oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 30 of 30
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    A harsher prison climate and a cultural heritage working against it2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    A harsher prison climate and a cultural heritage working against it: sub-cultural divisions among Swedish prison officers2011In: Penal exeptionalism?: Nordic prison policy and practice / [ed] Thomas Ugelvik, Jane Dullum, Abingdon: Routledge , 2011, 1, p. 215-231Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Emotional labour and emotional strain in late-modern prison work2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores emotional labour strategies among Swedish prison officers, and how these affect the emotional strain. Case studies of five Swedish prisons and a national survey of prison officers are used. Analysis indicates that prison officers perform complex emotional labour. Due to differences in subcultures and informal norms, the strategies officers use in managing their emotional display vary between wings and roles. Different strategies may also cause different kinds of emotional strain. Emotional surface acting may lead to cynicism and alienation tendencies, while deep acting may lead to stress and exhaustion.

  • 4.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Treating Drug Abusers in Prison: Competing Paradigms Anchored in Different Welfare Ideologies: The Case of Sweden2017In: Scandinavian penal history, culture and prison practice: Embraced by the welfare state? / [ed] Scharff Smith, Peter & Ugelvik, Thomas, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 177-204Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of prisoners in Sweden categorized as drug abusers have increased substantially in the last 20 years according to the Swedish Prison and Probation Service (SPPS). Drug abusers are defined by SPPS as those who have used illicit drugs during the previous 12 months (Ekbom et al. 2006). In 1970 about 20 % of the prisoners could be classified as drug abusers, while they made up 28 % of the prison population in 1997 (Amilon and Edstedt 1998). In 2010 the number of prisoners with drug problems had risen to 60 % (Ekbom et al. 2011). One reason for this increase may be the sentencing policy.

  • 5.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Professionalization of prison officers in Sweden and Norway: two routes, two different goals?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the development of the prison officer occupation within two prison systems, often characterized as “penal welfare” systems, namely the Swedish and the Norwegian. Despite a common origin, the development in the last decades shows diverging tendencies. What are the signs of, and the strategies behind, this development? The paper is based on documents, interviews with key positioned persons in these organizations, and data from a recent research project. Results show that while the Norwegian prison officer training is developed towards a University degree, the Swedish one is shortened to 20 weeks and made more vocational. The Norwegian prison officer training is developing in accordance to a traditional professionalization strategy. The Swedish one is adjusted to security-differentiation of prisoners, and the running of treatment programs, and seems more aimed towards a kind of narrowed organizational skill. The Norwegian prison officer role has been developed close to prison research and with support of unions in a long-term perspective. The Swedish officer role suffers from political-level ad hoc-adjustments to public debate combined with short-termed cost savings inspired by New Public Management ideas.

  • 6.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Johnsen, Berit
    University College Of Norwegian Correctional Service (KRUS), Lillestrøm, Norway.
    From prison guards to… what?: Occupational development of prison officers in Sweden and Norway2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, ISSN 1404-3858, E-ISSN 1651-2340, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 68-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prison officers are a key group of civil servants in the criminal justice system. Based on a comparative study of the systems for vocationaleducation in Sweden and Norway, this article compares policies andstrategies for developing the prison officer occupation. Differencesin this domain are analysed against the backdrop of theories aboutprofessionalization and growing differences between these countriesconcerning the ends and means of prison policy in general. Datacome from interviews and documents collected in 2013–2014, aswell as a rereading of data from two earlier prison-research projects.Results show that Norway is adopting a strategy quite similar to theone behind the birth of the so-called welfare professions duringthe heyday of the social-democratic welfare state. In Sweden, thecontinuing division of labour is leading to enhanced skills amongsome specialized subgroups, such as security and programme staff,but a reduction in qualifications for the majority. The study should beof interest in relation to different strategies for developing the workof prison officers as well as of other categories of public servants.It points to growing differences between two welfare regimes thatused to be quite similar, not least concerning the prison policy field.

