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  • 1.
    Amato, G.
    et al.
    Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazione (CNR-ISTI), Pisa, Italy.
    Bacciu, D.
    Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro Universitet, Örebro, Sweden.
    Chessa, S.
    Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Coleman, S.
    University of Ulster, Ulster, UK.
    Di Rocco, Maurizio
    Örebro Universitet, Örebro, Sweden.
    Dragone, M.
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Gallicchio, C.
    Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Gennaro, C.
    Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazione (CNR-ISTI), Pisa, Italy.
    Lozano, H.
    Tecnalia, Madrid, Spain.
    McGinnity, T. M.
    University of Ulster, Ulster, UK.
    Micheli, A.
    Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Ray, A. K.
    University of Ulster, Ulster, UK.
    Renteria, A.
    Tecnalia, Madrid, Spain.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Swords, D.
    University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Vairo, C.
    Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR)-Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazione (ISTI), Pisa, Italy.
    Vance, P.
    University of Ulster, Ulster, UK.
    Robotic Ubiquitous Cognitive Ecology for Smart Homes2015In: Journal of Intelligent and Robotic Systems, ISSN 0921-0296, E-ISSN 1573-0409, Vol. 80, p. S57-S81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robotic ecologies are networks of heterogeneous robotic devices pervasively embedded in everyday environments, where they cooperate to perform complex tasks. While their potential makes them increasingly popular, one fundamental problem is how to make them both autonomous and adaptive, so as to reduce the amount of preparation, pre-programming and human supervision that they require in real world applications. The project RUBICON develops learning solutions which yield cheaper, adaptive and efficient coordination of robotic ecologies. The approach we pursue builds upon a unique combination of methods from cognitive robotics, machine learning, planning and agent-based control, and wireless sensor networks. This paper illustrates the innovations advanced by RUBICON in each of these fronts before describing how the resulting techniques have been integrated and applied to a proof of concept smart home scenario. The resulting system is able to provide useful services and pro-actively assist the users in their activities. RUBICON learns through an incremental and progressive approach driven by the feedback received from its own activities and from the user, while also self-organizing the manner in which it uses available sensors, actuators and other functional components in the process. This paper summarises some of the lessons learned by adopting such an approach and outlines promising directions for future work.

  • 2.
    Amato, Giuseppe
    et al.
    ISTI-CNR, Pisa, Italy.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Chessa, Stefano
    Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Dragone, Mauro
    University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Gennaro, Caludio
    ISTI-CNR, Pisa, Italy.
    Lopez, Rafa
    Robotnik Automation, Valencia, Spain.
    Maguire, Liam
    University of Ulster, Coleraine, Ireland.
    McGinnity, Martin T.
    University of Ulster, Coleraine, Ireland.
    Micheli, Alessio
    Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Renteria, Arantxa
    Tecnalia, Derio, Spain.
    O’Hare, Gregory M. P.
    University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Robotic UBIquitous COgnitive Network2012In: Ambient Intelligence: Software and Applications / [ed] Paulo Novais, Kasper Hallenborg, Dante I. Tapia, Juan M. Corchado Rodríguez, Springer-Verlag New York, 2012, p. 191-195Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robotic ecologies are networks of heterogeneous robotic devices pervasively embedded in everyday environments, where they cooperate to perform complex tasks. While their potential makes them increasingly popular, one fundamental problem is how to make them self-adaptive, so as to reduce the amount of preparation, pre-programming and human supervision that they require in real world applications. The EU FP7 project RUBICON develops self-sustaining learning solutions yielding cheaper, adaptive and efficient coordination of robotic ecologies. The approach we pursue builds upon a unique combination of methods from cognitive robotics, agent control systems, wireless sensor networks and machine learning. This paper briefly illustrates how these techniques are being extended, integrated, and applied to AAL applications.

  • 3. Bacciu, D.
    et al.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Coleman, S.
    Dragone, M.
    Gallicchio, C.
    Gennaro, C.
    Guzmán, R.
    Lopez, R.
    Lozano-Peiteado, H.
    Ray, A.
    Renteria, A.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Vairo, C.
    Self-sustaining learning for robotic ecologies2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most common use of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is to collect environmental data from a specificarea, and to channel it to a central processing node for on-line or off-line analysis. The WSN technology,however, can be used for much more ambitious goals. We claim that merging the concepts and technology ofWSN with the concepts and technology of distributed robotics and multi-agent systems can open new waysto design systems able to provide intelligent services in our homes and working places. We also claim thatendowing these systems with learning capabilities can greatly increase their viability and acceptability, bysimplifying design, customization and adaptation to changing user needs. To support these claims, we illus-trate our architecture for an adaptive robotic ecology, named RUBICON, consisting of a network of sensors,effectors and mobile robots.

  • 4. Bordignon, Mirko
    et al.
    Rashid, Jayedur
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Seamless integration of robots and tiny embedded devices in a PEIS-ecology2007In: IEEE/RSJ international  conference on intelligent robots and systems, IROS 2007, New York: IEEE , 2007, p. 3101-3106Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fields of autonomous robotics and ambient intelligence are converging toward the vision of smart robotic environments, in which tasks are performed via the cooperation of many networked robotic devices. To enable this vision, we need a common communication and cooperation model that can be shared between robotic devices at different scales, ranging from standard mobile robots to tiny embedded devices. Unfortunately, today's robot middlewares are too heavy to run on tiny devices, and middlewares for embedded devices are too simple to support the cooperation models needed by an autonomous smart environment. In this paper, we propose a middleware model which allows the seamless integration of standard robots and simple off-the-shelf embedded devices. Our middleware is suitable for building truly ubiquitous robotics applications, in which devices of very different scales and capabilities can cooperate in a uniform way. We discuss the principles and implementation of our middleware, and show an experiment in which a mobile robot, a commercial mote, and a custom-built mote cooperate in a home service scenario.

