oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Geidne, Susanna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Gianotta, Fabrizia
    Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    “SMART - The contract concept”: a Swedish program preventing alcohol and tobacco use among youth2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theoretical background

    From a public health perspective, adolescent´s drug use is a phenomenon of concern. Multi-component interventions and parental support programs are effective in reducing adolescent’s drug use.  However those types of interventions usually do not reach parents with low Socio Economic Status (SES). School based interventions are the most appropriate to reach all youth, independently of their SES. To test this assumption, this study aims at describing the youth that participate in a popular school based intervention in Sweden.  The program is called “SMART - the contract concept” and has a long history in Sweden, involving around 30 000 youth each year, 10 to 16 years old. It consists in “a contract” where the adolescent commit not to smoke or drink alcohol and to behave properly. A requirement is that the contract is signed by the adolescent’s parent. The schools use positive reinforcement to sustain the youth’s choice by offering benefits and discounts. The aim of the program is to prevent and/or postpone various drug debuts.

    Research question and significance

    This study investigates whether SES is related to the participation in the program. The effects of duration of participation on alcohol and cigarettes use, delinquency, type of relationship with peers and parents are also analyzed.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional analysis, using self-report questionnaires collected in five schools in a middle-sized city in Sweden, is used in the present study, which is the first part in an on-going longitudinal study.  486 students in grade 7 (89 % response rate, 50% girls) participated. The majority of students and parents were born in Scandinavia (90%/83%). We performed ANCOVAs and multinomial logistic regressions.

    Results and interpretation of findings

    Students born in Scandinavia were more likely to have participated in school years 5 and 6 compared to students born elsewhere. They were also more likely to stay in the program until school year 7. Gender did not affect the participation. Students that never signed the contract were more often alcohol consumer, committed higher number of delinquent acts, have less established rules at home and have a worse relationship with their parents than those who signed the contract at least once. Finally the results clearly show that the longer the students stayed in the program, independently of SES, the less they smoke, drink alcohol and commit delinquent acts. The well-known and wide-spread but never evaluated program “the contract concept” shows promising results in this study.

  • 2.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Burk, William J.
    Ciairano, Silvia
    The role of inhibitory control in children’s cooperative behaviors during a structured puzzle task2011In: Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), ISSN 0022-0965, E-ISSN 1096-0457, Vol. 110, no 3, p. 287-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the role of inhibitory control (measured by Stroop interference) in children’s cooperative behaviors during a structured puzzle task. The sample consisted of 250 8-, 10-, and 12-year-olds (117 girls and 133 boys) attending classrooms in three primary schools in Northern Italy. Children individually completed an elaborated Stroop task, were paired with classmates into 125 dyads, and were observed during a 10-min puzzle task. Results confirmed that interaction partners exhibited similar levels of cooperative behaviors, and the cooperative behaviors of children predicted changes in the cooperative behaviors of their partners throughout the puzzle task. Cooperative behaviors of each interaction partner were predicted by the child’s own inhibitory control as well as the inhibitory control of the partner. Findings are discussed within a developmental contextual framework.

  • 3.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ortega, Enrique
    Ciairano, Silvia
    A two-year follow-up investigation of parenting and peer influences on tobacco use onset among Italian early adolescents2011In: European Journal of Developmental Psychology, ISSN 1740-5629, E-ISSN 1740-5610, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 573-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of peer and family influences on tobacco use onset among Italian early adolescents at two-year follow-up. Participants were 161 adolescents aged 11 to 12 (M = 11.14, SD = 0.39; 49% female) living in the northwest of Italy. Multiple logistic regressions were used. Results indicated that increases in positive family climate were negatively associated with lifetime smoking among non-smokers at two-year follow-up. Additionally, parental knowledge of child daily activities decreased lifetime smoking at two-year follow-up. Moderation analyses revealed that parental knowledge reduced the effect of peers' influence on youth smoking onset at two-year follow-up. This study underlined the influence of parenting practices in preventing early smoking initiation in Italy.

  • 4.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ortega, Enrique
    University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    An attachment family-based intervention to prevent adolescents' problem behaviors: a pilot study in Italy2013In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 71-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In spite of the proven effectiveness of parenting based programs to prevent adolescent risk behaviors, such programs are rarely implemented in Mediterranean countries.

    Objective

    This pilot study was aimed at assessing the feasibility and the effects of a parenting based universal prevention program (Connect) in Italy.

    Methods

    Our sample comprised 147 mothers and 147 youths, aged 11–14 (M = 12.46, SD = .72). We adopted a quasi-experimental design. Forty percent of the parents in the sample were in the intervention condition (receiving 10 one hour lessons a week). ANCOVAs and Cohen’s d coefficients were used to compute intervention effects.