  • 7.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Johnsen, Berit
    KRUS (Kriminalomsorgens Utdanningssenter), Lillestrøm, Norway.
    Professionalization of prison officers in Sweden and Norway: two routes, two different goals?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nordic prison policy has a reputation of beingliberal and progressive with rehabilitative efforts in prisons in a centralposition. Anglophone researchers have characterized this as a “Nordicexceptionalism” in comparison with the ongoing “penal excess” in their own countries. However, there are several important differences in prison policy and practice between the Nordic countries. Prison officers (PO) are the key actors and by far the biggest occupational group transforming penal policy into daily prison practice. In Sweden and Norway the strategies for developing this group are very different. The aim of this paper is to compare and analyse these strategies and how they are implemented. It is based on documents, interviews with key actors in and above the prison organizations, and data from recent research projects. Results show that the Norwegian prison officer recruitment and training is developing very much in accordance with a traditional strategy for transforming this occupational group into a profession. The main actor behind this has been the prison institute for research and education. In Sweden on the other hand development seems to go towards routinization and de-skilling, and at best a kind of differentiated and narrowed organizational professionalism. The Swedish officer role suffers from political-level ad hoc-initiatives combined with cost savings, and investments in security and rehab-programs based on “evidence based practice” run by special expertise.

  • 8.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Fyra korta artiklar om kriminalvård2013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The prison officer's dilemma: professional representations among Swedish prison officers2010In: Les Dossiers des sciences de l'education, ISSN 1296-2104, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 77-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is based on a study of Swedish prison officers. We analyse two types of professional representations, that is, their collectively evolved knowledge. A point of departure is the existence of sub-cultural gaps between different groups of officers. Society’s contradictory aims with the prison system lead to a permanent dilemma in prison work between security and rehabilitation. This dilemma becomes evident in the professional representations studied. However, there are also some differences in relation to different sub-cultural belongings. In our analysis of how prison officers deal with the dilemma in everyday practice we develop three ideal types - the frustrated, the rigid and the flexible one.

  • 10.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per-Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Synen på brott och straff har blivit inhuman2015In: ETC, ISSN 0348-6567, article id 2015-04-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per-Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Swedish ‘prison exceptionalism’ in decline: trends towards distantiation and objectification of the Other2015In: Punishing the other: the social production of immorality revisited / [ed] Eriksson, Anna, London & New York: Routledge, 2015, p. 101-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Giertsen, Hedda
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway .
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Asmussen Frank, Vibeke
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark .
    Kolind, Torsten
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark .
    Tourunen, Jouni
    A-Clinic Foundation, Helsinki, Finland .
    Prisoners' experiences of drug treatment and punishment in four Nordic countries2015In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 145-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: This article describes and analyses prisoners’ experiences of drug treatment in prison in four Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The article examines how prisoners experience drug treatment, control and sanctions as related to three main topics, namely motivation; the content of the measure and relations to staff; and control and sanctions.

    METHODS & DATA: The article is based on data from twelve prisons, three in each of the four countries; 91 interviews with prisoners; and around six months of observation. The two main kinds of drug treatment measures are drug treatment units and day programmes.

    RESULTS: Prisoners described several motives to participate in drug treatment measures: to leave drugs and crime; to renew relations with family and friends; to solve health problems; and to improve their prison conditions. Prisoners found that drug treatment measures offered possibilities to acquire new ways of being. Staff behaviour seemed to be more important to prisoners than the methods used, and some prisoners seemed more positive to staff involved with the drug treatment than to other staff. A surprising finding was the prisoners’ limited critique of controls and sanctions. We see this as embedded in the situation of being a prisoner, and also in relation to contexts outside prison.

    CONCLUSION: In discussing their experiences in the treatment units, prisoners are not so concerned about the rehabilitative features or the controls and sanctions. They evaluate their present situation in light of a future, which is their real concern. This is in line with a main task for staff, which is to prepare prisoners for release. 

  • 13.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Källström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Efter en barndom med en förälder i fängelse: Hälsa, utsatthet och sociala relationer2018In: Kriminalvården: Innanför och utanför / [ed] Annelie Björkhagen Turesson & Annika Staaf, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 177-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Holm, Claes
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Jukic, Elma
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Flera nyanser av blått: Kriminalvårdare på behandlingsavdelningar - deras beskrivningar av yrkesroller, drogbehandling och de intagna2014In: Nordisk Tidskrift for Kriminalvidenskab, ISSN 0029-1528, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 183-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over tha past 10 years drug treatment programmes have been exstensivly developed in Swedish prisons. Thsi article highlights how prison officers working in treatment wings think and act in relation to their professional role, their relations to the prisoners and the organisation of drug treatment within the prison.  Data consists of interviews and observations from three Swedish prisons in different security categories. The study examines the significance of secdurity categorie, overall prison-staff culture, treatment wing culture, inmate gender and the treatment role and officers work identity in the treatment wings. The ways in which prison officers think and act depends on how their professional roles are defined at the different prisons. Definitins differ in regard to views on addiction, preferences fo the ways in which treatment should be performed and organized and ideas about how ideal levels of staff-prisoner interaction are best accomplished within the treatment context.

  • 15.
    Källström, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Parental imprisonment, child victimization and adult problems2018In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses, in a Swedish sample, whether exposure to violence and/or crime during childhood, and mental health and/or behaviour problems as an adult, are overrepresented among young men and women who had a parent in prison at some time when they were a child. Results show that almost all the studied types of childhood victimization and adult problems were overrepresented, but verbal victimization, neglect, witnessing violence, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and depression were significantly overrepresented. Although the associations between having a parent in prison and childhood victimization as well as having mental health and behaviour problems are weak, these results indicate that it is important for practitioners who meet such children to be aware that they are more likely than other children not only to suffer from mental health and/or behaviour problems but also to have experienced violence and/or neglect.

  • 16.
    Lindberg, Odd
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kriminalvård: en inventering av behoven inom forskning, utbildning och verksamhet2000Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Det hotade kontaktmannaskapet?2016In: Tidskrift för kriminalvård, ISSN 0040-6821, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 4-6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det finns mycket som tyder på att vi idag ser en kursändring i Kriminavårdens syn på kontaktmannaskap, den rehabiliterande uppgift i vardagsarbetet som kriminalvårdare haft sedan 1991. Vi skisserar här den utvecklingen och vad som kan ligga bakom den.

  • 18.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Drug treatment in a Swedish women's prison: relations and identities among prison officers and prisoners2015In: Probation Journal, ISSN 0264-5505, E-ISSN 1741-3079, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 234-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes life in a drug-treatment wing (a prison therapeutic community) in a Swedish women’s prison, and aims to analyse prisoners’ and prison officers’ relations and identities, through observation field notes and interviews with staff and prisoners. The studied prison has a drug-treatment programme based on Twelve Step Facilitation Therapy, with external therapists. Within the treatment wing, prison officers are abandoning the traditional staff identity for one of ‘co-therapist’. The female prisoner-identity is initially that of the ‘traditional prisoner’, but is often replaced by other situational identities such as the ‘conscious addict’ and the ‘good group-member’. In cases of frustration and threats in the wing, the more traditional identities might temporarily be ‘re-activated’. This might be a source of confusion and inner conflict, especially for the prisoners.

  • 19.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Managing the dilemma: occupational culture and identity among prison officers2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    List of papers
    1. Säkerhet eller rehabilitering?: Om subkulturell differentiering bland kriminalvårdare
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Säkerhet eller rehabilitering?: Om subkulturell differentiering bland kriminalvårdare
    2008 (Swedish)In: Arbetsmarknad och arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 45-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [sv]

    Under senare år har säkerhetsfrågorna prioriterats kraftigt vid svenska fängelser. Men vad innebär denna skärpning av säkerhetsrutiner för verksamheten vid anstalterna? Och, vad innebär den för den yrkeskår som praktiskt ska genomföra svensk kriminalvård, dvs. vårdarna? I denna artikel fokuserar vi på hur kriminalvårdare tänker, känner och handlar i arbetet, hur deras yrkeskultur och yrkespraktik gestaltar sig, formas och utvecklas under dagens arbetsvillkor.

