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  • 1.
    Ekström, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Beyond the broadcast interview: specialized forms of interviewing in the making of television news2011In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 172-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a mixed-method approach, this article aims at exploring the specialized forms of interviewing that are used as resources in television broadcast news production. Interviews are analyzed as functionally specialized forms of interaction (cf. Heritage, 1985) with various functions in different phases of the news production. We assume that interviews are organized and carried out as communicative activities oriented towards specific tasks, identities and contexts of interaction. In contrast to established definitions of the archetypical on air news interview, we argue that broadcast interviewing is only partially produced for an “overhearing audience” (ibid.). Taking into account the entire process of producing and presenting news, journalism harbours a multitude of interviewing practices and activities which remain invisible if only the taped and transcribed broadcast talk is analyzed. Our study clearly indicates that news interviews contain more diversified and hybrid activities of communication than has been described in previous research.

  • 2.
    Ekström, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The joint construction of a journalistic expert identity in studio interactions between journalists on TV news2011In: Text & Talk, ISSN 1860-7330, E-ISSN 1860-7349, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 661-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this study is to examine how journalistic expert identities are constructed and displayed in the context of intraprofessional journalist-to-journalist interviews on live television news. Previous research has, in detail, explored how journalists orient to the identity of a critical and impartial interrogator, especially in political news interviews. By focusing on journalistic expert identities, this article contributes to a wider perspective on the multiple and changing identities performed in contemporary journalism. The overall argument is that the expert identity is enabled and promoted in collaborative activities on different levels of discourse such as: (i) the media format, (ii) the question–answer based organization of the interaction, (iii) the orientation to liveness, and (iv) how knowledgeability and epistemic stance are constructed and displayed in the actual design of questions and answers. The data consist of interviews from the prime-time news program Aktuellt, broadcast on Swedish public service television in 2008 and 2009.

  • 3.
    Ekström, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Kroon, ÅsaÖrebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Paketerad politik: elva essäer om journalistik och medier2007Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Paketerad politik - 11 essäer om journalistik och medier får läsaren/medborgaren att inse hur ömsesidiga relationerna är mellan medier och politik - idag, men också historiskt. Politiken och journalistiken är beroende av varandra. De är åtskilda, men förenade - politikerna använder medierna och vice versa. Mediernas förändringar vad gäller bl.a. teknik innebär också nya villkor för relationen politik-medier. Behovet av en "mediekritisk kompetens" blir allt större. Det mediegenomsyrade samhället kräver att vi alla kan tänka och reflektera kritiskt över de villkor medierna erbjuder för det offentliga samtalet. Till detta vill denna bok bidraga.

  • 4.
    Ekström, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Kroon, ÅsaÖrebro University, Department of Humanities.Nylund, Mats
    News from the interview society2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Eriksson, Göran
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Kroon, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Audience participation in "the post-broadcast era"2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Eriksson, Göran
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Kroon, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Is backstage the new frontstage in journalism?2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how web TV productions and journalists’ use of social media change how journalistic formats are being ”done” in terms of both form and content. Illustrating our argument with examples from recent studies of web TV productions, journalistic digital guidelines, and industry interviews, we suggest that “backstage informality” is both a prominent audience orientation in online productions, as well as an overarching characteristic of web TV journalism. Web TV productions expose backstage settings and practices, and journalists construct sociable relations with audiences by performing as if being mates with audiences in talk and interaction. This creates an image of audiences’ accessing the real, unmediated personas of journalists, as well as the real conditions of journalistic productions. We see this orientation to backstage informality as part of the current development of trying to understand audiences’ preferences and expectations in online media contexts.

  • 7.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Behind the scenes of a TV interview: off-camera interactions between journalists and politicians2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the organization of off-camera interactions between journalists and politicians. What kinds of talk transpire between the participants before and after the broadcast interview? What functions do the before and after interview interaction seem to have? What social norms and conventions seem to influence the character of the pre-interview and post-interview discourse? How are their respective professional roles negotiated in these settings? The framing of the interview as an object of study in its production context aims to contribute to existing research on the news interview, specifically within Conversation Analysis (e.g. Clayman and Heritage 2002), which has not studied processes of production, but has mostly restricted itself to analyses of that which is broadcast to the audience.

