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  • 1.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sartz, Lotta
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Bergskraft Bergslagen AB, Kumla, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sädbom, Stefan
    Bergskraft Bergslagen AB, Kumla, Sweden.
    Control of metal releases from historic sulphidic mine waste: Experience from the test site at the Ljusnarsberg mine field, Sweden (Project Bergskraft Bergslagen)2010In: Proc. EU Mine Drainage Research Exchange Conf. PADRE, June 11, Freiberg, Germany, 2010, p. 1 p-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Black shale: a biogeochemical archive2014In: Sedimentary Pore Space Cementation: Role of Microbes / [ed] Kothe E, Büchel G, 2014, p. 6-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Remedy by Sweden AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Mälardalen Univ., Västerås, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Structor Miljöteknik AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Peter
    Remedy by Sweden AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Structor Miljöteknik AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Ingvar
    Remedy by Sweden AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Structor Miljöteknik AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Remedy by Sweden AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Metal mobility or metal concentration as the basis for remediation strategy: a case study2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Metal loads or metal concentrations as the basis for risk assessment of a polluted site: a case study2013In: Sardinia 2013: executive summaries : proceedings of the fourteenth International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium / [ed] Raffaello Cossu, Pinjing He, Peter Kjeldsen, Yasushi Matsufuji, Debra Reinhart, Rainer Stegmann, Cagliari: CISA , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Allard, Bert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Remedy by Sweden AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Mälardalen Univ., Västerås, Sweden.
    Martell, Ulrika
    Structor Miljöteknik AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Andersson, Matilda
    Structor Miljöteknik AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Nordén, Anna
    Structor Miljöteknik AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Remedy by Sweden AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Carlsson, Peter
    Remedy by Sweden AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Structor Miljöteknik AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Reduction in situ of chromium(VI) at a heavily polluted site: a feasible remediation strategy2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Grandin, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ogar, Anna
    Nilsson, Charlotte
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Retention of uranium (VI) by live fungal biomass from a uranyl nitrate solution: Implications and applications under nutrient-poor conditionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7. Grandin, Anna
    et al.
    Ogar, Anna
    Institute of Environmental Science, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Potential use of native fungal strains for assisted uranium retention2015In: Minerals Engineering, ISSN 0892-6875, E-ISSN 1872-9444, Vol. 81, p. 173-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uranium-stabilizing ligands can be useful complexing agents for uranium in aqueous solution. The discovery of novel ligand candidates for selective uranium capture in artificial and natural waters could provide scope for their use in water remediation and metal recovery from low- and high grade ores. In this study we used seven fungal strains, isolated from shale waste, to monitor the uranium retention capacity from an aqueous solution. After four weeks of incubation, suspensions containing the fungal strains were filtered, and up to 100% of the total uranium inventory was removed from a 10 mg L-1 solution. Approximately 70% of the total uranium removal is attributed to complexation and/or adsorption by particles in the malt extract and some 10% is adsorbed by the fungal biomass. The additional 20% uranium removed could be related to the excretion of fungal metabolites. From 58% to 90% of the uranium is removed within ten minutes. The formation of colloidal/particulate uranium is proposed to be controlled by organic ligands in the culture medium and organic ligands excreted by the fungi where phosphorus moieties seem to be important. Membrane fouling by the hydrocarbons is also suggested to contribute to a loss of uranium from the aqueous phase.

  • 8.
    Grandin, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ogar, Anna
    Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland. .
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Biosorption of uranium by fungi isolated from weathered alum shale residues2013In: / [ed] E. Kothe and G. Büchel, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Grandin, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ogar, Anna
    Jagellonian University, Krakow, Poland.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Uranium induced stress promotes fungal excretion of uranium/metal stabilizing ligands: Analysis of metal-organic compounds with Size Exclusion Chromatography and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy2014In: Uranium - Past and Future Challenges: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Uranium Mining and Hydrogeology, Springer Publishing Company, 2014, p. 347-354Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Grandin, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Mobilization of vanadium from LD slag by salt-roasting/alkaline heterotrophic leaching2011In: 25th International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 22-26 August, 2011, Rovaniemi, Finland / [ed] Pertti Sarala, V. Juhani Ojala, Marja-Leena Porsanger, Vuorimiesyhdistys , 2011, p. 135-136Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Grandin, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Stability of weathered shales at water field capacity in the presence of Aspen wood shavings2011In: Mine water: managing the challenges:  proceedings of the International Mine Water Association Congress 2011 / [ed] Trude R.Rüde, Antje Freund, Christian Wolkersdorfer, Aachen: RWTH , 2011, p. 331-335Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Grawunder, Anja
    et al.
    Friedrich Sciller Univ., Jena, Germany.
    Schäffner, Franziska
    Friedrich Sciller Univ., Jena, Germany.
    Merten, Dirk
    Friedrich Sciller Univ., Jena, Germany.
    Büchel, Georg
    Friedrich Sciller Univ., Jena, Germany.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Rare earth elements distribution and fractionation in a former acidic shale pit lake2011In: / [ed] E. Kothe, G. Büchel, 2011, p. 44-44Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13. Gärdek, Oskar
    et al.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Retention of metals by optimized steel slag2017In: Bio-geo interactions: basic knowledge to application: 16th Symposium on remediation in Jena “Jenaer Sanierungskolloquium”. Conference proceedings, 2017, p. 24-24Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Silicon reduced Argon Oxygen Decarburization slag (Si-AOD) is a common by-product from manufacturing of stainless steel. In this work the possibility to use the slag as adsorbent for some selected metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb) is tested. The slag was obtained from Outokumpu, Avesta, Sweden as one black, powder like, and one greenish, pumice-stone like. Due to its small grain size the black Si-AOD was not suitable as a filter material since it quickly clogged and formed almost impermeable layers. However, the greenish Si-AOD with its porous structure showed good permeability and seems to be good as a filter material. Its ability to remove the selected elements from an aqueous solution was tested at different metal concentrations, ionic strengths and pH. The absorption capacity was tested in columns each holding 30 gram of the greenish Si-AOD and 300 mL of the aqueous phase was passed through the material. Six fractions of 50 mL each were collected and analyzed with respect to pH and metal content to estimate the retention capacity. With an initial concentration of 10 mg/L (Ni, Cu and Zn) and 1 mg/L (Cr and Pb) an almost 100% adsorption was obtained. The adsorption seemed to follow the Freundlich adsorption isotherm and with a 1/n-value of 0.13 the adsorption process is probably chemical. The adsorption capacity of the surface was estimated to be at least 80 μeqv/g. Hence a liquid to solid ratio of up to 100 can be reached with the used metal solution before the retention capacity of the slag is depleted