    Keywords
    kriminalvårdare, yrkeskultur, sociala represetationer, emotionellt arbete
    National Category
    Social Work
    Research subject
    Social Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-7776 (URN)
    Projects
    Kriminalvårdare i anstalt
    Available from: 2009-08-31 Created: 2009-08-31 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    2. The prison officer's dilemma: professional representations among Swedish prison officers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The prison officer's dilemma: professional representations among Swedish prison officers
    2010 (English)In: Les Dossiers des sciences de l'education, ISSN 1296-2104, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 77-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The article is based on a study of Swedish prison officers. We analyse two types of professional representations, that is, their collectively evolved knowledge. A point of departure is the existence of sub-cultural gaps between different groups of officers. Society’s contradictory aims with the prison system lead to a permanent dilemma in prison work between security and rehabilitation. This dilemma becomes evident in the professional representations studied. However, there are also some differences in relation to different sub-cultural belongings. In our analysis of how prison officers deal with the dilemma in everyday practice we develop three ideal types - the frustrated, the rigid and the flexible one.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Toulouse: Les Presses Universitaires du Mirail, 2010
    Keywords
    Prison officers, professional representations dilemma, sub cultures
    National Category
    Sociology Social Work
    Research subject
    Social Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-10665 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-05-11 Created: 2010-05-11 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    3. Emotional labour and emotional strain among Swedish prison officers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotional labour and emotional strain among Swedish prison officers
    2011 (English)In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 469-483Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores emotional labour strategies among Swedish prison officers, and shows how these affect their well-being. Case studies of five Swedish prisons and a national survey of prison officers are used. Analysis indicates that prison officers perform complex forms of emotional labour. Owing to differences in subcultures and informal norms, the strategies officers use in managing their displays of emotion vary between wings and roles. Different strategies may cause different kinds of emotional strain. So-called ‘surface acting’ may lead to cynicism and alienation, whereas ‘deep acting’ may lead to stress and exhaustion. Finally, the lack of opportunities for recovery is discussed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Sage Publications, 2011
    Keywords
    prison officer, emotional labour, emotional strain
    National Category
    Social Work
    Research subject
    Social Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-20500 (URN)10.1177/1477370811413806 (DOI)000297310700004 ()2-s2.0-81755163940 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2011-12-07 Created: 2011-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
    4. Prison officers in wing-differentiated prisons: towards professionalism?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prison officers in wing-differentiated prisons: towards professionalism?
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Social Work
    Research subject
    Social Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-20725 (URN)
    Available from: 2012-01-09 Created: 2012-01-09 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
  • 20.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Prison officers in differentiated prisons: signs of occupational or organizational professionalisation?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Prison officers in wing-differentiated prisons: towards professionalism?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Subcultural divisions among prison officers: the case of Sweden2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The transition of the prison officer role in late-modern prisons: the case of Sweden2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an era of increased incarceration of prisoners, there are still demands for prisoner rehabilitation. The eternal dilemma of safe custody and rehabilitative efforts to avoid re-conviction has shaped an increased specialisation into security-differentiated prisons, specialised wings and divided prison officer roles. In the case of Sweden, this threefold specialisation has reached a point where the occupational role is facing new problems and challenges. Drawing on results from a Swedish three-year research project, with five case-prisons and a nation-wide survey with 20 % of all prison officers, we argue that a specialization in the prisons creates new subcultures among prison officers with patterns overlapping individual attitudes, environmental conditions, as well as the traditional/non- traditional performances of the role. In the Swedish specialised wings correctional officers create representations of staff in other kinds of wings. In performing separate roles, either security/control or counselling/program management, they regard each others’ tasks as unimportant or less understandable. Different cultural patterns emerge in the prison context, where the professional representations, the emotional work and the use of formal rituals differ. While the specialisation might enrich the occupational role individually, the organisational changes also lead to work-place tensions and sub-cultural disintegration.

  • 24.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Säkerhet eller rehabilitering?: Om subkulturell differentiering bland kriminalvårdare2008In: Arbetsmarknad och arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 45-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under senare år har säkerhetsfrågorna prioriterats kraftigt vid svenska fängelser. Men vad innebär denna skärpning av säkerhetsrutiner för verksamheten vid anstalterna? Och, vad innebär den för den yrkeskår som praktiskt ska genomföra svensk kriminalvård, dvs. vårdarna? I denna artikel fokuserar vi på hur kriminalvårdare tänker, känner och handlar i arbetet, hur deras yrkeskultur och yrkespraktik gestaltar sig, formas och utvecklas under dagens arbetsvillkor.

  • 25.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Källström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Att ha haft en förälder i fängelse under uppväxten - har det betydelse senare i livet?2018In: Tidskrift för kriminalvård, ISSN 0040-6821, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 9-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Holm, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kontaktmannaskap, säkerhet och behandling i svenska fängelser - vilka professionella relationer är möjliga?2018In: Relationer i socialt arbete: I gränslandet mellan profession och person / [ed] Bruhn, Anders & Källström, Åsa, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, p. 202-217Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Holm, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Jukic, Elma
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Drug treatment in Swedish prisons: moving towards evidence-based interventions?2012In: Nordic studies on alcohol and drugs, ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 561-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This article reviews the development in Sweden of prison-based drug treatment (PBDT) from the 1970s to the present situation.

    Data: The data consists of committee reports, white papers, research reports and interviews with two senior managers from the Swedish Prison and Probation Services (SPPS).

    Results: The 1970s and 1980s trials with milieu therapy in prisons were followed by the introduction of cognitive programmes in the 1990s. Due to the growing number of prisoners with drug problems, the Prison Anti-Drug Effort increased the number of places and programmes for drug treatment in prisons. As of 2000, the scientific evaluation of all prison-based drug treatment has been strongly emphasised. Drug control has increased since 2004, and the very concept of PBDT is now approached rather more rigorously and scientifically.

    Conclusion: The SPPS programme evaluations are scientifically formed, but changes in practice are slow to emerge. The SPPS runs a more restricted policy compared to treatment outside, which leads to some evidence-based treatment methods being rejected. Also, PBDT is somewhat under threat by changes in the prisons' internal organisation with growing specialisation in different wings, as well as by the poor financial situation of the SPPS.

  • 28.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Källström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    After a childhood with a parent in prison: Relationships and well-being as a child and young adult2018In: International Journal of Prisoner Health, ISSN 1744-9200, E-ISSN 1744-9219, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 34-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore whether young adults who had a parent in prison while growing up in Sweden are disadvantaged in terms of parental support, school well-being and functioning, and socioemotional and/or behavioral problems, compared to young adults whose parents were not in prison when they were a child.

    Design/methodology/approach: Retrospective self-report information about parental imprisonment and childhood and adulthood welfare was collected from 2,500 Swedish young adults as part of the RESUME project. The 52 of these who had had a parent in prison during their childhood were compared to the young adults who had not had a parent in prison, by measuring differences concerning their family relations, school well-being, and well-being as adults, and the risk of some events occurring later in life.

    Findings: Findings Having had a parent in prison was significantly related to feeling less loved during childhood, and having less contact and support from both parents during adulthood, in comparison with other young adults. In school they experienced lower well-being and were more often placed in special education than other children. They were at greater risk of not attending higher education, of planning or attempting suicide, and of being hospitalized for mental health problems than the rest of the young adults.

    Research limitations/implications: Even taking into consideration the complexity of childhood conditions and the limitations of retrospective data, prison and social-services professionals should pay special attention to the fact that a child has a parent in prison.

    Originality/value: This is a unique study of young adults' experiences of a childhood with parent in prison.

  • 29.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Emotional labour and emotional strain among Swedish prison officers2011In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 469-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores emotional labour strategies among Swedish prison officers, and shows how these affect their well-being. Case studies of five Swedish prisons and a national survey of prison officers are used. Analysis indicates that prison officers perform complex forms of emotional labour. Owing to differences in subcultures and informal norms, the strategies officers use in managing their displays of emotion vary between wings and roles. Different strategies may cause different kinds of emotional strain. So-called ‘surface acting’ may lead to cynicism and alienation, whereas ‘deep acting’ may lead to stress and exhaustion. Finally, the lack of opportunities for recovery is discussed.

  • 30.
    Nylander, Per-Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Prison anti-drug treatment in a women’s prison: prescribed and negotiated identities2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Besides increased security measures and control, anti-drug treatment programs have dramatically expanded in Swedish prisons the last ten years. Today nearly 800 of the 5000 places in Swedish prisons are intended for anti-drug treatment. This paper addresses the institutional effects of this transition in the case of a women’s prison with a treatment wing. Data have been collected during 2012-2013 by documents, observations and interviews with staff and prisoners, as part of a Nordic research project. The prison has for many years run a 12-steps (AA/NA) program in one wing, with external full-time therapists running groups in the wing daily. Prison officers are actively participating in the groups. Preliminary findings indicate that the prison officer identity, as well as the prisoner identities, are challenged and changing in the treatment setting, while the borders to other wings arestrengthened. Within the treatment wing, prison officers are moving between the traditional prison officer role, and the role of ”co-therapist”, and this seems more awkward for the minority of male staff. The female prisoner identity is moving between the "Traditional Prisoner", the "Conscious Addict” and the "Good Friend", all depending on the situation. A conclusion is that this is an opportunity, but also a source to diffusion, for the prisoners.

1 - 30 of 30
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf