oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 26 of 26
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Addison, Tony
    et al.
    WIDER/UNU.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Revenue mobilization in aid-dependent countries: current and future challengesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent financial crisis and other climate related shocks pose important challenges to fiscal policies in a number of developing countries. The best way for developing countries to respond to the tax challenges are essentially to broaden tax bases, reduce rates and improve tax administration. But equally important, the focus has also to be on economic policies that accelerate growth and expand the tax base. In many developing countries, poor public service delivery, financed with existing revenue, creates dissatisfied citizens which are unwilling to pay taxes. A legitimate and responsive state one that secures the rule of law and keeps corruption under control is important for better mobilisation of tax revenue. With regard to the mix of tax instruments trade taxes will continue to reduce its significance as an important source of revenue. This suggests that indirect taxes such as VAT and direct taxes will be of significant importance in the future. Many developing countries have very narrow tax bases, with large number of exemptions, often designed to protect the interests of powerful groups. In these circumstances broadening the base can have the advantages of raising revenue, improving economic efficiency and achieving greater redistribution. Over the long-term taxation can reduce developing countries’ dependence upon aid and increase its ownership of the development agenda and become accountable to its citizens. This would also reinforce the social contract between state, citizens and the private sector which was how efficient institutions evolved in the developed world.

  • 2.
    Addison, Tony
    et al.
    WIDER/UNU.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    The determinants of tax revenue in sub-Saharan AfricaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Asmah, Emmanuel
    et al.
    University of Cape Coast Ghana.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Aid-financed public investments and the Dutch disease: evidence from Tanzania2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the impact of scaling-up aid in Tanzania using an economy-wide dynamic CGE model. The major conclusions coming out from this work is that productivity effects matter. If additional aid and consequently increased public spending has a positive impact on productivity this would spur GDP growth and reduce the risk of an appreciating real exchange rate. In a way this resembles previous results in the aid-growth literature that aid has a positive impact on growth in a country with good economic policies assuming that good policies have a positive impact on productivity. Presenting various scenarios on the impact of additional aid a sustained GDP growth rate of around 7 percent would be possible to achieve in a modest scaling-up aid scenario without any significant changes in the real exchange rate.

  • 4.
    Bigsten, Arne
    et al.
    Handelshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Persson, Håkan
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Debt relief and growth: a study of Tanzania and Zambia2004In: Debt relief for poor countries / [ed] Tony Addison, Henrik Hansen, Finn Tarp, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004, p. 181-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses some issues on how to evaluate the impact of HIPC debt relief in the cases of Tanzania and Zambia using two computable general equilibrium models. Within our relatively simple model framework, we found that the macroeconomic impact of debt relief is modest. One reason for this relatively modest impact is that the annual injection of additional resources relative to current actual debt service is small in both cases, which implies that the impact of debt relief per se would be expected to be modest. However, as illustrated in the case of Tanzania the impact could be considerably higher if additional public investment succeeds to improve private sector productivity.

  • 5.
    Bohlin, Lars
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sayeed, Yeasmin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Estimation of Multiregional Social Accounting Matrices Using Transport DataManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Kayizzi-Mugerwa, Steve
    et al.
    Handelshögskolan Göteborgs universitet.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Adjustment and poverty: a review of the African experience1994In: African Development Review, ISSN 1017-6772, E-ISSN 1467-8268, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 1-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The social impacts of adjustment have received considerable research and policy attention in recent years. This paper is a review of recent studies on adjustment and poverty in African countries. The ambition is to understand what determines the differences in outcomes in terms of the impacts on the vulnerable groups.

  • 7.
    Kiringai, Jane
    et al.
    World Bank.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Achieving the MDGs in Kenya with some aid and reallocation of public expenditures2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Kenya has ascribed to the Millennium Declaration and is already in the process of mobilising resources and instituting measures to achieve Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). A MDGs status report on Kenya indicates that progress has been made towards achieving the goal of universal primary education. However, the Government will need to scale-up its efforts beyond the current momentum, if the other goals are to be realised by 2015. A preliminary conclusion is that the resource requirements are not extremely large to reach the MDGs in Kenya. If the resources are effectively used and targeted to MDG sectors they could have a substantial impact on whether Kenya would reach the MDGs or not. Some targets seem to be easier to reach than others. The target of 100 percent completion in primary school can be achieved with some additional resources targeted to the primary sector. However, a substantial increase of resources is needed at secondary and tertiary level of education to reach other goals set by the Kenyan government. Even if higher investment in all MDG-sectors is needed the water sector seems to be requiring a substantial increase compared to what have been invested in the past. With regard to poverty our results show that annual average real GDP growth rate of around 8 percent would be enough to meet the poverty target of reducing the number of poor by half.

  • 8.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Adjustment to external shocks: Kenya 1986-952002In: African Development Review, ISSN 1017-6772, E-ISSN 1467-8268, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 78-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the process of stabilization and adjustment in Kenya during the period 1986–95, using a variant of the dependent economy model. The country’s adjustment experience has not been smooth, with terms of trade shocks, unfavourable movements in aid flows and policy reversals contributing to an uneven performance. It is argued that the tight monetary policy regime succeeded to stabilize the economy although the process was prolonged as fiscal adjustment was delayed. Finally, when the budget deficit was reduced the choice of higher protection as a means of raising revenue had a negative impact on export performance.