  • 8.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Cross-platform television: superliveness, metadiscourse and complex audience orientation in a sports journalism production on the web2014In: Northern Lights, ISSN 1601-829X, E-ISSN 2040-0586, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 11-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a close analysis of interactions in cross-media formats with a specific focus on how television ‘is done’ on the web by established sports broadcasters who are used to producing traditional sports television. It will be argued that the web platform promotes significantly altered audience-oriented behaviours compared to traditional television, and that the web ultimately both calls for and produces a new kind of sociability in relation to audiences. It will be proposed in the discussion that this new kind of sociability will have an increasing impact also on how traditional television ‘is done’. The article makes use of data from the sports genre that is normally associated with ‘lighter entertainment’. Therefore the results may not be immediately applicable to how other types of journalistic genres tackle the communicative challenges of new media. However, it will be argued that sports journalism may well be thought of as a frontrunner when it comes to adapting to increasingly ‘sociable’ communicative modes of address. The analysis of web interactions focuses around three overarching audience orientations that are promoted in the web context: superliveness, metadiscourse and complex audience orientation(s). Taken together, these orientations constitute ‘a new kind of sociability’.

  • 9.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Dialogisk analys2010In: Metoder i kommunikationsvetenskap / [ed] Mats Ekström, Larsåke Larsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2010, 2, p. 243-264Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Dialogues between journalists on the news: The intraprofessional 'interview' as a communicative genre2010In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 429-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Journalists engaged in dialogues between themselves on air have become a common feature on the news. The main purpose of this study is to identify the various ways that these ‘intraprofessional dialogues’ are used and performed on the news with a specific focus on examples from television. Besides identifying the different uses of intraprofessional dialogues, an extend ed example of a studio talk between a presenter and a political correspondent serves to problematise the distinction between the discourse of news presentation and report on the one hand, and the discourse in these kinds of intraprofessional talks on the other hand, made by Montgomery (2007, 2008). The qualitative data is drawn from a corpus of codings of news and current affairs programming from Great Britain and Sweden totalling approximately 150 hours including radio and television, commercial and public service channels. The quantitative findings that accompany the qualitative analysis show that journalists-as interviewees in news and current affairs broadcasts are even more common than politicians-as-interviewees. This raises interesting questions about the execution of political accountability in contemporary news journalism.

  • 11.
    Kroon [Lundell], Åsa
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    "Hur kunde du Gudrun?": Om stereotyper, skandaler och strategier i en medialiserad politisk värld2007In: Paketerad politik: elva essäer om journalistik och medier / [ed] Mats Ekström, Åsa Kroon, Stockholm: Carlssons , 2007, p. 95-111Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Metatalk in web talk and broadcast interaction2013In: Preconference: Language and engagement in changing forms of public interaction, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Talking politics in broadcast media: cross-cultural perspectives on political interviewing, journalism and accountability2013In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 381-382Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The before and after of a political interview on TV: Observations of off-camera interactions between journalists and politicians2010In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 167-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the organization of off-camera interactions between journalists and politicians. What kinds of talk transpire between the participants before and after the broadcast interview? What functions do the before and after interview interaction seem to have? What social norms and conventions seem to influence the character of the pre-interview and post-interview discourse? How are their respective professional roles negotiated in these settings? The framing of the interview as an object of study in its production context aims to contribute to existing research on the news interview, specifically within Conversation Analysis (e.g. Clayman and Heritage 2002), which has not studied processes of production, but has mostly restricted itself to analyses of that which is broadcast to the audience.

  • 15.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The design and scripting of 'unscripted' talk: liveness versus control in a TV broadcast interview2009In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 271-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By combining ethnographic methods with textual analysis, this article sets out to answer the question how a scripted event on live television is infused with a sense of ‘liveness’ in order to balance the requirements of control and spontaneity in a broadcast interview. The management of this seemingly paradoxical desire is, in this analysis, linked to the ways in which professionals work at maintaining the identity of public service while competing on a commercial media market. In relation to this general inquiry, the script’s status in the production of a broadcast interview will also be analyzed, an area which is somewhat of a blind spot in media research. In doing so, the conventional division between scripted and unscripted broadcast talk (Scannell 2003) is called into question.

  • 16.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The fragility of visuals: How politicians manage their mediated visibility in the press2010In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 219-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims at understanding how politicians of both genders who are constantly in the media relate to, and manage, their mediated visibility. I assume that politicians who are constantly subject to visual exposure need to manage their experienced lack of control by developing various strategies in order to feel more empowered than perhaps is possible given the media's power of framing their political personas. Six Swedish politicians in prominent positions were interviewed qualitatively using open-ended questions relating to their views on press photographers, the role of visuals and personal experiences of being visualised in the press. It was found that the politicians develop both manifest counter-strategies as well as more latent, reflexive ones which all imply an unwillingness to submit to the media's visual framing power.