  • 14.
    Karlsson, Lovisa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Release of metals from unprocessed and processed black shale due to natural weathering2013In: Annual International Mine Water Association Conference: Reliable Mine Water Technology / [ed] Adrian Brown, Linda Figueroa, Christian Wolkersdorfer, Colorado, USA: IMWA , 2013, p. 391-397Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Black shale was mined and processed for recovery of hydrocarbons in Kvarntorp, some 200 km SW of Stockholm, Sweden, during 1942–66. Remains from the mining period is a deposit with 40 Mm³ of crushed shale residues: Unprocessed 3ne-grained shale as well as processed shale. The deposit is still hot; oxidation of sulphides as well as burning of hydrocarbons are still in progress some 50 years a1er closure. Weathering of the shale leads to releases of metal-rich leachates which will increase with time. The release of metals from pristine shale as well as weathered shale (exposed to the atmosphere for 50 years) and two di2erent processed shale residues have been studied using water of di2erent pH as leaching solution, to simulate extreme pH-variations in environmental waters: 3.0 (determined by oxidation of iron sulphides), 5.5 (bu2ered by carbon dioxide), 8.5 (bu2ered by calcite) and 12.5 (bu2ered by calcium hydroxide). Extraction of cationic elements was substantial (several percent of the total content) for Ca and Mg, as well as Ni, Co and U at pH 3, and very high (up to 50–60 %) for anionic elements (V, Mo, As) at pH 12.5. Especially the high-temperature processed shale would be a potential source for As and Mo at high pH. The pH-dependence of the weathering processes should be considered when future remediation (or metal recovery) processes and strategies are designed.

  • 15. Karlsson, Lovisa
    et al.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bark compost for removal of Nickel in complex waste water2012In: / [ed] E. Kothe and G. Büchel, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Concentration dynamics in a boreal catchment: trace elements, REEs and humic substances2011In: 25th International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 22-26 August, 2011, Rovaniemi, Finland / [ed] Pertti Sarala, V. Juhani Ojala, Marja-Leena Porsanger, Rovaniemi, Finland: Vuorimiesyhdistys - Finnish Association of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers , 2011, p. 63-63Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Lovisa
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Water quality in a black shale mining area: effects of pH and natural organic acids on weathering and subsequent metal releases2014In: An Interdisciplinary Response to Mine Water Challenges / [ed] Wanghua Sui, Yajun Sun and Changshen Wang, China University of Mining and Techno logy Press , 2014, p. 136-136Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mining of black shale (alum shale) of Late Cambrium age for the extraction of alum started in the early 17th century in Sweden, and in the late 19th century there was an extensive use of shale, with its high content of organic carbon, as fuel in lime-burning processes. Full-scale recovery of hydrocarbons from shale took place in Kvarntorp during 1942-66, and recovery of uranium in Ranstad during 1965-76. Remains from the historic mining and processing of black shale are some 50 major deposits with processed and unprocessed shale residues, as well as water-filled pits, at the former mining sites. There are also large areas covered with crushed shale, e.g. as road filling material. Studies of the weathering of shale due to exposure to the atmosphere and water with pH within the natural range indicate a high leachability of cationic elements at low pH, as well as anionic elements at high pH. The presence of organic complexing acids of natural origin (microbial exudates and humic acids) may give an enhanced leaching, particularly at pH above 8, when hydroxy-groups would constitute active metal binding sites. Results from studies of weathering and leaching of processed and unprocessed black shale are presented, as well as the effects on the water quality observed at former mining sites and related environmental impact.

  • 18.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Nilsson, Charlotte
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Berg, Isabelle
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Avloppsslam som vattenreningsfilter2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Analysis of Acid Rock Drainage (ARD) with Micro Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (MP AES) – Comparison with ICP-MS2014In: Annual International Mine Water Association Conference: An Interdisciplinary Response to Mine Water Challenges / [ed] Sui Wanghua,Sun Yajunand Wang Changshen, Xuzhou: China University of Mining and Technology Press , 2014, p. 131-135Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis of dissolved metals in acid rock drainage (ARD) with an Agilent 4100 MP AES instrument that combines a nitrogen micro plasma with atomic emission detection (MP AES) was compared with an ICP-MS. Sample preparation consisted only of filtration, acidification (HNO3 1%) and addition of internal standard elements after appropriate dilution. In these complex matrices the systems gave identical results provided that care was taken to avoid ionization. This was easily done by addition of CsNO3 which eliminated the need for matrix matching of calibration solutions. The use of internal standards is only needed for elements with known spectral interferences.

