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  • 1.
    Agélii Genlott, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Att lära sig läsa och skriva - i nutid och för framtid2014In: Interaktiva medier och lärandemiljöer / [ed] Elza Dunkels; Simon Lindgren, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2014, 1, p. 155-166Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Agélii Genlott, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Closing the gaps: Improving literacy and mathematics by ict-enhanced collaboration2016In: Computers and education, ISSN 0360-1315, E-ISSN 1873-782X, Vol. 99, p. 68-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Literacy and mathematics are necessary skills that for different reasons unfortunately not everybody acquires sufficiently. In OECD countries there is also a gender gap; boys lag behind girls in literacy but often outperform girls in mathematics (OECD, 2012). ICT (Information and communication technologies) may contribute useful tools to address both these problems but in order to effectively create better educational conditions there is yet a need to develop effective methods that combine ICT with key factors for learning. This research contributes to this by measuring effects of the “Write to Learn” (WTL) method. WTL lets children from 1st grade use several ICT tools to write texts and subsequently discuss and refine them together with classmates and teachers using digital real-time formative feedback and assessment. The central learning factor addressed, in mathematics as well as in literacy, is the written communication allowing the learners to interact with peers and teachers. WTL draws on methods from socio-cultural theory, including continuous social interaction and written real-time formative feedback among peers, using shared electronic forums for collaboration, thereby providing social meaning and increased learning of literacy and mathematics, among both boys and girls.

    The study uses quantitative methods and two control groups, one using traditional method (no ICT) and one using technology individually (without integrated social interaction and formative feedback), to compare results from 502 students in grade 3 national tests in mathematics and literacy. WTL yields by far best results; higher average score both in literacy and mathematics, smaller gender gap, and significantly better results for the under-achievers. The ITU method performs worst, which shows that ICT use must be well integrated into the pedagogy to be useful.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    A Conceptual Framework for E-Learning in Developing Countries: A Critical Review of Research Challenges2009In: Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries, ISSN 1681-4835, E-ISSN 1681-4835, Vol. 38, no 8, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a critical review of research on challenges for e-learning with a particular focus on developing countries. A comprehensive literature review including 60 papers on e-learning challenges was undertaken for the purpose of understanding how to implement e-learning in developing countries. Research questions were: what has existing research identified as the major challenges for e-learning, and, what differences, if any, are there between developing countries and developed countries in this respect? The literature study found 278 papers which were condensed to 60 based on exclusion and inclusion criteria designed to find papers of best quality as well as papers that clearly investigated well-defined challenges. The research found 30 specific challenges which were grouped into four categories, viz.: courses, individuals, technology and context. The overall conclusion is that these challenges are equally valid for both developed and developing countries; however in developing countries more papers focus on access to technology and context whereas in developed countries more papers concern individuals. A further finding is that most papers focus on one or two categories of challenges; few papers exhibit a comprehensive view. Because challenges are interrelated, based on the findings we propose a conceptual framework of emerging issues for e-learning in developed and developing countries. The framework is useful to guide both practice and research.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    From one-to-one to integration of multiple toolsIn: Research in Learning Technology, ISSN 2156-7069, E-ISSN 2156-7077Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Wicander, Gudrun
    Karlstad universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Development as Freedom: how the Capability Approach can be used in ICT4D Research and Practice2012In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Åström, Joachim
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    “You can't make this a science!”: Analyzing decision support systems in political contexts2012In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 543-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on problems and conflicts encountered when using decision support systems (DSS) in political contexts. Based on a literature study and two case studies we describe problems encountered in relation not only to the DSS itself, but also to the political decision process. The case studies have been carried out in two cities in Sweden that at different times but in similar situations have used DSS in order to reach a decision in complicated and contested matters. In both cases we have previously found that the method and IT tool used for decision analysis were appreciated by most participants, but the inherent rationality of the DSS was in conflict with how participants usually make decisions as well as with the political process. The assumption was that a strict and open method would make grounds for clear decisions, but the results of the decision process were none of the cases implemented. In one case the result of the decision analysis was that no clear decision was made. In the other case the lowest ranked alternative was implemented. Furthermore, in neither city the method was ever used again. We therefore ask: What are the challenges and limitations to using DSS in political contexts? Our study shows that challenges relate to selecting and using criteria; eliciting weights for criteria (high level of subjectivity); understanding all the amount of facts available in the system; time constraints; and lack of impact on the final decision. This study contributes to both research and practice by increasing the understanding of what challenges are experienced in DSS use, since the findings can be used as a framework of challenges that should be addressed, in design of systems as well as method for use. The study also contributes to understanding the role of politicians in decision-making and the consequences for the use of DSS. Further, the literature study showed that there are overall very few studies on the actual use of DSS in a political context, and we therefore conclude by encouraging more studies reporting actual use.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Wiklund, Matilda
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Reclaiming the students: coping with social media in 1:1 schools2014In: Learning, Media & Technology, ISSN 1743-9884, E-ISSN 1743-9892, Vol. 39, p. 37-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a debate about the advantages and disadvantages of using social media in education. Drawing on interviews and surveys with students and teachers in three Swedish schools, this study finds that studentsas well as teachers find much of the students' social media use distractive to learning. We investigate this by means of an interpretative study of students' and teachers' experiences. We find that concerns relate to how social media use makes students less social, how weaker students are more likely to get distracted, how teachers lack strategies for tackling the problem and how the responsibility of the use is delegated to the students. We discuss how the distractive use of social media is made possible as a result of education policies requiring a higher degree of individual work, individual responsibility, and educational choices forstudents. Teachers and school leaders need to jointly reclaim the students and coping strategies for the distractive use are urgently needed.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Hedström, Karin
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Learning from e-learning: emerging constructive learning practices2009In: Doing IT research that matters, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research is situated within the field of Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D) and asks if ICT use can make learning practices change. While constructive learning practices are critical to both individual and societal development, repetitive learning practices are the norm in many developing countries. The study is based on observations and in-depth interviews and uses a structurational approach to understand if and how students views of learning change during an e-learning program in Sri Lanka. We found four constructive learning practices that emerged through technology use; individual exploring, interaction with peers, interaction with teachers, and taking responsibility of the learning. Many constructive learning practices emerged outside the LMS used, in students’ voluntary uses of publicly available resources on the Internet. The study shows that technology use can play a positive role for development, provided an open environment is available; students learn constructive practicesfrom e-learning.

  • 9.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    E-waste management in east African community2012In: Handbook of research on E-Government in emerging economies: adoption, e-participation, and legal frameworks / [ed] Kelvin Joseph Bwalya, Saul F.C. Zulu, Hershey: IGI Global, 2012, p. 307-327Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapidly increased use of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) has increased demand for electronic equipment such as mobile phones and computers. Individuals and government institutions worldwide are adopting ICTs at a fast pace. Increased consumption has resulted in huge amounts of e-Waste generated from scrapped electronics. E-Waste contains chemical substances that have adverse effects on the environment and human health. Consequently, handling of e-Waste needs to be organized in ways that minimize the adverse effects. This chapter investigates how the East African Community (EAC) governments, i.e., Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, and Burundi, conceive their role in combating negative impact of e-Waste and how their views and current actions compare to the current state of the art practices in e-Waste management. As data on e-Waste handling in EAC countries is not publicly available, semi-structured interviews with high government officials and a literature review were conducted. The results show that EAC governments consider e-Waste to be an emerging problem. Despite this awareness and attempts to mitigate the problem in some of the countries, there are currently no solid solutions that have been crafted to rectify or mitigate this problem. The study suggests practical solutions for resolving e-Waste challenges in EAC.

  • 10.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    MLCMS actual use, perceived use, and experiences of use2015In: ijEDict - International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology, ISSN 1814-0556, E-ISSN 1814-0556, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 101-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile learning involves use of mobile devices to participate in learning activities. Most elearning activities are available to participants through learning systems such as learning content management systems (LCMS). Due to certain challenges, LCMS are not equally accessible on all mobile devices. This study investigates actual use, perceived usefulness and user experiences of LCMS use on mobile phones at Makerere University in Uganda. The study identifies challenges pertaining to use and discusses how to improve LCMS use on mobile phones. Such solutions are a cornerstone in enabling and improving mobile learning. Data was collected by means of focus group discussions, an online survey designed based on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), and LCMS log files of user activities. Data was collected from two courses where Moodle was used as a learning platform. The results indicate positive attitudes towards use of LCMS on phones but also huge challenges whichare content related and technical in nature.