  • 5.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    A middleware for ecologies of robotic devices2007In: Proceedings of the 1st international conference on Robot communication and coordination, RoboComm '07, Piscataway: IEEE press , 2007, p. Art no 30-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fields of autonomous robotics and ambient intelligence are converging toward the vision of smart robotic environments, or ubiquitous robotics, in which tasks are performed via the cooperation of many simple networked robotic devices. The concept of Ecology of Physically Embedded Intelligent Systems, or PEIS-Ecology, combines insights from these fields to provide a new solution to building intelligent robots in the service of people. To enable this vision, we need a common communication and cooperation model that allows dynamically assembled ad-hoc networks of robotic devices, a flexible introspection and configuration model allowing automatic (re)configuration and that can be shared between robotic devices at different scales, ranging from standard mobile robots to tiny networked embedded devices.

    In this paper we discuss the development of a middleware suitable for ubiquitous robotics in general and PEIS-Ecologies in specific. Our middleware is suitable for building truly ubiquitous robotics applications, in which devices of very different scales and capabilities can cooperate in a uniform way. We discuss the principles and implementation of our middleware, and also point to experimental results that show the viability of this concept.

  • 6.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Coradeschi, Silvia
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Have another look on failures and recovery planning in perceptual anchoring2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important requirement for autonomous systems is the ability to detect and recover from exceptional situations such as failures in observations. In this paper we demonstrate how techniques for planning with sensing under uncertainty can play a major role in solving the problem of recovering from such situations. In this first step we concentrate on failures in perceptual anchoring, that is how to connect a symbol representing an object to the percepts of that object. We provide a classification of failures and present planning-based methods for recovering from them. We illustrate our approach by showing tests run on a mobile robot equipped with a color camera.

  • 7.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Coradeschi, Silvia
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Recovery planning for ambiguous cases in perceptual anchoring2005In: Proceedings of the 20th national conference on Artificial intelligence, AAAI-05: volume 3, 2005, p. 1254-1260Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An autonomous robot using symbolic reasoning, sensing and acting in a real environment needs the ability to create and maintain the connection between symbols representing objects in the world and the corresponding perceptual representations given by its sensors. This connection has been named perceptual anchoring. In complex environments, anchoring is not always easy to establish: the situation may often be ambiguous as to which percept actually corresponds to a given symbol. In this paper, we extend perceptual anchoring to deal robustly with ambiguous situations by providing general methods for detecting them and recovering from them. We consider different kinds of ambiguous situations and present planning-based methods to recover from them. We illustrate our approach by showing experiments involving a mobile robot equipped with a color camera and an electronic nose.

  • 8.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Coradeschi, Silvia
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    An ecological approach to odour recognition in intelligent environments2006In: 2006 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and automation, ICRA 2006, 2006, p. 2066-2071Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a new approach for odour detection and recognition based on a so-called PEIS-Ecology: a network of gas sensors and a mobile robot are integrated in an intelligent environment. The environment can provide information regarding the location of potential odour sources, which is then relayed to a mobile robot equipped with an electronic nose. The robot can then perform a more thorough analysis of the odour character. This is a novel approach which alleviates some the challenges in mobile olfaction techniques by single and embedded mobile robots. The environment also provides contextual information which can be used to constrain the learning of odours, which is shown to improve classification performance.

  • 9.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Daoutis, Marios
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Developing Medical Image Processing Algorithms for GPU assisted parallel computation2013In: Computer Vision in Medical Imaging / [ed] C H Chen, World Scientific, 2013, p. 245-270Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GPU’s have recently emerged as a significantly more powerful computing plat-form, capable of several orders of magnitude faster computations compared toCPU based approaches. However, they require significant changes in the algorithmic design compared to traditional programming paradigms. In this chapter we specifically introduce the reader to an overview of GPGPU development tools and the potential algorithmic pitfalls and bottlenecks when developing medical imaging algorithms for the GPU. We present a few general methodologies and building blocks for implementing fast image processing on GPUs. More specifically they include: methods for performing fast image convolutions and filtering;line detection, and bandwidth and memory considerations when processing volumetric datasets. Finally we conclude with a discourse on numerical precision as well as on mixing single floating-point versus double floating-point code.

