oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 56
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Book review: Social and caring professions in European welfare states: Policies, services and professional practices2019In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 199-201Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Changing Occupational Roles in Audit Society: The Case of Swedish Student Aid Officials2015In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, ISSN 2245-0157, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 31-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is about occupational change concerning a non-professional group of Street Level Bureaucrats—student aid officials at the Swedish Board for Study Support (SBSS). The aim is to describe and analyze changes in their occupational role—their discretional space and working conditions under the impact of changed ways to manage public service organizations and new information and communication technology. The SBSS is the sole administrator of student financial aid in Sweden. Its officials investigate and take decisions about students’ applications and repayment of loans. This work includes interacting with clients via telephone and computer. These officials have to have a certain amount of discretion to interpret and apply rules and regulations on specific circumstances in individual cases. How are their working conditions affected by organizational and policy changes in the authority? How is their ability to exercise influence and control over their own work performance affected? The analysis highlights how officials suffer from decreased discretion and an increasing routinization in their work. This is a result of a regulatory framework continuously growing in detail together with increasing management control based on new information and communication technology. What remains of discretion is a kind of ‘task’ discretion, the ability to do minor technical manipulations of rules in individual cases. Even today’s top management seems critical of this development. Besides further automatization and reduction of staff an ongoing process of organizational change is therefore also aiming to develop officials’ competence and working conditions toward what may be seen as organizational professionalism,a development of specific occupational skills and a discretion adjusted and subordinated to managerial means and ends. The analysis rests on data from a research project (2011 to 2014) about Institutional Talk. Data sources are qualitative interviews, audio-taped speech sequences, observational field notes, and official documents. 

  • 3.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Datorprogram för teorigenerering2002In: Kunskap utan väggar: perspektiv och metoder för fältstudier i grupp / [ed] Johan Arvidsson, Sune Fahlgren, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2002, p. 143-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Datorprogram i kvalitativ analys2002In: Kunskap utan väggar: perspektiv och metoder för fältstudier i grupp / [ed] Johan Arvidsson, Sune Fahlgren, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2002, p. 79-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    EBP - socionomutbildningar i bakvatten?2013In: Socionomen, ISSN 0283-1929, no 6, p. 76-80Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    En granskning av granskarna: utvärdering av Socialstyrelsens regionala tillsynsenhets i Örebro verksamhetstillsyn avseende hälso- och sjukvården i särskilda boendeformer inom Örebro kommun2001Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Fackligt arbete på regional nivå: framtidens fokus2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Förutsättningar för relationsarbete i yrkesutövning på det sociala arbetets fält2018In: Relationer i socialt arbete: I gränslandet mellan profession och person / [ed] Anders Bruhn och Åsa Källström, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, 1, p. 37-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Gender relations and division of labour among prison officers in Swedish male prisons2013In: Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, ISSN 1404-3858, E-ISSN 1651-2340, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 115-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden female officers is a since long established fact. Today women make up about 38% of the prison officer work force. However, the distribution of sexes in the organisation is quite uneven between different types of prison wings and units, and at the in-group level there is an informal gendered division of labour going on. The article deals with how a gendered division of labour comes about as a result of socially established motives and notions among prison officers as well as prisoners about men’s and women’s different qualities in performing different types of work tasks. It is based on data from a minor interview study (2006), and a three-year multi-strategic research project containing qualitative case-studies and a nationwide survey (2007-2009). The article concludes that a great number of female officers contribute to a more prominent position for the rehabilitative side of prison work. However, the on-going gendered division of labour in and between wings and units is also one important factor behind sub-cultural differentiation and variations in work practices in the prison organization. A more balanced distribution of the sexes would stimulate rehabilitative work, and a more unified view of the occupational role throughout the whole organization.