  • 17.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ekström, Mats
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Interpreting the news: Swedish correspondents as expert sources 1982-20122013In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines a news genre that is designed for the enactment of interpretive journalism: the live studio correspondent commentary on Swedish news. We trace how the role of expert commentator/interpreter of events has evolved during a 30-year period with a focus on the relation between interaction and surrounding context. How is the expert interpreter role multimodally achieved, and how do technologies enable or constrain the enactment of an expert identity in these dialogues? As we discuss our results, also basing our argument on other studies of the same interactional phenomena, we will propose that the existence of this particular news format can be related to an ongoing power struggle between journalists and politicians. We see these interactions as providing journalism with a perhaps yet underestimated powerful resource in the framing of news, and argue that they should not be written off as merely supplying lightweight, gossipy comments about politics in a glossy studio environment.

  • 18.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    "Interview bites" in television news production and presentation2010In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 476-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on how interviewees’ utterances are used as resources in      news production processes. We examine how these communicative units, here labelled ‘interview bites’, are integrated in every major aspect of the news      production process as well as in the presentation of news reports. Basically, we      argue that an interview bite operates in three distinct ways, as (a) a format, (b) a mental representation, and (c) an artefact. Although we claim that it has these different functions, the three dimensions interact and collectively work as powerful motivations for the choices made by reporters throughout the news production process. The data is gathered from field observations of Swedish reporters’ work at a major news desk and from in-depth reporter interviews. Theoretically, the study re-visits Clayman’s (1995) considerations for enhancing quotability: narrative relevance, conspicuousness and extractability. While maintaining these three basic cornerstones of what makes certain statements quote-worthy, a re-definition of the rationale behind each consideration is needed in order to make them relevant for our understanding of everyday news production practices.

  • 19.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    The complex visual gendering of political women in the press2008In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 891-910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we present an analysis of how gendering is “being done” in press visuals of women in politics. In short, we will argue that women professionals working within the area of politics are gendered and type-cast in more complex ways than previous research has yet shown. In a qualitative analysis of visuals from three different political scandals in Sweden involving prominent political women, we analyse the diversified ways of portraying women in visuals that do not simply reproduce the idea that the gendering of women uncritically correlates with concepts like sexualization, objectification, passivity and otherness. As on-lookers of a professional woman in politics caught in a pressing situation in a photograph, we will argue that at times we may be invited to see her as both an Other and a person with whom we can identify ourselves with. Or a woman may be positioned as an object with a focus on appearance, but not by emphasizing her femininity and sexuality but by doing exactly the reverse. We will also discuss the complexity that is related to the various contextual factors that come into play when press photographers and editors communicatively “work” at accomplishing specific gendered visual “preferred readings”.

  • 20.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ekström, Mats
    Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap, Örebro universitet, Örebro, Sweden.
    The gradual orientation away from the look-to-camera on live television news2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The direct-to-camera shot of a person speaking on TV is seen as fundamental for the shaping of an intimate “me”-relationship with the viewer (Scannell 2010). However, in live talks between newscasters and in-house correspondents, as in other formats, the participants look at each other and not the viewer. We ask what this visual look-transition means when it comes to audience address. By examining three examples from the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s, we focus on the visual representation of the broadcaster’s look and how it has gradually changed over time. Our results show that viewer relations and trust is established using a range of interactional tools beyond the look-to-camera. Audience address shifts over time from an “I see you-relation” to a “look-at-us” relation requiring another kind of performance by the represented participants, as well as another kind of relation between broadcaster and viewer.

  • 21.
    Kroon [Lundell], Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Vulnerable woman, raging bull or mannish maniac?: Gender differences in the visualization of political scandals2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the phenomenon commonly labelled political scandal (Thompson 1995, 2000). Our study of three political scandals in the print media, where a general framework of discourse analysis has been applied, is concerned with aspects of media, gender, power and celebrity. Main areas of interest are the journalistic use of visual techniques, and given that press photographers and photo editors in general are men, what actions and situations are seen as interesting to put forward in the visualization of male and female politicians? We will show how journalists, using visuals, actively re-use previous knowledge, experience and assumptions based on prior scandals when the discursive frame or image of a politician is constructed in a new scandal. This seems to be even more true when the politician in question is a woman, possibly because women are used more actively in the construction of an emotional scandal narrative. We also believe that we have found significant gender-based differences in the visual construction of male and female politicians respectively which will be further exemplified in the paper. Lastly, we argue that gender-bias in a political scandal is not only linked to traditional conceptions and stereotypical notions of ‘men’ and ‘women’, but can be defined and constructed in various ways depending on each politician’s media biography.