    L’article analyse le processus de stabilisation et d’ajustement au Kenya sur la période 1986–95. Les résultats de l’ajustement ont connu des mouvements en dents de scie, sous l’effet de la détérioration des termes de l’échange, à l’évolution heurtée des apports d’aide et aux dérapages des politiques. En utilisant une variante du modèle de l’économie dépendante, nous analysons le processus de stabilisation et d’ajustement durant cette période. Nous avançons que l’austérité monétaire a permis de stabiliser l’économie, même si cela a pris beaucoup de temps à cause de l’ajustement budgétaire tardif. Enfin, lorsque le déficit budgétaire a été réduit, le renforcement des mesures de protection institué en vue d’augmenter les recettes a eu une incidence négative sur la tenue des exportations.

  • 9.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    After the crisis: what about the MDGs?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Aid-constrained trade reform in Kenya1999In: The African economy: policy, institutions and the future / [ed] Steve Kayizzi-Mugerwa, London: Routledge, 1999, p. 65-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Poverty impact of rising maize prices in KenyaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent hike in food prices has been of great concern to policymakers, international organisations and donor agencies. In this paper we discuss, both from a partial and general equilibrium perspective, the impact of the recent price increase on maize on Kenyan households. Simulating a 100% increase in maize prices, we find that the headcount ratio in urban areas increased by 3-4 percentage unit points, depending on the size of windfall gain to producers. Based on the assumption that the price shock is passed through in total to the farmers, poverty in the rural areas could be reduced by almost 14%. If incomes are not passed through, rural food poverty would increase quite significantly in some provinces. It is the poorest of the poor in both urban and rural areas who are most adversely affected. Policy reforms, which would reduce marketing margins and fertiliser prices, would be important factors in promoting a positive impact on performance in the maize sector.

  • 12.
    Levin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Bigsten, Arne
    Handelshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Growth, income distribution, and poverty: a review2004In: Growth, inequality, and poverty: prospects for pro-poor economic development / [ed] Anthony Shorrocks, Rolph van der Hoeven, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004, p. 251-276Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Levin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Bigsten, Arne
    Handelshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Tillväxt, inkomstfördelning och fattigdom i u-länderna2001In: Ekonomisk debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, no 2, p. 105-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna artikel presenterar en översikt över aktuell litteratur om sambanden mellan ekonomisk tillväxt, inkomstfördelning och fattigdom. Dessutom diskuteras inverkan av ekonomisk politik på dessa tre faktorer. Slutligen dras några slutsatser om strategier för fattigdomsminskning. En viktig slutsats är att länder som är framgångsrika när det gäller ekonomisk tillväxt oftast är framgångsrika i att minska fattigdomen. Hur stor effekt tillväxten har på fattigdomen beror på vad som händer med inkomstfördelningen. Den ekonomiska politiken bör stimulera en uppbyggnad av de fattigas tillgångar och även öka efterfrågan på dem. Åtgärder för att säkra en långsiktig tillväxt av de fattigas inkomster bör dessutom kompletteras med direkta åtgärder för att hjälpa fattiga hushåll att handskas med risk. Det är dock ofta svårt att reformera den ekonomisk-politiska miljön och politiska makthavare kan vara ovilliga till att genomföra nödvändiga reformer.

  • 14.
    Levin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Bigsten, Arne
    Handelshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Abebe, Shimeles
    Handelshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Growth, income distribution and poverty: a review2004In: Attacking poverty: what makes growth pro-poor? / [ed] Michael Krakowski, Baden-Baden: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft, 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Levin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Köhlin, Gunnar
    Mekonnen, Alemu
    Distributive effect and food security implications of biofuelsinvestment in Ethiopia: a CGE analysis2012In: The global need forfood, fibre and fuel: land use perspectives on constraintsand opportunities in meeting future demand / [ed] Åke Barklund, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Levin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Löfgren, Hans
    World Bank, Washington, USA.
    Dessus, Sebastien
    World Bank, Washington, USA.
    Impact of aid and public spending: a macro-micro framework2015In: Journal of International Development, ISSN 0954-1748, E-ISSN 1099-1328, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 1479-1495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we have used Tanzania as a case to illustrate how a simulation model can beused to evaluate the impact of aid and the trade-offs between public spending categories and theirimpact on income poverty and other social development targets. Our results suggest the following.First, under plausible growth, fiscal and foreign assistance assumptions, in line with observedpatterns, the enormous difficulty of achieving most millennium development goals (MDGs) by2015 is evident. Second, there existed trade-offs between the various MDGs, in particular betweenachievements for poverty and other social development targets.