  • 10.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Individualiseringen och det fackliga kollektivet: en studie av industritjänstemäns förhållningssätt till facket1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Industritjänstemännen, facket och värdeförändringen: slutrapport från forskningsprojekt "Fackets plats i förändrade värde- och normsystem"1998Book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Inspector's Dilemma under Self-regulation2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Occupational unity or diversity in a changing work context?: The case of Swedish labour inspectors2009In: Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, ISSN 1477-3996, E-ISSN 1477-4003, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 31-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the development of occupational culture, identity and practice among Swedish inspectors, focusing on their collective occupational knowledge - their 'professional representations'. Working conditions and state policy and regulation for occupational safety and health have gone through several important changes in recent decades. These changes have forced the Swedish inspection authority to develop its organisation and adapt its aims, strategies and methods of inspection work to the new situation. As a consequence of several far-reaching organisational changes in a rather short time, a cultural gap has developed among inspectors: between a male-dominated group of experienced technicians and a female-dominated group of newly recruited academics (often with qualifications in the behavioural sciences). On the basis of a re-reading of data from three research and evaluation projects about inspection and the inspectorate, I describe important differences in representations between these two groups and discuss how, and under what circumstances, they may be able to develop towards occupational unity and uniformity in inspection practice.

  • 14.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Occupational Unity or Diversity: The Case of Swedish Work Environment Inspectors2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Om vetenskap som profession2007In: Social interaktion: förutsättningar och former / [ed] Mikael Carleheden, Rolf Lidskog, Christine Roman, Malmö: Liber , 2007, p. 240-265Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Omställning i Kumla: en utvärdering av de personalinriktade åtgärderna under omställningsprocessen vid Ericssons Kumlafabrik 2001-20022003Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Prison officers in wing-differentiated prisons: a development towards professionalism?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the Swedish prison officer work force, a growing internal division of labour into separate wings and tasks has been taking place in the last decade. This has contributed to a subcultural division between groups of officers. Specialization and division of labour in general are often signs of a development towards professionalism (Freidson, 2001). The traditional “ideal state” of such professionalism is when an occupation determines who is qualified to practise it, and controls the criteria of evaluation and knowledge (Freidson, 2001). There are ongoing processes within many occupations leading towards this ideal (Scott, 2008). In recent years, the impact of organizational modes of professionalism has been highlighted, and managerial strategies aiming to control occupations have received attention. This article aims to scrutinize signs of these processes within the prison officer occupation in Sweden. Data consists of interviews and field notes from five studied case-prisons and a nationwide survey among prison officers (n=806). The analysis shows that division of labour and specialization within prison officer work, with growing cultural and identity differences, is not a result of forces for professionalization within the occupation. The specialization is largely due to management-led top-down strategies to meet changing prison policy goals; also, standardization, e.g. by means of rules and regulations, is still crucial within the organization. Furthermore, occupational training and entry qualifications are strongly controlled by the prison bureaucracy. Finally, the view within the occupation and the unions on education, training, and occupational demands is not unified. The processes of occupational professionalization within the occupation seem to be weak and diverging, while the signs of a management-governed professionalism are numerous.

  • 18.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Springlife´s medarbetarenkät våren 2011: rapport om personalens fritextinlägg2011Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Swedish Student Aid Officials: changes of the occupational role in the era of New Public Management and Neo-liberal hegemony2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper is based on empirical findings from an ongoing multi-research project on institutional talk financed by the Swedish Research council. In the project, telephone-based conversations between officials and “customers” about student aid, loans, and repayment is studied in relation to the institutional and organizational context. The project includes a parallel qualitative study of the organization and the development of the occupational role and identities of the officials handling these tasks. In this paper some developments of the occupational role of these officials will be discussed. These officials should be seen as Street Level Bureaucrats. They are experts, mostly academic graduates, taking decisions about distribution of public means to private persons thus enabling them to pursue higher education. As such they have to apply Swedish law and regulation in singular cases, which requires a certain individual autonomy and discretion to make judgments and take actions in adjustment to unique situations. In the paper I will hold that this discretion today is subject to a growing number of restrictions. The occupational role is in transition from one which should be exercised on the basis of values of being supportive to people with limited means, and making higher education possible in a spirit of creating equal opportunities, to one based on strict rule-following and values about efficiency and control of the expenditure of tax revenues. As a result of this development especially experienced officials may experience a conflict between internalized professional values and the policy of today. Further; an aspect of occupational culture of today seems to be a fear of making “wrong” decisions, as every step in a single-case is visible to both management and colleagues. Finally; there are signs of some differentiation in occupational identities between newer and more experienced officials and also between local sub-cultures in the organization. I will discuss this development in relation to increasing standardization and regulation in accordance with the managerial principles of New Public Management (NPM), but also in a broader sense how the dominating neo-liberal view of the state and the public sector changes the main focus of state activity from the general themes of the welfare state promoting citizens empowerment, development and growth back to older principles of the state as protector and upholder of law and order, forcing citizens to fulfil their obligations according to legislation. Paradoxical here is that one of the concepts in NPM, the “customer-perspective”, since long implemented in the work of the officials at the Swedish Board for Study Support, also to some degree may be felt by the officials as in clear contradiction with the growing control-side of the occupational role.             

  • 20.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Sänkt rösträttsålder för större engagemang2000In: Allt eller inget: om ungas syn på engagemang och partipolitik / [ed] Anette Persson, Stockholm: Ungdomsstyrelsen , 2000, , p. 15p. 67-77Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The construction of gender and an emotional labor division among prison officers: the case of Sweden2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    The inspector's dilemma under regulated self-regulation2006In: Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, ISSN 1477-3996, E-ISSN 1477-4003, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 3-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regulated self-regulation (RSR) as the main strategy for regulation in the occupational health and security (OHS) field, and the expansion of the work environment concept to include work organisation and psychosocial health, requires that the inspection authority revaluate old methods of inspection work and develop new ones. Of vital importance here is the question of the so called inspector’s dilemma between control and educative methods in inspections. This dilemma is “classic” in state regulation. It rests upon two different principles for state activity: the legality and the service principles. Reflecting on it is necessary when developing tactics in a given situation. In this article I elaborate on the general logical and practical consequences that, first and foremost, the RSR-strategy has, or rather should have, on inspectors’ work and the alternative roles that comprise the dilemma. My main conclusions are that the dilemma in state inspection is permanent and can only be handled on a situational basis. However, because of the growing complexity and differentiation in working life, and because of the change of strategy and new tasks for the inspectorate, both the content of, and the balance between, the roles of the dilemma have to change. All in all this change calls for a stronger emphasis on the role of educator. At the same time the role-content has to change from traditional methods of direct control and advice/persuasion to negotiation, guiding and tutoring. However, to work with inspections in the OHS field today is to work with mixed strategies. Even if RSR is stated as the main strategy, the traditional command and control strategy still lives side-by-side with it in legislation. Methods based on this rationale sometimes have to be given priority. All in all, the fulfilment of the new tasks demands the development of professional competence and a higher degree of discretion for individual inspectors. To an even greater extent than before they have to be flexible in unique situations and develop proper tactics adjusted to local conditions.

  • 23.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Ungdomarna, politiken och valet1999In: Valdeltagande i förändring / [ed] Erik Amnå, Stockholm: Fakta info direkt , 1999, p. 205-265Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ekström, Mats
    Department of Journalism, Media and Communication, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Towards a Multi-level Approach on Frontline Interactions in the Public Sector: Institutional Transformations and the Dynamics of Real-time Interactions2017In: Social Policy & Administration, ISSN 0144-5596, E-ISSN 1467-9515, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 195-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study develops a multi-level approach on frontline interactions in the public sector. Previous research suggests that detailed analyses of frontline interactions are essential to our understanding of how welfare services take shape when policies and rules are applied and negotiated in individual cases. The dynamics and performances of real-time interactions have, however, rarely been analyzed as such. This study shows how the methods developed in the field of Conversation Analysis can contribute to this research. Our multi-level approach integrates analyses of the policy- and institutional transformations that shape conditions for frontline interactions; and analyses of how policies and rules are evoked, negotiated and reshaped in the turn-by-turn organization and performances of interaction. The approach is applied on an analysis of how rules regarding financial aid are applied in an authority highly affected by changes in welfare policy towards standardization and detailed regulations. The empirical case is the Swedish Board for Study Support. The empirical study includes analyses of documents, interviews and analyses of taped telephone conversations. The study shows how institutional arrangements of standardization, detailed regulations, monitoring and depersonalization, structure the frontline work and shape narrow frames for officials’ discretion in interactions with clients. The study also shows how rules are invoked and negotiated in recurrent practices in the interaction: in the careful design of decisions; in the investigations of alternatives and exceptions from the rules in order to find solutions to the client’s problems. The analyses of concrete interactional practices clearly indicate that also a rule-governed work dominated by task discretion involves recurrent negotiations, flexibility and local policy-making.

  • 25.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Frick, Kaj
    Regeringens sparkrav motverkar arbetslinjen2007In: Arbetarskydd, ISSN 0346-7805, no 1, p. 25-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Frick, Kaj
    Why it was so difficult to develop new methods to inspect work organization and psychosocial risks in Sweden2011In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 575-581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2001–2003, the Swedish Work Environment Authority (SWEA) ran a project to develop better methods to inspect psychosocial risk factors at work. The objective was twofold: to develop methods to enable most inspectors to effectively inspect such health risks, and to set a standard for method development within SWEA. This article presents our evaluation of the project and a discussion of this as an example of regulatory implementation. The methods project largely failed. Major reasons were the lack of general provisions on psychosocial risks, isolation from other policies in SWEA that affect the inspection of such risks, and a lack of engagement and guidance by top management on how to prioritize and conduct this very challenging development project. Underlying this was possibly a preoccupation with other major internal reforms, a limited competence and an unwillingness to challenge the employers on psychosocial and organizational issues within SWEA’s top management. Yet, the project probably had some indirect positive effects by raising awareness within the authority of psychosocial risk factors, of the complexities of inspecting such risks and of the difficulty to develop effective methods to supervise them.

  • 27.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Karlqvist, Lena
    Wahlgren, Ingela
    Malvorna II: utvärdering av ett utvecklingsprojekt för bättre arbetsmiljö, jämställdhet och hälsa2007Report (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Åke
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A new world of work challenging Swedish unions2013In: Nordic lights: work, management and welfare in Scandinavia / [ed] Åke Sandberg, Michael Allvin [och 24 andra], Stockholm: SNS förlag, 2013, 1, p. 126-186Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Källström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Inledning: Relationsbyggande på det sociala arbetes fält - utmaningar och möjligheter2018In: Relationer i socialt arbete : I gränslandet mellan profession och person / [ed] Bruhn, Anders & Källström, Åsa, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, p. 9-15Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Källström, ÅsaÖrebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Relationer i socialt arbete : I gränslandet mellan profession och person2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En väl fungerande relation mellan socialarbetare och klient är ett nödvändigt villkor och ett grundelement i allt professionellt socialt arbete. Men trots att relationsarbete är svårt, så problematiseras det sällan i texter som rör det sociala arbetets kärna och karaktär.

    I den här boken tar vi oss an just den uppgiften. Några exempel på frågeställningar som boken tar upp:

    • Vad kännetecknar ett gott relationsarbete på det sociala arbetets fält?
    • Hur kan en väl fungerande relation etableras mellan den professionelle tjänsteutövaren och en klient i ett mer eller mindre utsatt läge?
    • Hur och under vilka villkor kan ett gott relationsarbete utföras av socialarbetare inom olika verksamhetsområden?

    Bokens kapitel inrymmer både teoretiska fördjupningar och praktiska exempel och kan därför användas såväl inom utbildningar för socionomer och på angränsande fält som inom praktik på olika sociala yrkesfält.