  • 10.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Centre of Biomedical Engineering Research (MTFC), Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Emilsson, Kent
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Clinical Physiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Thunberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Medical Physics and Centre of Biomedical Engineering Research (MTFC), Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fast GPU based adaptive filtering of 4D echocardiography2012In: IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, ISSN 0278-0062, E-ISSN 1558-254X, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 1165-1172, article id 6099625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time resolved three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography generates four-dimensional (3D+time) data sets that bring new possibilities in clinical practice. Image quality of four-dimensional (4D) echocardiography is however regarded as poorer compared to conventional echocardiography where time-resolved 2D imaging is used. Advanced image processing filtering methods can be used to achieve image improvements but to the cost of heavy data processing. The recent development of graphics processing unit (GPUs) enables highly parallel general purpose computations, that considerably reduces the computational time of advanced image filtering methods. In this study multidimensional adaptive filtering of 4D echocardiography was performed using GPUs. Filtering was done using multiple kernels implemented in OpenCL (open computing language) working on multiple subsets of the data. Our results show a substantial speed increase of up to 74 times, resulting in a total filtering time less than 30 s on a common desktop. This implies that advanced adaptive image processing can be accomplished in conjunction with a clinical examination. Since the presented GPU processor method scales linearly with the number of processing elements, we expect it to continue scaling with the expected future increases in number of processing elements. This should be contrasted with the increases in data set sizes in the near future following the further improvements in ultrasound probes and measuring devices. It is concluded that GPUs facilitate the use of demanding adaptive image filtering techniques that in turn enhance 4D echocardiographic data sets. The presented general methodology of implementing parallelism using GPUs is also applicable for other medical modalities that generate multidimensional data.

  • 11.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Gritti, Marco
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Seo, Beom-Su
    Cho, Young-Jo
    PEIS ecology: integrating robots into smart environments2006In: 2006 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and automation, ICRA 2006, 2006, p. 212-218Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce the concept of Ecology of Physically Embedded Intelligent Systems, or PEIS-Ecology. This is a network of heterogeneous robotic devices (PEIS) pervasively embedded in the environment. A PEIS can be as simple as a toaster and as complex as a humanoid robot. PEIS can exchange information at different levels of abstraction, and share both physical and virtual functionalities to perform complex tasks. By putting together insights from the fields of autonomous robotics and of ambient intelligence, the PEIS-Ecology approach explores a new road to building assistive, personal, and service robots. In this paper, we discuss this concept, describe a first realization of it, and show an implemented use-case scenario.

  • 12.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Steps toward detecting and recovering from perceptual failures2004In: Proceedings of the 8th international conference on intelligent autonomous systems, 2004, p. 793-800Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important requirement for autonomous systems is the ability to detect and recover from exceptional situations such as failures in observations. In this paper we investigate how traditional AI planning techniques can be used to reason about observations and to recover from these situations. In this first step we concentrate on failures in perceptual anchoring. We illustrate our approach by showing experiments run on a mobile robot equipped with a color camera.

  • 13.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Interacting with a robot ecology using task templates2007In: 2007 RO-MAN: 16TH IEEE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON ROBOT AND HUMAN INTERACTIVE COMMUNICATION, VOLS 1-3, NEW YORK: IEEE , 2007, p. 486-491Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Robot ecologies provide a new paradigm for assistive, service, industrial, and entertainment robotics which is quickly gaining popularity. These ecologies contain a large number of robotic components pervasively embedded in the environment and interacting with each other. Human users of such systems need to be able to interface with both the system as a whole and, if desired, which each individual component. The humans should be able to transmit, in a natural way, commands that range from basic ones, such as ''turn on the lights in the bedroom'', to abstract ones, such as ''bring me a cup of coffee''. Human users may also need to interact with task execution especially at decision points. In this paper, we introduce an approach to interface a human user to a specific type of robot ecology, called an ecology of Physically Embedded Intelligent Systems, or PEIS-Ecology. The ecology includes simple sensors and actuators and more complicated devices such as mobile robots. The proposed interface satisfies two requirements: 1) to easily and automatically generate component interfaces, and 2) to provide a simple mechanism by which to request and monitor the execution of tasks in the ecology.

  • 14.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Interacting with a robot ecology using task templates2007In: 16th IEEE international symposium on robot and human interactive communication, RO-MAN 2007, New York: IEEE , 2007, p. 487-492Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robot ecologies provide a new paradigm for assistive, service, industrial, and entertainment robotics which is quickly gaining popularity. These ecologies contain a large number of robotic components pervasively embedded in the environment and interacting with each other. Human users of such systems need to be able to interface with both the system as a w hole and, if desired, which each individual component. The humans should be able to transmit, in a natural way, commands that range from basic ones, such as "turn on the lights in the bedroom", to abstract ones, such as "bring me a cup of coffee". Human users may also need to interact with task execution, especially at decision points. In this paper, we introduce an approach to interface a human user to a specific type of robot ecology, called an ecology of Physically Embedded Intelligent Systems, or PEIS-Ecology. The ecology includes simple sensors and actuators and more complicated devices such as mobile robots. The proposed interface satisfies two requirements: 1) to easily and automatically generate component interfaces, and 2) to provide a simple mechanism by which to request and monitor the execution of tasks in the ecology.

  • 15.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Seo, Beom-Su
    Kwon, Wo-Young
    The PEIS kernel: a middleware for ubiquitous robotics2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fields of autonomous robotics and ambient intelligence are converging toward the vision of smart robotic environments, or ubiquitous robotics, in which tasks are performed via the cooperation of many simple networked robotic devices. The concept of Ecology of Physically Embedded Intelligent Systems, or PEIS-Ecology, combines insights from these fields to provide a new solution to building intelligent robots in the service of people. To enable this vision, we need a common communication and cooperation model that allows dynamically assembled ad hoc networks of robotic devices, a flexible introspection and configuration model allowing automatic (re)configuration and that can be shared between robotic devices at different scales, ranging from standard mobile robots to tiny networked embedded devices. In this paper we discuss the development of a middleware suitable for ubiquitous robotics in general and P PEIS -Ecologies in specific. Our middleware is suitable for building truly ubiquitous robotics applications, in which devices of very different scales and capabilities can cooperate in a uniform way. We discuss the principles and implementation of our middleware, and also point to experimental results that show the viability of this concept.

