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  • 1.
    Angelo, Elin
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Profesjonsforståelse: en innfallsvinkel til å profesjonalisere det musikkpedagogiske yrkesfeltet2014Ingår i: Nordisk musikkpedagogisk forskning: Årbok, ISSN 1504-5021, Vol. 15Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Music-pedagogical philosophy – An approach to professionalize the field of music education

    A carefully considered music-pedagogical philosophy is necessary to develop professional knowledge for the individual music teacher, as well as for music-pedagogical communities and for the music teacher profession as a whole. In this article we elaborate on individuals’ music pedagogical philosophies (no: profesjonsforståelser) as a fruitful approach to articulate and discuss leading ideals and norms for quality within the field of music education. We argue that the professions “body of knowledge” is invisible and irreproachable, and that it is crucial to articulate, clarify and discuss the professional knowledge, expertise and mandate that is held within this vocational field. This article is informed by professional literature and research in music education, and focuses the aspects jurisdiction, certification and authorization, as well as power, identity and knowledge. In conclusion we argue that music pedagogical philosophy should be a focused part of music teacher education, in order to professionalize the field and qualify the discussions about quality, both inside and around the field of music education.

  • 2. Angelo, Elin
    et al.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Gries, Stefan
    Johansson, Karin
    Varkøy, Øivind
    Rolle, Christian
    Academization and the music profession in higher music education: an analysis from a discourse theory perspective2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 3.
    Angelo, Elin
    et al.
    NTNU, Trondheim, Norway.
    Varkøy, Øivind
    Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo, Norway.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Notions of Mandate, Knowledge and Research in Norwegian Classical Music Performance Studies2019Ingår i: Journal for Reserach in Arts and Sports Education, E-ISSN 2535-2857, Vol. 3, nr 1, s. 78-100Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Policy changes and higher education reforms challenge performing musician programmes across Europe. The academisation of arts education means that classical performance programmes are now marked by strong expectations of research paths, publications, and the standardisation of courses, grades and positions. Drawing on interviews with ten teachers and leaders within the field of higher music education, this article discusses notions of mandate, knowledge and research in classical performance music education in Norway. Against the backdrop of academisation, the aim of this article is to illuminate central tensions and negotiations concerning mandate, knowledge and research within higher music education. The problem concerns issues of who should be judged as qualified and who should have the authority to speak on behalf of the performing music expertise community. The study is part of the larger study Discourses of Academisation and the Music Profession in Higher Music Education (DAPHME), conducted by a team of senior researchers in Sweden, Norway and Germany. Through an analytic-theoretical reading of the empirical data, informed by Foucault’s power/knowledge concept, two discourses on mandate are identified (the awakening discourse and the Bildung discourse) as well as three discourses on knowledge (the handicraft discourse, the entrepreneurship discourse and the discourse of critical reflection) and two discourses on research (the collaborative discourse and the ‘perforesearch’ discourse). The latter of the two research discourses pinpoints a subject position as a musician/researcher with knowledge, craft and skills in both music performing and research.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Notions of Mandate, Knowledge and Research in Norwegian Classical Music Performance Studies
  • 4.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Ferm Thorgersen, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Varkøy, Øivind
    Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    Aesthetic and communicative experiences: building on the ideas of Christopher Small2014Ingår i: Music Education Research, ISSN 1461-3808, E-ISSN 1469-9893Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 5.
    de Boise, Sam
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Varkøy, Øivind
    Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo, Norway.
    Rolle, Christian
    Universität zu Köln, Köln, Germany.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Contesting the Concept of ‘Activism’ in Music Education2015Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 6.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    “A world of pluralism and diversity”… What?: Perspectives on diversity and uniformity, heterogeneity and homogeneity – and the question of content in general music education2013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been proclaimed that we live in an era of pluralism and diversity. It’s quite common to speak about the basis of comprehensive approaches and forms of understanding of life's diversity being on the wane. Different values ​​are set free from hierarchical conceptual models. Many stories about the world are said to be existing side by side. In many ways this is a reasonable description of the times we are living in.

    At the same time we find some quite opposite tendencies in our societies – tendencies to uniformity, sameness and homogeneity – or worse: simplicity and naivity – or even worse: a sweet innocence (sancta simplicitas) – regarding understanding and thinking about life, society and culture. We face a rise in fundamentalist thought – may be as a consequence of disorientation and a feeling of uncertainty in an era of rapid changes and increasing diversity. We can observe a kind of technical and economical rationality putting its clammy hand over more and more areas of life. This affects a lot of thinking in a number of fields, including education, art, science, health, children, sports and nature.

    In this panel, this tendency of uniformity and homogeneity of ideas – within in a culture of proclaimed diversity and heterogeneity – is addressed and discussed from different angles. Starting with some very broad perspectives on technical rationality, the discussion is ending up focusing ideas of content in general music education as well as in music teacher education. The participants in this panel are renowned researchers and music education philosophers that will present ideas connecting to current discussions in Scandinavian countries as well as in Germany in which they all take part. Viewed from an international perspective these critical reflections are not unique. Thus, when the questions on diversity and plurality in music education are discussed, it has the prospective to be of interest to international music education philosophy.

  • 7.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Berättelsen under deras fötter: fem musiklärares livshistorier2005Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The dissertation concerns five music teachers who teach on the course Artistic Activity at upper secondary school and the main aim is to acquire an understanding of the teachers’ views of the core subject Music. A further aim is to describe the five teachers' personal experiences of music in various social, educational and musical contexts, and how these experiences affect their teaching.

    The empirical material is designated life stories and comprises narratives, written by the teachers themselves and orally related to the researcher through conversations. The problem area concerns relations between life’s different directions in a number of interacting temporal and contextual dimensions. For this reason the interpretation of the teachers’ views of music as experience and as school subject is carried out on three levels of abstraction regarded as interacting with one another. The individual teachers’ narratives concerning their lives were on a first level of abstraction analysed and contextualised biographically, from which emerged five life histories which constituted the basis for in-depth hermeneutic interpretation. By way of interpretations on the personal, educational and institutional level the discussion concludes on the third level of abstraction, where focus is on the relationship between the teachers’ work and the broader educational discourse in society.

    The study also offers a discussion of the possibilities and problems of hermeneutics as an overall theoretical frame of reference. Furthermore it takes up theoretical angles of approach concerning narratives, this in connection with life history method.

    The study indicates that what is essential in the relationship between the five music teachers’ personal experience of music and their work is not the concrete experience of different types of music, of different musical contexts or of particular educational environments where such experience has been acquired. There is no straightforward relation of cause and effect and indeed there are certain differences between the teachers in this respect. However, there is a vital relation in that what

    the teachers have derived from their own musical experiences – pleasure and play, skill, a sense of community, outlet for emotion – is what they want to pass on to the pupils. Musical knowledge is regarded as personal and as being generated in processes where the pupils’ everyday culture is reconstructed. When this basic attitude to music comes into conflict with the teacher’s work, there appears another, joint discourse which is considered distinctive of contemporary life. Accordingly, the discussion takes up the theme of the individual in the centre, both in education – where the focus is on the pupil’s resources, requirements and need to assume responsibility – and in society as a whole, where such values as freedom of choice have acquired greater importance than collective ones.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 8.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Bildung, popular culture and music education: practical implications and a critical discussion of Swedish music education2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on an on-going study (Eva Georgii-Hemming & Victor Kvarnhall) concerning Swedish music education. The paper, like the study, is grounded in a hermeneutic view of Bildung. Viewed from an international perspective, the kind of music education that has developed in Sweden is quite unique. Thus, when the possibilities and limitations of this music education are discussed in terms of Bildung, it has the potential to be of interest to international music education research. During the presentation, video recorded examples of practice from Swedish high schools will be used to illustrate the issues under consideration.During the last years, a critical discussion of the contemporary music education in Sweden has emerged. In this music education, (some) popular music and (some of the) students’ ‘own’ music plays a significant and concrete part. Although researchers and evaluators of education agree that a variety of students’ personal experiences should be included in the school context, questions are raised concerning whether music education has become too limited in relation to repertoire, content and teaching methods. A hermeneutic view of Bildung holds that an encounter between the familiar and the unfamiliar is necessary to lead to a new understanding. Whenever ‘we ourselves’, our understanding and earlier experiences, encounter the unknown, others’ experiences, or new ideas – there is the potential for us to change fundamentally. In such a Bildung process it is necessary that we change perspective. Understanding ’the Other’ also requires us to dare to view the ingrained or familiar with different eyes. This is a chief issue in education. If Bildung is the aim, the main concern is how music education can contribute to this movement between the known and the unknown.

  • 9.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Challenges for the music teacher profession2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 10.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Confusing quality with quantity: What can philosophy contribute to contemporary (music) education?2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 11.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Digital music and media use2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 12.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Hermeneutic knowledge: dialogue between experiences2007Ingår i: Research Studies in Music Education, ISSN 1321-103X, E-ISSN 1834-5530, Vol. 29, nr 1, s. 13-28Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the need for theoretical analysis in narrative music education research. Stories we hear are not simply accounts of individual experiences. They are also part of cultural narratives, socially and historically located. For the purpose of increased and in-depth understanding in narrative studies there must be an analysis of how a person's life relates to phenomena such as time, culture, society and gender. In order to bring to light unconscious pre-understandings, hidden conventions and ideologies it is necessary to problematize the text on different levels of abstraction.

    One way of enriching narrative work is through the incorporation of hermeneutics.i Hermeneutics offers dialogue-based interpretations of meaningful phenomena in the life world. If we understand narrative as a form of knowledge, both narrative and hermeneutics refer to the same fundamental characteristics of our individual and social existence: historicity and interaction, or dialogue, between experiences.

  • 13.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    How mobile is man?: On social sounds of music2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 14.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Kunskapens Konst: Vänbok till Börje Stålhammar2007Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kunskapens konst: Vänbok till Börje Stålhammar, består av arton artiklar författade av internationella forskare inom bl.a. musikvetenskap, musikpedagogik, pedagogik och historia. Artiklarnas tematik har stor spännvidd och tar bland annat upp frågor om musik, konst och identitet; musikundervisning som profession och praktik.

  • 15.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Meeting the challenges of music teacher education2013Ingår i: Professional knowledge in music teacher education / [ed] Eva Georgii-Hemming, Pamela Burnard, Sven-Erik Holgersen, Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2013, 1, s. 203-213Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses the value to professional teachers of being able to relate teaching to pedagogical thinking as well as to broader social and philosophical perspectives. The text focuses on some of the challenges that are faced by music education in schools. Those who are about to face these challenges have been trained within the music teacher education system, so that these issues are also directly relevant to music teacher education. The challenges vary from country to country, according to their different educational systems and conditions. However, there are generic and basic music educational challenges that are common to most countries.

    In the early sections of this chapter we explore: (i) music teaching as a profession; (ii) the professionalization of the job; and (iii) professional knowledge in the sense of a critical and reflective approach to teaching. Following this are three sections which gradually develop the arguments of earlier sections from a general perspective to a more specific one. It is important for professional educators to be able to relate their teaching to theoretical and philosophical considerations in order to be able to participate in the general debate on education. Moreover, at a more specific music educational level, such knowledge is crucial in order to be able to make informed choices and decisions; this is important both for the status and legitimacy of the subject and for music educational practice.

