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  • 1.
    Broberg, Anders
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Linnea
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Axberg, Ulf
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Grip, Karin
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Kjerstin
    Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sharifi, Ulrika
    Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Cater, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Forssell, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Iversen, Clara
    Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stöd till barn som bevittnat våld mot mamma: resultat från en nationell utvärdering2011Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Cater [Källström Cater], Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Forssell, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Descriptions of fathers’ care by children exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV): relative neglect and children’s needs2014In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 185-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The situation of children exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV) raises certain issues related to child neglect. Little is known about how children exposed to IPV perceive and describe their living conditions. This paper addresses this lack by analysing aspects of fathers’ care in descriptions given by children whose fathers have subjected the mothers to IPV. The analysis is based on qualitative interviews with 10 children aged 8–12 years. Three themes constitute the results. First, the fathers are not described by the children as engaged and responsible care providers. Second, in their general descriptions of how mothers and fathers fill complementary roles for the child, parenthood seems to mean in practice that the mother is the provider of (almost) everything the child may need. Third, the mere absence of violence seems to be judged ‘good-enough’ fathering in the children’s descriptions. Altogether, this leads to the conclusion that being exposed to IPV and believing that mothers are responsible for their welfare precludes children from viewing their fathers as responsible for their well-being. The limited utility for child welfare practice of a ‘child-based’ definition of neglect in cases of IPV is discussed, and alternatives are suggested.

  • 3.
    Cater, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Forssell, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Almqvist, Linnea
    Almqvist, Kjerstin
    Utvärdering av stödinsatser för barn som upplevt våld i sin familj2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Forssell, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Better safe than sorry?: Quantitative and qualitative aspects of child-father relationship after parental separation in cases involving intimate partner violence2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between a child and its parents (caregivers) is essential for the child’s development and well-being. When one of these parents uses violence against the other parent (intimate partner violence, IPV), this will affect the child one way or another: physically, psychologically, cognitively, socially. When two parents separate, the circumstances surrounding contact between the child and its parents change. The aim of this thesis is to analyse – in the context of Swedish parenting ideals and family norms – aspects of children’s relationships (after parental separation) with a father who has used violence against the mother in order to bring forward a foundation to discuss if and under what circumstances a continued contact is in the best interest of the child. The empirical basis for the thesis consists of two different sets of data. The first is qualitative interviews with children living at a women’s shelter (n=10). The second is a subset of data from a large evaluation study investigating support tochildren who had witnessed IPV. The latter material  comprises interviews with and psychometric data on 165 mothers and 165 children. Results from the first article show that a majority of the children (75%) had continued contact with their fathers after parental separation, and that even in cases where there were indications of child abuse, about 50% of the children had unsupervised face-to-face contact with their fathers. This high rate can possibly be explained by the assumption (supported in legislation) that children have a need for contact. Further, the second article shows that children with and without contact do not differ in their level of well-being; i.e. contact with a violent father does not have the positive effect on children that has been found in general samples. In the third article, the violent fathers are described by the children as lazy and unreliable. Child–father contact is discussed in terms of why, when and how contact is in the child’s best interest.

    List of papers
    1. Patterns in child–father contact after parental separation in a sample of child witnesses to intimate partner violence
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterns in child–father contact after parental separation in a sample of child witnesses to intimate partner violence
    2015 (English)In: Journal of family Violence, ISSN 0885-7482, E-ISSN 1573-2851, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 339-349Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the well-documented negative consequences for children experiencing violence perpetrated bytheir fathers against their mothers, little is known about how characteristics of exposure to violence are related to child–father contact after parental separation. In this study, we (a) describe contact patterns between children and fathers after parental separation and (b) analyze links between patterns ofviolence and contact in a sample of child witnesses to intimate partner violence in Sweden. Information about 165 children (aged 3–13 years) was obtained from their mothers, who had been subjected to violence by the child’s father. In 60% of the cases, the parents had joint custody. Results suggest that children without contact with their father have witnessed more violence than children with contact. However, when they do have contact, previous violence against the mother does not correlate either with amount or type of child–father contact. Instead, high socioeconomic status and negotiation skills correlated positively with amount of contact.