  • 16.
    d. C. Silva-Lopez, Lia Susana
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Towards configuration planning with partially ordered preferences: representation and results2015In: Künstliche Intelligenz, ISSN 0933-1875, E-ISSN 1610-1987, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 173-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Configuration planning for a distributed robotic system is the problem of how to configure the system over time in order to achieve some causal and/or information goals. A configuration plan specifies what components (sensor, actuator and computational devices), should be active at different times and how they should exchange information. However, not all plans that solve a given problem need to be equally good, and for that purpose it may be important to take preferences into account. In this paper we present an algorithm for configuration planning that incorporates general partially ordered preferences. The planner supports multiple preference categories, and hence it solves a multiple-objective optimization problem: for a given problem, it finds all possible valid, non-dominated configuration plans. The planner has been able to successfully cope with partial ordering relations between quantitative preferences in practically acceptable times, as shown in the empirical results. Preferences here are represented as c-semirings, and are used for establishing dominance of a solution over another in order to obtain a set of configuration plans that will constitute the solution of a configuration planning problem with partially ordered preferences. The dominance operators tested in this paper are Pareto and Lorenz dominance. Our solver considers one guiding heuristic for obtaining the first solution, and then switches to a dominance based monotonically decreasing heuristic used for pruning dominated partial configuration plans. In our empirical results, we perform a statistical study in the space of problem instances and establish families of problems for which our approach is computationally feasible.

  • 17.
    Dragone, Mauro
    et al.
    University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Abdel-Naby, Sameh
    University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Swords, David
    University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    O'Hare, Gregory M.P.
    University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    A Programming Framework for Multi-agent Coordination of Robotic Ecologies2013In: Programming Multi-Agent Systems: 10th International Workshop, ProMAS 2012, Valencia, Spain, June 5, 2012, Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Mehdi Dastani, Jomi F. Hübner, Brian Logan, Springer Publishing Company, 2013, p. 72-89Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building smart environments with Robotic ecologies, comprising of distributed sensors, actuators and mobile robot devices facilitates and extends the nature and form of smart environments that can be developed, and reduces the complexity and cost of such solutions. While the potentials of such an approach makes robotic ecologies increasingly popular, many fundamental research questions remain open. One such question is how to make a robotic ecology self-adaptive, so as to adapt to changing conditions and evolving requirements, and consequently reduce the amount of preparation and pre-programming required for their deployment in real world applications. This paper presents a framework for the specification and the programming of robotic ecologies. The framework extends an existing agent system and integrates it with the pre-existing and dominant traditional robotic and middleware approach to the development of robotic ecologies. We illustrate how these technologies complement each other and offer a candidate technology to pursue adaptive robotic ecologies.

  • 18.
    Gritti, Marco
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Reactive self-configuration of an ecology of robots2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of ubiquitous robotics is burgeoning, and different brands of massively distributed heterogeneous robotic systems are being proposed and applied to several domains. The strong added value of these systems comes from their potential ability to dynamically self-configure, by changing the form of their cooperation to adapt to a given task or situation. In face of this, no satisfactory solution exists to the problem of how such a system should self-configure. In this paper, we explore a reactive approach to self-configuration inspired by ideas from the field of semantic web services. We illustrate our approach on a specific type of ubiquitous robot system, called PEIS-Ecology. We show experiments in which our approach autonomously generates a configuration to perform a cooperative navigation task, and dynamically changes this configuration when one of the components fails.

  • 19.
    Karlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Bouguerra, Abdelbaki
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Coradeschi, Silvia
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    To secure an anchor: a recovery planning approach to ambiguity in perceptual anchoring2008In: AI Communications, ISSN 0921-7126, E-ISSN 1875-8452, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An autonomous robot using symbolic reasoning, sensing and acting in a real environment needs the ability to create and maintain the connection between symbols representing objects in the world and the corresponding perceptual representations given by its sensors. This connection has been named perceptual anchoring. In complex environments, anchoring is not always easy to establish: the situation may often be ambiguous as to which percept actually corresponds to a given symbol.

    In this paper, we extend perceptual anchoring to deal robustly with ambiguous situations by providing general methods for detecting them and recovering from them. We consider different kinds of ambiguous situations. We also present methods to recover from these situations based onautomatically formulating them as conditional planning problems that then are solved by a planner.

    We illustrate our approach by showing experiments involving a mobile robot equipped with a color camera and an electronic nose.

  • 20.
    Larsson, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Fast laser-based feature recognition2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper we present our methods for feature recognition used for high speed reactive navigation based on a topological map, with none or sparse metric information. Our methods for corridor and intersection detection yields execution times of only a fraction of what we have found previously described in the relevant literature, and have proven robust and reliable in experiments performed both in office environment and in our test mine [Larsson et al., 2005]. A. Related Work Our Corridor

  • 21.
    Larsson, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    A navigation system for automated loaders in underground mines2006In: Field and Service Robotics: results of the 5th international conference / [ed] Peter Corke, Salah Sukkariah, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2006, p. 129-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For underground mining operations human operated LHD vehicles are typically used for transporting ore. Because of security issues and of the cost of human operators, alternative solutions such as tele-operated vehicles are often in use. Tele-operation, however, leads to reduced efficiency, and it is not an ideal solution. Full automation of the LHD vehicles is a challenging task, which is expected to result in increased operational efficiency, cost efficiency, and safety. In this paper, we present our approach to a fully automated solution currently under development. We use a fuzzy behavior-based approach for navigation, and develop a cheap and robust localization technique based on the deployment of inexpensive passive radio frequency identification (RFID) tags at key points in the mine.