  • 11.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    On mobile learning with learning content management systems: a contemporary literature review2014In: Communications in Computer and Information Science, ISSN 1865-0929, E-ISSN 1865-0937, Vol. 479, p. 131-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning Content management systems (LCMS) are important tools for organizing learning material and communication. Increasingly mobile technologies are used for internet access; particularly important in developing countries where broadband is scarce. Mobile LCMS introduce specific challenges, which are yet not fully addressed. This paper reviews the literature on mobile LCMS for the purpose of identifying current research focus, research gaps, and future research directions regarding how to bridge the gaps and leverage CMS technology to support "mobile learning". The concept matrix method is used to collect and analyze literature. Five prominent research areas are found; Use, access, design and infrastructure; communication and collaboration; engagement and knowledge development; content and service delivery; and implementation experiences and evaluation. A major gap identified is that research does neither clearly nor thoroughly address the intersection between learning and technology. Adjusting technologies to learning contexts and environments is a key area for future research.

  • 12.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    On mobile learning with Learning Content Management Systems: a contemporary literature review2014In: Mobile as a Mainstream – Towards Future Challenges in Mobile Learning: 13th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning, mLearn 2014, Istanbul, Turkey, November 3-5, 2014, Proceedings / [ed] Marco Kalz, Yasemin Bayyurt & Marcus Specht, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014, p. 131-145Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning Content Management Systems (LCMS) are important tools for organizing learning material and communication. Increasingly mobile technologies are used for internet access; particularly important in developing countries where broadband is scarce. Mobile LCMS introduce specific challenges, which are yet not fully addressed. This paper reviews the literature on mobile LCMS for the purpose of identifying current research focus, research gaps, and future research directions regarding how to bridge the gaps and leverage CMS technology to support “mobile learning”. The concept matrix method is used to collect and analyze literature. Five prominent research areas are found; Use, access, design and infrastructure; communication and collaboration; engagement and knowledge development; content and service delivery; and implementation experiences and evaluation. A major gap identified is that research does neither clearly nor thoroughly address the intersection between learning and technology. Adjusting technologies to learning contexts and environments is a key area for future research.

  • 13.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Practices and challenges in an emerging m-learning environmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Practices and challenges in an emerging m-learning environment2017In: ijEDict - International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology, ISSN 1814-0556, E-ISSN 1814-0556, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 103-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reports an interpretative case study investigating practices and challenges in an emerging m-learning environment at Makerere University in Uganda. The research was part of the MobiClass pilot project. Data was collected by means of observations and interviews with teachers and various m-learning support staff, including teacher trainers, systems administrators and a software developer. The Framework for Rational Analysis of Mobile Education (FRAME) is used as an analytic framework. The research focuses on how learning content management systems (LCMS) are implemented and used for m-learning purposes. We observed teacher training and m-learning content development practices and found that teacher skills for developing educational content, institutional m-learning policies and training programs are crucial success factors. The main finding is the importance of the support staff; it takes a long time to implement new technology and change teaching practices, support staff is needed to manage, inspire and support student and teachers.

  • 15.
    Asiimwe, Edgar
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Wakabi, Wairagala
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Using Technology for Enhancing Transparency and Accountability in Low Resource Communities: Experiences from Uganda2013In: ICT for Anti-Corruption, Democracy and Education In East Africa / [ed] Katja Sarajeva, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2013, 6, p. 37-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed at investigating the user needs, practices, experiences and challenges faced in promoting transparency and accountability using ICT in low-resource communities. The research was conducted on two ICT4D (Information and Communication Technology for Development) initiatives, a call center, and a telecenter supported by two projects; (1) “Promoting Social Accountability In The Health Sector In Northern Uganda”, (2) “Catalyzing Civic Participation And Democracy Monitoring Using ICTs”. The two projects sought to fight corruption by increasing transparency and accountability using ICT to enable “whistle-blowing,” i.e., reporting misconduct in service provision. The projects are based in Uganda and are carried out by Spider (Swedish Program for ICT in Developing Regions) partner organizations:Transparency International (TI) Uganda and Collaboration International ICT Policy in East and Southern Africa (CIPESA). Using interviews, focus group discussions and observations, the study addressed three research questions: (1) How have the two projects provided citizens a trusted and effective channel for “whistle-blowing”? (2) What are the enabling factors for whistle-blowing through ICT and challenges that affect whistle-blowers and how can the challenges be overcome?

    The ICT service-delivery monitoring and reporting methods used by projects include toll free phone calls, blogs, radio talk shows, SMS and e-mail for reaching out; and processes for verification of reports and for communicating reports to government. There are results that indicate these methods are sound enough to serve the purposes of transparency and accountability, and the track record exhibits real change achieved in many instances. ICT users are optimistic and trustful of these ICT methods. Effective whistle-blowing includes efficient and effective reporting processes, convenience in reporting, actual service delivery improvements, availability and privacy, and affordability.There are also a number of challenges, including user education, gender issues, and general issues pertaining to the business model, including economic sustainability and finding the most effective scope of the operations.

  • 16.
    Ask, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Implementation challenges: competing structures when new public management meets eGovernment2008In: Electronic government / [ed] Maria A.Wimmer, Hans J. Scholl, Enrico Ferro, Berlin: Springer , 2008, p. 25-36Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses practices, opportunities and challenges in local eGovernment project management by means of a case study of a Swedish city aiming at completely refocusing services, electronic and other, to become “citizen oriented”, meaning being able to meet the citizens’ needs more effectively. Based on empirical evidence collected by interviews and document studies, the article analyzes the development towards eGovernment and “the 24/7 agency”. Analyzing the case against eGovernment success factors we find seven challenges; political timing, resource allocation, political mandate, distinction between administrative and political responsibilities, coordination of departments, dependence on providers, and wise use of standards.. These challenges are critical because they mean choices important for national eGov development are open for local politics, complicated ad-hoc alliances among cities, and influences of strong individuals and groups. The article analyzes the challenges and finds that this situation is much a consequence of the prevailing strategic model for the public sector, New Public Management (NPM). This model by design leaves these issues in a void which has to be filled by negotiations among many actors with different roles, goals, and action space. The case shows that this makes national strategic eGov development volatile as it is dependent on a large number of local political assemblies; unlike the intention, NPM politicizes eGovernment.

  • 17.
    Ask, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    The Örebro city citizen-oriented e-Government strategy2009In: Social and organizational developments through emerging e-Government applications: new principles and concepts / [ed] Vishanth Weerakkody, Hershey, PA: IGI Global , 2009, p. 233-253Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Ask, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    The Örebro City Citizen-Oriented E-Government Strategy2008In: International Journal of Electronic Government Research, ISSN 1548-3886, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 69-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses practices, opportunities, and challenges in local e-government project management by means of a case study involving interviews, document studies, and an element of action research, over eight months. The analysis against e-government success factors finds seven "critical issues"; political timing, resource allocation, political mandate, distinction between administrative and political responsibilities, coordination of departments, dependence on providers, and use of standards. We found these issues open for local choice, influences of strong individuals and groups, and chance. This is a consequence of the prevailing strategic model for the public sector, New Public Management, which leaves these issues to be filled by negotiations among many actors with different roles, goals, and action space. The general lesson is that there is a need for practical ways of acting strategically to reduce the risk level and increase the ability to implement policy. 

  • 19.
    Ask, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    The Örebro city citizen-oriented e-Government strategy2009In: Handbook of research on strategies for local e-government adoption and implementation: comparative studies / [ed] Christopher G. Reddick, Hershey, PA: IGI Global , 2009, p. 752-772Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Avdic, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Hedström, KarinÖrebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.Rose, JeremyGrönlund, ÅkeÖrebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Understanding eParticipation: Contemporary PhD eParticipation Research in Europe2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book presents contemporary European research on eParticipation by means of a 13 chapters each describing a PhD research project as well as analyses of this research. The book both reflects the field and contributes to shaping it by discussing both long-standing and emerging issues. Contributions include three chapters on issues of DEVELOPMENT, including communities of practice, user-centred development, and safety & privacy issues, four chapters on IMPLEMENTATION, including spatial planning, participatory budgeting, and transformation processes, and five chapters on issues of USE, focusing on local government, developing countries, EU, civil society and NGO.