  • 31.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Källström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Slutord2018In: Relationer i socialt arbete : I gränslandet mellan profession och person / [ed] Bruhn, Anders & Källström, Åsa, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, p. 279-284Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Lind, Martin
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Svensson, Louise
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Arbetsmiljö och arbetsmiljöarbete i svenska kyrkan: en fallstudie2005Report (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindahl, Robert
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Flygare, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Promoting constructive relations between children in foster care and welfare officials2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between children in foster care and ‘their’ welfare official has recently been accentuated on political level in Sweden. In this paper we will discuss how Honneths theory of recognition can be applied on this relation – which is a very multifaceted one – not least because the role of the official is multi-dimensional. Besides ensuring official policy, law and regulation (the authority role) he/she shall represent the child vis-à-vis other actors’ and institutions involved (the advocacy role), and be a stable and trustful adult for the child to attach to socially/emotionally (the attachment role). The latter is now emphasized in Swedish law.

         Recently, in the framework of an evaluation we interviewed children in foster care. When asked about how they experience “their” official most of them show a quite negative or indifferent attitude referring first and foremost to the authority role, i.e. someone controlling and administering their foster-home placement. However, those most positive of “their” official highlights the attachment dimension, indicated by a deeper and more developed relation based on mutual trust. And, such a relation seems desired by most interviewed children. By Honnet’s theory of recognition we may reach deeper insights about how and under what circumstances a professional role that promotes such relations can be developed without undermining the authority role of the welfare official. The theory elucidates three types of recognition-relations needed for an individual to develop a positive identity: through primary relations of mutual emotional attachment self-confidence of importance for being able to articulate personal needs is developed. Through legal relations the individual is recognized as an adequate partner in interaction, i.e. as a person entitled to the same legal status and treatment as all other persons (universal dimension). This infuses self-respect. In complement to this – to care and legal recognition – the individual needs to be recognized for unique capacities and achievements via belonging to a community of shared values. The paper discusses if, how and what the welfare official can offer here on the basis of his/hers position in the welfare bureaucracy.

  • 34.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Computer aided qualitative data-analysis: some issues from a Swedish perspective1995Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kriminalvården sluter sig för insyn utifrån2018In: Dagens Nyheter DN Debatt, ISSN 1101-2447, no 5 augustiArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    En förändring i bemötandet gentemot utomstående forskning har uppstått hos Kriminal­vården. Den är inte lika öppen längre, skriver forskarna Anders Bruhn och Odd Lindberg. 

  • 36.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Kvalitativ metod och datateknologi1996In: Kvalitativa studier i teori och praktik / [ed] Per-Gunnar Svensson, Bengt Starrin, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 1996, p. 122-143Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    A harsher prison climate and a cultural heritage working against it2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    A harsher prison climate and a cultural heritage working against it: sub-cultural divisions among Swedish prison officers2011In: Penal exeptionalism?: Nordic prison policy and practice / [ed] Thomas Ugelvik, Jane Dullum, Abingdon: Routledge , 2011, 1, p. 215-231Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Emotional labour and emotional strain in late-modern prison work2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores emotional labour strategies among Swedish prison officers, and how these affect the emotional strain. Case studies of five Swedish prisons and a national survey of prison officers are used. Analysis indicates that prison officers perform complex emotional labour. Due to differences in subcultures and informal norms, the strategies officers use in managing their emotional display vary between wings and roles. Different strategies may also cause different kinds of emotional strain. Emotional surface acting may lead to cynicism and alienation tendencies, while deep acting may lead to stress and exhaustion.

  • 40.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Treating Drug Abusers in Prison: Competing Paradigms Anchored in Different Welfare Ideologies: The Case of Sweden2017In: Scandinavian penal history, culture and prison practice: Embraced by the welfare state? / [ed] Scharff Smith, Peter & Ugelvik, Thomas, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 177-204Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of prisoners in Sweden categorized as drug abusers have increased substantially in the last 20 years according to the Swedish Prison and Probation Service (SPPS). Drug abusers are defined by SPPS as those who have used illicit drugs during the previous 12 months (Ekbom et al. 2006). In 1970 about 20 % of the prisoners could be classified as drug abusers, while they made up 28 % of the prison population in 1997 (Amilon and Edstedt 1998). In 2010 the number of prisoners with drug problems had risen to 60 % (Ekbom et al. 2011). One reason for this increase may be the sentencing policy.