  • 22.
    Larsson, Johan
    et al.
    AASS, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    An evaluation of local autonomy applied to teleoperated vehicles in underground mines2010In: 2010 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), IEEE conference proceedings, 2010, p. 1745-1752Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Autonomous vehicles are being increasingly introduced in the mining industry. While these may offer high safety and high productivity, fully autonomous solutions are not always applicable or economically viable. Teleoperation is an attractive option, since it increases safety and comfort of the drivers. Unfortunately, the difficulty to operate the vehicle remotely often results in reduced productivity. In this paper, we show that techniques from the field of mobile robotics can be used to mitigate this problem. We extend a commercial teleoperation system for use in underground mines with a local autonomy functionality, with the main purpose to evaluate if the achieved productivity improvement motivates development of general algorithms and a fully commercial implementation. We then describe a user study performed in an underground mine with a 38 tonne articulated wheel loader, which proves that local autonomy gives a significant improvement in productivity of the teleoperation system, while retaining or even reducing the maintenance costs.

  • 23.
    Larsson, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Flexible infrastructure free navigation for vehicles in underground mines2008In: 4th international IEEE conference intelligent systems, IS '08, New York: IEEE , 2008, p. 2-45-2-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, mining companies and mobile equipment manufacturers have pursued improved efficiency, productivity, and safety in underground mining operations by automating some of the functions of underground vehicles. The work presented in this paper is the result of an effort to develop new flexible infrastructureless guidance system for autonomous tramming of center-articulated underground mining vehicles.

  • 24.
    Larsson, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Laser based intersection detection for reactive navigation in an underground mine2008In: IEEE/RSJ international conference on intelligent robots and systems, 2008, IROS 2008, 2008, p. 2222-2227Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we propose a new feature detection algorithm to enable junction recognition intended for high speed reactive navigation in tunnel like environments. We also present an extensive experimental evaluation of the algorithm based on data recorded in a real mine. The algorithm is faster and has less environmental constraints than similar algorithms that can be found in the litterature.

  • 25.
    Larsson, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Laser-based corridor detection for reactive navigation2008In: Industrial robot, ISSN 0143-991X, E-ISSN 1758-5791, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 69-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For mobile robots operating in real-world environments, reactive navigation is a useful complement (or even replacement) to pure plan-based metric navigation. Reactive navigation is performed with respect to local perceived features, rather than a global metric reference frame, and can provide reduced installation costs, increased flexibility, and robustness to changes in the environment. To be effective, however, reactive navigation requires fast and reliable perception of the relevant features in the environment. Corridor-like structures are one of the most common features that are used for this purpose. In this paper, we propose a new method for corridor detection from laser data, based on the Hough transform, which is fast, reliable, and noise tolerant. We describe the algorithm, report an extensive experimental evaluation of its performance, and motivate the research with a real application involving the autonomous operation of a loader vehicle in an underground mine.

  • 26.
    Larsson, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Local autonomy for tele-operated vehiclesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Lidén, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Radiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Andersson, Torbjörn
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Thunberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Medical Physics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Geijer, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Urinary stone size estimation: a new segmentation algorithm-based CT method2012In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 731-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The size estimation in CT images of an obstructing ureteral calculus is important for the clinical management of a patient presenting with renal colic. The objective of the present study was to develop a reader independent urinary calculus segmentation algorithm using well-known digital image processing steps and to validate the method against size estimations by several readers. Fifty clinical CT examinations demonstrating urinary calculi were included. Each calculus was measured independently by 11 readers. The mean value of their size estimations was used as validation data for each calculus. The segmentation algorithm consisted of interpolated zoom, binary thresholding and morphological operations. Ten examinations were used for algorithm optimisation and 40 for validation. Based on the optimisation results three segmentation method candidates were identified. Between the primary segmentation algorithm using cubic spline interpolation and the mean estimation by 11 readers, the bias was 0.0 mm, the standard deviation of the difference 0.26 mm and the Bland-Altman limits of agreement 0.0 +/- 0.5 mm. The validation showed good agreement between the suggested algorithm and the mean estimation by a large number of readers. The limit of agreement was narrower than the inter-reader limit of agreement previously reported for the same data. The size of kidney stones is usually estimated manually by the radiologist. An algorithm for computer-aided size estimation is introduced. The variability between readers can be reduced. A reduced variability can give better information for treatment decisions.

  • 28.
    Lidén, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Thunberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Kliniskt forskningscentrum (KFC), Univeritetssjukhuset, Örebro, Sverige.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Geijer, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Two- and three-dimensional CT measurements of urinary calculi length and width: a comparative studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The standard imaging procedure for a patient presenting with renal colic is unenhanced CT. The CT measured size has a close correlation to the estimated prognosis for spontaneous passage of a ureteral calculus. Size estimations of urinary calculi in CT images are still based on 2d-reformats. In the present study we developed and validated a calculus oriented 3dmethod for measurements of length and width of urinary calculi and compared those with corresponding 2d measurements in axial and coronal reformats.