    Results

    The results showed that, despite difficulty in recruiting parents, the program held promising effects regarding the prevention of alcohol use at a universal level (Cohen’s d = .55); the intervention also marginally decreased the level of non-empathic answers from parents, at least in the short term (Cohen’s d = .32).

    Conclusions

    This study highlighted the importance of focusing on families to prevent problem behaviors in adolescence. It also points to the need for new strategies to engage parents in universal prevention.

  • 5.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. University of Turin, Torino, Italy.
    Settanni, Michele
    University of Turin, Torino, Italy.
    Kliewer, Wendy
    Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond VA, USA.
    Ciairano, Silvia
    University of Turin, Torino, Italy.
    The role of threat appraisal in the relation between peer victimization and internalizing problems in early Italian adolescents2012In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, ISSN 0021-9029, E-ISSN 1559-1816, Vol. 42, no 9, p. 2077-2095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Appraisals are a key, but understudied part of the coping process. In the current study, the mediating role of threat appraisals in the relation between relational and physical victimization by peers and internalizing and externalizing problems was investigated in a sample of 155 Italian adolescents (52% female; M age = 12.2 years) using a cross-sectional design. Structural equation modeling revealed that appraisals of threat (negative self-evaluation, negative evaluation by others, loss of relationship) mediated associations between peer victimization and internalizing problems. Moreover, peer victimization affected externalizing behaviors, but this link was not mediated by threat appraisal. Implications for interventions with youth are discussed.

  • 6.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Vigna-Taglianti, Federica
    Dept Clin & Biol Sci, Univ Turin, Turin, Italy; Piedmont Ctr Drug Addict Epidemiol, Azienda Sanitaria Locale To3, Turin, Italy.
    Galanti, Maria Rosaria
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Stockholm Health Care District, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Scatigna, Maria
    Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy.
    Faggiano, Fabrizio
    Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy; Department of Translational Medicine, Avogadro University, Novara, Italy.
    Short-Term Mediating Factors of a School-Based Intervention to Prevent Youth Substance Use in Europe2014In: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 565-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate factors mediating the effects of a European school-based intervention (Unplugged) based on a social influence approach to youths' substance use.

    Methods: Schools in seven European countries (n = 143, including 7,079 pupils) were randomly assigned to an experimental condition (Unplugged curriculum) or a control condition (usual health education). Data were collected before (pretest) and 3 months after the end of the program (posttest). Multilevel multiple mediation models were applied to the study of effect mediation separately for tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis use. Analyses were conducted on the whole sample, and separately on baseline users and nonusers of each substance.

    Results: Compared with the control group, participants in the program endorsed less positive attitudes toward drugs; positive beliefs about cigarettes, alcohol, and cannabis; and the normative perception of peers using tobacco and cannabis. They also increased in knowledge about all substances and refusal skills toward tobacco. Decreased positive attitudes toward drugs, increase in refusal skills, and reappraisal of norms about peer using tobacco and cannabis appeared to mediate the effects of the program on the use of substances. However, mediating effects were generally weak and some of them were only marginally significant.

    Conclusions: This study lends some support to the notion that school-based programs based on a social influence model may prevent juvenile substance use through the modification of attitudes, refusal skills, and normative perceptions. (C) 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Alcohol use and delinquency: is positive school experience an antecedent or a consequence?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Parenting programs to prevent conduct problems in children: can we detect an interventionist effect?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    School bonding and alcohol use in Italian early adolescents: what comes first?2013In: Merrill-Palmer quarterly, ISSN 0272-930X, E-ISSN 1535-0266, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 280-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has identified school bonding as protective against substance use during adolescence. However, there is still a question as to whether school involvement predicts changes in substance use or if substance use actually predicts changes in level of school bonding. This study investigated the relationship between school bonding and alcohol use, which is commonly recognized as gateway drug, during early adolescence. A three-wave longitudinal analysis was conducted on a sample composed of 161 Italian adolescents (51% boys, 49% girls, mean age = 11.14 years, standard deviation =. 40). Associations were analyzed by using crossed-lagged autoregressive models in MPlus. Findings revealed that greater school involvement decreased alcohol consumption from Grade 6 to Grade 7. However, greater alcohol use decreased school involvement from Grade 7 to Grade 8. Findings of this study underlined the importance of choosing the right time for prevention.

  • 10.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Division of Public Health Sciences, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardarens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    The Implementation Integrity of Parenting Programs: Which Aspects Are Most Important?2019In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 917-933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The implementation of preventive interventions is considered a crucial aspect of their success. However, few studies have investigated which components of implementation are most important.