  • 20.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Influence of humic substances on metal mobility in soil from the Gessenwiese test field2014In: / [ed] E. Kothe and G. Büchel, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Impact of humic substances on the transport of metals from a boreal watershed: Time trends and annual variability2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Impact of humic substances on uranium mobility in soil: a case study from the Gessenwiese test field2014In: Uranium - Past and Future Challenges: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Uranium Mining and Hydrogeology / [ed] Broder J. Merkel, Alireza Arab, Cham: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014, p. 239-248Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Metal transport dynamics in a small watershed - Dylta bruk, Sweden2017In: Bio-geo interactions: basic knowledge to application: 16th Symposium on remediation in Jena “Jenaer Sanierungskolloquium”. Conference proceedings, 2017, p. 23-23Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal transport in small streams in boreal catchments is a function of weathering rate, water balance and redistribution mechanisms. Because of these highly dynamic processes long term water quality changes are difficult to determine but needed in order to assess the impact of several local and largescale changes on local water quality.

    The field site is situated at Dyltabruk, some 20 km North of Örebro in South Central Sweden. The 4 km2 catchment has deciduous and coniferous species on a granitic moraine with some 20% ofmires and fens adjacent to the oldest sulphur mine in Sweden. Grab samples were collected weekly since 2006 but more frequent during periods with large changes in water balance. The samples were analysed for general hydrochemical parameters (temperature, electrical conductivity, pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), inorganic carbon (IC), fulvic and humic acids and dissolved oxygen), dissolved principal anions, principal and trace metals. Standardized analytical procedures were applied. Temperature, precipitation and other climatic parameters were recorded some 2 km from thesite every 15 minutes.

    The results showed a general concentration pattern where the water balance had the largest single influence. The concentrations had a seasonality inversely related to the ground water level. Inter annual variations of one to two orders of magnitude were observed for group 1 and 2 elements. For transition metals with high affinity to solid matter as well as DOC the variation reached three to four orders of magnitude. Only aluminium and iron had concentrations that occasionally exceeded solubility limits which resulted in a similar inter annual variation.

    During the study period the average annual temperature and precipitation were no different (p 0.05) from the previous ten years but rainfall intensities increased. In a long term perspective the concentrations for all metals except calcium had positive trends. The tendencies remained when normalizing against chloride. The same was found for DOC, nitrate and sulphate. Hence, there is an accelerating loss of most elements that is not limited by weathering. It is uncertain, however, if the positive trends for DOC depend on increased production or a balancing release from the supply in mires and fens. In addition, there is also an indication of increasing inter annual concentration changescwith time. Although not exclusively proven such phenome would occur as a result of increased rainfall intensity. It is therefore likely that the accelerating loss of elements is a result of increased weathering rather than increasing water discharge.

  • 24.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Heterotrophic leaching of LD-slag: formation of organic ligands2011In: Mine Water: Managing the Challenges: proceedings of the International Mine Water Association Congress 2011 / [ed] Trude R.Rüde, Antje Freund, Christian Wolkersdorfer, Aachen: RWTH , 2011, p. 371-374Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Revegetating acidic mine waste using UMBRELLA guidelines: The second summer2012In: 11 Symposium on remediation in Jena, "Jenaer Sanierungskolloquium": Geobiotechnology: from lost areas to resourcesConference Proceedings, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Leaching pattern of metals from historic sulphidic mine waste upon addition of bark compost2013In: Annual International Mine Water Association Conference: Relialbe Mine Water Technology, Vol.1 / [ed] Brown, Adrian; Figueroa, Linda; Wolkersdorfer, Christian, IMWA & QuarkXPress , 2013, p. 625-632Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Revegetation of historic acid mine waste with Agrostis capillaris: Impact on leachate composition in pot experiments2012In: International Mine Water Association Symposium / [ed] McCullough C D; Lund M A; Wyse L, Perth: IMWA & The Expo Group , 2012, p. 489-497Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Revegetation of historic acidic mine waste with Agrostis capillaris: Remediation strategy2012In: International Mine Water Association Symposium / [ed] McCullough, C.D.; Lund, M.A. & Wyse, L., International Mine Water Association ( IMWA ) , 2012, p. 317-325Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To establish vegetation on historical acidicmine waste and metal polluted soil has several environmental, physical and chemical advantages on metalrelease. Pot experiments with material from the Ljusnarsbergs mine waste deposit in Sweden showed that different kinds of refuse can be used to sustain germination and improve growth of Agrostiscapillariswhere it otherwise isimpossible. Bark compost increased the water holding capacity and an increase of pHin the top 50 mm by addition of water works granules made it possible for the grass to survive. An even better growth was obtained if those systems were also inoculated with mycorrhiza.

  • 29.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Substrate conditioning for growth of Agrostis capillaris on historical sulphidic mine waste: Impact on ARD composition2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ogar, Anna
    Plant-Microbial Interactions, Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland.
    Comparison of MP AES and ICP-MS for analysis of principal and selected trace elements in nitric acid digests of sunflower (Helianthus annuus)2015In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 135, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of nitrogen as plasma gas for microwave plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (MP AES) is an interesting development in analytical science since the running cost can be significantly reduced in comparison to the inductively coupled argon plasma. Here, we evaluate the performance of the Agilent 4100 MP AES instrument for the analysis of principal metals (Ca, K, Mg, and Na), lithogenic metals (Al, Fe, and Mn) and selected trace metals (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn) in nitric acid plant digests. The digests were prepared by microwave-assisted dissolution of dry plant material from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) in concentrated nitric acid. Comparisons are made with analysis of the same solutions with ICP-MS (Agilent 7500cx) using the octopole reaction system (ORS) in the collision mode for As, Fe, and V.

    The limits of detection were usually in the low μg L-1 range and all principal and lithogenic metals were successfully determined with the MP AES and provided almost identical results with the ICP-MS. The same applies for the selected trace metals except for As, Co and Mo where the concentrations were below the detection limit with the MP AES. For successful analysis we recommend that (i) only atom lines are used, (ii) ionization is minimized (e.g. addition of CsNO3) and (iii) the use of internal standards should be considered to resolve spectral interferences.

  • 31.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ogar, Anna
    Dep. Environ. Sci., Jagellonian University, Krakow, Poland.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Leachability of Cu, Zn, As, Ba and Pb from refuse in the Zelazny Most tailings dam2014In: Annual International Mine Water Association Conference: An Interdisciplinary Response to Mine Water Challenges / [ed] Sui, W., Sun, Y. & Wang, C., Xuzhou, China: China University of Mining and Technology Press , 2014, p. 121-125Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to establish plants on any kind of mine waste it is essential to determine its chemical properties, i.e. the potential to release elements. In this study we combine chemical extraction of six different solid metal species (water soluble, ion-exchangeable, carbonate, reducible, oxidizable acid leachable) on tailings from Zelazny Most, Poland. The results show that the plants encounter an environment with circumneutral pH and high availability of Ca, Na, and Cu. During reducing conditions there is also an increasing availability of As, Fe, Pb, and Zn.

  • 32.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pourjabbar, Anahita
    Friedrich Schiller Univ., Jena, Germany.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Distribution of rare earth elements and other metals in a stratified acidic pit lake in black shales 45 years after mine closure2012In: 9th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage  (ICARD 2012): Ottawa, Canada20-26 May 2012 / [ed] Price WA, Hogan C, Tremblay G, Curran Associates, Inc., 2012, p. 812-821Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Wetterholm, Petter
    Structor Miljöteknik AB, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Chemical characterization of metal polluted soils: why and how2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Nilsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Phosphorus speciation in sewage sludge and ashes from three municipal WWTPs in Sweden: investigating the possibilities for phosphorus recoveryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Nilsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Ekokem AB, Kumla, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    von Kronhelm, Thomas
    Ekokem AB, Kumla, Sweden.
    Municipal sludge ash for abatement of ARD2016In: Mining Meets Water – Conflicts and Solutions: IMWA 2016 in Leipzig, Germany, July 11–15, 2016 / [ed] Drebenstedt, C. & Paul, M., Freiberg: TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Mining and Special Civil Engineering , 2016, p. 699-705Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abatement of ARD with passive treatment systems can quite often rely only on pH-control if the iron content is high enough and to allow for the formation of ferric hydrous oxides, which act as efficient adsorbents. The stability of ferric hydrous oxides is sensitive to lowering of pH as well as Eh why they must be controlled. Hence, it would be favourable to use a well ordered adsorbent that is stable over time and under the chemical conditions of ARD. Municipal waste water sludge is a growing problem in many countries and incineration under oxidative conditions can be used to oxidize anthropogenic organic molecules which pose a threat to the environment. Sludge ashes rendering from wastewater treatment in which iron is used as a flocculation agent have high concentrations of calcium/ magnesium and ferric oxides, and should therefore, in theory be a suitable candidate for treatment of ARD. This study has therefore focused on the ability for these ashes to act as a sorbent for the removal of metals from ARD. The stability and potential release of metals from the material were quantified in batch experiments by extraction at pH 2-10, resulting in equilibrium concentrations (at pH 8) of 11.9, 0.08 and 24.1 mg L-1 for Al, Fe and Mn respectively. However, after washing with water the corresponding values were 0.01, 0.03 and 0.09 mgL(-1). In fact, after washing the sludge ash is stable from pH 4 to 10, with only slightly higher concentrations found at pH 2. Batch experiments on metal adsorption from ARD showed more than 99% sorption of Cr, Cu, Pb and V, corresponding values for Co, Ni and Zn were 56, 86 and 34% respectively. The overall results from this study show that sludge ashes are a promising solution for treatment of ARD.

  • 36.
    Ogar, Anna
    et al.
    Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Turnau, Katarzyna
    Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Stabilization of Uranium(VI) at Low pH by Fungal Metabolites: Applications in Environmental Biotechnology2014In: 5th International Conference on Environmental Science and Development - ICESD 2014, 2014, Vol. 10, p. 142-148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uranium contamination of soils and water is a worldwide problem due to geology or anthropogenic release such as mining, or use of inorganic fertilizers. In situ remediation of low and moderately contaminated sites is a complicated procedure due to the complex chemistry of uranium. This study demonstrates that at pH 3.5, a fungal strain isolated from unprocessed uranium bearing shale creates hydrochemical conditions that immobilize 97% of a total of 10 mg L-1 dissolved uranium in a 0.20 μm pore system. The redistribution occurred within 10 minutes and remained for five weeks and just 12% of the inventory was retrieved in the biomass. Size exclusion chromatography of the dissolved phase identified organic substances in the range of more than 60 kD down to 100 D as a response to time of incubation. Geochemical modeling indicates formation of uranium-organic complexes where ligand size, coordination chemistry and their tendency to agglomerate determine the redistribution.

