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  • 1. Berg, M.
    et al.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Possible gender differences in the quality of life and choice of therapy in acne2011In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 969-972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Acne is a very common skin disease that has major impact on the patients' quality of life. Although the disease has been extensively studied we still need more knowledge of factors influencing the decisions for choice of therapy. Objective To evaluate the relationships between clinical severity, patients' self-reported quality of life, treatment choice and the outcome of therapy in a structured out-patient acne clinic. Methods In total 211 consecutive patients (143 females, 68 males) at a structured acne clinic were included. At the first visit a clinical assessment was conducted, therapy was initiated and the patients answered a quality-of-life questionnaire (Dermatology Life Quality Index, DLQI). A follow up was performed after six months, when patients once again answered the DLQI questionnaire and the clinical outcome was assessed by the physician. Results The quality of life was improved after treatment at a group level. At the first visit, the quality of life showed a gender difference (females scoring worse) but did not correlate to the clinical grading nor to the choice of therapy. At six months the DLQI correlated with clinical outcome. Patients with isotretinoin therapy showed a significantly greater improvement in quality of life. There was a tendency to gender difference in the choice of therapy, as in females 32% of the patients were treated with isotretinoin although they were clinically graded as moderate. The corresponding figure for males was 23%. A correlation was found between the initial clinical grading and gender, age and the choice of therapy. Conclusion DLQI can be used to evaluate treatment effects in acne. However, the self-reported quality of life will depend on several factors including age, gender, psychosocial factors and clinical severity.

  • 2. Berne, Berit
    et al.
    Tammela, Monica
    Färm, Gunilla
    Inerot, Annica
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Can the reporting of adverse skin reactions to cosmetics be improved?: A prospective clinical study using a structured protocol2008In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 223-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The use of cosmetics is rising, and adverse reactions to these products are increasing. In Sweden, the Medical Products Agency (MPA) keeps a voluntary reporting system for such adverse reactions. However, the reporting is sparse, consisting almost only of cases with test-proven allergic contact dermatitis, thus under-reporting the more common irritant reactions.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to try to improve the reporting system.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: Dermatologists at 3 dermatology departments used a structured protocol during the clinical investigation of 151 consecutive patients reporting skin reactions to cosmetics. The protocol included symptoms, signs, affected body site, suspected products, and final diagnosis after patch testing. Based on clinical data and patch test results, a causality assessment for each product was made according to a protocol used at the MPA. Results: Allergic contact dermatitis was found in 28% of the patients, and irritant reactions were equally common at 27%.

    CONCLUSIONS: Using this structured protocol, the cases of irritant dermatitis were also reported, and it is recommended that such a protocol is used as a standard to improve the reporting of adverse reactions to skin care products.

  • 3. Bingefors, Kerstin
    et al.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Isacson, Dag
    Quality of life, use of topical medications and socio-economic data in hand eczema: a Swedish nationwide survey2011In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 452-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hand eczema is common and has an adverse impact on the lives of patients. There is a need for population-based surveys on the pharmacoepidemiological aspects, quality of life and impact of socioeconomic factors in hand eczema. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate these factors. A questionnaire-based nationwide survey of health was performed, including questions on hand eczema, use of pharmaceuticals and socioeconomic factors. Quality of life was estimated with the generic instrument Short Form 36 (SF-36). The questionnaire was sent to 7,985 persons (age range 18-84 years), response rate 61.1% (n=4,875). The 1-year prevalence of hand eczema in the study population was 7.5%. In this group, quality of life was lower. All dimensions of SF-36 were affected, most markedly general health and those dimensions reporting on mental health. In the group with self-reported hand eczema, 51% reported using topical pharmaceuticals. Hand eczema was more common among women (9.1%, n=2,630) than among men (5.6%, n=2,245) and in the age group below 65 years (8.5%, n=3,274) compared with those aged 65 years and over (4.3%, n=1,151). This survey clearly demonstrates the impact of hand eczema on several dimensions of life and also highlights age, gender and socioeconomic differences.