    Methods: Fifty unenhanced CT examinations demonstrating urinary calculi were included. A 3d-symmetric segmentation algorithm was validated against reader size estimations. The calculus-oriented size from the segmentation was then compared to the size in axial and coronal reformats.

    Results: The validation showed 0.1±0.7 mm agreement against reference measure. There was a 0.4 mm median bias for 3d-estimated calculus length compared to 2d (p<0.001), but no significant bias for 3d-width compared to 2d.

    Conclusion: The size of the urinary calculus becomes underestimated if its orientation is not aligned to the axial or coronal image plane. Future studies aiming to correlate calculus size with patient outcome should use a calculus oriented size estimation.

  • 29.
    Lidén, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Radiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thunberg, Per
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Medical Physics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Modeling and Simulation Research Center, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Geijer, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Radiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Two- and three-dimensional CT measurements of urinary calculi length and width: a comparative study2015In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 487-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The standard imaging procedure for a patient presenting with renal colic is unenhanced computed tomography (CT). The CT measured size has a close correlation to the estimated prognosis for spontaneous passage of a ureteral calculus. Size estimations of urinary calculi in CT images are still based on two-dimensional (2D) reformats.

    Purpose: To develop and validate a calculus oriented three-dimensional (3D) method for measuring the length and width of urinary calculi and to compare the calculus oriented measurements of the length and width with corresponding 2D measurements obtained in axial and coronal reformats.

    Material and Methods: Fifty unenhanced CT examinations demonstrating urinary calculi were included. A 3D symmetric segmentation algorithm was validated against reader size estimations. The calculus oriented size from the segmentation was then compared to the estimated size in axial and coronal 2D reformats.

    Results: The validation showed 0.1 +/- 0.7mm agreement against reference measure. There was a 0.4mm median bias for 3D estimated calculus length compared to 2D (P < 0.001), but no significant bias for 3D width compared to 2D.

    Conclusion: The length of a calculus in axial and coronal reformats becomes underestimated compared to 3D if its orientation is not aligned to the image planes. Future studies aiming to correlate calculus size with patient outcome should use a calculus oriented size estimation.

  • 30.
    Loutfi, Amy
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Coradeschi, Silvia
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Object recognition: a new application for smelling robots2005In: Robotics and Autonomous Systems, ISSN 0921-8890, E-ISSN 1872-793X, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 272-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Olfaction is a challenging new sensing modality for intelligent systems. With the emergence of electronic noses, it is now possible to detect and recognize a range of different odours for a variety of applications. In this work, we introduce a new application where electronic olfaction is used in cooperation with other types of sensors on a mobile robot in order to acquire the odour property of objects.We examine the problem of deciding when, how and where the electronic nose (e-nose) should be activated by planning for active perception and we consider the problem of integrating the information provided by the e-nose with both prior information and information from other sensors (e.g., vision). Experiments performed on a mobile robot equipped with an e-nose are presented.

  • 31.
    Loutfi, Amy
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Coradeschi, Silvia
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Putting olfaction into action: anchoring symbols to sensor data using olfaction and planning2005In: Workshop on planning and learning in a priori unknown or dynamic domains: Proceedings of the 19th IJCAI conference Edinburgh, UK, August 2005, 2005, p. 35-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Olfaction is a challenging new sensing modality for intelligent systems. With the emergence of electronic noses (e-noses) it is now possible to train a system to detect and recognise a range of different odours. In this work, we integrate the electronic nose on a multi-sensing mobile robotic platform. We plan for perceptual actions and examine when, how and where the e-nose should be activated.

    Finally, experiments are performed on a mobile robot equipped with an e-nose together with a variety of sensors and used for object detection.

  • 32.
    Loutfi, Amy
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Coradeschi, Silvia
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Putting olfaction into action: using an electronic nose on an multi-sensing mobile robot2004In: Proceedings of the 2004 IEEE/RSJ international conference on intelligent robots and systems (IROS 2004), 2004, p. 337-342Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Olfaction is a challenging new sensing modality for intelligent systems. With the emergence of electronic noses it is now possible to detect and recognise a range of different odours for a variety of applications. An existing application is to use electronic olfaction on mobile robots for the purpose of odour based navigation. In this work, we introduce a new application where electronic olfaction is used in cooperation with other types of sensors on a mobile robot in order to acquire the odour

  • 33.
    Rashid, Jayedur
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Indirect reference: reconfiguring distributed sensors and actuators2010In: 2010 IEEE international conference on sensor networks, ubiquitous, and trustworthy computing: SUTC 2010, IEEE conference proceedings, 2010, p. 284-290Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many sensor networks have lately included actuation as an important property of the nodes. With the introduction of actuation, new requirements are posed on these nodes in terms of reconfiguration of collaboration patterns. The sensors/actuators are very often connected to various heterogeneous hardware that have a few KBs of memory, low processing power and communication range, such as WSN motes. Also, for many applications networks of small and simple sensor and actuator nodes need to cooperate with networked robotic devices, which leads to further requirements to enable collaboration between devices of different scales. In this networked robot and sensor/actuator infrastructure, tasks are performed by the cooperation of multiple devices. Dynamically changing availability of devices as well as changes of tasks lead to a need of reconfiguration of the devices at runtime. Therefore a mechanism should be available in the communication level, which affords reconfiguration ability to the sensor/actuator nodes as well as robots. In this article, a concept called indirect reference is proposed, which facilitates dynamic reconfiguration of sets of distributed devices. We describe here also an implementation of the concept on a ubiquitous robotic middleware, which offers seamless integration of robots and WSN motes like tiny embedded devices with an example.