  • 37.
    Ogar, Anna
    et al.
    Jagellonian University, Krakow, Poland.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Phytostabilization of uranium-containing shale residues using Hieracium pilosella2014In: Uranium Mining and Hydrogelogy: Uranium - Past and Future Challenges / [ed] Broder J. Merkel and Alireza Arab, Springer Publishing Company, 2014, p. 425-432Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using Hieracium pilosella and soil microorganisms for phytostabilization of uranium-containing shale residues. Conductivity of leachates significantly decreased and pH increased when plants were grown on the substratum. H. pilosella has ability to change the hydrochemical parameters and to decrease the mobilization of uranium. Moreover, H. pilosella is able to accumulate significant amounts of uranium in the shoots.

  • 38. Ogar, Anna
    et al.
    Sobczyk, L.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Turnau, Katarzyna
    Plant-associated microbes in heavy metal phytoremediation: a network of interaction2014In: / [ed] E. Kothe and G. Büchel, 2014, p. 6-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Rai, Neha
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. The Life Science Centre - Biology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Forsberg, Göran
    Detectum AB, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Olsson, Per-Erik
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. The Life Science Centre - Biology.
    Jass, Jana
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. The Life Science Centre - Biology.
    Metal contaminated soil leachates from an art glass factory elicit stress response, alter fatty acid metabolism and reduce lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans2019In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 651, p. 2218-2227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study evaluated the toxicity of metal contamination in soils from an art glass factory in Smaland Sweden using a Caenorhabditis elegans nematode model. The aim of the study was to chemically analyze the soil samples and study the biological effects of water-soluble leachates on the nematodes using different physiological endpoints. The total metal content showed that As, Cd and Pb were at levels above the guideline values for soils in areas around the factory. Less than 10% of the total metal content in the soil was found in the water-soluble leachates, however, Al, As, Fe and Pb remained higher than the guideline values for safe drinking water. Exposure of C. elegans to the water-soluble leachates, at both post-hatching larvae stage (L1-young adult) for 48 h and at the young adult stage (L4) for 6 h, showed significant gene alteration. Although the nematodes did not exhibit acute lethality, lifespan was significantly reduced upon exposure. C. elegans also showed altered gene expression associated with stress response and fat metabolism, as well as enhanced accumulation of body fat. The study highlighted the significance of assessing environmental samples using a combination of gene expression analysis, fatty acid metabolism and lifespan for providing valuable insight into the negative impact of metals. The altered fat metabolism and reduced lifespan on exposure to soil leachates motivates further studies to explore the mechanism of the toxicity associated with the metals present in the environment.

  • 40.
    Saqib, Naeem
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Flotation tailings as a copper resource - Extraction and characterization through chemical leachingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Sartz, Lotta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    ARD treatment in sequential filter sections: efficiency of different alkaline waste materials2010In: Mine water and innovative thinking: proceedings 2010 / [ed] Christian Wolkersdorfer, Antje Freund, Nova Scotia, Canada: Cape Breton University Press , 2010, p. 271-274Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Six alkaline waste materials are tested as potential filter materials for ARD treatment. The study is an ongoing project since 2.5 years on a mine waste remediation test field in  opparberg, Sweden. The filters (0.5 m3) are operating under field conditions and general parameters (pH, electric conductivity, redox potential (Eh), alkalinity, acidity and sulphate) are measured immediately after sampling in a mobile laboratory. The reactive (alkaline) materials are followed by other filter materials in sequence with non-reactive support materials, to ensure iron/aluminum precipitation and trace metal sorption.

  • 42.
    Sartz, Lotta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Successive neutralization, precipitation and trace metal immobilization in meso-scale filters for ARD treatmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Six alkaline by-products were studied in reactive filters (3×0.4 m3) built on the historic mine site Ljusnarsbergsfältet, Kopparberg, Sweden. Each filter was made out of three connected sections in a sequence (neutralization – oxidation (precipitation) – sorption). Total buffering capacity of the alkaline materials was found to have a minor impact on their respective performances. Other chemical and physical circumstances were more important, e.g. carbonation, iron precipitation and preferential flow path formations. A combination of fresh fly ash and lime mud had similar chemical responses as a carbonated fly ash. These filters were also the worst performers, considering overall trace element immobilizations.

    No particular differences were found between two different passive adsorbents in the oxidation stage, where iron and aluminum were intended to precipitate and act as sorbent phases for other elements: Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb. In general it was found that highly alkaline materials containing alkalinities as CaO/Ca(OH)2 were superior to materials with carbonate alkalinity.

  • 43.
    Sjöberg, S.
    et al.
    Department of Geological Sciences (IGV), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Rattray, J. E.
    Department of Geological Sciences (IGV), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Callac, N.
    Department of Geological Sciences (IGV), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Skelton, A.
    Department of Geological Sciences (IGV), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Dupraz, C.
    Department of Geological Sciences (IGV), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Ivarsson, M.
    Department of Paleobiology and NordCEE, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Putative Biogenic Signature found in Extremely REE Enriched Black Substance, Ytterby Mine, Sweden2015In: Goldschmidt Abstracts, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Characterization of a black substance seeping from fractured bedrock in a subterranean tunnel revealed a manganese and calcium bearing substance highly enriched in rare earth elements (REE). This tunnel is dry and at shallow depth and was built to convert the former Ytterby mine, into a fuel deposit for the Swedish Armed Forces. To keep the tunnel dry, groundwater level is kept below its natural level which has resulted in oxidizing conditions in a previously dysoxic or anoxic environment. The deposition of the substance therefore occurs in a dark and moist environment which was exposed to changing redox conditions.