  • 4.
    Bingefors, Kristina
    et al.
    Farmaci, Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svensson, Åke
    Hudkliniken, Skånes universitetssjukhus, Malmö, Sweden.
    Isacson, Dag
    Farmaci, Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Self-reported lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis and co-morbidity with asthma and eczema in adulthood: a population-based cross-sectional survey2013In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 93, no 4, p. 438-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atopic dermatitis and its co-morbidity with asthma and allergy is well described in younger age groups. However, population-based studies on adults with atopic dermatitis in childhood are sparse. The aims of this study were to determine: (i) the prevalence of self-reported childhood atopic dermatitis in the population; and (ii) its association with present self-reported hand eczema, eczema, allergy, urticaria and asthma. A questionnaire was sent to a cross-sectional random sample of the Swedish population (n = 7,985), age range 18–84 years (response rate 61.1%). The questionnaire included the question “Have you had childhood eczema?” and questions on 5 other medical problems (hand eczema, other eczema, asthma, urticaria and allergy). Persons reporting eczema in childhood reported increased odds ratios (OR) for hand eczema (4.01), other eczema (3.88), urticaria (2.50), allergy (2.98), and asthma (2.06) as adults. The combination of eczema, allergy and asthma had an OR of 14.10 (95% confidence interval 8.44–23.54). Adults in the age range 18–84 years reporting childhood atopic dermatitis still have high co-morbidity with eczema, asthma, urticaria and allergy.

  • 5. Buraczewska, Izabela
    et al.
    Berne, Berit
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Lodén, Marie
    Törmä, Hans
    Long-term treatment with moisturizers affects the mRNA levels of genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation and desquamation2009In: Archives of Dermatological Research, ISSN 0340-3696, E-ISSN 1432-069X, Vol. 301, no 2, p. 175-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent study, we showed that long-term treatment with two different moisturizers affected TEWL in opposite directions. Therefore, we decided to examine the effect of these moisturizers on the cellular and molecular level. In a randomized controlled study on 20 volunteers, epidermal mRNA expression of genes essential for keratinocyte differentiation and desquamation after a 7-week treatment with two moisturizers was analyzed. Treatment with one test moisturizer increased gene expression of involucrin, transglutaminase 1, kallikrein 5, and kallikrein 7, while the other moisturizer affected only expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A. Thus, moisturizers are able to modify the skin barrier function and change the mRNA expression of certain epidermal genes. Since the type of influence depends on the composition of the moisturizer, these should be tailored in accordance with the requirement of the barrier of each individual patient, which merits further investigations.

  • 6.
    Ekbäck, Maria Palmetun
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Benzein, Eva
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Health and Caring Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Department of Health and Caring Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal University College and Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Social support: an important factor for quality of life in women with hirsutism2014In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 12, article id 183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Women with hirsutism have reported imparied health and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Social support is a factor that might increase HRQoL in chronic diseases, but little is known about this association among women with hirsutism.

    Aim: The aim of the study was to describe social support and explore its association with HRQoL among women with hirsutism. A further aim was to compare HRQoL in women with hirsutism with a Swedish normal population.

    Methods: A questionnaire including socio-demographic questions, Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), and a self-estimation of hairiness using the Ferriman-Gallway scale (F-G scale) was answered by 127 women with hirsutism.

    Results: Multiple regression analyses showed significant associations between social support and all health dimensions in the SF-36, also after the model was adjusted for age, hairiness and body mass index. Compared to the normal Swedish population, women with hirsutism reported significantly lower HRQoL in all dimensions of the SF-36 (p < 0.01).

    Conclusions: There is a significant positive association between social support and HRQoL, demonstrating its importance for the ability to adapt to problems associated with hirsutism. As women with hirsutism reported poorer HRQoL compared to the normal population, social support may be a factor to consider in clinical practice.

  • 7.
    Ekbäck, Maria [Palmetun]
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. University hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden; Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden; Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; ; Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. University hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Social support and quality of life among women diagnosed with hirsutismManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Women with hirsutism report more anxiety, depression and lower quality of life. However, their social situation with a family and employment does not differ from other women. Social support is a factor that might increase quality of life in chronic diseases. Little is known about social support and skin diseases.

    Objectives: The aim was to evaluate the relation between health-related quality of life and social support among women with hirsutism.

    Methods: A questionnaire including socio-demographic questions, Short Form 36 (SF-36), the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) and a self-estimation of hairiness using the Ferriman-Gallway scale (F-G scale) was filled out by 127. MSPSS has three sub-scales (family, friends, significant others) and a total score, that was used for calculation.

    Results: Compared to a Swedish population based reference group women with hirsutism reported lower quality of life in all dimensions of SF-36 (p<0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the MSPSS and SF-36 in the initial and adjusted model.

    Conclusions: There is a significant positive relation between quality of life and social support, demonstrating its importance for the ability to adapt to problems associated with hirsutism. It can be postulated that social support is important for the quality of life in chronic skin diseases wich merits further investigations.

  • 8.
    Evenhamre, Karolina
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ekbäck, Maria Palmetun
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Correlations Between Disease-specific DLQI and Generic WHOQOL-BREF Quality of Life Instruments in a Clinical Population with Mixed Dermatological Diagnoses: A Pilot Study2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 270-272Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Fall, Sofia
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden .
    Bruze, Magnus
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden .
    Isaksson, Marlene
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden .
    Lidén, Carola
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Matura, Mihaly
    Unit of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Contact allergy trends in Sweden: a retrospective comparison of patch test data from 1992, 2000, and 20092015In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 72, no 5, p. 297-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Contact allergy prevalence rates change over time as a result of variations in allergen exposure. Data from patch test clinics are often used as markers for allergy trends.

    Objectives: The aim of the present retrospective study was to describe trends in rates of sensitization to allergens in the Swedish baseline series.

    Patients/materials/methods: Prevalence rates are described by comparing consecutive patch test data from 1992, 2000 and 2009 in Swedish patch test clinics. In total, 3680 patients were included in 1992, 3825 in 2000, and 3112 in 2009.

    Results: Among test substances with a sensitization rate above 2% in 2009, significant decreases were noted for nickel sulfate, cobalt chloride, colophonium, and methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI)/methylisothiazolinone (MI), and a significant increase for p-phenylenediamine, as compared with 1992. Potassium dichromate reactions had increased among younger women, whereas reactions to nickel and cobalt had decreased in this group. Sensitization to chromium, cobalt and fragrance mix I had decreased among older men, and sensitization to nickel had decreased among younger men.

    Conclusions: It is probable that these changes in 1992-2009 reflect both changes in regulations for nickel, lower levels of chromium in cement and of MCI/MI in cosmetics, and increasing use of hair dyes.

  • 10.
    Hagvall, Lina
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Engfeldt, Malin
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Marléne
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ryberg, Kristina
    Department of Dermatology, Uddevalla Hospital, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Stenberg B., Berndt
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology & Venerology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svedman, Cecilia
    Karlberg, Ann-Therese
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bråred Christensson, Johanna
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Dermatochemistry and Skin Allergy, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Contact allergy to citral and its constituents geranial and neral, coupled with reactions to the pre- and prohapten geraniol2020In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 31-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Citral is commonly used as a fragrance and flavour material and consists of the aldehydes geranial and neral. Citral is included in fragrance mix (FM) II. Geranial and neral have also been identified in autoxidation of geraniol, a fragrance compound present in FM I.

    Objectives: To study contact allergy to citral, geranial and neral and concomitant reactivity to oxidized geraniol and fragrance markers of the baseline series.

    Patients and Methods: 1476 dermatitis patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis were patch tested using geranial, neral and citral, all 3.5% pet., geraniol 6.0% and oxidized geraniol 11% pet. in addition to the Swedish baseline series.

    Results: Frequencies of positive reactions to citral, geranial and neral were 2.9%, 3.4% and 1.9%, respectively. Together, citral and geranial gave 4.2% positive patch test reactions in consecutive dermatitis patients. In patients with positive reactions to citral or its components, 25‐34% reacted to FM II and 61% reacted to oxidized geraniol.

    Conclusions: Patch testing with citral, its components or oxidized geraniol detects contact allergic reactions not detected using the baseline series. Patch testing with pure geraniol was shown to be of little value. Geranial and neral, although closely chemically related, are concluded to be separate haptens.

  • 11.
    Hagvall, Lina
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Engfeldt, Malin
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Marléne
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ryberg, Kristina
    Department of Dermatology, Uddevalla Hospital, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology & Venereology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svedman, Cecilia
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Karlberg, Ann-Therese
    Dermatochemistry, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bråred Christensson, Johanna
    Department of Dermatology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Dermatochemistry, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Contact allergy to oxidized geraniol among Swedish dermatitis patients: A multicentre study by the Swedish Contact Dermatitis Research Group2018In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 232-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Geraniol is a widely used fragrance terpene, and is included in fragrance mix I. Geraniol is prone to autoxidation, forming the skin sensitizers geranial, neral, and geraniol-7-hydroperoxide. Oxidized geraniol has previously been patch tested in 1 clinic, giving 1% to 4.6% positive reactions in consecutive patients when tested at 2% to 11%.

    AIM: To compare test reactions to pure and oxidized geraniol, to compare 2 different test concentrations of oxidized geraniol and to investigate the pattern of concomitant reactions to fragrance markers of the baseline series in a multicentre setting.

    METHODS: One thousand four hundred and seventy-six consecutive patients referred for patch testing were patch tested with geraniol 6% pet. and oxidized geraniol 6% and 11% pet.

    RESULTS: Pure geraniol 6% pet., oxidized geraniol 6% pet. and oxidized geraniol 11% pet. gave 1%, 3% and 8% positive patch test reactions and 0.7%, 3% and 5% doubtful reactions, respectively. Approximately 50% of the patients with doubtful reactions to oxidized geraniol 6% pet. had positive reactions to oxidized geraniol 11% pet.

    CONCLUSIONS: Oxidized geraniol 11% pet. provides better detection than oxidized geraniol 6% pet. As most patients reacted only to oxidized geraniol, it is important to explore further whether oxidized geraniol should be included in a baseline patch test series.

  • 12.
    Hedberg, Yolanda S.
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Department of Chemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lidén, Carola
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Chromium Dermatitis in a Metal Worker Due to Leather Gloves and Alkaline Coolant2016In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 104-105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Jamil, Wasim N.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Effects of time and recall of patch test results on quality of life (QoL) after testing: Cross-sectional study analyzing QoL in hand eczema patients 1, 5 and 10 years after patch testing2017In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 88-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patch testing can improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

    Objectives: To study the impact on HRQoL of elapsed time after patch testing (1-10 years), and how the outcome of testing and patients' recall affects HRQoL.

    Patients/materials/methods: The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaire was sent to all patients (aged 18-65 years) who were patch tested for suspected contact allergy in 2009, 2005 and 2000 at the Department of Dermatology in Örebro.

    Results: The response rate was 51% (n = 256). The DLQI score was significantly lower at 10 years after patch testing (mean DLQI = 5.5) than at 1 year (mean DLQI = 7.7). Work was the most impaired aspect. A binary logistic model showed that only time (10 years after testing) was associated with no effect, a light effect or a moderate effect (DLQI < 10) on HRQoL. No such association was seen for patients with negative or positive test results concerning full recall, partial recall or no recall of diagnosed allergens.

    Conclusions: Although there was an improvement in HRQoL over time, the work aspect remained a major problem. The improvement was not affected by the outcome of testing and patients' recall of test results.

  • 14.
    Jamil, Wassim N.
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Erikssohn, Ingalill
    Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    How well is the outcome of patch testing remembered by the patients?: A 10-year follow-up of testing with the Swedish baseline series at the Department of Dermatology in Örebro, Sweden2012In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 215-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patch testing is beneficial for patients with contact dermatitis. However, it is not known how well the outcome of patch testing is remembered after a prolonged period.

    Objectives: To study how well patients remember the outcome of their tests after 1-10 years. Patients/materials/methods. In 2010, a questionnaire was sent to all patients tested with the Swedish baseline series in 2009, 2005, and 2000.

    Results: The response rate was 53.3% (252/473), and 96% (241/252) of patients reported that they had been submitted for allergy testing. Among those with positive patch test results, 79% (111/141) remembered a positive result and 29% (41/141) reported the correct name of the allergen. We found a wide variation (0-80%) in how well the patients remembered positive test results for different allergens. The ability to recall allergens had no relationship with the localization or extension of eczema lesions, but was negatively correlated with the number of diagnosed allergies, the number of years after patch testing, and being male.

    Conclusions: Our results indicate that improved information for patients following patch testing is required, in order to improve the prognosis of contact dermatitis.

  • 15.
    Johansen, Jeanne D.
    et al.
    Dept Dermatoallergol, Natl Allergy Res Ctr, Gentofte Hosp, Univ Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark.
    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina
    Occupat Med, Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Agner, Tove
    Dept Dermatol, Bispebjerg Hosp, Univ Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersen, Klaus E.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Univ Southern Denmark, Dept Dermatol, Odense, Denmark; Allergy Ctr, Odense Univ Hosp, Univ Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Bircher, Andreas
    Dept Dermatol, Allergy Unit, Univ Basel Hosp, Basel, Switzerland; Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Cannavo, Alicia
    Hosp Municipal Vicente Lopez Prof Bernard Houssay, Buenos Aires DF, Argentina.
    Gimenez-Arnau, Ana
    Dept Dermatol, Hosp Mar, Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Goncalo, Margarida
    Dept Dermatol, Univ Hosp, Coimbra, Portugal; Fac Med, Univ Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
    Goossens, An
    Dept Dermatol, Contact Allergy Unit, Univ Hosp KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    John, Swen M.
    Dept Dermatol, Environm Med, Hlth Theory,Univ Osnabruck, Osnabruck, Germany.
    Liden, Carola
    Inst Environm Med, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Dept Dermatol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mahler, Vera
    Dept Dermatol, Allergy Unit, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
    Matura, Mihly
    Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Unit Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Stockholms Läns Sjukvårdsområde (SLSO), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rustemeyer, Thomas
    Dept Dermatol, Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Serup, Jorgen
    Dept Dermatol, Bispebjerg Hosp, Univ Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Spiewak, Radoslaw
    Dept Expt Dermatol & Cosmetol, Coll Med, Jagiellonian Univ, Krakow, Poland.
    Thyssen, Jacob P.
    Dept Dermatoallergol, Natl Allergy Res Ctr, Gentofte Hosp, Univ Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark.
    Vigan, Martine
    Dept Dermatol, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU) Besancon, Besancon, France.
    White, Ian R.
    St Johns Inst Dermatol, Dept Cutaneous Allergy, St Thomas Hosp, London, England.
    Wilkinson, Mark
    Spire Hosp, Leeds, England.
    Uter, Wolfgang
    Dept Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
    European Society of Contact Dermatitis guideline for diagnostic patch testing: recommendations on best practice2015In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 195-221Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present guideline summarizes all aspects of patch testing for the diagnosis of contact allergy in patients suspected of suffering, or having been suffering, from allergic contact dermatitis or other delayed-type hypersensitivity skin and mucosal conditions. Sections with brief descriptions and discussions of different pertinent topics are followed by a highlighted short practical recommendation. Topics comprise, after an introduction with important definitions, materials, technique, modifications of epicutaneous testing, individual factors influencing the patch test outcome or necessitating special considerations, children, patients with occupational contact dermatitis and drug eruptions as special groups, patch testing of materials brought in by the patient, adverse effects of patch testing, and the final evaluation and patient counselling based on this judgement. Finally, short reference is made to aspects of (continuing) medical education and to electronic collection of data for epidemiological surveillance.