    Keywords
    Child abuse; Child–father relationship; Consequences of family violence; Family violence
    National Category
    Social Work Psychology
    Research subject
    Social Work; Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43145 (URN)10.1007/s10896-015-9673-2 (DOI)000351522300007 ()2-s2.0-84925538173 (Scopus ID)
    Funder
    Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare
    Available from: 2015-03-02 Created: 2015-03-02 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    2. Contact with a violent father after parental separation: When is it beneficial for children’s well-being?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contact with a violent father after parental separation: When is it beneficial for children’s well-being?
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Social Work
    Research subject
    Social Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49859 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-04-18 Created: 2016-04-18 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    3. Descriptions of fathers’ care by children exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV): relative neglect and children’s needs
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Descriptions of fathers’ care by children exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV): relative neglect and children’s needs
    2014 (English)In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 185-193Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The situation of children exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV) raises certain issues related to child neglect. Little is known about how children exposed to IPV perceive and describe their living conditions. This paper addresses this lack by analysing aspects of fathers’ care in descriptions given by children whose fathers have subjected the mothers to IPV. The analysis is based on qualitative interviews with 10 children aged 8–12 years. Three themes constitute the results. First, the fathers are not described by the children as engaged and responsible care providers. Second, in their general descriptions of how mothers and fathers fill complementary roles for the child, parenthood seems to mean in practice that the mother is the provider of (almost) everything the child may need. Third, the mere absence of violence seems to be judged ‘good-enough’ fathering in the children’s descriptions. Altogether, this leads to the conclusion that being exposed to IPV and believing that mothers are responsible for their welfare precludes children from viewing their fathers as responsible for their well-being. The limited utility for child welfare practice of a ‘child-based’ definition of neglect in cases of IPV is discussed, and alternatives are suggested.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Blackwell Publishing, 2014
    Keywords
    children, fathering, neglect, violence
    National Category
    Social Sciences Social Work
    Research subject
    Social Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-25512 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2206.2012.00892.x (DOI)000331612900007 ()2-s2.0-84894234623 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2012-08-29 Created: 2012-08-29 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
  • 5.
    Forssell, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Contact with a violent father after parental separation: When is it beneficial for children’s well-being?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Forssell, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Cater, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Patterns in child–father contact after parental separation in a sample of child witnesses to intimate partner violence2015In: Journal of family Violence, ISSN 0885-7482, E-ISSN 1573-2851, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 339-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the well-documented negative consequences for children experiencing violence perpetrated bytheir fathers against their mothers, little is known about how characteristics of exposure to violence are related to child–father contact after parental separation. In this study, we (a) describe contact patterns between children and fathers after parental separation and (b) analyze links between patterns ofviolence and contact in a sample of child witnesses to intimate partner violence in Sweden. Information about 165 children (aged 3–13 years) was obtained from their mothers, who had been subjected to violence by the child’s father. In 60% of the cases, the parents had joint custody. Results suggest that children without contact with their father have witnessed more violence than children with contact. However, when they do have contact, previous violence against the mother does not correlate either with amount or type of child–father contact. Instead, high socioeconomic status and negotiation skills correlated positively with amount of contact.

  • 7.
    Jonhed, Anna L
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Att bevittna våld i föräldrarelationen - konsekvenser för barn2018In: Våld i nära relationer: Socialt arbete i forskning, teori och praktik / [ed] Eveliina Sinisalo & Linn Moser Hällen, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, p. 170-178Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Jonhed, Anna L
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Barns upplevelser av våld2018In: Våld i nära relationer: Socialt arbete i forskning, teori och praktik / [ed] Eveliina Sinisalo & Linn Moser Hällen, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, p. 161-169Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Jonhed, Anna L
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Föräldrarnas separation och samhällets ansvar2018In: Våld i nära relationer: Socialt arbete i forskning, teori och praktik / [ed] Eveliina Sinisalo & Linn Moser Hällen, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, p. 179-190Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Jonhed, Anna L
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bennich, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Samverkansrelationer mellan socialarbetare och andra yrkesgrupper2018In: Relationer i socialt arbete: i gränslandet mellan profession och person / [ed] Anders Bruhn & Åsa Källström, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, 1, p. 262-278Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Jonhed, Anna L
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Källström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Glatz, Terese
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Utmaningar i relationsbaserat arbete med barn och föräldrar som lever med våld i familjen2018In: Relationer i socialt arbete : I gränslandet mellan profession och person / [ed] Bruhn, Anders & Källström, Åsa, Liber, 2018, p. 138-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
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  • text
  • asciidoc
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