    Geochemical analysis show that the substance is enriched in REEs with concentrations one to two orders of magnitude higher than in the surrounding rocks. X-ray diffraction spectra indicate that the main component is birnessite. SEM revealed an internal lamination of these Mn-oxides implying an iterative change in production. Previous results show that REE occurrences in Ytterby are localized within pegmatites in the mine. It is thus suggested that Mn colloids, suspended in the local groundwater, work as metal traps and contribute to the mobility of the REEs. The black substance is suspected to act as a sink for these metals in the Ytterby mine area.

    The influence of microorganisms on the accumulation of Mn-oxides appears to be important. The occurrence of the C31 to C35 extended side chain hopanoids among the identified biomarkers provides evidence of bacterial presence in the depositional environment. The abiotic vs biotic origin of the precipitated manganese was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The substance is composed of two or more components, with one part having a biogenic signature. Ongoing investigations of the microbial communities and the REE accumulation processes include δ13C analysis of the extracted lipids, DNA deep sequencing, quantitative PCR and sequential leaching

  • 44.
    Sjöberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Rattray, Jayne E.
    Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Callac, Nolwenn
    Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grawunder, Anja
    Institute of Geosciences, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Jena, Germany.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    Department of Paleobiology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Skelton, Alasdair
    Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dupraz, Christophe
    Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rare earth element enriched birnessite in water-bearing fractures, the Ytterby mine, Sweden2017In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 78, p. 158-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Characterization of a black substance exuding from fractured bedrock in a subterranean tunnel revealed a secondary manganese oxide mineralisation exceptionally enriched in rare earth elements (REE). Concentrations are among the highest observed in secondary ferromanganese precipitates in nature. The tunnel is located in the unsaturated zone at shallow depth in the former Ytterby mine, known for the discovery of yttrium, scandium, tantalum and five rare earth elements.

    Elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction of the black substance establish that the main component is a manganese oxide of the birnessite type. Minor fractions of calcite, other manganese oxides, feldspars, quartz and about 1% organic matter were also found, but no iron oxides were identified. The Ytterby birnessite contains REE, as well as calcium, magnesium and traces of other metals. The REE, which constitute 1% of the dry mass and 2% of the metal content, are firmly included in the mineral structure and are not released by leaching at pH 1.5 or higher. A strong preference for the trivalent REE over divalent and monovalent metals is indicated by concentration ratios of the substance to fracture water. The REE-enriched birnessite has the general formula Mx(Mn3+,Mn4+)2O4·(H2O)n with M = (0.37–0.41) Ca + 0.02 (REE + Y), 0.04 Mg and (0.02–0.03) other metals, and with [Mn3+]/[Mn4+] = 0.86–1.00.

    The influence of microorganisms on the accumulation of this REE enriched substance is demonstrated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results show that it is composed of two or more manganese phases, one of which has a biogenic signature. In addition, the occurrence of C31 to C35 extended side chain hopanoids among the identified lipid biomarkers combined with the absence of ergosterol, a fungal lipid biomarker, indicate that the in-situ microbial community is bacterial rather than fungal.

  • 45.
    Sjöberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Dept of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Rattray, Jayne E.
    Dept of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    REE-Enriched Mn-Oxide Precipitates in Water-Bearing Fractures in the Ytterby Mine, Sweden2016In: Mining Meets Water – Conflicts and Solutions: IMWA 2016 in Leipzig, Germany, July 11–15, 2016 / [ed] Drebenstedt, C. & Paul, M., Freiberg: TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Mining and Special Civil Engineering , 2016, p. 346-352Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Ytterby mine, Sweden, is known for the discovery of eight elements, including yttrium and five of the rare earth elements (REE). The mine was in operation from 1750 to 1933 and was after closure used as a storage depot for fuel from the 1950s to 1995. A tunnel was opened in the 1950s through the bedrock into the mine to allow access to the storage depot. Recent water monitoring campaigns (20122015) in the mine revealed a black substance (denoted YBS) in some fractures opening into the tunnel. Analysis of the YBS (elemental analysis, phase analysis by XRD, SEM with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, IR-and EPR-spectroscopy, preferential leaching at pH 4) showed that the main mineral component of the YBS is the manganese oxide birnessite. Also minor quantities of other less well defined manganese oxides were found, as well as silicates (quartz grains, possibly feldspar grains) and calcite. Birnessite has typically the composition Mx(Mn3+, Mn(2)(4+))O(4)xAq, with M= Na, Ca and x= 0.5. The birnessite component in YBS had a Mn3+/Mn4+ ratio of 1.04/0.96 with M = 0.42 Ca + 0.03 (REE+Y), 0.03 Mg and 0.03 other metals. All of these metals were firmly associated with the structure, since no release was observed at pH 4, except for significant fractions of the total Na, Mg, Ca-contents. Thus, REE+Y correspond to 1% of the total YBS mass and up to 3% of the metal content in the birnessite phase. This corresponds to an REE enrichment factor of the order 106 (YBS-birnessite/ fracture water). Birnessite with a substantial fraction of REE in the lattice has not previously been reported. The formation of birnessite is a microbial process. Identification of the microorganisms present in the Ytterby system is in progress.

  • 46.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Utilization of waste materials for extraction of strategic metals: a biogeochemical approach2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Worldwide the modern society produces vast amounts of waste materials containing strategic and valuable metals. Some of them are of substantial economic or environmental significance if controlled recovery of metals can be performed or if uncontrolled release to the environment occurs.