  • 22.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ekström, Mats
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Live co-produced news: emerging forms of news production and presentation on the web2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ekström, Mats
    Journalism, Media and Communication (JMG), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Live co-produced news: emerging forms of newsproduction and presentation on the web2013In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 620-639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New technologies offer new interactional possibilities for news journalism, but they also pose a challenge to broadcasters who are accustomed to the practices of ‘old’ television news. The web is one such arena where broadcasters are in the process of mastering a sense of sociability (Scannell 1996, 2010) and ‘communicative ease’ (cf. Hutchby, 2006) in relation to audiences. They struggle to find ways to engage audiences in the roles of both viewers and users in line with the technological affordances of the web. Rather little attention has yet been paid to how the general sociability of broadcasting is influenced by the development of digital media. This study presents a case of how broadcasters orient to their audience(s) in a so-called live news co-production on the web. The main point is to highlight both possibilities and dilemmas in the management of audience-oriented activities on a new technological platform with its different conditions for production and reception. We argue that broadcasters interested in producing web news both need to adhere to the professional principles and standards of ordinary broadcasting, and at the same time show that they are competent enough to also produce unpolished, layman-like material normally associated with unprofessionality.

  • 24.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Interviews as communicative resources in news and current affairs broadcasts2010In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 20-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we quantitatively establish the centrality and importance of interviews in news and current affairs broadcasts. We show how segments of interviews (from soundbites to longer recorded or live question-and-answer interactions) are deployed as communicative resources in the construction and presentation of news in various ways. The data allows for a cross-national comparison in between the UK and Sweden that point to differences in practice between the  countries. We argue that our findings may be used to critically examine various conceptualisations of broadcast interviews in general and political interviews in particular. We also show how journalists outnumber politicians as interviewees in the news, a finding that is in need of further exploration from a range of perspectives We also believe that our study provides solid ground on which to base future critical studies of the authority of journalism, dialogical and soundbite journalism, and the alleged fragmentisation of news.

  • 25.
    Kroon, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Being sociable on web TV2014In: SemiotiX New Series, ISSN 1916-7296, Vol. XN, no 12Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Kroon, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Föreställningar om framgång: en intervjustudie om kvinnors och mäns erfarenheter av framgång i arbetslivet2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Kroon, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    More than a hashtag: Producers' and users' co-creation of a loving "we" in a second screen TV sports production2017In: Television and New Media, ISSN 1527-4764, E-ISSN 1552-8316, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 670-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a case study of a series of Swedish football commentary webcastswhere both producers and users engage in communication with each other duringthe FIFA World Cup in 2014. The main aim is to identify what the participants doto construct sociable bonds with each other using the technological affordancesavailable, specifically those connected to second screens. Second screening isapproached as a thoroughly sociable activity rather than a practice you engage in forprimarily instrumental reasons like finding facts or statistics. The analysis shows howusers and producers adopt strategies of inclusion oriented to creating a joint senseof “being here together” in the community that is formed around the official hashtagexpressenvm. The results indicate that second screen setups of this kind have thepotential of displacing the big TV screen and its live sports event, at least for a specificuser crowd.

  • 28.
    Kroon, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Recontextualizing racism and segregation by ways of "cozification" in a TV sports broadcast2019In: Social Semiotics, ISSN 1035-0330, E-ISSN 1470-1219, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 112-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper qualitatively examines a Swedish case where a TV broadcaster takes it upon itself to confront discriminatory practices in sports by addressing issues of segregation and racism in relation to the practice of cross-country skiing in a seven-part series called Stephan, Gliding. It is argued that racism and segregation are addressed through processes of cozification of both form and content. This means that the producers use semiotic resources and strategies of narration that strip the subject matter of any threatening and confrontative components, and instead embed it within a cosy story frame that will not alienate those watching. At a denotative level, Stephan, Gliding tells the story of a beginner who takes on the challenge of skiing in the 90-kilometre cross-country ski competition The Vasa Race. On an ideological level, the programme can be read critically as the narrative of a foreigner deciding to undertake the mission of his own integration into Swedish society by ways of learning to ski. It is argued that the existence of these simultaneous, competing discourses may be a better strategy to maintain a successful “communicative relationship” with audiences than to not address the topic at all.