  • 16.
    Josefson, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Berg, Mats
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gånemo, Agneta
    Department of Dermatology, Institute of Clinical Research in Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Hallander, Anna
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hindsén-Stenström, Monica
    Department of Dermatology, Institute of Clinical Research in Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Meding, Birgitta
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svensson, Åke L.
    Department of Dermatology, Institute of Clinical Research in Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Methodological aspects of assessing hand eczema: Comparison of two tools and three different categories of evaluators2017In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 176, no 5, p. 1373-1375Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Jönsson, Agnez
    et al.
    WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Foerster, Sunniva
    WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Institute for Infectious Diseases, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Golparian, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hamasuna, Ryoichi
    Department of Urology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan.
    Jacobsson, Susanne
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatovenerology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jensen, Jörgen Skov
    Department of Microbiology and Infection Control, Sexually Transmitted Infections, Research and Development, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ohnishi, Makoto
    Department of Bacteriology I, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan.
    Unemo, Magnus
    WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    In vitro activity and time-kill curve analysis of sitafloxacin against a global panel of antimicrobial-resistant and multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates2018In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 126, no 1, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatment of gonorrhoea is a challenge worldwide because of emergence of resistance in N. gonorrhoeae to all therapeutic antimicrobials available and novel antimicrobials are imperative. The newer-generation fluoroquinolone sitafloxacin, mostly used for respiratory tract infections in Japan, can have a high in vitro activity against gonococci. However, only a limited number of recent antimicrobial-resistant isolates from Japan have been examined. We investigated the sitafloxacin activity against a global gonococcal panel (250 isolates cultured in 1991-2013), including multidrug-resistant geographically, temporally and genetically diverse isolates, and performed time-kill curve analysis for sitafloxacin. The susceptibility to sitafloxacin (agar dilution) and seven additional therapeutic antimicrobials (Etest) was determined. Sitafloxacin was rapidly bactericidal, and the MIC range, MIC50 and MIC90 was ≤0.001-1, 0.125 and 0.25 mg/L, respectively. There was a high correlation between the MICs of sitafloxacin and ciprofloxacin; however, the MIC50 and MIC90 of sitafloxacin were 6-fold and >6-fold lower, respectively. Sitafloxacin might be an option for particularly dual antimicrobial therapy of gonorrhoea and for cases with ceftriaxone resistance or allergy. However, further in vitro and particularly in vivo evaluations of potential resistance, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and ideal dosing for gonorrhoea, as well as performance of randomized controlled clinical, trials are crucial.

  • 18.
    Klasson, Maria
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Helena
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Carin
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Husby, Bente
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Westberg, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Biological monitoring of dermal and air exposure to cobalt at a Swedish hard metal production plant: does dermal exposure contribute to uptake?2017In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 77, no 4, p. 201-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Occupational exposure to cobalt is well established in hard metal manufacture. Cobalt is known to cause contact allergy, asthma, hard metal lung disease, and lung cancer. The relationship between skin exposure and uptake determined in blood has not been extensively investigated.

    Objective: To examine whether skin and inhalable air exposure to cobalt contributes to uptake, determined as cobalt in blood, in a hard metal manufacturing factory.

    Methods: The amount of cobalt on the skin found with an acid wash technique, the air concentrations of inhalable cobalt and cobalt blood concentrations were determined and correlated in exposed workers.