    My goal is to suggest ways for music teachers to face current and future challenges by connecting aspects of the central arguments in this book.

  • 16.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Mobile identities: adults' use of music in digital media2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 17.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Music as experience inside and outside school2006Ingår i: RAIME : research alliance of institutions for music education: proceedings of the eight international symposium held at Schaeffergaarden, Copenhagen September 29-October 1, 2005 / [ed] Bengt Olsson, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet , 2006, s. 123-134Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 18.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Music as knowledge in an educational context2013Ingår i: Professional knowledge in music teacher education / [ed] Eva Georgii-Hemming, Pamela Burnard, Sven-Erik Holgersen, Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2013, 1, s. 19-37Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines student music teachers’ notions of different forms of knowledge and knowledge acquisition, and how they converge in music teacher education. The issues concern perceptions of knowledge in educational contexts in terms of art, craft, and science. How do the student teachers view the nature and characteristics of different forms of knowledge? And what implications arise for present and future education?

    Omnipresent questions concerning teacher education are whether the education should have an experience-based focus gained in schools, or a more academic, content-oriented focus: the crux is the relationship between subject content knowledge and pedagogical skills and competence. However, in music teacher education, musical practice in the broadest sense must also be taken into account, if only for its unique qualities when it comes to creating artistic knowledge.

    The main part of this chapter considers the relationship between artistic and pedagogical knowledge as guided by Aristotle’s discussion on knowledge. Accordingly techne (craft and the act of creation) as well as phronesis (‘practical wisdom’ including ethics) can be seen as two forms of practical knowledge, while episteme (‘justified, true belief’) concerns scientific knowledge.

    In order for society to reach a meaningful understanding of artistic activity, along with its worth and educative potential, awareness of the shifting forms and content of knowledge must be increased. Research into the interconnection of different forms of knowledge in a variety of pedagogical contexts and occupational cultures will meet a clear need on the part of music teacher education and the teaching profession in general.

  • 19.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Music education as practical wisdom: student music teachers’ views on phronesis2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Music teacher education poses some of the most challenging questions about the role of ‘knowledge’ or epistemological issues, as well as assumptions about what it is to be musically educated. Pressures to reform curricula in music education are widespread. Continuous development and self-renewal of music teachers and teaching requires careful thought and reflection concerning the complexity of forms of knowledge and practices that we encounter, as teachers, university lecturers, teacher educators, student teachers, policy-makers and researchers. This symposium focuses on how ‘knowledge’ in music teacher education is understood, what theories we hold and related assumptions we make about teachers and learners, and how we can understand and make connections between theory and practice. Within this symposium, we will address a number of fundamental questions designed to take the audience to the heart of current debates around knowledge, practice, professionalism, and learning and teaching in music. Questions considered include:

    •    What forms of knowledge are an inherent part of, and shape our understanding of, music education?

    •    What are the implications and challenges for music teacher education?

    There are eight papers presented across two sessions in this symposium.

    Part I

    The particular focus of the first part of the symposium is to demonstrate the power of diverse theoretical concepts and perspectives to explore, analyse and engage with different forms of knowledge. Empirical studies will be used to highlight and illustrate philosophical perspectives.

    Eva Georgii-Hemming (chair), Örebro University, Sweden: Music education as practical wisdom. Student music teachers’ views on phronesis. Øivind Varkøy, Örebro University, Sweden and Norwegian Academy of Music, Norway: Techne and music education. Jonathan Stephens, University of Aberdeen, Scotland: Knowledge in practice. Sven-Erik Holgersen, University of Aarhus, Denmark: Knowledge and professionalism in music teacher education.

    Part II

    The particular focus of the second part of the symposium is to demonstrate how research can inform: (a) pedagogical approaches in music teacher education; (b) methods, courses and field experiences; and (c) the preparation of teachers for diverse populations from a range of educational settings. Pamela Burnard, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom: Knowledge differentiation and creative professionalism in music teacher education? Suzanne L. Burton, University of Delaware, USA: Constructing professional paths by construing the curriculum through collaboration in music teacher education.Teresa Mateiro and Maria Westvall, Örebro University, Sweden: Student teachers' reflections on the relationship between professional knowledge and cultural influences in music education. Andreas Lehmann-Wermser, Bremen University, Germany: Artist and/or music teacher: Developing professionals.

  • 20.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Music in European classrooms: a comparison of two lessons from Sweden and Germany2012Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 21.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Musikalisk erfarenhet och Estetisk verksamhet2006Ingår i: Nordisk musikkpedagogisk forskning: årbok, Oslo: Norges Musikkhøgskole , 2006, Vol. 8, s. 153-172Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 22.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Personal experiences and professional strategies2006Ingår i: Music Education Research, ISSN 1461-3808, E-ISSN 1469-9893, Vol. 8, nr 2, s. 217-236Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on empirical research carried out in Sweden during the years 2000 and 2004. The study concerns five music teachers who teach at upper secondary school and the main aim was to acquire an understanding of the teachers' views of the core subject Music. A further aim was to describe the five teachers personal experiences of music in various social, educational and musical contexts, and how these experiences affect their teaching. The problem area concerns relations between life's different directions in a number of interacting temporal and contextual dimensions. For this reason the teachers' narratives were analysed and contextualised on different levels of abstraction. The study indicates that there is a vital relationship between what the teachers have derived from their own musical experiences—e.g. pleasure and play, outlet for emotion—an what they want to pass on to their pupils.