    By cultivating Agrostis capillaris on historical sulfidic mine waste the leachate composition can be altered and its volume reduced. In combination with additives such as bark compost and water works granules the concentration of several hazardous metals decreased significantly already after eight weeks. Limited actions can therefore be used to decrease the environmental impact from such waste.

    Shale in general contains considerable amounts of strategic metals. If naturally occurring microorganisms are provided with a source of nutrients, increased mobilization of strategic metals can be obtained. By using wood chips as the nutrient source the mobilization of vanadium and uranium increased significantly. Highest mobilization efficiency was observed when the carbon source was put on top of the shale.

    Analysis of strategic metals is often performed by argon plasma techniques such as ICP-QMS. However, the use of argon increases the analytical costs. If isotopic information is not needed and slightly higher uncertainties can be accepted, several strategic metals can successfully be quantified by the nitrogen plasma based MP AES. The analytical cost can then be cut with more than 99%.

    List of papers
    1. Conditioning sulfidic mine waste for growth of Agrostis capillaris - impact on solution chemistry
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conditioning sulfidic mine waste for growth of Agrostis capillaris - impact on solution chemistry
    2014 (English)In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 6888-6904Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Contamination of the environment due to mining and mineral processing is an urgent problem worldwide. It is often desirable to establish a grass cover on old mine waste since it significantly decreases the production of leachates. To obtain sustainable growth, it is often necessary to improve several properties of the waste such as water-holding capacity, nutrient status, and toxicity. This can be done by addition of organic materials such as wood residues, e. g., compost. In this study, we focus on the solution chemistry of the leachates when a substrate containing historic sulfidic mine waste mixed with 30 % (volume) bark compost is overgrown by Agrostis capillaris. The pot experiments also included other growth-promoting additives (alkaline material, mycorrhiza, and metabolizable carbon) to examine whether a more sustainable growth could be obtained. Significant changes in the plant growth and in the leachates composition were observed during 8 weeks of growth. It was concluded that in this time span, the growth of A. capillaris did not affect the composition of the leachates from the pots. Instead, the composition of the leachates was determined by interactions between the bark compost and the mine waste. Best growth of A. capillaris was obtained when alkaline material and mycorrhiza or metabolizable carbon was added to the substrate.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2014
    Keywords
    Agrostis capillaris, Mine waste, Bark compost, Leachate composition
    National Category
    Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-37809 (URN)10.1007/s11356-014-2600-x (DOI)000336371000012 ()2-s2.0-84901248901 (Scopus ID)
    Funder
    EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 226870
    Available from: 2014-10-17 Created: 2014-10-17 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Impact of organic carbon on the leachability of vanadium, manganese, iron and molybdenum from shale residues
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of organic carbon on the leachability of vanadium, manganese, iron and molybdenum from shale residues
    2015 (English)In: Minerals Engineering, ISSN 0892-6875, E-ISSN 1872-9444, Vol. 75, p. 100-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    From 1942 to the 1966, oil was produced by pyrolysis of shale, in Kvarntorp, Sweden. This generated some 40 million m3 of metal rich pyrolyzed shale and discarded fines that were piled on site with its original metal content almost intact. The present study focuses on the leaching of vanadium, manganese, iron and molybdenum from fines after addition of wood chips and steel slag, in outdoor 1 m3 reactor systems at low liquid to solid ratio, in order to evaluate the potential environmental impact and recovery of the elements from the leachates. Seasonal variations were observed, with increased leaching during peak summer. For vanadium and molybdenum, high addition of wood chips decreased the leaching, probably due to adsorption. Manganese showed the opposite behavior while leaching of iron was almost independent of the amount of wood chips. Depending on the systems, up to 2200 μg L-1 vanadium, 90 μg L-1 molybdenum, 25 mg L-1 manganese and 500 mg L-1 iron was found in the aqueous phase. Applied to the 40 million m3 pile, the annual leaching of those elements may reach 14 ton, 0.6 ton, 200 ton and 2400 ton, respectively.

    Keywords
    Bioleaching; Environmental; Leaching; Pollution
    National Category
    Environmental Sciences
    Research subject
    Enviromental Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41168 (URN)10.1016/j.mineng.2014.10.018 (DOI)000353861300015 ()2-s2.0-84927124587 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    Faculty of Economics, Science and Technology at Örebro University

    Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Release of uranium from weathered black shale in meso-scale reactor systems: first year of data
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Release of uranium from weathered black shale in meso-scale reactor systems: first year of data
    2014 (English)In: Uranium - Past and Future Challenges: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Uranium Mining and Hydrogeology / [ed] Merkel Broder J., Arab Alireza, Springer, 2014, p. 139-146Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2014
    National Category
    Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-37820 (URN)978-3-319-11059-2 (ISBN)
    Conference
    Uranium Mining and Hydrogeology 7, 2014, Freiberg, Germany
    Available from: 2014-10-17 Created: 2014-10-17 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    4. Comparison of MP AES and ICP-MS for analysis of principal and selected trace elements in nitric acid digests of sunflower (Helianthus annuus)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of MP AES and ICP-MS for analysis of principal and selected trace elements in nitric acid digests of sunflower (Helianthus annuus)
    2015 (English)In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 135, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The use of nitrogen as plasma gas for microwave plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (MP AES) is an interesting development in analytical science since the running cost can be significantly reduced in comparison to the inductively coupled argon plasma. Here, we evaluate the performance of the Agilent 4100 MP AES instrument for the analysis of principal metals (Ca, K, Mg, and Na), lithogenic metals (Al, Fe, and Mn) and selected trace metals (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn) in nitric acid plant digests. The digests were prepared by microwave-assisted dissolution of dry plant material from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) in concentrated nitric acid. Comparisons are made with analysis of the same solutions with ICP-MS (Agilent 7500cx) using the octopole reaction system (ORS) in the collision mode for As, Fe, and V.