  • 34.
    Rashid, Jayedur
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    A middleware to integrate robots, simple devices and everyday objects into an ambient ecology2012In: Pervasive and Mobile Computing, ISSN 1574-1192, E-ISSN 1873-1589, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 522-541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fields of ambient intelligence, distributed robotics and wireless sensor networks are converging toward a common vision, in which ubiquitous sensing and acting devices cooperate to provide useful services in the home. These devices can range from sophisticated mobile robots to simple sensor nodes and even simpler tagged everyday objects. In this vision, a milkbox left on the table after the user has left the home could ask the service of a mobile robot to be placed back in the refrigerator. A missing ingredient to realize this vision is a mechanism that enables the communication and interoperation among such highly heterogeneous entities. In this paper, we propose such a mechanism in the form of a middleware able to integrate robots, tiny devices and augmented everyday objects into one and the same system. The key moves to cope with heterogeneity are: the definition of a tiny, compatible version of the middleware, that can run on small devices; and the concept of object proxy, used to make everyday object accessible within the middleware. We describe the concepts and implementation of our middleware, and show a number of experiments that illustrate its performance.

  • 35.
    Rashid, Jayedur
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Digital representation of everyday objects in a robot ecology via proxies2008In: IEEE/RSJ international conference on intelligent robots and systems, 2008, IROS 2008, 2008, p. 1908-1914Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robotic middlewares increasingly allow the seamless integration of multiple heterogeneous robots into one distributed system. Unfortunately, very simple devices like tagged everyday objects and smart objects are left orphan in this otherwise pervasive trend. We claim that the inclusion of simple everyday objects as part of distributed robot systems would have many advantages, and propose a design pattern to allow this inclusion. We make this pattern concrete by describing an implementation of it using a specific multi-robot middleware, called PEIS-Ecology Middleware. We also show an illustrative experiment which integrates everyday objects in a smart home equipped with mobile robots as well as more advanced distributed sensor nodes.

  • 36.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Affordances in an ecology of physically embedded intelligent systems2008In: Towards affordance-based robot control, SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN, HEIDELBERGER PLATZ 3, D-14197 BERLIN, GERMANY , 2008, p. 106-121Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of Ecology of Physically Embedded Intelligent Systems, or PFIS-Ecology, combines insights from the fields of autonomous robotics and ambient intelligence to provide a new solution to building intelligent robotic systems in the service of people. The concept of PEIS-Ecology also offers an interesting setting to study the applicability of Gibson's notion of affordances to an ecology of robots. In this paper we introduce this concept, and discuss its potential and implications both from an application point of view and from an ecological (Gibsonian) point of view. We also discuss some new scientific challenges introduced by a PEIS-Ecology, present our current steps toward its realization, and point at a few experimental results that show the viability of this concept.

  • 37.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Affordances in an ecology of physically embedded intelligent systems2008In: Towards affordance-based robot control / [ed] E. Rome, J. Hertzberg, G. Dorffner, Berlin: Springer , 2008, p. 106-121Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of Ecology of Physically Embedded Intelligent Systems, or PEIS-Ecology, combines insights fromthe fields of autonomous robotics and ambient intelligence to provide a new solution to building intelligent robotic systems in the service of people. The concept of PEIS- Ecology also offers an interesting setting to study the applicability of Gibson's notion of affordances to an ecology of robots. In this paper we introduce this concept, and discuss its potential and implications both from an application point of view and from an ecological (Gibsonian) point of view. We also discuss some new scientific challenges introduced by a Peis- Ecology, present our current steps toward its realization, and point at a few experimental results that show the viability of this concept.

  • 38.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    PEIS ecologies: ambient intelligence meets autonomous robotics2005In: Proceedings of the 2005 joint conference on Smart objects and ambient intelligence: innovative context-aware services: usages and technologies, 2005, p. 275-280Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common vision in the field of autonomous robotics is to create a skilled robot companion that is able to live in our homes and to perform physical tasks to help us in our everyday life. Another vision, coming from the field of ambient intelligence, is to create a network of intelligent devices that provides us with information, communication, and entertainment. We propose to combine these two visions into the new concept of an ecology of networked Physically Embedded Intelligent Systems (PEIS). In this paper, we define this concept, discuss ways to implement it, and illustrate it on a simple example involving some real robotic devices.

  • 39.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Gritti, Marco
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    LeBlanc, Kevin
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lundh, Robert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Rashid, Jayedur
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Seo, Beom-Su
    Cho, Young-Jo
    The PEIS-ecology project: vision and results2008In: IEEE/RSJ international conference on intelligent robots and systems, IROS 2008, New York: IEEE , 2008, p. 2329-2335Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vision of an Ecology of Physically Embedded Intelligent Systems, or PEIS-Ecology, combines insights from the fields of autonomous robotics and ambient intelligence to provide a new approach to building robotic systems in the service of people. In this paper, we present this vision, and we report the results of a four-year collaborative research project between Sweden and Korea aimed at the concrete realization of this vision. We focus in particular on three results: a robotic middleware able to cope with highly heterogeneous systems; a technique for autonomous self-configuration and re-configuration; and a study of the problem of sharing information of both physical and digital nature.

  • 40.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Seo, Beom-Su
    Cho, Young-Jo
    Steps toward an ecology of physically embedded intelligent systems2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of Ecology of Physically Embedded Intelligent Systems, or PEIS-Ecology, combines insights from the fields of ubiquitous robotics and ambient intelligence to provide a new solution to building intelligent robots in the service of people. While this concept provides great potential, it also presents a number of new scientific challenges. In this paper we introduce this concept, discuss its potential and its challenges, and present our current steps toward its realization. We also point to experimental results that show the viability of this concept. The discussion in this paper is also relevant to any type of ubiquitous robot or network robotic system

  • 41.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Seo, Beom-Su
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Cho, Young-Jo
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    The PEIS-ecology project: a progress report2007In: Proceedings of the ICRA-07 Workshop on Network Robot Systems. Roma, Italy, 2007, 2007, p. 16-22Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of Ecology of Physically Embedded Intelligent Systems, or PEIS-Ecology, combines insights from the fields of ubiquitous robotics and ambient intelligence to provide a new solution to building intelligent robots in the service of people. While this concept provides great potential, it also presents a number of new scientific challenges. The PEIS-Ecology project is an ongoing collaborative project between Swedish and Korean researchers which addresses these challenges. In this paper we introduce the concept of PEIS-Ecology, discuss its potential and its challenges, and present our current steps toward its realization. We also point to experimental results that show the viability of this concept.

  • 42.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Seo, Beom-Su
    Cho, Young-Jo
    The PEIS-ecology project: a progress report2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of Ecology of Physically Embedded Intelligent

    Systems, or Peis-Ecology, combines insights from the fields of ubiquitous robotics and ambient intelligence to provide a new solution to building intelligent robots in the service of people. While this concept provides great potential, it also presents a number of new scientific challenges.

    The Peis-Ecology project is an ongoing collaborative pro ject between Swedish and Korean researchers which addresses these challenges. In this paper we introduce the concept of Peis-Ecology, discuss its potential and its challenges, and present our current steps toward its realization. We also point to experimental results that show the viability of this concept.

  • 43.
    Seeman, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Virtual 360° panorama for remote inspection2007In: IEEE international workshop on safety, security and rescue robotics, SSRR 2007, New York: IEEE , 2007, p. 1-5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of remotely operated robotic systems in security related applications is becoming increasingly popular. However, the direct teleoperation interfaces commonly used today put a large amount of cognitive burden on the operators, thus seriously reducing the efficiency and reliability of these systems. In the context of an adjustable autonomy control architecture meant to relieve operators from unnecessary low-level tasks, we present an user interface technique for 360° virtual panorama video as a perception aid to increase the situation awareness in tele-operation tasks, and as a block in the overall adjustable autonomy control architecture. At the hardware level, we rely on the intrinsic autonomy and robustness provided by the spherical morphology of our GroundBot robot. The work presented here is a step towards the overall goal of increasing the effectiveness of the GroundBot robot for remote inspection tasks.

  • 44.
    Seeman, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Wide, Peter
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    An autonomous spherical robot for security tasks2006In: 2006 IEEE International Conference on Computational Intelligence for Homeland Security and Personal Safety, 2006, p. 51-55Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of remotely operated robotic systems in security related applications is becoming increasingly popular However, the direct teleoperation interfaces commonly used today put a large amount of cognitive burden on the operators, thus seriously reducing the efficiency and reliability of these systems. We present an approach to alleviate this problem by exploiting both software and hardware autonomy. At the software level, we propose a variable autonomy control architecture that dynamically adapts the degree of autonomy of the robot in terms of control, perception, and interaction. At the hardware level, we rely on the intrinsic autonomy and robustness provided by the spherical morphology of our Ground-Bot robot. We also present a prototype system for facilitating the interaction between human operators and robots using our control architecture. This work is specifically aimed at increasing the effectiveness of the GroundBot robot for remote inspection tasks

  • 45. Seo, Beom-Su
    et al.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Gritti, Marco
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Using Javaspace for a PEIS ecology2006In: Intelligent Autonomous Systems 9 - IAS-9, 2006, p. 831-838Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ecology of Physically Embedded Intelligent Systems (PEIS) is a new multirobotic framework conceived by integrating insights from the fields of autonomous robotics and ambient intelligence. A PEIS-Ecology is a network of intelligent robotic devices that can provide the user with assistance, information, communication, and entertainment services. In this paper we introduce the concept of PEIS Ecology, and we investigate about the use of JAVASPACE to build a middleware infrastructure that meets its special requirements. At the end, we illustrate a concrete realization of a PEIS-Ecology we implemented using JAVASPACE as a communication middleware.

  • 46.
    Silva-Lopez, Lia Susana d.C.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Empirical methods for evaluating properties of configuration planning algorithms2013In: Evolving Ambient Intelligence: AmI 2013 Workshops, Dublin, Ireland, December 3-5, 2013. Revised Selected Papers / [ed] O'Grady et. al., Springer International Publishing , 2013, p. 114-119Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the field of configuration planning grows, so does the need for objective comparisons of algorithms and results. As the community stands today, different approaches to formalise and solve the problem at hand exist, and little or no importance has been given to compare results of different research groups. In this paper we summarize the definitions used by a few different research groups, and we explain two empiric method for comparing planning algorithms, based on statistics. While the methods themselves do not solve all the problems of comparative studies, it is a first step towards numerically comparing performances of the different configuration planning methods proposed by the community.

1 - 46 of 46
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