  • 23.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Popular music in school: beyond the familiar?2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is grounded in a hermeneutic view of Bildung. The hermeneutic tradition holds that an encounter between the familiar and the unfamiliar is necessary to lead to a new understanding. Whenever ‘we ourselves’, our understanding and earlier experiences, encounter the unknown, others’ experiences, or new ideas – there is the potential for us to change fundamentally. In such a Bildung process it is necessary that we change perspective. Understanding ’the Other’ also requires us to dare to view the ingrained or familiar with different eyes. This is a chief issue in education.In Swedish music education, (some) popular music and (some of the) students’ ‘own’ music plays a significant and concrete part. According to both research studies and the national evaluation from 2003 music teachers in Sweden are striving to connect with students’ music preferences, leisure-related knowledge and interests. The problem is that this ambition not seems to be inclusive of all groups of students or musical experiences. Regardless of whether students or teachers choose the repertoire, it often involves music that students know well and the selections of styles within pop- and rock genres also appear to be limited.Undoubtedly, music education needs to address and include a variety of students’ personal experiences in the school context. Equally unequivocal is that school is a part of the society, as is popular culture. Consequently, schools and music education need to strive towards an understanding of this culture. But schools also have a democratic responsibility to give the students the social as well as the cultural capital they need to be able to meet, understand and co-operate with other human beings from a variety of cultures in the broadest sense. These resources might no longer be connected to either lofty or everyday music, but cultural multiplicity or competence doesn’t arise on its own. (Music) education has the potential to contribute to a thriving multitude that will encourage solidarity, acceptance and awareness. How music education can contribute to a playful, critical, musical and educational dialogue between different experiences – between the known and the unknown – is an important challenge for music educators as well as for music educational research.

  • 24.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Preface2013Ingår i: Professional knowledge in music teacher education / [ed] Eva Georgii-Hemming, Pamela Burnard, Sven-Erik Holgersen, Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2013, 1, s. xvii-xviiiKapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 25.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Shaping a music teacher identity in Sweden2011Ingår i: Learning, teaching, and musical identity: voices across cultures / [ed] Lucy Green, Bloomington: Indiana University Press , 2011, s. 197-209Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 26.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    The debate on (music) education quality: Aims and limitations2013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 27.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    The Professional Knowledge of Music Teachers: Previous and future research2013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Music teacher education, and consequently music teacher education research, poses many challenging questions. Studies from different parts of the world show teachers as being continually in the grips of educational change and rapid reform. Many music teachers are striving to achieve improved social status and legitimacy and pressures to reform curricula in music education are widespread.

    Professional music-pedagogical knowledge therefor includes critical thinking skills and a reflective approach in order to allow music teachers to react at a micro-political level. If teachers were to engage only in practical aspects of teaching, they would inevitably contribute to the implementation and the acceptance of initiatives coming from above in the hierarchy, or from the outside. Music-pedagogical practice cannot be limited to how others define it.

    Music teacher education as well as music teacher education research has an urgent theoretical and critical task ahead if we are to prevent pedagogical activities for future music teachers from being confined to adaptation to government directives and political and organizational changes, following and submitting to new guidelines and policies, and delivering only what is expected.

    Building an understanding of music teachers and music teacher education is concerned with professional knowledge; questions of the role of ‘knowledge’, epistemological issues, ways of viewing the value of music as well as assumptions about what it is to be musically educated and what this means for the pedagogical practice and development.

    The new book Professional Knowledge in Music Teacher Education, edited by Georgii-Hemming, Burnard and Holgersen, focuses on how ‘knowledge’ in music teacher education is understood, what theories we held and related assumptions we make about teachers and learners, and how we can understand and make connections between theory and practice.

    Within this symposium, my intention is to point to some fundamental issues addressed in the book, but first and foremost to discuss significances for further research.

  • 28.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Views of music as theory and practice: understanding music within music teacher education2008Ingår i: Proceedings of the IX International Symposium, November 8–10, 2007, University of Miami, Miami: Frost School of Music, University of Miami , 2008, s. 32-42Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 29.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    What is Quality?: The political debate on education and its implications for music education2013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the understandings of ‘quality’, found in on-going political debate and educational reforms around the world, and to discuss the implications of such meanings for music education.

    The quality of education is currently considered to be a concern of the highest political priority. To measure quality, exams and grades are being accredited with a more important role and the demands for reporting and controlling results are increasing. In other words, to improve quality in education the idea is to apply quality control and assurance through quantitative measurements. Furthermore, in the discourse of education quality concepts like ‘effectiveness’, ‘efficiency’ and ‘competitiveness’ are frequently recurring.

    Throughout the last decades the meanings of quality has shifted from being a dynamic concept related to education quality, to a concept referring to properties linked to the fields of production, policy-making and marketing. This way of thinking indicates a confusion of two opposing concepts. While the original, philosophical meaning of quality (lat. qualitas) – ‘character’ and ‘disposition’ – deals with questions like ‘what kind?’, quantity deals with questions such as ‘how much?’. The impact of this shift has been significant and today quality is e.g. subject to a number of goals already formulated.

    Moreover, notions of education quality necessarily imply educational values. The question is how an instrumental understanding of quality influences the essentially human and interpersonal activity of (music) education. These problems relate to challenges that are faced by music education and music teachers. The specific challenges vary from country to country, according to their different educational systems and conditions. However, there are generic and fundamental music educational challenges that are common to most countries. These will be discussed in this paper.

  • 30.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    What is quality?: the political debate on education and its implications for pluralism and diversity in education2017Ingår i: Philosophy of Music Education Review, ISSN 1063-5734, E-ISSN 1543-3412, Vol. 25, nr 1, s. 67-86Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The quality of education is currently considered to be a concern of the highest political priority. However, quality assurances of all kinds seem to be built on, and above all result in, a number of quantities. In this essay, I discuss the quality concept’s traditional and philosophical meaning and how it is being used today, but above all how our current understanding of “quality” may influence pluralism and diversity in education and music education. The worrying trends discussed in this essay are too complex to be solved with quick efforts by philosophers, researchers and/or teachers. Nevertheless, I illuminate some aspects of the issue, which are all in need of further discussions and analysis in relation to the area of music. I also indicate a number of philosophical concepts that can contribute to creating awareness as well as evoke some resistance.

  • 31.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Angelo, Elin
    Program for lærerutdanning, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway.
    Gies, Stefan
    Hochschule für Musik Karl Maria von Weber Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Johansson, Karin
    Konstnärliga fakulteten, Lunds universitet, Malmö, Sweden.
    Rolle, Christian
    Universität zu Köln, Köln, Germany.
    Varkøy, Øivind
    Norges musikkhøgskole, Oslo, Norway.
    Artist or researcher? Tradition or innovation? Challenges for performing musician and arts education in Europe2016Ingår i: Nordic Research in Music Education, ISSN 1504-5021, Vol. 17, nr 5, s. 279-292Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Artist or researcher? Tradition or innovation? Challenges for performing musician and arts education in Europe
  • 32.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Angelo, Elin
    Program for lærerutdanning , Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Trondheim, Norge.
    Varkøy, Øivind
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Rolle, Christian
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    The impact of academization on higher music education and the music profession2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 33.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Bouij, Christer
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    National and local perspectives on transition in music education after World War II2008Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 34.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Burnard, PamelaCambridge University, Cambridge, UK.Holgersen, Sven-ErikAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Professional knowledge in music teacher education2013Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Music teacher education poses some of the most challenging questions of any profession. The complexity of various forms of knowledge and practices that we encounter, as teachers, university lecturers, teacher trainers, student teachers, policy-makers or researchers, demands careful thought and reflection.

    Professional Knowledge in Music Teacher Education focuses on how knowledge is understood, what theories we hold and related assumptions we make about teachers and learners, and how we can understand and make connections between theory and practice imaginatively in music teacher education. Within this volume, internationally renowned contributors address a number of fundamental questions designed to take the reader to the heart of current debates around knowledge, practice, professionalism, and learning and teaching in music.

  • 35.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Johansen, Geir
    Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo, Norway.
    Knowledge and music teacher education today2010Ingår i: International Society for Philosophy of Music Education: The Eighth International Symposium on the Philosophy of Music Education / [ed] Werner Jank, 2010Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Even as a series of concepts of knowledge – knowledge production, knowledge as a commodity, useful knowledge, and knowledge economy – have been taken up by the political discourse, knowledge has come to be regarded a commodity, a product which can be tested and measured, and used as a means to enhance a nation’s competitiveness. This view of knowledge continues to exert an increasing influence on higher education, higher music education, and the education of music teachers around the globe. Despite this marketisation of higher education, the fact that academics have raised their voices against it, and the knowledge that people acquire via or in music being regarded as insignificant in terms of the national economy, the philosophy of knowledge has attracted only little attention within the philosophy of music education. This is particularly true of the question of what should be regarded as the central forms of knowledge in music teacher education. Among the themes in need of closer discussion are the relationship between knowledge priorities within music education and concepts of information and knowledge; the Aristotelian concepts of episteme, techne, and phronesis; and tacit knowledge. In turn, these knowledge forms and their role in music teacher education need to be considered relative to the knowledge values of a test and measurability based knowledge regime. What kind of framework for the knowledge priorities of music teacher education is entailed by such a regime?

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 36.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Johansson, Karin
    Konstnärliga fakulteten, Lunds universitet, Lund, sweden.
    Negotiating Critical Reflection: On research activities within performing musician programmes2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Performing musician programmes around Europe currently find themselves in a phase of change. While the main concern of higher music education (HME) has been to educate musicians and composers for a profession where conceptions of craftsmanship and artistic skill were given, new conditions for employability and processes of academization are now challenging this expert culture. Since the Bologna declaration 1999 music institutions must stimulate research activities within the context of artistic practice. Musical expertise is not enough for today’s music profession.  

    This paper draws on the on-going comprehensive three-year study DAPHME (Discourses of Academization and the Music Profession in Higher Music Education) conducted by a team of senior researchers in Sweden, Norway and Germany. By focusing discourses in HME the project explores contrasting perspectives on performing musicians’ expertise and societal mandate. Data are gathered through official documents and interviews with institutional leaders and teachers in HME across Europe.

    Based on the analysis of about 30 interviews we present and discuss what constitutes notions of competence, knowledge and research activities within HME. Findings indicate that ‘artistic research’ is acknowledged as the main way of enquiry in art but also that there are significant negotiations and renegotiations within and between different individual institutions. These debates relate to ontological questions on what (artistic) research is and epistemological questions on how knowledge is formed and transferred.

    There are contradictory ideas on whether or not artistic work needs textual supplements to become ‘research’. Either of these positions influences the content and organisation of teaching in HME. As an example of this, we focus on how critical reflection as a concept is discussed and negotiated in relation to research and artistic practice in undergraduate education.

  • 37.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Johansson, Karin
    Malmö Academy of Music, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Reflection, artistic research and higher music education2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Music performance programmes and higher music education (HME) in Europe are currently in a phase of change. Until the 21stcentury, the higher education of instrumental musicians and composers has been framed by fairly stable conceptions of craftsmanship and artistic skill, and by straight-forward connections with the professional field. Today, however, the future is unclear.Changing conditions for employability and processes of academization are challenging traditional notions of knowledge and competence in the expert culture. 

    The DAPHME project (Discourses of Academization and Professionalisation in Higher Music Education)[1] explores contrasting perspectives on performing musicians’ expertise and societal mandate in Sweden, Norway and Germany. Data are gathered through official documents and interviews with institutional leaders and teachers in HME. The concept of academization can be understood as the process of placing art into a university system and an academic discourse. Following this, fundamental ideas about artistic competence, knowledge and research are challenged and conflicts are likely to arise. In order to grasp and make visible such tensions, the DAPHME project employs a methodology inspired by critical discourse studies.

    In the context of results from the Swedish part study, that comprises seventeen leaders and teachers at four academies of music, this senior research paper discusses the development of HME from two perspectives: a) the articulation and negotiation of ‘reflection’ as part of the education of performing musicians and the music profession, b) the role of artistic research in the process of transforming traditional conservatoires into institutions of education and research.

    Reflection, and more specifically critical reflection, is often pointed out as contributing to successful lifelong learning. Reflective practice is seen as a method for professional growth and lasting learning outcomes, but what this implies in the context of HME has not been given much attention.  Findings from this study demonstrate how leaders and teachers negotiate interrelated conceptions of reflection; as based on language and cognition; as embodied, and as ‘purely’ musical. These positions relate to views on the content and organisation of teaching in HME, to epistemological questions on how artistic knowledge is formed and transferred and to how reflection is legitimized. 

    Following the Bologna process, all higher education programmes are to be research based. In Sweden, artistic research is by now implemented in the university system with an academic degree and governmental funding initiatives. What a research based higher education means in the 1stand 2ndcycle education of musicians is, however, a matter of debate. Findings indicate that ‘artistic research’ is acknowledged as the main way of enquiry and knowledge development in HME but also point to significant negotiations and renegotiations within and between different institutions. As part of this process, the conceptualisation and organisation of the degree project at bachelor and master levels will be discussed as an important tool not only for individual professional learning but for the implementation of institutional profiles and for the future development of HME.

    [1]https://www.oru.se/english/research/research-projects/rp/?rdb=p1032

     

  • 38.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Johansson, Karin
    Konstnärliga fakulteten, Lunds universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Angelo, Elin
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Gies, Stean
    Dresden University of Music, Dresden, Germany.
    Rolle, Christian
    University of Cologne, Köln, Germany.
    Varkøy, Øivind
    Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo, Norway.
    The construction of Academic Academies: Art, research and marketization as competing discourses2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim of this paper

    This paper draws on the on-going comprehensive three-year study Discourses of Academization and the Music Profession in Higher Music Education (DAPHME) conducted by a team of senior researchers in Sweden, Norway and Germany. The overall purpose of the project is to investigate how processes of academization affect performing musician programmes. By focusing discourses in higher music education (HME) the project, more specifically, explores contrasting perspectives on performing musicians’ expertise and societal mandate. Data are gathered through official documents and interviews with institutional leaders and teachers in HME across Europe.

    Based on the preliminary analysis of about 30 interviews this paper presents findings that concern notions of competence, knowledge and research activities within HME. We will particularly discuss these findings in relation to the analytic framework of critical discourse analysis (Angermüller 2007; Fairclough 1993, 2009, 2010).

    The Context

    Performing musician programmes around Europe currently find themselves in a phase of change. While the main concern of HME during the 20th century has been to educate musicians and composers for a profession where conceptions of craftsmanship and artistic skill were given, new conditions for employability and processes of academization are now challenging this expert culture. Since the Bologna declaration 1999, music institutions must stimulate research activities within the context of artistic practice. Musical expertise is thus not enough for today’s music profession. Traditionally, concepts like employability and (artistic) research have not played an important role in music profession. Therefore it is likely that conflicts arise when these enter the discourses on and within music academies. In a wider context, this also concerns the broader issue of the role of higher education in times of marketization and instrumentalization.

    Methodology

    Empirical data consist of official documents (e.g. syllabi, official presentations, self evaluations, political documents related to the Bologna process) and interviews with leaders and teachers within four institutions in Sweden, Norway and Germany respectively. We are primarily interested in exploring the tensions between different viewpoints within higher education institutions. Therefore we are focusing on those responsible for implementing educational policies on a daily basis, rather than interrogating students’ experiences. The topics addressed in the open-ended interviews, central for this paper, concern notions of competence, knowledge, and artistic research, as well as views on their functions in education and in the music profession.

    In order to analytically capture and make visible the tensions that indicate negotiations and renegotiations of higher music education, the analytic framework of critical discourse analysis (Fairclough 1993, 2009, 2010), combined with linguistically informed French discourse analysis (Foucault 1974), especially enunciative pragmatics (Angermüller 2007) are used. The reason for this choice is CDA’s view on discourse, not only as language in general but discourses as a form of social interaction and practice (Fairclough 1993; 2009). Changes, and discursive events, in society help to shape both institutions and interactions between actors. This relationship can be understood in terms of a mix of discourses. The method of analysis can therefore demonstrate how multiple, competing discourses are shaped by the politics of education reforms. Over time, different discursive practices within and across institutions are also restructured.

    Earlier examinations concerning the purposes of higher (music) education, and its role in relation to society and the individual, provided three key discourses (Barkholt 2005; Georgii-Hemming, Burnard & Holgersen 2013; Unemar Öst 2009; Kezar 2004; Hufner 2003, Johansson 2013; Wilson and van Ruiten 2014; Stephens 2013), which served as the foundation for the first phases of our analysis: (i) The classical academic discourse, (ii) The discourse of marketization; (iii) The discourse of artistic freedom.

    These articulations have a long history in the Western world, but are also present within the European policy arena today. Thus, present-day articulations adhere to, and in different ways reformulate, earlier ideas about higher (music) education. Following Fairclough (e.g. 2010), discursive struggles are fundamental social conditions. Different social actors have access to, and help to create, plural discourses, which does not mean that certain discourses are linked to specific actors. However, depending on the distribution of power particular discourses are easier to obtain than other.

    With regards to academic institutions, it is fairly common that they acquire a hybrid discourse where elements of the ”Entrepreneurial University” are added to, and fused with, classical European university norms and structures (Melander 2006). This potentially means that art academies are currently in a process of developing hybrid discourses where components from articuations of art, research and market are mixed.

    Conclusion

    This paper deals with empirical discursive objects in a theoretical way and will engage in a critical reflection of the nexus of language, knowledge and practice in contemporary higher music education. Preliminary analyses indicate discourses between at least two social logics: in the world of knowledge to be recognised as part of a specialised art community and in the world of power to be recognised as part of academic organisations with a certain status (c.f. Angermüller 2013). 

  • 39.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Johansson, Karin
    Faculty of Fine and Performing Arts, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Moberg, Nadia
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Reflection in Higher Music Education: What, Why, Wherefore?2020Ingår i: Music Education Research, ISSN 1461-3808, E-ISSN 1469-9893Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Reflection in higher music education: what, why, wherefore?
  • 40.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Kvarnhall, Victor
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Music listening and matters of equality in music education2015Ingår i: Svensk tidskrift för musikforskning / Swedish Journal of Music Research (STM–SJM), ISSN 2002-021X, Vol. 97, s. 27-44Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The journal is also named Swedish Journal of Music Research, vol 2, pp 27-44

  • 41.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Kvarnhall, Victor
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Musiklyssnande i undervisningen2014Ingår i: Musik för alla: Filosofiska och didaktiska perspektiv på musik, bildning och samhälle / [ed] Øivind Varkøy, Johan Söderman, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 1:1, s. 121-133Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    I det här kapitlet diskuterar vi lyssnandets roll i skolans musikundervisning. När människan lyssnar på musik, hör hon sällan bara det som klingar. Mer eller mindre medvetet associerar hon också till personliga minnen, särskilda platser eller musikaliska och sociala konventioner som finns i samhället. Det kan vara kulturella föreställningar, konnotationer, om hur en viss musik är förbunden med vissa (grupper av) människor – exempelvis kvinnor, män, svenskar, homosexuella. Det kan vara musikaliska konventioner som är knutna till en viss stil – tonartshöjning, ett särskilt ”sound” eller typiska ackordfärgningar. Sådana konnotationer och konventioner kan påverka hur musiken värderas, vilket i sin tur kan göra människor ”döva” för musik som känns främmande. Att öka sin kompetens att ta till sig sådan musik, är inte synonymt med att lära sig att ”tycka om”. Det handlar snarare om att kunna möta skilda musikstilar, utövare eller lyssnare med respekt. Varför och hur man arbetar med musiklyssning i undervisningen kan, och bör, variera. Vi har dock avgränsat den här texten till att handla om arbetssätt som är inriktade dels mot adekvata beskrivningar av hur den klingande musiken låter (som exempelvis ljudbild, tempo, rytm, instrument), dels mot diskussioner om vad i detta som gör att musiken kan upplevas som o/intressant, nyskapande eller förutsägbar. Vi menar att detta kan bidra till att elever kommer förbi för-givet-tagna föreställningar, vilket också har en viktig funktion att fylla i utformandet av en jämlik musikundervisning.

    Vårt resonemang tar sin utgångspunkt i att människor utvecklar kunskap och förståelse genom att tillägna sig och tolka redan existerande uppfattningar i ett samhälle. Som individer föds vi in i ett visst sammanhang som är betydelsefullt för våra tankar, idéer och föreställningar, men också för vad och hur vi lär. Detta innebär att våra erfarenheter, tolkningar och vårt lärande delvis är kollektivt präglade. Vår vardagliga förståelse och våra vardagliga tolkningar tas ofta för givna och blir sällan föremål för reflektion. Det betyder däremot inte att vi behöver vara fast i dessa för-givet-taganden. Skolan är en plats där våra erfarenheter, föreställningar och argument kan prövas och utmanas genom möten med andra/s erfarenheter och synsätt. Vår utgångspunkt och bärande tanke kan därmed benämnas ett hermeneutiskt bildningsperspektiv (Gustavsson 2009; Schuback Sá Cavalcante & Ruin 2006: 42).

  • 42.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Kvarnhall, Victor
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    What do you hear?: How music listening can promote fundamental values in education2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 43.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Kvarnhall, Victor
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    YouTube som musikalisk erfarenhet2011Ingår i: Perspektiv på populärmusik och skola / [ed] Claes Ericsson, Monica Lindgren, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2011, s. 143-164Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att frågor kring kultur, livsvillkor och samhälle hör ihop med (möjligheterna och begränsningarna för) lärande är det förmodligen ingen större tvekan om. Problemet blir då istället hur vi ska tala om denna kultur, dessa livsvillkor och detta samhälle, av idag. Det finns givetvis otaliga vis att karaktärisera den svenska och västerländska samtiden, och vad som format och formar den. Men något som kan ses som ofrånkomligt att diskutera, och som också diskuteras flitigt, är vad den ”digitala revolutionen” kan sägas bära på. Vad innebär det att vi nu lever i ett samhälle där informations- och kommunikationsteknologin (IKT) är en del av ungas lärande, meningsskapande, och socialisation? Svaren på denna fråga i relation till utbildning och skola har tidigare tenderat att vara antingen teknikromantiska, utopiska eller teknikfientliga, dystopiska.

    Med utgångspunkt i ett hermeneutiskt bildningsideal, där kunskap uppstår med grund i ”det egna”, ett möte med ”det andra/”den andre”, och tillbaka igen till ”det egna” (som då förändrats, eller utvidgats), krävs onekligen en förståelse av vad detta ”det egna” egentligen är. Denna kunskapssyn innebär att pedagogik måste ta hänsyn till elevernas egna erfarenheter – även om de i sig inte kan betraktas som ”tillräckliga”. För att kunskap ska uppstå krävs ett möte med ”det andra/den andre”, vilket kan ses som skolans uppdrag. Med andra ord, i detta sammanhang: Vad menar vi när vi talar om elevernas egen (musikaliska) kultur, elevernas egna (musikaliska) erfarenheter? Om dessa kan begreppsliggöras som ”populärkultur” behöver vi formulera en bild av denna. Vad innefattar, innebär och medför den samtida populärkulturen? Vi vill påstå, att när vi talar om detta idag, kan vi inte undgå att prata om den moderna IKT’n.

    I det här kapitlet är inte vår avsikt att presentera konkreta förslag på musikundervisningens innehåll och hur den kan organiseras med hjälp av IKT. Det handlar snarare om att synliggöra lärandekvalitéer i det digitala rummet, och hur medvetenheten omkring dessa kan utgöra grund för ett pedagogiskt förhållningssätt som både tillvaratar och förändrar elevernas egna erfarenheter.

    Ambitionen är att förstå och formulera, med hjälp av You Tube som exempel, vad denna elevernas egen musikaliska erfarenhet kan betraktas som, och således vad det får för musikpedagogiska konsekvenser, i termer av en rörelse som tar avstamp i den bekanta livsvärlden, men som sedan främmandegör den. För akten av att kunna ha distans och yppa kritik, kräver att vi vet vad det är vi ska förhålla oss distanserat till och kritisera. Oavsett om vi är elever, forskare, lärare eller studenter.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    YouTube som musikalisk erfarenhet FINAL DRAFT
  • 44.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Lilliedahl, Jonathan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Why "What" Matters: On the Content Dimension of Music Didactics2014Ingår i: Philosophy of Music Education Review, ISSN 1063-5734, E-ISSN 1543-3412, Vol. 22, nr 2, s. 132-155Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Is the most important function of education to provide students with basic skills and useful knowledge in order to eventually become employable? In many parts of the world knowledge league tables and policy documents inform us this is the case. As the question of what should form the educational content seems to be answered, teachers can concentrate on how they should teach, and researchers can concentrate on what method is the most effective. In the current rhetoric, however, many vital pedagogical issues have been placed in the background and the aesthetic subjects are downgraded. These tendencies worried Frede V. Nielsen who stated that didactic studies and philosophical inquiries yet again are needed to explore and give substance to the content dimension. Nielsen's writings on didactics form the basis for this essay, where we highlight which perspectives and dilemmas could be placed on a critical, philosophical didactic study agenda. The starting point is the field of tension between the what and the why of education.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Why What Matters: On the Content Dimension of Music Didactics
  • 45.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Westvall, Maria
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    A transition from school music to music in school and back?2009Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 46.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Westvall, Maria
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Music education – a personal matter?: Examining the current discourses of music education in Sweden2010Ingår i: British Journal of Music Education, ISSN 0265-0517, E-ISSN 1469-2104, Vol. 27, nr 1, s. 21-33Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The embedding of informal practises in music education in school relates to significant issues concerning students’ engagement, participation, inclusion and the role of the teacher. This article addresses these issues by presenting and discussing current music education in compulsory comprehensive schooling in Sweden. It does so by drawing upon music pedagogical research, music education studies conducted during the last ten years and national evaluations. Examples of practice from upper secondary schools are also used to clarify and illustrate the issues under consideration. It has been said that Swedish music education has gone from ‘School Music’ to ‘Music in School’. This development has been characterised by greater influence of students on curriculum content resulting in increased use of popular music, and, consequently, teaching strategies acquired from informal music playing contexts. The curriculum states that the core of the subject is practical music playing, through which personal development can occur – both musically and socially. Music education in several other countries is developing a more practical approach, and the role of popular music in schools and what is sometimes called informal learning is featured in international music pedagogy debates. This article considers the musical, pedagogical and democratic consequences of this pedagogy from a Swedish perspective. As a result of a sharp focus on personal social development and individual students’ musical interests, music education has become relatively limited in terms of repertoire, content and teaching methods. Recent evaluations and studies also demonstrate that music education lacks direction, and is short of creative engagement with music. The role of the teacher is unclear and sometimes lacks in validity in a practical music education situation. Viewed from an international perspective, the kind of music education that has developed in Sweden is relatively unique. Thus, when the possibilities and limitations of music education in Sweden are discussed, it has the prospective to be of interest to international music education research.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Music education – a personal matter?
  • 47.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Westvall, Maria
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Music education: a personal matter?: Examining the current discourses of music education in Sweden2012Ingår i: Future prospects for music education: corroborating informal learning pedagogy / [ed] Sidsel Karlsen, Lauri Väkevä, London: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012, s. 97-114Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 48.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Westvall, Maria
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Teaching music in our time - an appeal for active musicianship?2010Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 49.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Westvall, Maria
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Teaching music in our time: A study of student teachers' reflections on participation, inclusion and the right to musical development in their school-based music teacher education2009Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 50.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Westvall, Maria
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Teaching music in our time: student music teachers' reflections on music education, teacher education and becoming a teacher2010Ingår i: Music Education Research, ISSN 1461-3808, E-ISSN 1469-9893, Vol. 12, nr 4, s. 353-367Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerns students of music education in Sweden. It investigates the student teachers’ perceptions of their ongoing music teacher education, with a particular focus on the task of teaching music today. It considers whether they believe their teacher education prepares them for this undertaking, and in that case, how. Their various experiences from their school-based in-service education are considered, and the findings lead to a discussion of ideological issues with a bearing on democracy, the value of music and the function of music as a curriculum subject.

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    Teaching Music in Our TIme (accepted version)
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