    Results: We found a significant rank correlation for cobalt concentrations on the skin, in inhalable air, and in blood (0.376-0.498). Multiple linear regression showed significant regression coefficients for cobalt skin exposure and blood (B = 0.01, p < 0.05) and for inhalable cobalt in air and blood (B = 49.1, p < 0.001). According to our model based on data from the regression analyses, a twofold increase in skin exposure levels at different air concentrations caused a 3 - 14% increase in blood levels.

    Conclusions: Our data suggest that skin exposure to cobalt in the hard metal industry could affect the total uptake at the same order of magnitude as air exposure.

  • 19.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    A New Perspective on the Formation of Stratum Corneum Intercellular Space2016In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 291-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    is missing (In this Issue...).

  • 20.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden; IMM, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berg, Mats
    Department of Dermatology Sörmland, Mälar Hospital, Eskilstuna, FoU Centre Sörmland, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Some observations on reporting quality of life in treatment of psoriasis in outpatient clinics2012In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 93, no 2, p. 210-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bingefors, Kerstin
    Institute of Environmental Medicine (IMM), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Meding, Birgitta
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berg, Mats
    Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hand eczema and health-related quality of life: a comparison of EQ-5D and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) in relation to the hand eczema extent score (HEES)2013In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 138-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is associated with the extent and severity of hand eczema. We still lack a consensus about which HRQoL instrument to use as the standard, and how to measure the extent and severity of hand eczema.

    Objectives: To compare the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) with EQ-5D (a standardized instrument for use as a measure of health outcome), and to evaluate how the Hand Eczema Extent Score (HEES) relates to these instruments.

    Methods: Ninety-three patients (61 females) were included. The HEES was recorded by a dermatologist, and the DLQI and EQ-5D by the patients. The results were analysed with factor analysis and non-parametric statistics.

    Results: The DLQI and EQ-5D showed decreased HRQoL. Using factor analysis, we could not establish an association between the DLQI and EQ-5D. There were, however, correlations between the DLQI and the HEES (0.31), the EQ(index) and the HEES (-0.32), the DLQI and the EQ(VAS) (-0.62), and the DLQI and the EQ(index) (-0.67) (the EQ(VAS) and the EQ(index) are calculated from EQ-5D).

    Conclusions: We could not link factors in the DLQI to EQ-5D, which has previously been done for SF-36 (Short Form 36). On the basis of this, we cannot recommend EQ-5D over SF-36 for hand eczema studies. The DLQI correlates with the EQ(VAS) and the EQ(index), and can probably be used as an approximation for EQ-5D. Our findings with the HEES are interesting, as it can be used by patients.

  • 22.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Isacson, Dag
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bingefors, Kerstin
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Self-reported Skin Diseases, Quality of Life and Medication Use: A Nationwide Pharmaco-epidemiological Survey in Sweden2014In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 94, no 2, p. 188-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to determine self-reported consumption of dermatological pharmaceuticals and quality of life (QoL), measured with Short Form 36, in relation to eczema, acne, psoriasis and other inflammatory skin conditions in the Swedish population. A questionnaire containing questions on the occurrence of skin diseases, health-related QoL and the use of pharmaceuticals was sent to a cross-sectional sample of the Swedish population, age range 18-84 years (n =8,000). The response rate was 61%. The 1-year prevalence of skin diseases was 30-35%, with females reporting a higher prevalence. The prevalence was 11.5% for eczema other than hand eczema, 10.2% for acne, 7.5% for hand eczema, 3.9% for psoriasis and 3.1% for urticaria. QoL was significantly affected and 25% of females and 19% of males had used a dermatological drug. Compared with hand eczema, persons with psoriasis and other eczema reported significantly more use of topical steroids on prescription and more use of dermatological pharmaceuticals in total. Skin conditions are common; they affect QoL and lead to a high consumption of dermatological drugs; which deserves increased awareness in the society.

  • 23.
    Norstedt, Sofia
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Medical Faculty, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Medical Faculty, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Dietary regimes for treatment of acne vulgaris: A critical review of published clinical trials2016In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 96, no 2, p. 283-284Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Prosén, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Göthlin Eremo, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Clinical Research Laboratory, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tsegai, Alexander Duarte
    School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tina, Elisabet
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Clinical Research Laboratory, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Decreased expression of the mitochondrial solute carrier SLC25A43 in basal cell carcinoma compared with healthy skin2017In: Oncology Letters, ISSN 1792-1074, E-ISSN 1792-1082, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 2218-2222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common type of cancer in fair-skinned individuals, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The aim of the present study was to investigate the gene and protein expression of the mitochondrial solute carrier family 25 member 43 (SLC25A43) in basal cell carcinoma. SLC25A43 has previously been identified to be genetically altered and associated with cell proliferation in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer. However, the knowledge about SLC25A43 is limited, and its role in other cancers is unknown. The SLC25A43 gene and protein expression was analysed in 14 basal cell carcinomas and healthy skin samples from the same individuals by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The results demonstrated a significantly lower (>= 50%) SLC25A43 gene expression in all carcinomas compared with that in healthy skin. In addition, SLC25A43 protein expression was absent in >90% of all visual fields in the basal cell carcinomas, and the H-score was significantly lower in tumours compared with the adjacent epidermis. These results demonstrate that SLC25A43 expression is altered at the gene and protein levels in basal cell carcinoma. The underlying mechanisms and the clinical relevance of these data must be elucidated in additional experimental and clinical studies.

  • 25.
    Smirnova, Jevgenija
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Karlstad Central Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden.
    von Kobyletzki, L.
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svensson, Å.
    Department of Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Langan, S. M.
    Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London, School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Atopic dermatitis, educational attainment and psychological functioning: a national cohort study2019In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 180, no 3, p. 559-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) might adversely affect academic performance, possibly through influences on psychological functioning such as stress resilience.

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association of atopic dermatitis with stress resilience, cognitive function and educational attainment.

    METHODS: We used data from a national cohort of men who underwent a military conscription examination at ages 17 to 20 years in Sweden between 1969 and 1976. All potential conscripts met a physician who assessed current or previous history of AD. Stress resilience was measured by a psychologist using a semi-structured interview. The conscription assessment included a written cognitive function test. Highest level of achieved education was obtained through record linkage.

    RESULTS: The study population included 234 715 men, 1 673 (0·7%) had an AD diagnosis. AD was associated with a greater risk of low stress resilience (adjusted relative risk ratio (RRR) 1·60; 95% confidence interval 1·38 to 1·86). AD was associated with higher cognitive function (b coefficient 0·15; 0·05 to 0·24) and higher educational level (RRR 1·29; 1·13 to 1·47) but adjustment for socioeconomic characteristics of the family of origin attenuated the magnitude of the associations and eliminated statistical significance (b coefficient 0·06; -0·03 to 0·15) and (RRR 1·16; 1·00 to 1·35).

    CONCLUSIONS: Swedish males with AD had lower stress resilience in late adolescence but did not have lower cognitive function or poorer educational attainment. The lower stress resilience associated with AD is consistent with an increased risk of possible long-term adverse health outcomes.

  • 26.
    Tammela, Monica
    et al.
    Department of Cosmetics, Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Marlene
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Inerot, Annica
    Department of Dermatology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rudel, Jana
    Department of Dermatology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Berne, Berit
    Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Cosmetics, Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Patch testing with own cosmetics: a prospective study of testing and reporting of adverse effects to the Swedish Medical Products Agency2012In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 42-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Swedish Medical Products Agency (MPA) provides a voluntary reporting system for adverse reactions to cosmetics. However, the reporting is sparse, and the products involved are sometimes difficult to identify.

    Objectives: To investigate how often patients referred for patch testing were tested with the cosmetic products that they had been using themselves, and to improve the reporting to the MPA by the use of photographic documentation of product labels.

    Patients and methods: Consecutive patients at five dermatology departments who were patch tested with their own cosmetics were included. Reports including protocols of positive patch test results for the patients' own cosmetics and photographs/photocopies of product labels were sent to the MPA. Results. Three hundred and sixteen of 948 patients (33%) were tested with their own cosmetics, and 15% of these tested positive with one or more products. The number of reports was more than three times higher than in corresponding periods in earlier years. For 79% of the products, photographs/photocopies of the containers were submitted, and for 30%, batch numbers were submitted.

    Conclusions: For a substantial number of patients, their own cosmetics were suspected of causing adverse reactions and were therefore tested. During the study, the number of reports to the MPA tripled, and the relevant products were easier to identify.

  • 27.
    Tina, Elisabet
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Clinical Research Laboratory.
    Prosén, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lennholm, S.
    School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro university, Örebro, Sweden.
    Gasparyan, G.
    School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro university, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Clinical Research Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Dermatology, Örebro University hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Göthlin Eremo, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Clinical Research Laboratory.
    Expression profile of the amino acid transporters SLC7A5, SLC7A7, SLC7A8 and the enzyme TDO2 in basal cell carcinoma2019In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 180, no 1, p. 130-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is increasing and the costs for care rising. Therefore, the need for simplified and cost-effective treatment choices is substantial. Aberrant signalling in several pathways, induced by ultraviolet radiation, is of importance in the development of BCC. Alterations in tumour metabolic activity are part of general carcinogenesis; however, these alterations are only partially recognized in skin cancer.

    Objectives: To study expression profiles in BCCs compared with individually matched nontumour skin, with a focus on finding differences associated with tumour metabolism.

    Materials and methods: Gene expression in biopsies from BCCs (n = 14) compared with biopsies from nontumour gluteal skin was analysed with microarrays (n = 4 + 4) and/or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, n = 14 + 14). Protein expression and localization was assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded BCC samples.

    Results: Microarray analysis revealed increased expression of the amino acid transporters SLC7A5, SLC7A7 and SLC7A8 as well as the cytosolic enzyme tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) 2 in BCC. Higher expression of SLC7A5 (P < 0.001), SLC7A8 (P < 0.001) and TDO2 (P = 0.002), but not SLC7A7 (P = 0.50), was confirmed by qPCR, and IHC demonstrated correlating tumour cell protein expression of SLC7A5 and SLC7A8. Protein expression of SLC7A7 was observed in the stratum granulosum, and TDO2 in immune cells.

    Conclusions: This study highlights the upregulation of SLC7A5, SLC7A8 and TDO2 in BCC compared with nontumour skin. Our findings imply that amino acid transporters may be further explored as potential targets for future medical treatment.

  • 28. Törmä, Hans
    et al.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Berne, Berit
    Skin barrier disruption by sodium lauryl sulfate-exposure alters the expressions of involucrin, transglutaminase 1, profilaggrin, and kallikreins during the repair phase in human skin in vivo2008In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, ISSN 0022-202X, E-ISSN 1523-1747, Vol. 128, no 5, p. 1212-1219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detergents are skin irritants affecting keratinocytes. In this study, healthy volunteers were exposed to water (vehicle) and 1% sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) under occlusive patch tests for 24 hours. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of keratinocyte differentiation markers and of enzymes involved in corneodesmosome degradation was examined in skin biopsies (n=8) during the repair phase (6 hours to 7 days postexposure) using real-time reverse-transcription PCR. It was found that the expression of involucrin was increased at 6 hours, but then rapidly normalized. The expression of transglutaminase 1 exhibited a twofold increase after 24 hours in the SLS-exposed skin. Profilaggrin was decreased after 6 hours. Later (4–7 days), the expression in SLS-exposed areas was >50% above than in control areas. An increased and altered immunofluorescence pattern of involucrin, transglutaminase 1, and filaggrin was also found (n=4). At 6 hours post-SLS exposure, the mRNA expression of kallikrein-7 (KLK-7) and kallikrein-5 (KLK-5) was decreased by 50 and 75%, respectively, as compared with control and water-exposed areas. Thereafter, the expression pattern of KLK-7 and KLK-5 was normalized. Changes in protein expression of KLK-5 were also found. In conclusion, SLS-induced skin barrier defects induce altered mRNA expression of keratinocyte differentiation markers and enzymes degrading corneodesmosomes.

  • 29. Wiebert, P.
    et al.
    Svartengren, M.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, T.
    Lundberg, I.
    Nise, G.
    Mortality, morbidity and occupational exposure to airway-irritating agents among men with a respiratory diagnosis in adolescence2008In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 120-125Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To examine the influence of an airway diagnosis in adolescence on future health and occupation in Swedish men.

    Methods: Data were collected from the linkage of four Swedish national registers: the Military Service Conscription Register, the Population and Housing Censuses, the Inpatient Care Register and the National Cause of Death Register. A job-exposure matrix for airway-irritating substances was developed for application on the conscription cohort. The cohort included 49 321 Swedish men born 1949–51. Three groups—(1) healthy, (2) asthmatics (mild and severe asthma) and (3) subjects with allergic rhinitis without concurrent asthma—were identified at conscription and analysed for mortality, in-patient care and strategies for choice of occupation with emphasis on airway-irritating job exposure. Analyses were adjusted for smoking and childhood socioeconomic position.

    Results: The prevalence of total asthma was 1.8%, severe asthma 0.45% and allergic rhinitis 2.7%. Mortality for all causes was significantly higher in total asthma, hazard ratio (HR) 1.49 (95% CI 1.00 to 2.23), and lower in allergic rhinitis, HR 0.52 (95% CI 0.30 to 0.91). Asthma was a risk factor for inpatient care while allergic rhinitis was associated with less in-patient care (odds ratio (OR) for total asthma 1.16 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.34), severe asthma 1.38 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.85), allergic rhinitis 0.92 (95% CI 0.82 to 1.03)). Those with asthma tended to avoid jobs with a high probability for airway-irritating exposure (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.09), but not to the same extent as subjects with allergic rhinitis (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.70) (ORs from 1990).

    Conclusion: Subjects with asthma did not change their exposure situation to the same extent as subjects with allergic rhinitis. Further, asthmatics had an increased risk for morbidity and mortality compared to healthy subjects and subjects with allergic rhinitis.

1 - 29 of 29
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