  • 41.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Professionalization of prison officers in Sweden and Norway: two routes, two different goals?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the development of the prison officer occupation within two prison systems, often characterized as “penal welfare” systems, namely the Swedish and the Norwegian. Despite a common origin, the development in the last decades shows diverging tendencies. What are the signs of, and the strategies behind, this development? The paper is based on documents, interviews with key positioned persons in these organizations, and data from a recent research project. Results show that while the Norwegian prison officer training is developed towards a University degree, the Swedish one is shortened to 20 weeks and made more vocational. The Norwegian prison officer training is developing in accordance to a traditional professionalization strategy. The Swedish one is adjusted to security-differentiation of prisoners, and the running of treatment programs, and seems more aimed towards a kind of narrowed organizational skill. The Norwegian prison officer role has been developed close to prison research and with support of unions in a long-term perspective. The Swedish officer role suffers from political-level ad hoc-adjustments to public debate combined with short-termed cost savings inspired by New Public Management ideas.

  • 42.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Quality employment and quality public services in prisons: Rapportdel: Sweden2018Report (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Johnsen, Berit
    University College Of Norwegian Correctional Service (KRUS), Lillestrøm, Norway.
    From prison guards to… what?: Occupational development of prison officers in Sweden and Norway2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, ISSN 1404-3858, E-ISSN 1651-2340, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 68-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prison officers are a key group of civil servants in the criminal justice system. Based on a comparative study of the systems for vocationaleducation in Sweden and Norway, this article compares policies andstrategies for developing the prison officer occupation. Differencesin this domain are analysed against the backdrop of theories aboutprofessionalization and growing differences between these countriesconcerning the ends and means of prison policy in general. Datacome from interviews and documents collected in 2013–2014, aswell as a rereading of data from two earlier prison-research projects.Results show that Norway is adopting a strategy quite similar to theone behind the birth of the so-called welfare professions duringthe heyday of the social-democratic welfare state. In Sweden, thecontinuing division of labour is leading to enhanced skills amongsome specialized subgroups, such as security and programme staff,but a reduction in qualifications for the majority. The study should beof interest in relation to different strategies for developing the workof prison officers as well as of other categories of public servants.It points to growing differences between two welfare regimes thatused to be quite similar, not least concerning the prison policy field.

  • 44.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Johnsen, Berit
    KRUS (Kriminalomsorgens Utdanningssenter), Lillestrøm, Norway.
    Professionalization of prison officers in Sweden and Norway: two routes, two different goals?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nordic prison policy has a reputation of beingliberal and progressive with rehabilitative efforts in prisons in a centralposition. Anglophone researchers have characterized this as a “Nordicexceptionalism” in comparison with the ongoing “penal excess” in their own countries. However, there are several important differences in prison policy and practice between the Nordic countries. Prison officers (PO) are the key actors and by far the biggest occupational group transforming penal policy into daily prison practice. In Sweden and Norway the strategies for developing this group are very different. The aim of this paper is to compare and analyse these strategies and how they are implemented. It is based on documents, interviews with key actors in and above the prison organizations, and data from recent research projects. Results show that the Norwegian prison officer recruitment and training is developing very much in accordance with a traditional strategy for transforming this occupational group into a profession. The main actor behind this has been the prison institute for research and education. In Sweden on the other hand development seems to go towards routinization and de-skilling, and at best a kind of differentiated and narrowed organizational professionalism. The Swedish officer role suffers from political-level ad hoc-initiatives combined with cost savings, and investments in security and rehab-programs based on “evidence based practice” run by special expertise.