    The limits of detection were usually in the low μg L-1 range and all principal and lithogenic metals were successfully determined with the MP AES and provided almost identical results with the ICP-MS. The same applies for the selected trace metals except for As, Co and Mo where the concentrations were below the detection limit with the MP AES. For successful analysis we recommend that (i) only atom lines are used, (ii) ionization is minimized (e.g. addition of CsNO3) and (iii) the use of internal standards should be considered to resolve spectral interferences.

    Keywords
    Digestion; ICP-MS; Macro and trace elements; MP AES
    National Category
    Chemical Sciences
    Research subject
    Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41166 (URN)10.1016/j.talanta.2014.12.015 (DOI)000349730700018 ()25640135 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84921468749 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Faculty of Economics, Science and Technology at Örebro Universitet, Sweden

    Foundation for Polish Science, International PhD Projects Program

    EU European Regional Development Fund MPD/2009-3/5

    Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    5. Release of vanadium from LD-slag by exposure to ARD
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Release of vanadium from LD-slag by exposure to ARD
    2010 (English)In: Mine water and innovative thinking: proceedings 2010 / [ed] Christian Wolkersdorfer, Antje Freund, Cape Breton University Press , 2010, p. 399-402Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In abatement of acid rock drainage (ARD) slag from the Linz-Donawitz steel making process (LD-slag) provides high neutralizing capacity at low cost. A serious drawback for the use of this by-product is its high content of vanadium, which makes it a potential source of toxic vanadium species. The aim of this work was to determine the most common vanadium species, V(IV) and V(V), leached from LD-slag by artificial ARD. Capillary electrophoresis was employed to quantify the species. From the results an initial dominance of V(V) and increasing abundance of V(IV) with increasing artificial ARD L/s ratio was observed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cape Breton University Press, 2010
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Research subject
    Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-24257 (URN)000323234800092 ()978-1-897009-47-5 (ISBN)
    Conference
    International Mine Water Association symposium: Mine Water and Innovative Thinking (IMWA), Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada, Sep. 05-09, 2010
    Available from: 2012-08-06 Created: 2012-08-06 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
    6. Potential use of native fungal strains for assisted uranium retention
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potential use of native fungal strains for assisted uranium retention
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Minerals Engineering, ISSN 0892-6875, E-ISSN 1872-9444, Vol. 81, p. 173-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Uranium-stabilizing ligands can be useful complexing agents for uranium in aqueous solution. The discovery of novel ligand candidates for selective uranium capture in artificial and natural waters could provide scope for their use in water remediation and metal recovery from low- and high grade ores. In this study we used seven fungal strains, isolated from shale waste, to monitor the uranium retention capacity from an aqueous solution. After four weeks of incubation, suspensions containing the fungal strains were filtered, and up to 100% of the total uranium inventory was removed from a 10 mg L-1 solution. Approximately 70% of the total uranium removal is attributed to complexation and/or adsorption by particles in the malt extract and some 10% is adsorbed by the fungal biomass. The additional 20% uranium removed could be related to the excretion of fungal metabolites. From 58% to 90% of the uranium is removed within ten minutes. The formation of colloidal/particulate uranium is proposed to be controlled by organic ligands in the culture medium and organic ligands excreted by the fungi where phosphorus moieties seem to be important. Membrane fouling by the hydrocarbons is also suggested to contribute to a loss of uranium from the aqueous phase.

    Keywords
    Biotechnology; Environmental; Pollution; Wasteprocessing
    National Category
    Chemical Sciences
    Research subject
    Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46072 (URN)10.1016/j.mineng.2015.04.003 (DOI)000361253100023 ()2-s2.0-84940440497 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Academy of Economy, Science and Technology at Orebro University

    Foundation of Polish Science

    EU European Regional Development fund MPD/2009-3/5

    Available from: 2015-10-12 Created: 2015-10-12 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
  • 47.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ekqvist, I.
    Hultman, C.
    Ingvarsson, J.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Uptake of metals in Pisum sativum grown on sulfidic shale residues2013In: / [ed] E. Kothe and G. Büchel, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Lovisa
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bioleaching of shale: impact of carbon source2011In: The new uranium mining boom: challenges and lessons learned / [ed] Broder Merkel, Mandy Schipek, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, p. 449-454Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioleaching is often used for processing low-grade shale feedstock and the microbial community used for that purpose is supplied with nutrients such as sugar and/or Fe2+. In the present study, the leaching efficiency was tested when crushed weathered shale was mixed with aspen wood shavings and kept moist, at the mixtures field capacity. The purpose was to investigate whether a more complex carbon source and a lower content of water may be a feasible way of lowering the cost for bioleaching. After 56 days of incubation the amount of uranium mobilized from the shale reached some 1.7% with a minimum of effort and cost.

  • 49.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Re-adsorption of uranium from low grade shale to aspen wood during heterotrophic leaching2011In: Proceedings of the 10th symposium on remediation in Dornburg / [ed] E. Kothe and G. Büchel, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Johansson, A.
    Nyåker, S.
    Thurfors, J.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Uptake of arsenic in Pisum sativum grown on arsenic contaminated soil2013In: / [ed] E. Kothe and G. Büchel, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 71
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