  • 29.
    Kroon, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The design and organization of a shared ‘live’ multi-screen sports event on web television2015In: The 65th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Kroon, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The gendered practice and role of pull quoting in political newspaper journalism2006In: News from the interview society / [ed] Mats Ekström, Åsa Kroon, Mats Nylund, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2006, p. 165-184Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Kroon, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Angus, Daniel
    School of Communication and Arts, School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD, Australia.
    Microphone pokes as prank or political action?: Challenges to politicians' visibility in the age of web TV2018In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 222-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production of political talk is changing in response to ongoing changes in the overall media ecology. The rise of web TV challenges the previously dominant mediated politics of traditional broadcasting. In this paper we examine the practices of the mediatization of politics in the web TV environment via a humorous encounter between a self-declared “prankster” posing as a web TV broadcaster, and several Swedish politicians. The discussion reflects on various data emanating from this encounter to reveal how Web TV challenges traditional broadcasting norms, and offers fresh challenges for politicians who are continuously adapting to new media logics for exposure.

  • 32.
    Kroon, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Messy interviews: Changing conditions for politicians’ visibility on the web2016In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 1015-1033Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides an updated analysis relating to John B. Thompson’s argument about political visibility and fragility. It does so in light of recent years’ development of communication technologies and the proliferation of nonbroadcasting media organizations producing TV. Instances of a new mediated encounter for politicians is analyzed in detail – the live web interview – produced and streamed by two Swedish tabloids during election campaigning 2014. It is argued that the live web interview is not yet a recognizable ‘communicative activity type’ with an obvious set of norms, rules, and routines. This fact makes politicians more intensely exposed to moments of mediated fragility which may be difficult to control. The most crucial condition that changes how politicians are able to manage their visibility is the constantly rolling ‘non-exclusive’ live camera which does not give the politician any room for error. The tabloids do not seem to mind ‘things going a bit wrong’ while airing; rather, interactional flaws are argued to be part and parcel of the overall web TV performance.

  • 33.
    Kroon, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Talking with politicians on web TV during the Swedish General Election 20142014In: News Discourse in the Digital Age, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the Swedish General Election in September 2014, the web exploded as a crucial communication platform for politicians. Especially non-broadcasters such as tabloids went all in to produce a multitude of various formats where politicians got to be confronted with questions on a wide range of issues. The web platform clearly gives rise to ‘new’ or at least other ways of interacting with politicians than what has been previously offered in traditional broadcasting. In this paper, we will present an overview of the various formats used, and also particularly focus on a number of communicative practices that we argue are particularly promoted in, and by, the web context. 

  • 34.
    Kroon, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The Impact of the Digital Transformation on Sports Journalism Talk Online2019In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 13, no 7, p. 834-852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the impact of the digital transformation on broadcast practices from a producer/studio participant perspective with a focus on sports journalism online. More specifically, the study targets changes in sports talk and interaction as producers re-shape their communicative activities to fit audiences’ new contexts of reception. It discusses how these changes in practices relate to some of the fundamental assumptions in current broadcast talk theory. The textual studies are complemented by interviews with six prominent Swedish media industry representatives in order to shed light on their perceptions of the broadcast to online shift given their respective experiences. The results show how producers/participants adapt to a more casual and relaxed interactional style and tone online than in ordinary broadcasting. The studied sportscasts also largely abandon the traditional broadcast address, as expressed in direct discursive address and looks-to-camera, for an orientation to screen devices where social media active audiences are to be “found,” although still having a traditionally positioned audience to attend to. Although sociability is still the structural principle for producers’ interactional choices irrelevant of platform, the strategies of how to achieve it are changing due to the digital transformation.

  • 35.
    Rasmussen, Joel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Understanding “communication gaps” among personnel in high-risk workplaces from a dialogical perspective2012In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our primary aim in this paper is to argue for a discourse analytical take on questions of how risk and safety are managed by personnel in high-risk workplaces, with a special focus on constructions of “us” and “them”. Thus, we approach the same issue investigated in many other studies, i.e., diverging safety-related understandings between people representing various occupational groups. We choose to examine so-called communication gaps as they are “talked into being” in discourse, meaning that we treat them as primarily socially constructed. A case analysis based on interviews will be used to illustrate how we can understand this phenomenon from a communicative perspective inspired by Linell’s (1998a) dialogue theory. While previous discourse and safety culture research emphasizes broad patterns and differences between entire professions and departments, we argue that researchers should hesitate to reinforce the notion of homogeneous groups. Instead, there is great value in demonstrating collective social construction processes and commonalities so as to facilitate inter-group solidarity and possibly productive change.

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