  • 21.
    Bakunzibake, Pierre
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. bUniversity of Rwanda, College of Science and Technology, School of Engineering and School of ICT, Rwanda.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Klein, Gunnar O.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    E-Government Implementation in Developing Countries: Enterprise Content Management in Rwanda2016In: Electronic Government and Electronic Participation, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2016, p. 251-259Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    E-Government is now on the rise in developing countries. While developing countries can "leapfrog" technology generations, the necessary organizational change is another matter. In industrialized countries technical systems have been developed over long time in parallel with institutional development; developing countries hope to make that journey faster. Most of the e-Government implementation research focuses on developed countries. It is important to explore the relation between the literature and the findings in the context of developing countries as to come up with a gap to reduce. An interview study with 56 people in 10 government organizations involved in implementing a government-wide enterprise content management system was conducted to find out how critical success factors found in literature on implementation of information management systems relate to the situation in the Rwanda public sector to discover the step forward in Rwanda. We find a large gap between expectations and results due to a strong focus on the technical tool and little concerns about issues related to organizational change.

  • 22.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Jonsson, Östen
    Leissner, Lena
    Trust and mistrust, quality-of-life and need for support: essons from narcolepsy-afflicted children and adolescents after the swine flu vaccination2015In: 3rd Nordic Symposium on Narcolepsy, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23. Danielson, Mats
    et al.
    Ekenberg, Love
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Larsson, Aron
    Public decision support: using a DSS to increase democratic transparency2005In: International Journal of Public Information Systems, ISSN 1653-4360, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 3-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a case study in which a decision support method (ADL) was employed by a local government in order to guide and aid decisions on three complicated and politically infected issues which had remained unresolved for many years. The research inquiry was whether a well-defined and openly accessible method would aid a common understanding of the decision problems, and whether people would be able to accept a clearly motivated decision even if politically they preferred a different option. The ADL method has been used in several public sector projects ranging from very large purchasing decisions to the selection of national policies, but this test case was novel in that it involved close inspection by the public. This case was also devised as a test of new methods for potential inclusion into normal practices. The post-case analysis shows mixed understanding of and belief in the method. The results raise issues concerning both the potential for decision support methods in a political context and the nature of political decision making.

  • 24. Danielson, Mats
    et al.
    Ekenberg, Love
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Åström, Joachim
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Towards interactive public decisions: connecting participatory processes and institutional contexts2008In: Collaboration and the knowledge economy: issues, applications, case studies : volym 1 / [ed] Paul Cunningham, Miriam Cunningham, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 2008, p. 345-350Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    And the winner is: eServices!: Comparing electronic and manual services from a user inclusion perspective 2007In: E-governance: transforming Government to build trust and quality, EuroSpace , 2007, p. 192-207Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Att förändra skolan med teknik: Bortom "en dator per elev"2014Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    "En dator per elev" är inte ett it-projekt utan ett förändringsprojekt. I den processen är det skolhuvudmännen som har bollen och det gäller för dem att sprida de positiva erfarenheterna till alla skolor. I den här boken pekar vi ut fem utvecklingsområden och diskuterar hur man bör gå tillväga.

  • 27.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Building an electronic service infrastructure in Europe: process drifting and link missing2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Building an infrastructure to manage electronic services2000In: Managing internet and intranet technologies in organizations: challenges and opportunities / [ed] Subhasish Dasgupta, Hershey, Pa.: Idea Group Publishing, 2000, p. 71-103Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Communication quality at the electronic highway: a challenge for systems development1994In: Electronic commerce, electronic partnership / [ed] J. Gricar, 1994Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Connecting eGovernment to real government: the failure of the UN eParticipation index2011In: Electronic government / [ed] Marijn Janssen, Hans J. Scholl, Maria A. Wimmer, Yao-Hua Tan, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, Vol. 6846/2011, p. 26-37Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    eGovernment rankings are increasingly important as they guide countries’ focus of their efforts. Hence indexes must not just measure features of web sites but also accurately indicate underlying government processes. eGovernment rankings are in a process of maturation in that direction, moving from purely measuring web sites to assessing use and government qualities. One such measurement is the UN eParticipation index, intended to measure how well governments connect to their citizens. This paper analyzes the quality of the index by validating it against other indexes of government-citizen relations qualities, democracy, internet filtering, and transparency. Results: The relation between the index and democracy and participation is non-existent. Countries which are authoritarian or obstruct citizen internet use by filtering can score high on eParticipation by window-dressing their webs. We suggest that the eParticipation index includes an element of reality check and propose ways to do that.

  • 31.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Democracy in an IT-framed society: introduction2001In: Communications of the ACM, ISSN 0001-0782, E-ISSN 1557-7317, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 23-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    DSS in a local government context: how to support decisions nobody wants to make?2005In: Electronic government: proceedings of the 4th International Conference, EGOV 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark, August 22-26, 2005 / [ed] Maria A.Wimmer Roland Traunmüller, Åke Grönlund Kim V. Andersen, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2005, p. 69-80Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports and analyses a case where a Decision Support System (DSS) was used in a local government for the purpose of arriving at a decision on a complicated and politically infected issue the City Council despite years of effort had failed to sort out. It was assumed that a strict and open method would make the grounds for the decision clearer, and that people would accept a clearly motivated decision even though they personally preferred another solution. The project was also intended as a test of new methods for potential adoption into normal practices. The analysis shows mixed understanding of, and mixed belief in, the method. While generally happy with the project work, also this time the Council failed to make a decision as constituency concerns eventually overruled the rationality of the arguments in the decision making council. The case raises issues of both the potential for DSS in a political context and the nature of political decision making. In particular we conclude that DSS use has to be carefully crafted but swiftly executed, and more than a one-off effort as a change process is involved.

  • 33.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    e-democracy: in search of tools and methods for effective participation2003In: Journal of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis, ISSN 1057-9214, E-ISSN 1099-1360, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of e-democracy has approached the problem of improving democratic decision making by emphasizing encouraging broad participation. This is due to a perceived lack of credibility on part of politicians, indicated by decline in both turnout in elections and recruitment to political parties. Experiences so far show that while in local contexts use of electronic tools in combination with redesigned democratic processes have indeed affected participation positively, both scaling and quality requires more sophisticated technical tools of at least two kinds. One kind, recognized by the e-democracy community, are tools supporting cooperative work for facilitating communication among humans. Another kind, this paper argues, is tools for more formal problem modelling. The e-democracy field has so far almost exclusively been concerned with encouraging and—at best—modelling, moderating, and reviewing discussions. Experiences from e.g. citizen juries point to the importance of expert participation. Decision Support Systems could provide—mediated—expert participation in virtual groups and in communication with the public. To achieve this, there is a need to carefully consider both the usability of Decision Support Systems and their role in the overall democratic system.

  • 34.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Electronic government2007In: Encyclopedia of digital government / [ed] Ari-Veikko Anttiroiko and Matti Malkia, Hershey, PA: Idea Group Reference , 2007, p. 634-642Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Electronic government - what’s in a word?: Scope, status and future of the field2005In: e-Government: European strategies compared, Editorial Verbo, 2005Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Electronic government: design, applications and management2002Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Electronic identity management in Sweden: governance of a market approach2010In: Identity in the Information Society, ISSN 1876-0678, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 195-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews the history and current status of electronic identities (eID) and eID management in Sweden, including an outlook for the future. The paper is based on official policy documents, technical documentation, presentations by key experts, and comments from government agencies and independent experts. The future perspective is based on the October 2009 public investigation (SOU 2009:86) by the E-delegation. It is concluded that the E-delegation proposal, while still pending political decision, is a major step forward in terms of making eID more established as an infrastructural element in the government electronic service program