    Objective: We aimed to understand whether the components of implementation integrity—adherence, quality of delivery, dose, and participants’ involvement—influenced the effectiveness of four parenting programs. We also investigated factors associated with these components.

    Method: Data come from a national evaluation of parenting programs in Sweden. The study was a randomised controlled effectiveness trial, with a sample of 535 parents with 3–12-year-old children. Measures included parenting behaviors (angry outbursts, harsh parenting, attempts to understand, rewarding, and praising), child conduct problems (ECBI and SNAP-V), and measures tapping into the four components (adherence, quality of delivery, dose, and participant involvement).

    Results: We ran multilevel models and found that implementation quality (adherence and quality of delivery) did not influence the effects on parents and children. Conversely, participant involvement was associated with improvements in parenting and child conduct. Finally, parents’ perceptions of their leaders as supportive and understanding were associated with parents’ responsiveness and attendance.

    Conclusions: Our study highlights the importance of having actively engaged parents to maximise intervention effects.

  • 11.
    Graziano, Federica
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Bina, Manuela
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ciairano, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Drinking motives and alcoholic beverage preferences among Italian adolescents2012In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 823-831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although drinking motives have been largely studied, research taking into account the Mediterranean drinking culture and focusing on motives specifically associated to adolescents' developmental tasks is lacking. For these reasons the study investigates drinking motives in a group of Italian adolescents and their relationships with drunkenness and high levels of alcohol consumption (wine, beer, spirits and alcopops). A self-report questionnaire on drinking motives and amount of alcohol use was administered to 784 adolescents, boys (46%) and girls, ages 15-19. Using confirmatory factor analysis and stepwise logistic regressions, we found that: 1) motives for drinking were coping, conformity, self-affirmation and experimentation-transgression; 2) coping motives were positively related to the high consumption of all alcoholic beverages and to drunkenness; 3) conformity motives were negatively related to high beer consumption and drunkenness, while experimentation-transgression motives were positively related to high alcopops consumption. Implications for prevention are discussed.

  • 12.
    Olofsson, Viveca
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Enebrink, Pia
    Karolinska institutet.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Uppsala university.
    One-Year Follow-Up of Comet, Cope, Incredible Years, and Connect: findings from a National Effectiveness TrialManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Ortega, Enrique
    et al.
    Laboratory of Developmental Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Latina, Delia
    Laboratory of Developmental Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Ciairano, Silvia
    Laboratory of Developmental Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Cultural adaptation of the strengthening families program 10-14 to Italian families2012In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 197-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The family context has proven to be a useful target in which to apply prevention efforts aimed at child and adolescent health risk behaviors. There are currently a variety of cultural adaptation models that serve to guide the international adaptation of intervention programs.

    The cultural adaptation process and program reception of the Strengthening Families Program 10-14 (SFP 10-14) was described in this article. The implementation context is one in which strong family bonds and high family communication are the norm.

    We described our cultural adaptation process comparing our efforts to the recommended stages of the main current cultural adaptation models. We pilot tested and implemented the adapted version of our program with a total of 35 families in the city of Turin Italy.

    This study showed that the SFP 10-14 may indeed be quite suitable for Italian families given the particularities of Italian society regarding strong family bonds and extended social networks. We described the language translation, cultural adaptation process for program materials, staff training, onsite supervision, and the process evaluation feedback that were undertaken as part of the adaptation efforts.

    The field of prevention could greatly benefit from the identification of tools and techniques that are applicable to populations with diverse social and cultural backgrounds. The family is extremely important for Italians and represents a rich context in which prevention efforts could be addressed.

  • 14.
    Özdemir, Metin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Improving dissemination of evidence‐based programs through researcher–practitioner collaboration2014In: New Directions for Youth Development, ISSN 1533-8916, E-ISSN 1537-5781, Vol. 141, p. 107-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prevention field has achieved major advances in developing, implementing, and testing the efficacy of preventive interventions in controlled settings. Nevertheless, there is still a gap in translating the success of programs in efficacy trials into real-life settings. Dissemination of evidence-based programs is a major challenge. The authors argue that promoting adoption of evidence-based programs requires further improvements in three areas, and collaboration between researchers and practitioners. First, there is a need to develop a holistic assessment system encompassing both risk/need and readiness assessments. Second, there is need for new methods for improving implementation quality. Third, prevention research needs to focus more on identifying the mechanisms that explain how programs work and the core elements of the program. Both researchers and practitioners have roles and opportunities to collaborate to achieve developments in these areas.

1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf