. In a study of violent young men in residential care, undergoing Aggression Replacement Training (ART) the issue becomes pertinent in an ART-discussion. One of the young men discloses that he has hit a girl once. In different accounts he elaborates the motives for doing this, and works to justify his actions. He gives two accounts of the episode in the ART-lesson; in an interview afterwards he produces yet another version. In this article I examine the variations he gives of what happened, how he is striving to position himself as morally justifiable and produce a successful masculine position for himself.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tänk om man tycker det är gott då?: Elevers perspektiv på alkoholprevention2013In: Samverkande föräldrastöd : nätverk för forskning och utveckling / [ed] Bengt Sandin & Disa Bergnéhr, Linköping: Tema Barn, Linköpings universitet , 2013, p. 19-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Unga män och våld: att studera våld i ett genusperspektiv2007In: Mandom, mod och morske män: rapport från manlighetskonferensen den 30 november 2006 / [ed] Renée Frangeur, Linköping: Forum för genusvetenskap och jämställdhet, Linköpings universitet , 2007, p. 55-63Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Cater, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Det våldbevittnande barnets ontologi2014In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, ISSN 1654-5443, Vol. 35, no 2-3, p. 82-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recurring demand in Sweden today is to view children witnessing domestic violence as victims of crime. In this article, we discuss the ontological status of the child and how witnessing violence might affect this status. In light of research on children witnessing domestic violence and how these children are described in support methods, we aim to contribute to the understanding of the ontology of children and particularly of the child witnessing domestic violence. This is related to the political history of and current theories on children. Previous research shows that witnessing domestic violence increases the risk for developing violent behaviors. Despite this, current Swedish support methods pay little attention to possible use of violence among these children. This could entail that important aspects are not given discursive space within interventions. Chris Jenk’s writing on mythological imageries of children is related to children witnessing domestic violence. The imageries of Apollo and Dionysus respectively produce different ideas about innocence, vulnerability, responsibility and competence. An Apollonian imagery of children witnessing domestic violence focuses exclusively on children as victims, ignoring their potential for violence. The Dionysian imagery on the other hand generates an idea of children with an innate propensity for violence, which threatens their ontological status as victims. Furthermore, the ontology of children explored in the context of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and a more complex understanding of children is called for. The imagery of Athena is put forth to broaden the understanding of children as responsible and participating on their own terms. This imagery goes hand-in-hand, we argue, with John Wall’s call for a childism parallel to feminism. Athena is put forth to broaden the understanding of children as responsible and participating on their own terms. This imagery goes hand-in-hand, we argue, with John Wall’s call for a childism parallel to feminism.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nehlin, Ann
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Muftee, Mehek
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Becevic, Zulmir
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Barns perspektiv på jämställdhet i skola: En kunskapsöversikt2010Report (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Utvärdering av BRIS Internetbaserade stödkontakter2012Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    et al.
    Department of Thematic Studies (Child Studies), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. .
    Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
    Department of Government, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Department of Thematic Studies (Gender Studies), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK.
    Mediated communications of violence: the example of “happy slapping”2011In: Journal of Children and Media, ISSN 1748-2798, E-ISSN 1748-2801, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 230-234Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) afford new possibilities for complex interactions among young people. An Internet user can be both a consumer (receiver) and a producer (sender) of mediated communication, asynchronously or simultaneously—such as someone who both uploads and watches video clips on YouTube (von Feilitzen, 2009). “And between these two extremes—the reception and sender roles— the user can be interacting or participating to different extents, for example, in games and in communities owned, maintained and copywrited by someone else” (von Feilitzen, 2009, p. 36). Communication and socializing in virtual online and real offline life through ICTs provides new dimensions to young peoples’ “identity experiments and identity formation” (p. 38). As discussed by Wellman (2001), the “social affordances of computerized communication networks” provide youth with many possibilities for new forms of production and consumption of violence in and through media technology. In this Commentary we aim to outline some important, yet relatively underdeveloped, aspects of research that connect new media, violence, and young people.

  • 20.
    Hearn, Jeff
    et al.
    Linköpings University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Linköpings University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Cowburn, Malcolm
    University of Bradford, UK.
    Guidelines for researchers on doing research with perpetrators of sexual violence: final report2007Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Hearn, Jeff
    et al.
    Gender Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nordberg, Marie
    Education, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Child Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Balkmar, Dag
    Education, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Klinth, Roger
    Education, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Pringle, Keith
    Sociology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Linn
    Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hegemonic masculinity and beyond: 40 years of research in Sweden2012In: Men and Masculinities, ISSN 1097-184X, E-ISSN 1552-6828, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 31-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the status of the concept of hegemonic masculinity in research on men and boys in Sweden, and how it has been used and developed. Sweden has a relatively long history of public debate, research, and policy intervention in gender issues and gender equality. This has meant, in sheer quantitative terms, a relatively sizeable corpus of work on men, masculinities, and gender relations. There is also a rather wide diversity of approaches, theoretically and empirically, to the analysis of men and masculinities. The Swedish national context and gender equality project is outlined. This is followed by discussion of three broad phases in studies on men and masculinities in Sweden: the 1960s and 1970s before the formulation of the concept of hegemonic masculinity; the 1980s and 1990s when the concept was important for a generation of researchers developing studies in more depth; and the 2000s with a younger generation committed to a variety of feminist and gender critiques other than those associated with hegemonic masculinity. The following sections focus specifically on how the concept of hegemonic masculinity has been used, adapted, and indeed not used, in particular areas of study: boys and young men in family and education; violence; and health. The article concludes with review of how hegemonic masculinity has been used in Swedish contexts, as: gender stereotype, often out of the context of legitimation of patriarchal relations; "Other" than dominant, white middle-class "Swedish," equated with outmoded, nonmodern, working-class, failing boy, or minority ethnic masculinities; a new masculinity concept and practice, incorporating some degree of gender equality; and reconceptualized and problematized as a modern, heteronormative, and subject-centered concept.

  • 22.
    Källström, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andersson Bruck, Kjerstin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Etiska reflektioner i forskning med barn2017Book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Thunberg, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Young victims’ positioning: Narrations of victimhood and support2019In: International Review of Victimology, ISSN 0269-7580, E-ISSN 2047-9433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aims to analyze how young people narratively negotiate their position as victims, how their social surroundings react to their victim positioning and what types of support they are offered. It is argued that those who position themselves as innocent victims receive support, while those who do not position themselves as such are left to fend for themselves. It is concluded that receiving support functions as a way for young victims to keep intact their narratives of who they are; while young people who did not receive support and acceptance for their positioning needed to re-negotiate their narrative to make sense of who they are after the victimization. Thereby, the victimizing event was incorporated into their narrative identity.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-06-19 07:46
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