  • 38.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Elektroniska omröstningar2001In: Rösträtten 80 år: forskarantologi / [ed] Christer Jönsson, Stockholm: Justitiedepartementet , 2001, p. 233-254Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Emerging electronic infrastructures: exploring democratic components2005In: Handbook of public information systems / [ed] David Garson, New York: Taylor & Francis, 2005, 2Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Emerging electronic infrastructures: exploring democratic components2003In: Social science computer review, ISSN 0894-4393, E-ISSN 1552-8286, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 55-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concepts of electronic government and electronic democracy have common roots in that electronic government must rest on, and support, democratic principles. This article discusses how the components of a democratic society are treated as they are built into the emerging electronic infrastructures, dealing with services and dialogues pertinent to the functioning of the public sector, and tries to find emerging patterns. This article opens a discussion on the nature of the emerging infrastructures by reviewing four implementations of local e-democracy and putting them into the context of global e-government development, in particular the European Union’s development of “eEurope.” It is found that the cases represent different models of democracy, models that are only partially explicit. The development is governed more by gradual implementation of information and communication technology than a general political agenda. This means local actors have great influence, and hence, e-democracy is not deterministic; it can come in many shapes.

  • 41.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    European electronic service infrastructure building: drifting into the future?2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Framing electronic government: e-mc3: in search of strong inscriptions2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    ICT is not participation is not democracy: eParticipation development models revisited2009In: Electronic participation, proceedings / [ed] Ann Macintosh, Efthimios Tambouris, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009, Vol. 5694, p. 12-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There exist several models to describe "progress" to eParticipation. Models are typically ladder type and share two assumptions, progress is equalled with more sophisticated use of technology, and direct democracy is seen as the most advanced democracy model None of the assumptions are true. considering democratic theory. and neither is fruitful as the simplification disturbs analysis and hence obscures actual progress made. The models convey a false impression of progress. but neither the goal, nor the path or the stake-holders driving the development are clearly understood, presented or evidenced. This paper analyses commonly used models based on democratic theory and eParticipation practice, and concludes that all are biased and fail to distinguish between the three dimensions an eParticipation progress model must include: relevance to democracy by any definition, applicability to different processes. (capacity building as well as decision making), and measuring different levels of participation without direct democracy bias.

  • 44.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Informatics: exploring a world of change2006In: Democratic eGovernance: approaches and research directions / [ed] Jan Olsson, Joachim Åström, Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell international , 2006, 1, p. 27-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Introduction to the special issue on e-democracy in practice: methods, infrastructures and discourse2002In: e-Service Journal, ISSN 1528-8226, E-ISSN 1528-8234, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 3-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    IT, demokrati och medborgarnas deltagande2001Book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    "It's the Economy Stupid": Why the Swedish e-Government Action Plan will not Deliver Better Government, and How it Could2009In: International Journal of Public Information Systems, ISSN 1653-4360, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 61-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish 2008 Government’s Action Plan on eGovernment offers old wine (focussed on technology rather than on services; production-centred rather than needs-based) in old bottles (closed political systems rather than open infrastructure; no measurements and, consequently, no incentives for government agencies to change). This paper analyzes the Plan based on an Enterprise Architecture integration perspective, shows why the proposed measures are not productive, and suggests an alternative route to remedy the shortcomings. The fundamental underpinning idea is that an open infrastructure should replace one negotiated in a piecemeal manner by the largest stakeholders. The paper proposes an open information infrastructure model to replace the one based on politics and negotiations suggested in the Plan. Within the Swedish government model such an infrastructure has to be placed under the jurisdiction of a dedicated agency.

  • 48.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Lost in competition?: The State of the Art in e-Government research2008In: Digital government: e-Government research, case studies, and implementation / [ed] Hsinchun Chen, Lawrence Brandt, Valerie Gregg, Roland Traunmüller, Sharon Dawes, Eduard Hovy, Ann Macintosh, Catherine A. Larson, Berlin: Springer , 2008, p. 61-84Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Making eGovernment happen, and why it doesn’t2004In: e-Government and e-Democracy: progress and challenges / [ed] J. Padget, R. Neira, J.L. Diaz de León, nstituto Politecnico Nacional , 2004Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Managing electronic services: a public sector perspective2000Book (Refereed)
1234 1 - 50 of 155
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