  • 45.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Fyra korta artiklar om kriminalvård2013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The prison officer's dilemma: professional representations among Swedish prison officers2010In: Les Dossiers des sciences de l'education, ISSN 1296-2104, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 77-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is based on a study of Swedish prison officers. We analyse two types of professional representations, that is, their collectively evolved knowledge. A point of departure is the existence of sub-cultural gaps between different groups of officers. Society’s contradictory aims with the prison system lead to a permanent dilemma in prison work between security and rehabilitation. This dilemma becomes evident in the professional representations studied. However, there are also some differences in relation to different sub-cultural belongings. In our analysis of how prison officers deal with the dilemma in everyday practice we develop three ideal types - the frustrated, the rigid and the flexible one.

  • 47.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per-Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Synen på brott och straff har blivit inhuman2015In: ETC, ISSN 0348-6567, article id 2015-04-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per-Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Swedish ‘prison exceptionalism’ in decline: trends towards distantiation and objectification of the Other2015In: Punishing the other: the social production of immorality revisited / [ed] Eriksson, Anna, London & New York: Routledge, 2015, p. 101-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Thunman, Elin
    Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ekström, Mats
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Swedish social insurance officials struggling with the vagueness of the work ability concept: The case of sickness compensation2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a research project – Practices of Frontline Interactions in the Swedish Social Insurance Agency (SSIA) – we are studying how goals and rules are shaped and handled in conversations between officials and clients. A central aim is to develop knowledge about what kind of room these officials have to develop policy in practice and how they make use of it. This is done by a multi-level research approach combining analyses on an institutional and interactional level (Bruhn & Ekström 2017). Data are collected via mixed methods: recorded interactions (official–client), qualitative interviews, and documents. In this paper, except for some minor changes identical with a paper originally presented at the 2nd Conference on Street-level Bureaucracy in Copenhagen 2017, we discuss officials’ room for and use of discretion when assessing work ability in investigations about sickness compensation (previously called sickness pension). To get sickness compensation the individual’s work ability must be permanently reduced (i.e. he/she shall not be able to take part in  working life anymore). Work (dis-)ability is a diffuse and contested concept. It is a core concept not only for officials here in focus, but for several other organisational actors in the field of labour market and health insurance issues as well. Many actors with different missions and interests are recurrently involved in negotiations about how to interpret and take actions on the basis of this concept. The diffuseness of the concept often puts the investigating official – the Street Level Bureaucrat – in a position of having quite lot of room to assess and affect the outcome of the investigations at hand. Internal SSIA statistics also point to quite wide variations in outcome of investigations between different units in the organisation. At the same time there is also internal pressure on the investigators to “keep figures down”. The magnitude of such pressure is related to changes in pressure upon the authorities on the political level. This leads to fluctuations between different fiscal years. Last year (2016), 70% of the applications for this benefit were rejected. This is an increase from earlier years, and a hint of a growing restrictiveness in assessments of what is seen as permanently reduced work ability. In this paper, we discuss the work ability concept in relation to the room for assessment – the discretion – of these sickness compensation investigating officials. It is based on earlier research, official documents, qualitative interviews and speech recordings.

  • 50.
    Ekström, Mats
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Thunman, Elin
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A caring interview: Polar questions, epistemic stance and care in examinations of eligibility for social benefits2019In: Discourse Studies, ISSN 1461-4456, E-ISSN 1461-7080, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 375-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on conversation analysis, this study investigates central practices in what is defined as a caring interview, in the context of welfare administration. Caring refers to (1) a helpful interviewing in reformulations of questions, taking interviewees' difficulties to answer into consideration; (2) a caring attitude in the framing of questions, showing understanding of clients' circumstances and (3) professional's enactment of expertise in assessments of clients' disabilities and care needs. Data include a corpus of 43 recorded interviews in which officials at the Swedish Social Insurance Agency interview clients who have applied for benefits. The study adds to research on interactional sensitivity, polar questions and epistemic stance in institutional interaction. The study shows how the interviewer prioritizes confirming polar questions, takes responsibilities of knowing into account and reduces the epistemic gap to the interviewee in practices of a caring interview. This makes the interviewing markedly different from standardized and bureaucratic interviewing.

12 1 - 50 of 56
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf