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  • 1.
    Branzén, Marie
    et al.
    Specialist Clinic of Orthodontics, Public Dental Health Service, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Alf
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Dental Research Department, Public Dental Health Service, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bazargani, Farhan
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Orthodontics, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Implant-Supported Single Crowns Replacing Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A 5-Year Follow-Up2015In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 1134-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Knowledge of the long-term survival of single implants in cases of congenitally missing lateral incisors in the maxilla is limited.

    Purpose: This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the 5-year survival of implants and implant-supported crowns (ISCs) and to assess the functional and aesthetic outcomes from the professional and patient perspectives.

    Materials and Methods: From a total of 46 patients with congenitally missing upper lateral incisors, 36 patients treated with 54 Branemark (R) (Nobel Biocare AB, Goteborg, Sweden) implants and ISCs participated in the study. A clinical examination, California Dental Association (CDA) evaluation, and patient questionnaire were used to rate and compare the objective and subjective evaluations of the ISCs.

    Results: The survival of implants and ISCs was 100%. The CDA ratings were satisfactory for all ISCs, with 70% being rated excellent. The patient rating was also high for the overall satisfaction item, with 21 being completely satisfied and 14 fairly satisfied. However, 12 patients wished for the replacement of their ISCs. Logistic regression analysis indicated that a less optimal embrasure fill was the most discriminating factor though not statistically significant (p = .082).

    Conclusions: One-third of the patients wished for the replacement of their ISCs. Soft tissue adaptation seems to be an important factor for overall satisfaction.

  • 2.
    Hedlund, Maria
    et al.
    Odontologiska forskningsenheten, Folktandvården, Region Örebro Län, Örebro, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Alf
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Odontologiska forskningsenheten, Folktandvården, Region Örebro Län, Örebro, Sweden.
    Femårsöverlevnad för keramikkronor2017In: Tandläkartidningen, ISSN 0039-6982, Vol. 3, p. 66-70Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Kalicinski, Anna
    et al.
    GHP Specialisttandläkarna Stockholm, Sophiahemmets sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Göthberg, Catharina
    Avd. för oral protetik, Odont. inst., Folktandvården Region Jönköpings län, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Alf
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Avd. för protetik, Centrum för specialisttandvård, Folktandvården Region Örebro län, Örebro, Sweden.
    Zirkoniadistanser på Astra Tech-implantat: överlevnad och tekniska komplikationer2016In: Tandläkartidningen, ISSN 0039-6982, no 11, p. 58-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Sjögren, J. Jonsson
    et al.
    Dental Research Department, Public Dental Health Service, Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Kvist, T.
    Department of Endodontology, Institute of Odontology at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Alf
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Dental Research Department, Public Dental Health Service, Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pigg, M.
    Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    The frequency and characteristics of pain and discomfort associated with root filled teeth: a practice-based study2019In: International Endodontic Journal, ISSN 0143-2885, E-ISSN 1365-2591, Vol. 52, no 9, p. 1264-1273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To (i) investigate the frequency and characteristics of pain and discomfort associated with root filled teeth in adult patients regularly attending the Public Dental Service in orebro County, Sweden; (ii) assess the association between symptoms and clinical and radiographic findings; and (iii) explore the impact of pain and discomfort from root filled teeth on daily life.

    Methodology: Patient records of adult patients (>= 20 years) scheduled for routine check-ups in April 2015 were screened to identify individuals with root filled teeth; all patients with >= 1 root filled tooth were asked to participate. The examination comprised of clinical and radiographic examinations and questionnaires on general health, on pain symptoms from root filled teeth and on the impact of pain on daily activities. In a general estimating equation (GEE), examination findings and patient-related factors were independently analysed in relation to the outcome 'presence of pain'.

    Results: In total, 550 patients with 1256 root filled teeth participated. Fifty-three patients (9.6%) experienced pain or discomfort from 62 (4.9%) root filled teeth. Lower age, percussion tenderness and apical tenderness were significantly associated with pain (P > 0.001 to P = 0.044). The average pain intensity was 2.1 on a (0-10) Numeric Rating Scale, and average duration was 28.4 months. The impact on daily life was low.

    Conclusions: On average, pain associated with root filled teeth was of mild intensity, >2 years of duration and had low impact on daily life. Although the significantly associated clinical findings may indicate apical periodontitis as the most probable explanation in some teeth, the origin of pain from root filled teeth remains partly unexplained.

  • 5.
    Svanborg, Per
    et al.
    Department of Prosthodontics/Dental Materials Science, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Alf
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Postgraduate Dental Education Center.
    Stenport, Victona
    Department of Prosthodontics/Dental Materials Science, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Additively Manufactured Titanium and Cobalt-Chromium Implant Frameworks: Fit and Effect' of Ceramic Veneering2018In: International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants, ISSN 0882-2786, E-ISSN 1942-4434, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 590-596, article id PMID 29763497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fit of additively manufactured cobalt-chromium and titanium and CNC-milled titanium frameworks before and after ceramic veneering.

    Materials and Methods: Ten stone casts simulating an edentulous maxilla provided with six abutment analogs were produced. For each stone cast, one additively manufactured cobalt-chromium framework (AM CoCr) and one titanium framework (AM Ti) were fabricated. The fit was analyzed with a coordinate measuring machine in three dimensions (x, y, and z axes) using best-fit virtual matching of center point coordinates, before and after ceramic veneering. CNC-milled titanium frameworks (CNC Ti) and earlier results from CNC-milled cobalt-chromium frameworks (CNC CoCr) were used for comparison.

    Results: All frameworks presented minor misfit before and after veneering in the horizontal plane (x- and y-axes) between 2.9 and 13.5 mu m and in the vertical plane (z-axis) between 1.6 and 5.4 mu m. Ceramic veneering affected the fit of all groups of frameworks. Both AM Ti and AM CoCr presented significantly smaller distortion in the vertical plane compared with the CNC-milled frameworks.

    Conclusion: Implant-supported frameworks can be produced in either Ti or CoCr using either CNC milling or additive manufacturing with a fit well within the range of 20 mu m in the horizontal plane and 10 mu m in the vertical plane. The fit of frameworks of both materials and production techniques are affected by the ceramic veneering procedure to a small extent.

  • 6.
    Svanborg, Per
    et al.
    Department of Prosthodontics/Dental Materials Science, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Norström Saarva, Veronika
    Department of Prosthodontics/Dental Materials Science, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Stenport, Victoria
    Department of Prosthodontics/Dental Materials Science, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Alf
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Public Dental Health Service, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fit of 3Y-TZP complete-arch implant-supported fixed dental prostheses before and after porcelain veneering2019In: The Journal of prosthetic dentistry (Print), ISSN 0022-3913, E-ISSN 1097-6841, Vol. 122, no 2, p. 137-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: To minimize technical complications, implant-supported fixed dental prostheses must fit well. The fit of complete-arch veneered zirconia frameworks has not been fully evaluated.

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the fit of screw-retained zirconia implant-supported complete-arch maxillary frameworks for fixed dental prostheses before and after porcelain veneering.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten stone casts simulating an edentulous maxilla and provided with 6 abutment analogs were produced. For each stone cast, 1 zirconia framework was fabricated by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing. The fit was analyzed by using a coordinate measuring machine in 3 dimensions (x, y, and z axes) using best fit by virtual matching of center point coordinates before and after porcelain veneering. Also, the horizontal distances between implant position pairs P1-P6, P2-P5, and P3-P4 were measured. Furthermore, an optical microscope was used to evaluate vertical fit at the terminal abutments after porcelain veneering.

    RESULTS: Before the porcelain veneering procedure, the frameworks had a mean horizontal misfit of 27.7 μm in the x-axis and 12.0 μm in the y-axis. In the vertical dimension (z-axis), the mean misfit was 2.4 μm and the mean 3D misfit value was 32.3 μm before veneering. Porcelain veneering increased the mean misfit by 0.2 μm in the horizontal plane (x and y axes), 0.4 μm in the vertical plane, and 0.4 μm in 3D; the difference before and after veneering was not statistically significant (P>.05). The mean ±standard deviation vertical misfit at the terminal abutments was 9.2 ±2.9 μm, optically recorded after porcelain veneering. The measured horizontal distances between implant position pairs P1-P6, P2-P5, and P3-P4 increased to 0.9 μm, 2.0 μm, and 1.9 μm, respectively, after porcelain veneering. The difference for the implant position pair P2-P5 was statistically significant (P<.05).

    CONCLUSIONS: Screw-retained zirconia implant-supported complete-arch maxillary frameworks for fixed dental prostheses have a fit well within the range of 30 μm in the horizontal plane and 10 μm in the vertical plane. The porcelain veneering procedure did not affect the fit of the frameworks.

  • 7.
    Svanborg, Per
    et al.
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry/Dental Materials Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skjerven, Henrik
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Carlsson, Pablo
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry/Dental Materials Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Alf
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, , Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry/Dental Materials Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Örtorp, Anders
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry/Dental Materials Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marginal and internal fit of cobalt-chromium fixed dental prostheses generated from digital and conventional impressions2014In: International Journal of Dentistry, ISSN 1687-8728, E-ISSN 1687-8736, article id 534382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Digital impressions are increasingly used and have the potential to avoid the problem of inaccurate impressions. Only a few studies to verify the accuracy of digital impressions have been performed. The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal and internal fit of 3-unit tooth supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) fabricated from digital and conventional impressions.

    Methods: Ten FDPs were produced from digital impressions using the iTero system and 10 FDPs were produced using vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression material. A triple-scan protocol and CAD software were used for measuring and calculating discrepancies of the FDPs at 3 standard areas: mean internal discrepancy, absolute marginal gap, and cervical area discrepancy. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for analyzing the results. Results. For conventional and digital impressions, respectively, FDPs had an absolute marginal gap of 147  μ m and 142  μ m, cervical area discrepancy of 69  μ m and 44  μ m, and mean internal discrepancy of 117  μ m and 93  μ m. The differences were statistically significant in the cervical and internal areas (P < 0.001).

    Significance: The results indicated that the digital impression technique is more exact and can generate 3-unit FDPs with a significantly closer fit compared to the VPS technique.

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