  • 17.
    Levin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Ndungu, Njugna
    Handelshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    The impact of structural adjustment on manufacturing2001In: Structure and performance of manufacturing in Kenya / [ed] Arne Bigsten, Peter Kimuyu, Basingstoke: Palgrave , 2001Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Levin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Ndungu, Njuguna
    Handelshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Kenya’s growth prospects: the basic constraints2001In: From crisis to growth in Africa? / [ed] Mats Lundahl, London: Routledge, 2001, p. 97-109Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Levin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Ohlin, Mikael
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Trade policies and export growth: employment and poverty impact in Tanzania2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study on Tanzania is part of a series of annual studies, undertaken by various Swedish universities and academic research institutes in collaboration with Sida. The main purpose of these studies is to enhance our knowledge and understanding of current economic development processes and challenges in Sweden's main partner countries for development co-operation. The hope is also that they will have a broader academic interest and that the collaboration will serve to strengthen the Swedish academic resource base in the field of development economics. The study contains an analysis of the determinants of export in Tanzania in light of the changing composition of exports in the past years. This is followed by an analysis of the impact of trade reforms on employment and poverty. The report was prepared by Jörgen Levin and Mikael Ohlin at the Department of Economics at Örebro University.

  • 20.
    Levin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sayeed, Yeasmin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Welfare impact of broadening VAT by exempting local food markets: The case of Bangladesh2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The spread of value-added tax (VAT) in developing countries has been dramatic since the beginning of 1990’s. Adopted by more than 130 countries, including many of the poorest, VAT has been, and remains, the key of tax reform in many developing countries. While adopting VAT, there are arguments for and against uniform general VAT system. A uniform and general VAT on all commodities is considered to be efficient and less distortionary. On the other hand, from the distributional perspective many goods especially food is exempted from VAT as low income households spend a high share of income on food. The contribution of this study is to analyze the income distribution and welfare impact of VAT reform when the food sectors are divided into local markets and supermarkets. A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model is used to evaluate the consequences of VAT reforms for Bangladesh. Our simulation results show that, a VAT reform that exempts the agriculture sector and local market food commodities provides the best welfare and distributional impact.

  • 21.
    Levin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Vimefall, Elin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Welfare impact of higher maize prices when allowing for price heterogeneityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Levin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Widell, Lars
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Tax evasion in Kenya and Tanzania: Evidence from missing imports2014In: Economic Modelling, ISSN 0264-9993, E-ISSN 1873-6122, Vol. 39, p. 151-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we estimate the amount of tax evasion in customs authorities in both Kenya and Tanzania by calculating measurement errors in reported trade flows between the two countries and correlate those errors with tax rates. We find that the measurement error is correlated with the tax rates in Tanzania.We also introduced a third country into our analysis, the United Kingdom, and tax evasion seems to be more severe in trade flows between Kenya and Tanzania compared to trade flows between the United Kingdom and Kenya/Tanzania. Finally we also find that the tax evasion coefficient is lower in the Kenya–United Kingdom case compared to the Tanzanian– United Kingdom case which suggests that tax evasion is more severe in the Tanzanian customs authority.

  • 23.
    Sayeed, Yeasmin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Welfare Impact of Broadening VAT by Exempting Small-Scale Food Markets: The Case of BangladeshManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Vimefall, Elin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Andrén, Daniela
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Ethnolinguistic Background and Enrollment in Primary Education: Evidence from Kenya2017In: African Development Review, ISSN 1017-6772, E-ISSN 1467-8268, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 81-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Kenya, educational enrollment rates increased significantly after 2003, when primary education became free ofcharge. Unfortunately, approximately one million school-aged children are still not enrolled in school. Earlier literature providesevidence that educational opportunities differ among children, due to poverty, gender and area of residence. Our paper providesnew empirical evidence of the importance of children’s ethnolinguistic background for their probability of being in school.Using data from the Kenya Integrated Household Budget Survey 2005/06, we found that Somali and Maasai children are leastlikely to be in school. Girls and boys from the Somali and Maasai groups, but also Mijikenda and Swahili girls, have a lowerprobability to be in school than their Kikuyu peers. This might indicate that gender norms are stronger in these groups.

  • 25.
    Vimefall, Elin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Andrén, Daniela
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Ethnolinguistic background and enrollment in primary education: evidence from KenyaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Vimefall, Elin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Levin, Jörgen
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Welfare impact of higher maize prices when allowing for heterogeneous price increases2015In: Food Policy, ISSN 0306-9192, E-ISSN 1873-5657, Vol. 57, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore the short-term welfare impact of higher maize prices on different regions and socioeconomic groups in Kenya. We find that approximately 80% of the population would be negatively affected by higher maize prices and that poor households would lose a larger proportion of their welfare than wealthy households. More specifically, rural landless households would lose the most, whereas households with landholdings of five acres or more would gain. We simulate a 25% increase in maize prices and find that rural poverty would increase by approximately 1 percentage point and urban poverty by 0.5 percentage points. Moreover, the impact differs among regions; poverty would increase by 3 percentage points in the rural parts of Coast Province, whereas it would be almost unchanged in the rural parts of Western Province. Furthermore, we relax the standard assumption that consumer and producer prices change in the same proportions and allow for heterogeneity in marketing margins among districts. We demonstrate that relaxing this assumption substantially affects the results and that the results from previous research were thus likely biased.

1 - 26 of 26
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf